Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

King and no King

Author: William Butler Yeats

File Description

Electronic edition compiled and proof-read by Beatrix Färber, Juliette Maffet

Funded by School of History, University College, Cork

1. First draft.

Extent of text: 536 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland—http://www.ucc.ie/celt

(2012)

Distributed by CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: E910001-038

Availability [RESTRICTED]

The works by W. B. Yeats are in the public domain. This electronic text is available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of private or academic research and teaching.

Sources

    Bibliography
  1. A bibliography is available online at the official web site of the Nobel Prize. See: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1923/yeats-bibl.html
    The edition used in the digital edition
  1. William Butler Yeats King and no King in , Ed. William Butler Yeats Responsibilities and other Poems. The Macmillan Company, New York, (1916) page 94–95

Encoding

Project Description

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Sampling Declaration

The whole selection.

Editorial Declaration

Correction

Text has been proof-read twice.

Normalization

The electronic text represents the edited text. Lines (or parts of them) reproduced in italics in the printed edition are tagged hi rend="ital".

Hyphenation

The editorial practice of the hard-copy editor has been retained.

Segmentation

div0 =the poem, stanzas are marked lg.

Interpretation

Names of persons (given names), and places are not tagged. Terms for cultural and social roles are not tagged.

Profile Description

Created: By William Butler Yeats (1865–1939). Date range: before 1916.

Use of language

Language: [EN] The poem is in English.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: E910001-038

King and no King: Author: William Butler Yeats


p.94

  1. 'WOULD it were anything but merely voice!'
    The No King cried who after that was King,
    Because he had not heard of anything
    That balanced with a word is more than noise;
    Yet Old Romance being kind, let him prevail
    Somewhere or somehow that I have forgot,
    Though he'd but cannon—Whereas we that had thought
    To have lit upon as clean and sweet a tale
    Have been defeated by that pledge you gave
    In momentary anger long ago;

    p.95

    And I that have not your faith, how shall I know
    That in the blinding light beyond the grave
    We'll find so good a thing as that we have lost?
    The hourly kindness, the day's common speech,
    The habitual content of each with each
    When neither soul nor body has been crossed.