Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

O'Hussey's Ode to the Maguire

Author: James Clarence Mangan

File Description

D.J. O'Donoghue

Electronic edition compiled by Beatrix Färber , Ruth Murphy

Proof corrections by Ruth Murphy

1. First draft, revised and corrected.

Extent of text: 3190 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland—http://www.ucc.ie/celt

(2008) (2011)

Distributed by CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: E840000-003

Availability [RESTRICTED]

Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Notes

This poem was written for M'Glashan's Dublin University Magazine. M'Glashan, however, did not use it in that periodical, but gave it in H.R. Montgomery's Specimens of the Early Native Poetry of Ireland, 1846, where it first appeared. It, like 'Dark Rosaleen', was founded on an unrhymed version in Ferguson's articles on Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy (Dublin University Magazine, 1834). (D.J. O'Donoghue.)

Sources

    Mangan's Works
  1. James Clarence Mangan, Ballad-Poetry of Ireland (Dublin: Duffy 1845).
  2. James Clarence Mangan, Specimens of the early native poetry of Ireland: in English metrical translations by Miss Brooke, Dr. Drummond, Samuel Ferguson, J. C. Mangan, T. Furlong, H. Grattan Curran, E. Walsh, J. D'Alton and J. Anster, with historical and biographical notices by Henry R. Montgomery (Dublin: James McGlashan; London: W.S. Orr and Co. 1846).
  3. James Clarence Mangan, The Book of Irish Ballads, ed. Denis Florence McCarthy (Dublin: J. Duffy 1846).
  4. James Clarence Mangan, Miscellany (Dublin: Celtic Society 1849).
  5. James Clarence Mangan, The poets and poetry of Munster: A selection of Irish songs by poets of the last century, with poetical translations by the late James Clarence Mangan, now for the first time published with the original music and biographical sketches of the authors 1st ed. (Dublin:John O'Daly 1849; Poole, England: Woodstock Books 1997).
  6. James Clarence Mangan, Romances and Ballads of Ireland, ed. Hercules Ellis (Dublin: J. Duffy 1850).
  7. James Clarence Mangan, The tribes of Ireland: a satire by Aenghus O'Daly; with poetical translation by the late James Clarence Mangan; together with an historical account of the family of O'Daly; and an introduction to the history of satire in Ireland by John O'Donovan (Dublin: John O'Daly 1852; Reprint Cork: Tower Books 1976).
  8. James Clarence Mangan, Poems by James Clarence Mangan, with biographical introduction by John Mitchel (New York: Haverty 1859).
  9. James Clarence Mangan, Anthologia Germanica; or a garland from the German poets and miscellaneous poems, 2 vols (Dublin: Duffy 1884).
  10. James Clarence Mangan, Essays in prose and verse by J. Clarence Mangan, ed. Charles P. Meehan. (Dublin: Duffy 1884).
  11. James Clarence Mangan, Irish and Other Poems: With a selection from his translations [The O'Connell Press Popular Library] (Dublin: O'Connell Press 1886).
  12. James Clarence Mangan, James Clarence Mangan, his selected poems; with a study by the editor, ed. Louise Imogen Guiney (London: Lamson, Wolffe & Co. 1897; Montana: Kessinger Publishing Co. 2007).
  13. James Clarence Mangan, Poems of James Clarence Mangan (many hitherto uncollected), ed. with preface and notes by D.J. O'Donoghue; introduction by John Mitchel (Dublin: O'Donoghue, 1903; Reprint New York: Johnson 1972).
  14. James Clarence Mangan, The prose writing of James Clarence Mangan, ed. D.J. O'Donoghue. (Dublin: O'Donoghue 1904).
  15. James Clarence Mangan, Autobiography edited from the manuscript by James Kilroy [Chapel Books Series] (Dublin: Dolmen Press 1968).
  16. James Clarence Mangan, Selected Poems of James Clarence Mangan, ed. Michael Smith with a foreword by Anthony Cronin (Dublin: Gallery Press 1973).
  17. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Poems Vol. 1 1818–1837, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1996).
  18. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Poems Vol. 2 1838–1844, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1996).
  19. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Poems Vol. 3 1845–1847, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1997).
  20. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Poems Vol. 4 1848–1912, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1997).
  21. James Clarence Mangan, Anthologia Germanica: Selection on a German Theme from the Verse of the Poet of Young Ireland (Ireland & Germany), ed. with an introduction by Brendan Clifford (London: Athol Books 2001).
  22. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Prose Vol. 1 1832–1839, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 2002).
  23. James Clarence Mangan, The collected works of James Clarence Mangan: Prose Vol. 2 1840–1882: correspondence, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 2002).
  24. James Clarence Mangan, Selected Poems of James Clarence Mangan, foreword by Terence Brown, ed. Jacques Chuto et al. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, bicentenary ed. 2003).
  25. James Clarence Mangan, Poems, ed. with an introduction by David Wheatley (Oldcastle: Gallery Press 2003).
  26. James Clarence Mangan, Selected Prose of James Clarence Mangan. ed. Jacques Chuto, Peter van de Kamp (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, vicentenary ed. 2004).
  27. James Clarence Mangan, James Clarence Mangan: Selected writings, ed. with an introduction by Sean Ryder (Dublin: University College 2004).
    Secondary Literature
  1. W. B. Yeats, 'Clarence Mangan, 1803–1849' [Irish Authors and Poets series]. In: Irish Fireside 12 March 1877; reprinted in John Frayne, Uncollected Prose of W. B Yeats, Vol. 1 (London: Macmillan 1970).
  2. W. B. Yeats, 'Clarence Mangan's Love Affair'. In: United Ireland 22 August 1891.
  3. D. J. O'Donoghue, Life and Writings of James Clarence Mangan (Edinburgh: Geddis; Dublin: M. H. Gill 1897).
  4. Ellen Shannon-Mangan, James Clarence Mangan: a biography (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1996).
  5. Henry Edward Cain, James Clarence Mangan and the Poe-Mangan question, A dissertation (Washington: Catholic University Press 1929).
  6. James Joyce, James Clarence Mangan: from St. Stephen's, Dublin, May, 1902 (Dublin: Ulysses Bookshop 1930).
  7. John D. Sheridan, Famous Irish lives: James Clarence Mangan (Dublin: Phoenix Publishing 1937).
  8. P. S. O'Hegarty, 'A bibliography of James Clarence Mangan'. In: Dublin Magazine 16 (1941) 56–61.
  9. Séamus Ó Casaide, 'James Clarence Mangan and his Meath relatives: new light on the poet's circumstances'. In: Father Matthew Record 35:6 (1941) 4–5.
  10. Roibeárd Ó Faracháin, 'James Clarence Mangan'. In: Thomas Davis and Young Ireland, ed. M. J. MacManus (Dublin: The Stationery Office 1945), 61–67.
  11. Marvin Magalaner, 'James Mangan and Joyce's Dedalus family'. In: Philological Quarterly (1952).
  12. Patrick Diskin, 'The poetry of James Clarence Mangan'. In: University Review: A Journal of Irish Studies 2:1 (1960) 21–30.
  13. Rudolf Patrick Holzapfel, James Clarence Mangan: A Check-List Of Printed And Other Sources (Dublin: Scepter Publishing 1969).
  14. Jacques Chuto, 'Mangan's "Antique Deposit" in TCD Library'. In: Long Room 2 (1970) 38–39.
  15. James Kilroy, James Clarence Mangan (Lewisburg, N.J.: Bucknell University Press 1970).
  16. Jacques Chuto, 'Mangan and the "Irus Herfner" articles in the Dublin University Magazine'. In: Hermathena 106 (1971) 55–57.
  17. Henry J. Donaghy, James Clarence Mangan. [English Authors Series] (Macmillan Library Reference, 1974). James Liddy, 'An Introduction to the Poetry of James Mangan'. In: Lace Curtain 5 (1974) 55–56.
  18. John McCall, The life of James Clarence Mangan. (Dublin; T. D. Sullivan 1887; Blackrock: Carraig Books 1975).
  19. Jacques Chuto, 'Mangan, Petrie, O'Donovan and a few others: the poet and the scholars'. In: Irish University Review 6:2 (1976) 169–187.
  20. James Kilroy, 'Bibliography of Mangan'. In: Anglo-Irish Literature: A Review of Research, ed. Richard J. Finneran (New York: Modern Language Association 1976) 43–44.
  21. Robert Welch, ''In wreathed swell': James Clarence Mangan, translator from the Irish'. In: Éire-Ireland 11:2 (1976) 36–56.
  22. Peter MacMahon, 'James Clarence Mangan: the Irish language and the strange case of the tribes of Ireland'. In: Irish University Review 8:2 (1978) 209–222.
  23. Anthony Cronin, 'James Clarence Mangan: The Necessary Maudit'. In: Heritage Now: Irish Literature in the English Language (Dingle: Brandon 1982), 47–50.
  24. David Lloyd, 'Great gaps in Irish song: James Clarence Mangan and the ideology of the nationalist ballad'. In: Irish University Review 14 (1984) 178–190.
  25. Patrick Smith, James Clarence Mangan: the conscious victim. [Unpublished M.A. Thesis, Dept. of English, UCC, 1986].
  26. David Lloyd, Nationalism and minor literature: James Clarence Mangan and the emergence of Irish cultural nationalism [The new historicism: studies in cultural poetics, 3]. (Berkeley: California University Press 1987).
  27. Brendan Clifford, The Dubliner: the lives, times and writings of James Clarence Mangan (Belfast: Athol Books 1988).
  28. Ellen Shannon-Mangan, 'New letters from James Clarence Mangan to John O'Donovan'. In: Irish University Review 18 (1988) 207–214.
  29. Sean Ryder, 'Male autobiography and Irish cultural nationalism: John Mitchel and James Clarence Mangan'. In: The Irish Review 13 (1992-93) 70–77.
  30. Jacques Chuto, 'James Clarence Mangan and the Beauty of Hate'. In: Éire-Ireland 30: 2 (1995) 173–81.
  31. Heyward Ehrlich, 'Inventing patrimony: Joyce, Mangan, and the self-inventing self'. In: Joyce through the ages: a nonlinear view, ed. Michael Patrick Gillespie (Gainesville: University Press of Florida 1999).
  32. Jacques Chuto, James Clarence Mangan: a bibliography (Dublin: Irish Academic Press 1999).
  33. Anne MacCarthy, James Clarence Mangan, Edward Walsh and Nineteenth-century Irish literature in English [Studies in Irish Literature] (Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000).
  34. David Lloyd, 'James Clarence Mangan's Oriental Translations and the Question of Origins'. In: Comparative Literature 38:1 (1986), 20–55.
  35. Dr. Elie Bouhereau, 'Mangan and the worst of woes'. In: Borderlands: essays on literature and medicine in honour of J.B. Lyons, ed. Davis Coakley and Mary O'Doherty (Dublin: Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 2002).
  36. Peter van de Kamp, 'Hands off! Joyce and the Mangan in the Mac'. In: Costerus 147 (2003) 183–214.
James Clarence Mangan The Poems of James Clarence Mangan in , Ed. D.J. O'Donoghue The Poems of James Clarence Mangan (many hitherto uncollected). O'Donoghue & Co., 31 South Anne Street, Dublin, Ireland, (1967) page 8–10

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CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

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Pages 8–10.

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Profile Description

Created: by James Clarence Mangan (1846)

Use of language

Language: [EN] The text is in English.
Language: [GA] Some words are in Irish, however some are in anglicised spelling.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: E840000-003

O'Hussey's Ode to the Maguire: Author: James Clarence Mangan


p.8

12
  1. Where is my Chief, my Master, this bleak night, mavrone!
    O, cold, cold, miserably cold is this bleak night for Hugh,
    It's showery, arrowy, speary sleet pierceth one through and through,
    Pierceth one to the very bone!

  2. p.9

  3. Rolls real thunder? Or was that red vivid light
    Only a meteor? I scarce know; but through the midnight dim
    The pitiless ice-wind streams. Except the hate that persecutes him
    Nothing hath crueler venomy might.
  4. An awful, a tremendous night is this, meseems!
    The flood-gates of the rivers of heaven, I think, have been burst wide—
    Down from the overcharged clouds, like unto headlong ocean's tide,
    Descends grey rain in roaring streams.
  5. Though he were even a wolf ranging the round green woods,
    Though he were even a pleasant salmon in the unchainable sea,
    Though he were a wild mountain eagle, he could scarce bear, he,
    This sharp, sore sleet, these howling floods.
  6. O mournful is my soul this night for Hugh Maguire!
    Darkly as in a dream, he strays! Before him and behind
    Triumphs the tyrannous anger of the wounding wind,
    The wounding wind, that burns as fire!
  7. It is my bitter grief—it cuts me to the heart—
    That in the country of Clan Darry this should be his fate!
    O woe is me, where is he? Wandering, houseless, desolate,
    Alone, without or guide or chart!
  8. Medreams I see just now his face, the strawberry-bright,
    Uplifted to the blackened heavens, while the tempestuous winds

    p.10

    Blow fiercely over and round him, and the smiting sleet-shower blinds
    The hero of Galang to-night!
  9. Large,large affliction unto me and mine it is,
    That one of his majestic bearing, his fair stately form,
    Should thus be tortured and o'erborne—that this unsparing storm
    Should wreak its wrath on head like his!
  10. That his great hand, so oft the avenger of the oppressed,
    Should this chill, churlish night, perchance, be paralysed by frost—
    While through some icicle-hung thicket— as one lorn and lost—
    He walks and wanders without rest.
  11. The tempest-driven torrent deluges the mead,
    It overflows the low banks of the rivulets and ponds—
    The lawns and pasture-grounds lie locked in icy bonds
    So that the cattle cannot feed.
  12. The pale bright margins of the streams are seen by none.
    Rushes and sweeps along the untamable flood on every side—
    It penetrates and fills the cottagers' dwellings far and wide—
    Water and land are blent in one.
  13. Through some dark woods, 'mid bones of monsters, Hugh now strays,
    As he confronts the storm with anguished heart, but manly brow—
    Oh! what a sword-wound to that tender heart of his were now
    A backward glance at peaceful days.
  14. But other thoughts are his—thoughts that can still inspire
    With joy and onward-bounding hope the bosom of Mac-Nee—
    Thoughts of his warriors like bright billows of the sea,
    Borne on the wind's wings, flashing fire!
  15. And though frost glaze to-night the clear dew of his eyes,
    And white ice-gauntlets glove his noble fine fair fingers o'er,
    A warm dress is to him that lightning-garb he ever wore,
    The lighting of the soul, not skies.
  16. 3
    Hugh marched forth to fight—I grieved to see him so depart;
    A lo! to-night he wanders frozen, rain-drenched, sad, betrayed—
    But the memory of the lime-white mansions his right hand hath laid
    In ashes, warms the hero's heart!