Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

Annals of the Four Masters

Author: [unknown]

File Description

Electronic edition compiled by Floortje Hondelink

Funded by University College, Cork and
Seoirse Ó Luasa, An Caifé Liteartha, An Daingean, who donated a copy of the Annals of the Four Masters to the CELT Project.

2. Second draft, revised and corrected.

Proof corrections by Floortje Hondelink, Orla McDonald

Extent of text: 87 370 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland—http://www.ucc.ie/celt

(2002) (2008)

Distributed by CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: T100005D

Availability [RESTRICTED]

Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Notes

[The precise relationship between MSS 1–4 (below) is a matter for scholarly debate. Two views have been put forward, that of Walsh and Mooney (for bibliographical details of their publications, see below). According to Walsh, MSS 1 and 4 are what remains of the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 3 are the copies forwarded to Louvain for possible printing. According to Mooney, MSS 1 and 3 are the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 4 are what remains of the set forwarded to Louvain. It is more likely that Walsh's view is correct. For an excellent and fully documented discussion of the problem, see Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters, Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95.]

Sources

    Manuscript sources
  1. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 1220 olim C iii 3; paper; s. xvii; five hands, including Míchél Ó Cléirigh and Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh; 522 folios. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1171. Used by Dubhaltach Mac Fir Bhisigh, who refers to it as belonging to Fearghal Ó Gadhra. For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone & Elizabeth FitzPatrick, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 26 (Dublin 1943) 3276-82; Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95: 88–92.
  2. Dublin, University College L, OFM, A 13; paper; s. xvii; an autograph copy but scribal signatures are absent in the body of the text. The hands resemble those of Míchél Ó Cléirigh, but there are other hands including marginal notes by John Colgan. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1169. For a description of the MS, see Myles Dillon, Canice Mooney, & Pádraig de Brún, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Franciscan Library, Killiney (Dublin 1969) 24–27; Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 94–95.
  3. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 687 and 688 olim 23 P 6 and 23 P 7; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Míchél Ó Cléirigh, Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, and Conaire Ó Cléirigh, and two others. Annals from 1170 to 1616. For a description of the MSS, see Lilian Duncan, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 17 (1936) 2112–2114; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95; annals from 1170 to 1616); Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=MSS 687-8]) Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95.
  4. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1301 olim H. 2. 11; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Conaire Ó Cléirigh; and two other Ó Cléirigh scribes. Annals from 1334 (beginning acephalous) to 1605 in 466 folios. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82–83; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 92–94.
  5. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1300 olim H. 2. 9 and H. 2. 10; paper; s. xviii (1734-5) scribe: Hugh O'Mulloy (Aodh Ó Maolmhuaidh); a transcript of MS (i) made for John O'Fergus. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82).
  6. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 988 and 989 olim 23 F 2 and 23 F 3; paper; s. xviii; scribe not named; the text was transcribed in the house of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, and apparently under his supervision. This is a transcript of MS (i). For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy, fasc. 22 (1940) 2829–30).
    Editions and Translations
  1. Charles O'Conor (ed.) Rerum Hibernicarum scriptores veteres iii: Quatuor Magistrorum Annales Hibernici usque ad annum M.CLXXII. ex ipso O'Clerii autographo in Biblioteca Stowense servato, nunc primum uersione donati ac notis illustrati (Buckingham, 1826) [O'Conor's edition, though based on MS (i) is seriously defective].
  2. John O'Donovan (ed. & trans.) Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes, 7 vols. (Dublin 1848-51; repr. Dublin, 1856; repr. Dublin, 1990.) [volumes i-ii: pp v-vi (dedicatory letter of the editor) + pp vii-liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv-lxi (epistle dedicatory of Míchél Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii-lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2-1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189-93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii-vi: pp 2-2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377-2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494-8 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii-vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The edition of volumes i-ii, AM 2242-AD 1171, is made from a corrected copy of Charles O'Conor's edition (Buckingham, 1826). This edition is based on MS (i) which was not available to O'Donovan. O'Donovan collated the text so derived with MS (v) and MS (vi) both eighteenth-century transcripts of MS (i). MS (ii) was not known to O'Conor or O'Donovan. The text of the remainder of the remainder of the Annals (volumes iii-vi) is edited from MS (iii) collated with MS (iv).]
  3. Owen Connellan, The Annals of Ireland, translated from the original Irish of the Four Masters (Dublin, 1846) [Annals from 1171 to 1616].
  4. Henri Lizeray, Le livre des quatre maîtres: Annales du royaume d'Irlande, depuis les origines jusqu'à l'arrivée de saint Patrice (Leroux, 1882).
    Literature
  1. George Petrie, 'Remarks on the history and authenticity of the Annals of the Four Masters', Trans Roy Ir Acad 16 (1831) 381-93 [repr. O'Donovan, op. cit. i, pp vii-xix].
  2. Sir John T. Gilbert, 'The Celtic records of Ireland', Ir Q Rev 1 (1852) 588-700 [notice of O'Donovan's edition].
  3. Eugene O'Curry, Lectures on the manuscript materials of ancient Irish history (Dublin, 1861; repr. Dublin, 1878) 141-61 [note O'Curry's translation of John Colgan's remarks about Míchél Ó Cléirigh (143-45) and his sardonic comments on the Stowe sale of Irish MSS and the attitude of Lords Macaulay and Ashburnham].
  4. P. Mac Suibhne, 'A great historical work: the Annals of the Four Masters', J Ivernian Soc 7 (1915) 66-93.
  5. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24.
  6. E. J. Gwynn, 'Miscellanea', Ériu 9 (1921-23) 27-30: 27-8 [verse fragments in Annals of the Four Masters].
  7. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters', in Paul Walsh, Gleanings from Irish manuscripts, 2nd ed. (Dublin, 1933) 69-85.
  8. Paul Walsh, 'The Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 22 (1934) 128-31.
  9. Paul Walsh, 'The convent of Donegal, 1632-36', Ir Book Lover 23 (1935) 109-15.
  10. Brendan Jennings, Michael O Cleirigh, chief of the Four Masters, and his associates (Dublin, 1936) [an inadequate account of the MSS, otherwise very valuable].
  11. Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MSS 687-8])', Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3 [repr. for the most part in a chapter of his The Four Masters and their work].
  12. Paul Walsh, 'Slips in O'Donovan's Four Masters, vol. V', Ir Book Lover 25 (1937) 100-02.
  13. M. A. O'Brien, 'Miscellanea Hibernica, 5: a wrong entry in AU and FM [A.D. 603], Études Celtiques 3 (1939) 365.
  14. Paul Walsh, 'The dating of Irish annals', Ir Hist Stud 2, (1941) 355-75.
  15. Canice Mooney, 'Irish Franciscan libraries of the past', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser., 60 (1942) 223-4.
  16. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'John O Donovan and the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 29 (1943-5) 4-8.
  17. Paul Walsh, The Four Masters and their work (Dublin, 1944).
  18. Michael Duignan [notice of Walsh's Four Masters and their work], Éigse 4 (1943-4) 312.
  19. Helena Concannon, 'John O'Donovan and the Annals of the Four Masters', Studies (Dublin) 37 (1948) 300-7.
  20. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'Annals of the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 31 (1949-51) 126-8.
  21. Alexander Boyle, 'Fergal Ó Gadhra and the Four Masters', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser, 100 (1963) 100-14.
  22. Cathaldus Giblin, 'The Annals of the Four Masters', in Liam de Paor (ed.) Great books of Ireland (Dublin, 1967) 90-103, repr. in Benignus Millett & Anthony Lynch (ed.) Dún Mhuire, Killiney, 1945-95 (Dublin, 1995) 135-43.
  23. David Greene & Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry (London, 1967; repr. Dingle, 1990) 107-9, 200-01 [edition of restored text and translation of four verse epigrams that occur s. aa. 606, 614, 1022, and 1088].
  24. Pádraig Ó Súilleabháin, 'Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála', Éigse 15 (1973) 20-22.
  25. Alan Mac an Bhaird, 'Dán díreach agus ranna as na hannála 867-1134', Éigse 17 (1977) 157C168.
  26. Breandán Ó Buachalla, 'Annála ríoghachta Éireann is Foras feasa ar Éirinn: an comhthéacs comhaimseartha', Studia Hibernica, 22-3 (1982-3) 59-105.
  27. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75-95.
  28. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Vikings II: Ross Cam', Peritia 10 (1996) 236.
  29. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The celebrated antiquary: Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh (c.1600-71): his lineage life and learning (Maynooth, 1996) 6-10, 100-101, 186-89.
  30. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'Cathal Ó Mac Maghnusa: his time, life and legacy', Clogher Rec 16/2 (1998) 45-64.
  31. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Ad Annals of the Four Masters, 823-24', Peritia 13 (1999) 141.
  32. William O'Sullivan, 'The Slane manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters'. Ríocht na Mídhe [Journal of the County Meath Historical Society] 10 (1999) 78-85.
  33. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, 'The chronology and sources of the early Irish annals', Early Medieval Europe 10:3 (2001) 323341.
  34. Pádraig A. Breatnach, 'Irish records of the Nine Years' War: a brief survey, with particular notice of the relationship between Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill and the Annals of the Four Masters'. In Ó Riain, Pádraig (ed.), Beatha Aodha Ruaidh: the life of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Historical and literary contexts (Irish Texts Society, subsidiary series 12) (London 2002) 124-147.
  35. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, on his website at http://www.cs.tcd.ie/misc/kronos/chronology/synchronisms/annals-chron.htm offers comprehensive information on two traditions of dating used in the Irish Annals, together with two ancillary articles, 'Chronological synchronisation of the Irish annals', and 'Collation of the Irish regnal canon'.
  36. Bernadette Cunningham, O'Donnell Histories: Donegal and the Annals of the Four Masters (Rathmullan, 2007).
  37. Edel Bhreatnach and Bernadette Cunningham (eds.), Writing Irish History: the Four Masters and their World (Dublin, 2007).
  38. Bernadette Cunningham, 'The Ó Duibhgeannáin family of historians and the Annals of the Four Masters', Breifne 44 (2008) 557-572.
  39. Bernadette Cunningham, 'John O'Donovan's edition of the Annals of the Four Masters: an Irish classic?' in Dirk van Hulle and Joep Leersen (eds.), Editing the Nation's Memory: Textual Scholarship and Nation-building in Nineteenth-century Europe (Amsterdam, 2008), 129-149.
  40. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish Annals: their genesis, evolution and history (Dublin 2008).
  41. Nicholas Evans, The present and the past in medieval Irish chronicles, Studies in Celtic History 27 (Woodbridge, 2010).
  42. Bernadette Cunningham, The Annals of the Four Masters (Dublin, 2010).
  43. Pádraig A.Breatnach, The Four Masters and their manuscripts: studies in palaeography and text (Dublin, 2013).
    The edition used in the digital edition
  1. Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes.. in Volume 4: TranslationJohn O'Donovan (ed), First edition [Seven volumes. Volumes i—ii: pp v—vi (dedicatory letter of the editor)+ pp vii—liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv—lxi (epistle dedicatory of Mícheál Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii—lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2—1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189—93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii—vi: pp 2—2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377—2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494—98 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii—vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The whole work extends to 4167 pp.] Hodges & Smith Dublin (1848-51)

Encoding

Project Description

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Sampling Declaration

The present text represents pages 657–1259 of the translation of volume 4, being the years A. D. 1373 to A. D. 1500, in the chronology of the compilers. That chronology deviates from the historical chronology, but it has not been corrected in this edition. All editorial introduction, original text, notes and indexes have been omitted. Editorial corrigenda are integrated into the electronic edition. Missing text supplied by the editor is tagged sup.

Editorial Declaration

Correction

Text has been checked and proofread three times. All corrections and supplied text are tagged. The Annals of the Four Masters is an extremely large and complex work. Any corrections of errors in the original text, as edited by O'Donovan, or in this digital edition of the translation are welcome. They will be credited to the scholars who make them.

The editors of this digital edition reproduce O'Donovan's translation, with a few obvious corrections, in the full knowledge of its limitations. Its limitations are particularly evident in the translations of the embedded verse in Old and Middle Irish, many of which (given the stage of development of Irish studies in the mid-nineteenth century) are approximations or mistaken. Their correction cannot be undertaken in this digital edition and must await a new scholarly edition of the Annals as a whole. O'Donovan omits diacritics in the English translation, but quantities are marked in the digital edition of the Irish text, and this should be consulted on this point.

Normalization

The electronic text represents the edited text. The editor's divisions of words have been retained.

Quotation

Quotation marks are rendered q.

Hyphenation

Soft hyphens are silently removed. When a hyphenated word (hard or soft) crosses a page-break, the page-break is marked after the completion of the hyphenated word.

Segmentation

div0=the body of annals; div1=the individual annals (i.e. the annalistic matter gathered under one year); div2=the annalistic entry; paragraphs are marked; passages of verse occurring within paragraphs are treated as embedded texts and the stanzas are marked lg and metrical lines are marked l. Page-breaks are marked pb n=""; words in languages other than English are tagged.

Standard Values

Dates are encoded in the format yyyy-mm-dd.

Canonical References

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Refs: EVENT (<DIV2>)

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Profile Description

Created: Translation by John O'Donovan (for source text see CELT file G100005D) Date range: c.1846–1850.

Use of language

Language: [EN] The text is in English.
Language: [LA] Some words are in Latin.
Language: [GA] Some words and phrases are in Irish.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: T100005D

Annals of the Four Masters: Author: [unknown]

M1373.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1373. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-three.

M1373.1

William Mac Carmaic, Bishop of Ardagh, a man of wisdom and piety, died.

M1373.2

Adam O'Keenan, a canon and learned historian, died at Lisgool in Fermanagh.

M1373.3

An incursion was made by the English of Meath into Annaly, on which occasion they slew Rory, the son of Cathal O'Farrell, and his son, with a number of their people. Donough O'Farrell, with all his forces, pursued them, and slew great numbers of them; but this hero received a shot of a javelin, as he was routing the English before him, which killed him, upon which his people were defeated.

M1373.4

William Dalton and the Sheriff of Meath were slain by the Kinel-Fiachach, and by O'Melaghlin.

M1373.5

Mac-an-Pharson Mac Feorais Bermingham was slain by Turlough Roe O'Conor, with one stroke of his sword, in Conmaicne-Dunmore (after they the Berminghams had acted treacherously towards him, as he was coming


p.659

from Conmaicne Cuile), and afterwards made his escape, in despite of his enemies, by the strength of arm, but severely wounded. Andreas Mac Kenny was afterwards put to death by them the Berminghams, he having been left with them by Turlough,—when they had acted treacherously towards him,—as a hostage, in whose ransom they might demand what they pleased.

M1373.6

Barrduv, daughter of O'Rourke, and wife of Mac Tiernan, died.

M1373.7

John Mac Namara, Head Chieftain of Clann-Cuilein in Thomond, and Teige O'Duirnin, died.

M1373.8

Sabia, daughter of Cathal O'Conor, and wife of Flaherty O'Rourke, died.

M1373.9

Randal, son of Cormac Mac Rannall, was treacherously slain by the son of Mac Naisci.

M1373.10

Melaghlin Connaughtagh O'Neill died.

M1373.11

Master Nichol Mac Techedain, Official of Cluain in the county of Leitrim, died.

M1373.12

Brian Oge, son of Brian O'Dowda, was slain by the Barretts.

Annal M1374.

M1374.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1374. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-four.

M1374.1

Senicin Jenkin Savadge was slain by Magennis.

M1374.2

Donnell Oge, son of John O'Doherty, died.

M1374.3

Cucogry Oge Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, was treacherously slain after he had gone to Athlone with the Bishop of Meath: it was the Sinnach Mac Mearain (one of William Dalton's people) that killed him, with one thrust of a lance; and he Mac Mearain himself was afterwards torn asunder, and his body was cut into small pieces, for this crime.


p.661

M1374.4

Theobald Burke, heir of Mac William, was slain by the people of Hy-Many.

M1374.5

A battle was gained by Niall O'Neill over the English, in which Roche, the knight, Bogsa na-Cairrge, Sandal, Burke, and William of Baile Dalat, the head of the inhospitality of Ireland, with many others not enumerated, were slain

M1374.6

Teige, son of Rory, son of Cathal Roe O'Conor, King of Connaught, worthy heir to the title of The O'Conor, died.

M1374.7

Melaghlin, the son of Dermot O'Farrell, went from Annaly to Muintir-Maelmora, to wage war with the English. A fierce and sharp conflict afterwards took place between them the Irish and the English, in which he O'Farrell and many others were slain.

M1374.8

Teige Oge Mac Rannall was wounded by a cast of a javelin, and died of the wound; but who it was that made the shot was not to a certainty known. The Muintir-Birn charged the Clann-Murtough with it; and the Clann-Murtough, in turn, charged the Muintir-Birn; for these were the parties between whom the conflict was at the time. In consequence of this death, a war broke out between the Muintir-Eolais and the Muintir-Birn.

M1374.9

Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh O'Farrell, was slain.

M1374.10

Farrell, the son of Flaherty O'Rourke, was slain by Philip O'Rourke.

M1374.11

Tiernan, the son of Brian Mac Tiernan, died.

M1374.12

Melaghlin Roe O'Duigennan, a learned historian, and Mahon An Chinn of the head, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Rourke, fell by each other.

Annal M1375.

M1375.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1375. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-five.

M1375.1

Donough Kavanagh Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, was treacherously slain by the English, among whom he had often before spread desolation.


p.663

Mahon, the son of Manus O'Conor, died, after gaining the palm for hospitality and prowess.

M1375.2

The castle of Roscommon was given to Rory O'Conor; and Ballintober was given to Turlough Roe, in lieu of it, together with other considerations.

M1375.3

Mac Artan, Chieftain of Kinel-Faghartaigh, was treacherously slain by his own kinsman, the son of Gilla-Ternoinn Mac Artan.

M1375.4

A great victory was gained by Niall O'Neill over the English of Downpatrick, where Sir James, of Baile-atha-thid (or Alahid), the King of England's Deputy, Burke, of Camline, and many others not enumerated, were slain in the conflict.

M1375.5

Cu-uladh Mac Mahon, Tanist of Oriel, died in consequence of venesection.

M1375.6

Art, the son of Maguire, a man full of hospitality and munificence, died.

M1375.7

Dermot Mac Rannall made an excursion against Cormac O'Beirne, on which occasion Donogh, son of Conor an-Chopain, was slain on this occasion, with many other persons; and he seized upon great spoils.

M1375.8

Melaghlin O'Donnellan, Ollav of Sil-Murray in particular in poetry, and the most learned man in all Ireland in the same art, died of Fiolun.

M1375.9

Carbry and Owen, two sons of Mac Tiernan, marched against the English with all their forces; but one of their own people acted treacherously towards them, and betrayed them to the English for a bribe. The English surrounded them, after they had been betrayed to them, and beheaded on the spot the sons of Mac Teirnan, and twenty-five of the chiefs of their people.

M1375.10

Geoffrey, son of Gilla-na-Naev O'Farrell, worthy heir to the lordship of Annaly for hospitality and prowess, personal shape, and polite manners died after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance.

M1375.11

Sir Edmond Albanagh Mac William Burke died, after the victory of Penance: Thomas, his son, assumed the lordship after him.


p.665

M1375.12

Oscar, the son of Art Maguire, was slain by the sons of Donough Maguire.

M1375.13

Donough, the son of Teige, son of Conor an-Chopain, was slain by the Muintir-Birn the O'Beirnes.

M1375.14

Thomas Mac Feorais Bermingham, Lord of Athenry, and John Mac Loughlin, Chief of his own tribe, died.

M1375.15

Cathal Oge, son of Cathal Oge, son of Cathal More, son of Donnell O'Conor, was slain by the Clann-Rickard. Loughlin, the son of Donough O'Dowda, was taken prisoner on this occasion.

M1375.16

Brian O'Brian, Lord of Thomond, was banished by Turlough, son of Murtough O'Brien, and by the Clann-Rickard.

M1375.17

A war broke out between Rory O'Conor, King of Connaught, and Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, in which O'Conor subdued the Hy-Many.

M1375.18

Cathal, son of Manus Mac Dermot, died.

Annal M1376.

M1376.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1376. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-six.

M1376.1

Teige O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, a man full of hospitality and munificence, a man of fame and renown, the Bear of Breifny, and Lion of Leth-Chuinn, died. Tiernan, his son, assumed the lordship of Breifny after him.

M1376.2

Hugh O'Toole, Lord of Hy-Mail, was slain by the English.

M1376.3

Dalvagh, son of Melaghlin O'Byrne, the most eminent man in Leinster for hospitality and prowess, was wounded by his own spur, and died immediately afterwards.

M1376.4

Hugh, son of John O'Farrell, died. Like unto a fountain had his generosity and bounty flowed on the literati of Ireland universally, from his youth to that time i.e. the time of his death.


p.667

M1376.5

Bebinn, daughter of Donnell O'Dunne, and wife of O'Dempsy, died.

M1376.6

Robert O'Ferrall died, after penance.

M1376.7

Cuaifne O'Conor Faly, worthy heir to the lordship of Offaly, died.

M1376.8

Conor O'Beaghan, a learned Historian; Kellach Mac Curtin, chief Historian of Thomond; John O'Rooney, chief Poet to Magennis; Melaghlin O'Mulvany, Ollav to O'Kane; Donough Mac Firbis, a good Historian; and Ruarcan O'Hamill, chief Poet to O'Hanlon, died. This Ruarcan had kept a house of general hospitality, and had never refused to receive any one.

M1376.9

Cooey O'Kane, Lord of Orieacht-Ui-Chathain, was taken prisoner by the English in the port of Coleraine, and sent by them to Carrickfergus in fetters.

M1376.10

A general muster of the English of Meath, Ulster, and Leinster, proceeded into Annaly, and treacherous depredations were committed by them in the territory. O'Farrell, with all his forces, afterwards invaded, by turns, the English of Ulster, Leinster, &c., so that he burned their farm-houses and towns, and plundered their territories, and returned home in victory and triumph, and loaded with immense spoils.

Annal M1377.

M1377.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1377. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-seven

M1377.1

O'Kelly, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan; John O'Rodaghan, Coarb of St. Caillin, a general scholar; and Mac Morrissy, the Great Dean, died. It was at Rome that this dean died.

M1377.2

The monastery of Assaroe near Ballyshannon was burned.

M1377.3

Walter, son of Sir David Burke; Donnell, son of Farrell, son of the Manach O'Gallagher; Geoffrey O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Chathail; Donough, son of


p.669

William Alainn; O'Carroll, Lord of Ely; Dermot Bacagh Mac Branan, Chief of Corcachlann; Faghtna, son of David O'More; and Brian O'Flaherty, died.

M1377.4

An army was led by Richard Burke into Clann-Cuilein. The Clann-Cuilein assembled around Mac Namara (i.e. the son of O'Daly's daughter), gave battle to the Clann-Richard, and defeated them. Theobald, son of Ulick, head of the kerns, the three sons of O'Heyne, and many others of the chiefs of Clann-Rickard, were slain.

M1377.5

Rory O'Conor defeated Mac William Burke, and Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, at Roscommon, where Richard Burke, the brother of Mac William, Donnell, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, Teige Oge, the son of Teige O'Kelly, O'Mainnin, Chief of Sodan, Mac Dowell Galloglagh, and many other persons not enumerated, were slain.

M1377.6

The castle of Lis-ard-abhla was erected by John O'Ferrall, Lord of Annaly.

M1377.7

A great war broke out between Mac Dermot and Rory O'Conor, in consequence of which all Moylurg was spoiled and burned, as well its fields of corn as its buildings. Numbers were killed on both sides. A peace was at last concluded between them; and Mac Dermot received considerations from


p.671

Rory O'Conor for acceding to the peace, and as compensation for the injuries he had suffered.

M1377.8

Mahon, the son of John Macnamara, died.

M1377.9

Richard II. became King of England on the 21st of June.

M1377.10

Godfrey, son of Annadh O'Reilly, was slain by the Clann-an-Chaoich O'Reilly.

Annal M1378.

M1378.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1378. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-eight.

M1378.1

Carbry O'Farrell, Bishop of Ardagh, a bond for the preservation of piety, the fostering knee of wisdom, a vessel of divine love and of humanity, died at Rome, having overcome the world and the Devil.

M1378.2

More, the daughter of O'Farrell, and wife of Mac Rannall (Dermot), died, and was interred with honour in Cluain-Conmaicne.

M1378.3

Walter Mac William Burke was slain by the O'Malleys.

M1378.4

Farrell Mac Rannall was slain by Con, son of Murtough Mac Rannall.

M1378.5

Gilchreest O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, died.

M1378.6

Turlough Mac Sweeny, High Constable of Connaught, died.

M1378.7

Teige, the son of Loughlin Mac Namara, was slain by the son of the daughter of O'Daly.

M1378.8

Donnell Mac Brady, Chief of Cuil-Brighdin, and of Teallach Cearbhaill, a general scholar; John O'Fialan, a good poet; and Duvcovla, the daughter of Mac Rannall, and wife of O'Mulvey, died.

M1378.9

An incursion was made by Mac Rannall, with his kinsmen and people, by


p.673

the two Clann-Hughs, and by Farrell O'Rourke, against Cathal Roe Mac Rannall. Cathal assembled at one place his kinsmen and sons-in-law, together with Dermot Mac Dermot, to meet them. They defeated Mac Rannall and Farrell Mac Rannall, a good, rich, and affluent man. Mac Shanly, Mac Gilduff, and many others not enumerated, were killed in that engagement.

M1378.10

Gilchreest O'Sgingin, Ollav of Kinel-Connell in History, died of fiolun.

M1378.11

Brian Maguire (heir to the lordship of Fermanagh), was slain by the sons of Art Maguire.

M1378.12

Farrell O'Mulvey, Chief of Muintir-Carolan, died.

M1378.13

Teige Mac Egan, Chief Brehon of Lower Connaught, a sage without contention or reproach, who kept a house of general hospitality for all comers, died.

Annal M1379.

M1379.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1379. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-nine.

M1379.1

The Bishop of Meath, i.e. Faltach, died in England.

M1379.2

James O'Conolly, Prior of Devenish, and Flaherty O'Mongan, Erenagh of Rossory in Fermanagh, died.

M1379.3

Philip, son of Nichol, i.e. the Dalton, Lord of Westmeath, died.

M1379.4

Firbis Mac Firbis, a learned historian, died.

M1379.5

David O'Dunne, Chief of Hy-Regan, was slain by the son of Carroll 0'Dunne.

M1379.6

Richard Mac Cawell was slain by Philip Maguire and Donnell O'Neill.

M1379.7

The defeat of Dreach was given by O'Neill (Niall More) to Philip Maguire,


p.675

where Teige Maguire, the two sons of Mac Manus, Turlough, the son of Donough Maguire, Brian, the son of Magrath, and Murtough Mac Milchon, were slain.

M1379.8

Mac-an-Chaoich O'Reilly was slain by the son of Annadh O'Reilly.

M1379.9

Cumara Gearr i.e. the Mac Namara, was treacherously slain by his own kinsmen.

M1379.10

Cuconnaught, the son of Philip Maguire, materies of a lord of Fermanagh for his hospitality and nobleness, was slain by the Clann-Donnell of Clann-Kelly.

M1379.11

Maelmora Oge, the son of Maelmora Roe O'Conor Faly, was slain by the English.

M1379.12

Finola, the daughter of O'Kelly, and wife of William Burke, died.

M1379.13

Richard O'Dugan died. He was the intended Ollav of Hy-Many.

M1379.14

William, the son of Gilla-Caech Mac Carroll, the most eminent of the Irish in music, died.

Annal M1380.

M1380.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1380. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty.

M1380.1

The Abbot Mac Dermot Roe, i.e. Abbot of the Monastery of the Blessed Trinity on Lough-Key, and Donnell O'Lennan, Prior of Lisgool in Fermanagh, died.

M1380.2

John, the son of Conor, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell and the adjacent territories, and Roydamna of all Ulster, and his son, Melaghlin Duv, were slain at the monastery of Assaroe by Turlough, the son of Niall O'Donnell, the sons of Cathal Oge O'Conor, and Muintir Duirnin the O'Durnins, in a nocturnal attack on his camp.

M1380.3

Mac William Burke defeated Mac William Uachtrach (Richard Oge) at


p.677

the town of Atha-leathann, where Mac Jordan de Exeter, Lord of Athleathan, and John de Exeter, were slain.

M1380.4

Teige, son of Murtough O'Brien, was slain by Brian Sreamach O'Brien.

M1380.5

Rory, the son of Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, set out to attack the O'Rourkes, but was killed by Manus O'Rourke.

M1380.6

A very great defeat was given by Magennis (Art) to the English and the people of Orior. O'Hanlon, Chief of Orior, and great numbers of the English, were slain on this occasion.

M1380.7

Mortimer came to Ireland with great powers, as Lord Justice; whereupon the Irish nobility repaired to pay their court to him, and among others the Roydamna of Ireland, i.e. Niall O'Neill, O'Hanlon, O'Farrell, O'Reilly, O'Molloy, Mageoghegan, and the Sinnach Fox, with many other nobles.

M1380.8

Art Magennis, Lord of Iveagh, in Ulidia, was treacherously taken prisoner in the house of Mortimer. After this the Irish and many of the English stood very much in awe of him Mortimer; and, seeing themselves at his mercy, they resolved not to cultivate any familiarity with him.

M1380.9

Art, the son of Gerald Kavanagh, was slain by the English.

M1380.10

A great victory was gained by O'Donnell (Turlough) over Conor Oge, the son of John, son of Conor, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, and over O'Doherty and the Mac Sweenys. Many of their chiefs were slain in the conflict; the two brothers of Mac Sweeny, John and Murrough, were taken prisoners; and they were deprived of considerable spoils, consisting of horses, arms, and armour.


p.679

M1380.11

Art, the son of Gerald, son of Thomas Finn (of the Mac Murroughs), was slain by Mac Murrough, King of Leinster.

M1380.12

An army was led by the Clann-Murtough and Philip O'Reilly into Breifny-O'Rourke, where they slew Thomas MacDorcy; but O'Rourke overtook them, and drove them forcibly from the territory, leaving behind some of their men and horses.

M1380.13

Kian, the son of Rory O'Carroll, worthy heir to the lordship of Ely, was slain by Hugh, the son of Murtough O'Molloy, with one cast of a javelin.

M1380.14

An army was led by Mortimer into Ulster, and many fortresses and towns were destroyed by him on that occasion, including both lay and ecclesiastical buildings, as Urnaidhe, Donaghmore, Errigal, Clogher, &c.

M1380.15

Cormac Oge Mac Carthy; Henry, son of Donnell O'Farrell; Hugh, son of Murtough Muimhneach Mageoghegan; and Donnell, son of David Mageoghegan, died.

M1380.16

Donnell, the son of Brian O'Dowda, Lord of Tireragh and Tirawley, who defended his territory despite of the English and Irish who were opposed to him, died in his own town on the third of May; and his son Rory assumed his place.


p.681

Annal M1381.

M1381.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1381. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-one.

M1381.1

The Image of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Kilmore spoke after a wonderful manner.

M1381.2

William, the son of Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, a man of the greatest character, worth, and renown, of his own tribe; the man who had given a general invitation of hospitality to the schools of Ireland, and had given them all their own demands, died a very old man, after the victory of penance; and his son Melaghlin assumed his place.

M1381.3

Teige Roe Mac Dermot Gall, who had the chieftainship of Airteach, was slain by the Clann-Costello.

M1381.4

Dermot Mac Carthy, heir to the lordship of Desmond, was slain by O'Mahony.

M1381.5

Kennedy Mac Brien, of Hy-Cuanagh, was slain by the English.

M1381.6

The grandsons of Felim O'Conor were plundered by Rory O'Conor, and deprived of the castle of Ballintober.

M1381.7

Cathal, son of Rory O'Conor, was afterwards valiantly and triumphantly taken prisoner by Brian Ballagh O'Conor, at Bel-an-tachair, and many good men along with him, among whom were Brian O'Beirne and Loughlin O'Hanly, who were taken as they were returning from Conmaicne of Dunmore. Brian detained Cathal in prison, until he obtained his own terms from him for his ransom; and they then made peace.


p.683

M1381.8

The castle of Athlone was taken by the Earl (Mortimer), and the son of Richard an-t-Sonnaigh was killed in it.

M1381.9

The castle of Ath-leathan Ballylahan was broken down by the Clann-Donough; and its gate was carried by them to Ballymote.

M1381.10

O'Dunne was slain by the people of Fircall, as he was committing a depredation upon them.

M1381.11

Philip O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, and his wife, Aine, the daughter of Mac Namara, died.

M1381.12

An army was led by Niall O'Neill into Oriel, and there committed great depredations. The people of Oriel pursued him, and broke through the rear of O'Neill's army, and deprived them of some of the spoils. Donough, son of Manus Mac Mahon, was slain in that conflict.

M1381.13

Sir Edmond Mortimer, Lord of the English of Ireland, died.

M1381.14

Duvcovla, the daughter of Hugh Mac Dermot, and wife of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall; Lasarina, the daughter of Turlough O'Conor, and wife of Mac Rannall; Finola, the daughter of Cooey O'Kane, and wife of Turlough Mac Sweeny; Sabia, the daughter of Ulick Burke, and wife of O'Conor; Duvcovla, the daughter of O'Conor Faly, and wife of Donnell, the son of Theobald O'Molloy; and Lasarina, the daughter of Farrell O'Duigennan, and wife of O'Meehin of Ballagh, died.

M1381.15

Owen Sinnach Fox, Tanist of Muintir-Tadhgain, was slain by the Daltons.

M1381.16

Hugh, son of Murtough Muimhneach Mageoghegan, was slain in a skirmish by Meyler, the son of Theobald O'Molloy, with the stroke of a javelin.


p.685

M1381.17

O'Murchadha Murphy was slain by the Hy-Kinsellaghs.

M1381.18

Dungalagh O'Madden was slain in a skirmish by the Clann-Rickard.

M1381.19

Ranailt, daughter of Mag Brady, died.

M1381.20

Owen O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan, died.

M1381.21

Donnell O'Murphy, Chief of Hy-Felimy, was slain by the Hy-Kinsellagh.

M1381.22

Philip, the son of Philip O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, and Aine, daughter of Mac Namara, his wife, both died.

Annal M1382.

M1382.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1382. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-two.

M1382.1

Thomas O'Carmacan, Bishop of Thomond, and Matthew Mac Murray, Prior of Kilmore, died.


p.687

M1382.2

Dermot O'Donnell, son of Owen (who was the son of Inghean Ruadh), son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, heir to the lordship of Tirconnell, died. This Owen was surnamed Mac na h-Inghine Ruaidhe.

M1382.3

Laurence Tuite was slain by the sons of John O'Farrell, Cormac and Donnell.

M1382.4

Farrell Roe, son of Donough, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, was treacherously slain by the inhabitants of Fircall, at Cillmona, east of Rath-Aedha-mic-Bric. Farrell O'Molloy and the son of Theobald O'Molloy made the assault, and Meyler Maintin struck and slew him.

M1382.5

Some of the chiefs of Connaught were taken prisoners by Rory O'Conor, at a meeting of his own, namely, O'Hanly, O'Beirne, and Mac Keherny, because he had obtained intelligence that they were forming a friendship with the grandsons of Felim against him.

M1382.6

Rury, son of John O'Farrell, died.

M1382.7

The Clann-Maurice made an incursion into Corcomodha, and plundered the people. O'Concannon went in pursuit of the prey, but he was at once killed. Conor Oge Mac Dermot, with his kinsmen, afterwards set out on an excursion against the Clann-Maurice; but a forewarning of their intentions


p.689

having reached the Clann-Maurice, they had all their forces in readiness to meet them; but the others advanced as far as the town of Brees in despite of them, and burned it, both buildings and corn, and slew many persons around it; and Conor and his people afterwards returned, by dint of prowess, without any of them receiving injury.

M1382.8

A plundering army was led by Murrough O'Brien into Desmond, and totally devastated it.

M1382.9

Donnell, the son of Mahon Donn O'Kennedy, and Edmond Oge, the son of Edmond Butler, died.

M1382.10

Murtough, the son of Mahon Moinmoy O'Brien, died in the prison of Trim.

M1382.11

Donnell O'Brien; Turlough, the son of Dermot O'Brien; and Brian, the son of Dermot O'Brien, of the race of Brian Roe, died.

M1382.12

Gilla-Bhrighde O'Sgingin, intended ollav of Kinel-Connell, died.

M1382.13

Murtough Oge, the son of Mac Manus of Tir-Tuathail, died.

M1383.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1383. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-three.

M1383.1

Thc Abbot Mac David, i.e. Abbot of Boyle, a man eminent for charity and humanity, died.

M1383.2

Teige Mac Donough (i.e. the son of Tomaltagh, son of Maurice, son of Donough, from whom the Clann-Donough are named), Lord of Tirerrill, a man full of generosity and hospitality, died on Good Friday; and his son, Tomaltagh, assumed his place.

M1383.3

A great army was led by Niall O'Neill, with his sons and the chieftains of Kinel-Owen, into Trian-Chongail, against the English; and they burned and totally plundered many of their towns. The English of the territory assembled


p.691

to oppose them. Hugh O'Neill and Raibilin Savadge met each other in a charge of cavalry, and they made two powerful thrusts of their spears into each others' bodies. Raibilin returned severely wounded to his house, where Mac Eoin Bisset killed him, and Hugh O'Neill died the third day afterwards of the effects of his wound; and Mac Eoin Bisset, he was killed by Raibilin's people the third day after the killing Raibilin himself.

M1383.4

Murtough O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-Ratha, and Cormac, the son of Art Maguire, died.

M1383.5

John Mac Caffrey and Manus Mac David were slain on the one day.

M1383.6

Art, son of Thomas Finn of the Clann-Murrough, Roydamna of Leinster, was slain by the EngIish of the county of Wexford.

M1383.7

A great and virulent plague raged universally throughout Ireland.

M1383.8

Art Magennis, Lord of Iveagh in Ulster, sole prop of the hospitality of Ireland in his time, died of the plague at Trim, where he had been detained in prison by the English.

M1383.9

Murrough na-Raithnighe O'Brien, More, the daughter of Murrough O'Madden, and wife of Mac William of Clanrickard (Richard); and Joanna, the daughter of the Earl of Ormond, and wife of Teige O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, died of it the plague.

M1383.10

Murrough, son of Brian O'Kennedy; Donough an-Chuil Mac Mahon, Lord of Corco-Baiscin; Owen, the son of Donough, son of Rory O'Kelly; and Lundrasach Loundres of Baile-Atha-buidhe, died.

M1383.11

Fonntach of Tigh-Munna, and the daughter of O'Brien, and wife of O'Kennedy, died.

M1383.12

Honora, daughter of William Burke, and wife of O'Meagher; Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory; and the son of Kellagh Mac Gillapatrick, Tanist of Ossory, all died of the same plague.

M1383.13

Dermot O'Dempsy, Lord of Kinel-Maoilughra, was slain by the English.


p.693

M1383.14

Donough O'Conor, Lord of Kerry-Luachra, and Melaghlin Magauran, Tanist of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1383.15

John, the son of Donnell O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died at Lisard-abhla, and was interred in the monastery of Leath-ratha.

M1383.16

Cathan, son of Rory O'Kane; John Gallda, the son of the Earl; William Barrott; and Rory, the son of Hugh Oge O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall, died.

M1383.17

Rory, the son of Art Maguire, was slain by the son of Donough Maguire.

M1383.18

Dermot Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg, died.

M1383.19

Farrell, the son of Thomas Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach Dunchadha Tullyhunco, died.

M1383.20

Murrough, the son of Cahir O'Conor Faly, died.

M1383.21

Miles Mac Costello was slain by the sons of Fiachra O'Flynn.

M1383.22

Ivor O'Hanly, heir to the chieftainship of Kinel-Dofa, was slain by his own tribe.

M1383.23

Cathal, son of Geoffrey O'Farrell, died.

M1383.24

Dermot Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, committed a depredation upon O'Rourke.

Annal M1384.

M1384.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1384. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-four.

M1384.1

John Mac Gilla-Coisgli, a master erenagh, and parson of Airech-Brosga died.

M1384.2

Rory, the son of Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, died of the plague on the night of St. Catherine's festival, after reigning sixteen years and three months as king of all Connaught, as the poet Maoilin O'Mulconry testifies in the poem which enumerates the kings of Ireland:


p.695

  1. 1] Rory the Royal obtained the reins
    2] For sixteen years and a quarter,
    3] At Cruachan-Aoi, without contention,
    4] The son of Turlough, fierce in battles.

After this two lords were set up in Connaught, Turlough Oge, son of Hugh, son of Turlough, was inaugurated by O'Kelly, the Clann-Rickard, Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, and all the Clann-Donough; Turlough Roe, son of Hugh, son of Felim, son of Hugh, son of Owen, was likewise installed into the lordship by Mac Dermot, the race of Murtough Muimhneach, and all the other chieftains of Sil-Murray. In consequence of this, a great war afterwards broke out through all Connaught, in general, so that they were much disturbed.

M1384.3

Mac Rannall, i.e. Mac Rannall Duv, Dermot, son of Melaghlin, the excellent chief of Muintir Eolais illustrious for hospitality and prowess, was treacherously slain by the sons of Randall Mac Rannall in the doorway of the house of Richard Mac Rannall.

M1384.4

Murtough O'Conor, Lord of Offaly, died at a great age.

M1384.5

Tomaltagh Mac Dorcy, chief of Kinel-Duachain, was killed by his own knife while he was shoeing a horse.

M1384.6

A meeting, took place between O'Flaherty and O'Malley, but a quarrel arose between them, in which Owen O'Malley, Cormac O'Malley (i.e. Cormac Cruinn), and many others besides these, were slain by the people of O'Flaherty.

M1384.7

Carrickfergus was burned by Niall O'Neill, who thereupon acquired great power over the English.


p.697

M1384.8

Cuconnaught, the son of Hugh 0'Farrell, Lord of Magh-Treagha; and Geoffrey O'Farrell, died.

M1384.9

William, the son of Sir Edmond Burke, and Richard, the son of Maiduke, son of Tomin Barrett, the general patron of the learned, died.

M1384.10

Vigistin O'Duigennan, chief historian of Conmaicne, died.

M1384.11

Ualgarg O'Rourke, worthy heir to the lordship of Breifny, was drowned in Lough Gamhna.

M1384.12

Philip O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir-Maelmora, died.

M1384.13

Meyler, son of Sir William Burke, was killed by a fall. John and David, two other sons of Mac William Burke, died of the plague.

M1384.14

Manus, the son of Melaghlin O'Farrell; Tomaltagh, the son of Carbry O'Farrell; and Farrell, the son of Cathal O'Farrell, died.

M1384.15

An army was led by Donnell, the son of Murtough, with his adherents, into Moylurg; and he burned Mac Dermot's fortress.

M1384.16

Donough O'Dowda died, and his son Murtough assumed his place.

M1384.17

Donnell, the son of Flaherty O'Rourke, died.

Annal M1385.

M1385.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1385. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-five.

M1385.1

David, son of Edmond, son of Hubert Burke, was taken prisoner by O'Conor; and he afterwards died in prison at Ballintober.


p.699

M1385.2

An army was led by O'Rourke and Mac Donough, with their nobles, into Moylurg; and they burned the fortress of Mac Dermot, and also the territory in general. The son of John O'Hara was slain while in pursuit of this army, and his brothers was taken prisoner.

M1385.3

Felim Cleireach O'Conor and Conor Oge Mac Dermot went upon an excursion into Tirerrill; but a forewarning of their designs had preceded them, and preparations were made to meet them. They, however, passed into the country, and killed men and cattle; but the guards of the territory afterwards overtook them, and a battle ensued, in which Cathal Cairbreach Mac Donough was killed, Conor Mac Dermot taken prisoner, and Felim O'Conor wounded.

M1385.4

An incursion was made by Murtough, son of Cathal O'Conor, Cormac, son of Rory O'Conor, Teige Mac Dermot, and Cathal Mac Dermot, against Mac Rannall Roe and Hugh O'Conor, both of whom they took prisoners, and conveyed to the Rock of Lough Key, to be imprisoned there.

M1385.5

Cathal O'Farrell, worthy heir to the lordship of Annaly; and Cooey O'Kane, Lord of Oireacht-Ui-Chathain, died, while at the pinnacle of prosperity and renown.

M1385.6

O'Conor Roe, Mac Dermot, the sons of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, and the chieftains of Connaught, proceeded with a very great army into Hy-Many, and burned the town of the son of Edmond O'Kelly. On this occasion William Boy O'Naghtan was slain.

M1385.7

The men of Breifny and Tirerrill repaired to meet O'Conor Don, and made


p.701

an incursion against the people of Corcoachlann, where they burned many of their towns, and cut down many fields of corn.

M1385.8

Tireragh was burned by Mac William Burke; he afterwards went to Sligo, which was burned by him in like manner, together with South Carbury. But here battle was given to him, and Maidiuc Mael, one of the chiefs of his people, was slain; and hostages were afterwards forced from him.

M1385.9

Tirawley was burned by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, where he killed numbers of people, acquired great spoils, and afterwards took with him some of their chieftains as hostages.

M1385.10

A victory was gained by Murrough O'Conor, Lord of Offaly, and the Kinel-Fiachach, over the English of Meath, at Tochar Cruachain-Bri-Ele; Nugent of Meath, Chambers and his son, and a countless host of the chiefs and plebeians of the English were slain.

M1385.11

Tany O'Mulconry, Chief Ollav of Connaught in History and Poetry, died at Lammas, in his own house, after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance, and was interred with honour at Cluain Coirpthe.

M1385.12

A peace was made by the Connacians with each other, and Sil-Murray was divided into two equal parts between the two O'Conors.


p.703

M1385.13

Art, the son of Art More O'Melaghlin; Dervorgilla, the daughter of Cathal Oge, and wife of O'Conor Roe; and Beanmidhe, daughter of Mac Mahon, and wife of O'Neill, died.

M1385.14

Gilchreest Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir-Pheodachain, died.

M1385.15

Great preys were taken by the Clann-Donough in Carra, but were opposed by the sons of Cathal Oges O'Conor, the Stauntons, and a great number of others. The Clann-Donough were defeated; many of their people were slain, and they themselves were afterwards driven into Cill-Chondaibh.


p.705

Annal M1386.

M1386.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1386. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-six.

M1386.1

Aine, daughter of Teige Mac Donough, and wife of Tiernan O'Rourke (Lord of Breifny), the most favoured of the women of Leth Chuinn, died at Tuaim Seancha, on Lough Finvoy, and was interred at Sligo.

M1386.2

Carbry, son of Brian, son of Murrough O'Farrell, Lord of Caladh na h-Anghaile, a bountiful, generous, brave, and protecting man, died, after gaining the victory of good fame and renown, Extreme Unction, and Penance.

M1386.3

Niall, the son of Cucogry Oge Mageoghegan, materies of a lord of his tribe, was slain by William Dalton and his son.

M1386.4

Manus, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, was also slain by the Daltons.

M1386.5

A great army was led by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, the Mac Donoughs, O'Dowda, and the O'Haras, into the territory of MacWattin, which they totally plundered and devastated on that occasion; and many persons were killed, among whom were Robert of Dun Domhnainn, Mac Meyler of Corran, and Maigeog Gallda. They took Lynott's castle, and cut down the Orchard of Caerthannan, and the orchard of Inis Cua.

M1386.6

Heremon O'Melaghlin was slain by Magawley and the Daltons.

M1386.7

O'Conor Roe, with all the Connacians he could find to join him, went to assist Mac William Burke against Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor


p.707

Sligo, and the Clann-Donough. They carried off great preys from Tir-Fiachrach Muaidhe. After this they proceeded to Clanrickard on a predatory excursion. O'Brien, with a great army, and Mac William of Clanrickard, came up with them; but O'Conor Roe turned round on them, and defeated them; and Conor, the son of Teige, son of Conor O'Brien, was slain in the conflict.

M1386.8

Numbers of the English of Ossory fell by Mac Murrough, King of Leinster.

M1386.9

Donnell Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin, died.

M1386.10

Fineen, son of Rory Mageoghegan, was killed.

M1386.11

A peace was made by the Connacians with one another after the war, and Mac William Burke went into the house of Mac William of Clanrickard, and ceded to him the lordship. Mac Feorais Bermingham went into his house in like manner.

M1386.12

Donough Mac Cabe was slain by the son of Manus O'Reilly

M1386.13

Cathal O'Naghtan was slain by O'Conor Roe.

Annal M1387.

M1387.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1387. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-seven

M1387.1

A house was built at Eamhain Macha, by Niall O'Neill, King of Ulster, for the entertainment of the learned men of Ireland.


p.709

M1387.2

Sabia, daughter of Hugh O'Neill, the choice woman of the descendants of Niall of the Nine Hostages in her time, and wife of John Bisset, died, after penance.

M1387.3

Richard Oge, i.e. the Mac William of Clanrickard, died.

M1387.4

Godfrey Finn O'Daly, Chief Poet of Ireland, and Rory O'Keenan, a learned historian, and Ollav of Oriel, died.

M1387.5

Donnell, the son of Donough Docair Maguire, and Matthew Mac Coinleagha, were slain at Cill-Naile (in Fermanagh).

M1387.6

Conor, the son of Brian Caragh O'Neill, was slain by the English of Sradbhaile.

M1387.7

William, the son of Dermot Mac Rannall, materies of a chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by Muintir Birn the O'Beirnes.

M1387.8

John, the son of Aengus Mac Donnell, Lord of the Insi Gall the Hebrides, died.

M1387.9

Dermot Roe O'Durnin died.

M1387.10

A house was erected at Eamhain Macha Emania by Niall O'Neill, for there was not any house within it i.e. the fort for a long time till then.


p.711

Annal M1388.

M1388.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1388. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-eight.

M1388.1

Cormac Mac Donough, royal champion of Tirerrill, and its Tanist, went by night on a predatory excursion into Moylurg, and made great preys. O'Conor Roe, the grandsons of Felim, the sons of Cathal Oge O'Conor, and the sons of Hugh Mac Dermot, namely, Cathal and Cormac, with their forces, followed him in pursuit of the preys. Cormac Mac Donough betook himself to the rear of his own people, where some of O'Conor's party first made towards him, and unsparingly attacked him; but O'Conor himself came up with them, and commanded his people not to kill him, if they could take him prisoner; but he Mac Donough did not consent to protection, so that they were at last obliged to kill him. There was not of his tribe, up to that time, his peer for hospitality and prowess. Conor Mac Donough, Murrough, the son of Cormac Mac Donough, and Mac Dermot Roe, were afterwards taken and led away captives. O'Conor Roe pursued them (the enemy) over the mountain downwards i.e. northwards, and the Clann-Donough fled before him to Cuil-Maile Collooney, and the lower part of Tirerrill.

M1388.2

Murtough, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, attacked O'Donnell's camp in the vicinity of Eas-ruadh, and, in the course of this incursion, slew many persons, among whom were the sons of O'Boyle and O'Gallagher, and their kinsmen. Mac Sweeny and his son were taken prisoners, and carried away by him, together with a considerable spoil of horses, arms, and armour. The Clann-Murtough turned against O'Donnell on this occasion.

M1388.3

John Roe O'Tuathail, Lord of the Hy-Muireadhaigh, pillar of the hospitality


p.713

and prowess of his tribe, was slain by a clown of his own people, in the middle of his own fortress. The clown was immediately killed for his crime.

M1388.4

The sons of O'Curnin, Siry, Carbry, and Gillapatrick, were slain by the English of Leinster.

M1388.5

Great depredations were committed by O'Conor Roe and Mac Dermot upon O'Conor Don, in consequence of which a general war broke out in Connaught. Mac Donough burned Moylurg on account of these depredations.

M1388.6

Cucogry O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall, died.

M1388.7

Hostilities arose between O'Rourke and the Clann-Donough.

M1388.8

Donnell O'Conor made an incursion into Machaire-Connacht, and burned Ard-an-Choillin, and the island Loch-Cairrgin. Donnell Oge Mac Donnell (i.e. a constable of gallowglasses) was slain on this excursion.

M1388.9

An army was led by O'Donnell (Turlough an Fhina) against the Clann-Murtough; and, arriving at Sligo, he plundered and spoiled all the territory of Carbury of Drumcliff. After numbers had been killed, and the country had been plundered on this occasion, Donnell, the son of Murtough, went into O'Donnell's house, and concluded a peace with him, giving him his full demands, besides the hostages which had been taken from the Kinel-Connell on a former occasion.

M1388.10

A war broke out between O'Rourke and the Mac Donoughs; and Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, rose up to assist the Mac Donoughs.

M1388.11

Manus, the son of Melaghlin Mac Manus, was slain by the sons of the Mac Donough, and by Mulrony Mac Donough.


p.715

Annal M1389.

M1389.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1389. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighty-nine.

M1389.1

The Vicar of Inis Cain died.

M1389.2

Niall Oge O'Neill was taken prisoner by the English.

M1389.3

Maurice Mael O'Conor Faly was slain by one shot of an arrow at the church of Cluain da-torc, by one of the O'Kellys of Ley.

M1389.4

Melaghlin Cam O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe, was treacherously slain by his own brother.

M1389.5

Owen O'Rourke and the sons of Cathal Oge O'Conor went to Caislen an Uabhair, where they were met by the cavalry of Muintir Healy. These were defeated, and Manus O'Healy and others were there killed. They afterwards plundered Muintir Healy, and killed Murtough O'Healy. After this O'Rourke,


p.717

Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor and the Clann-Donough, made peace with each other. A peace was also concluded between Mac Dermot and the Clann-Donough; and the hostages that had on a former occasion been taken from the Clann-Donough were now restored to them; and Cathal Mac Dermot, who had been in captivity with the Clann-Donough, was set at liberty after the ratification of the peace aforesaid.

M1389.6

Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor Sligo carried off the spoils of Tirconnell.

M1389.7

Randal Mac Rourke, Chief of Teallach-Conmasa, died.

M1389.8

Brian, son of Donnell O'Reilly, was slain by the Clann-Murtough.

M1389.9

Manus O'Rourke was treacherously taken prisoner by Cormac O'Farrell.

M1389.10

Affric, the daughter of Hugh O'Neill, and wife of Henry Aimreidh O'Neill, died.

Annal M1390.

M1390.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1390. The age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety.

M1390.1

Niall O'Taichlich, Canon Chorister of Clogher, and Coarb of Devenish, died.

M1390.2

Petrus O'Howen, Deacon of Lough Erne, and Bartholomew O'Congaile, Canon and Sacristan of Lisgool in Fermanagh, died.

M1390.3

A great war broke out between O'Rourke and O'Reilly; and the people of


p.719

Annaly the O'Farrells, the Muintir-Eolais the Mac Rannalls; and the Clann-Murtough O'Conor, at the instigation of Donnell, the son of Murtough, and Tomaltagh Mac Donough, came to join in that war.

M1390.4

Manus O'Rourke, who had been imprisoned by O'Reilly in the castle of Lough Oughter, made his escape from it, and went to the castle of Lough-an Scuir; but the Clann-Murtough, being informed of this by his betrayers, they slew him as he was coming ashore out of a cot.

M1390.5

A peace was concluded between O'Rourke and O'Reilly; and O'Reilly received great rewards for banishing and expelling from him the enemies of O'Rourke. Owen O'Rourke and the son of Cathal Reagh were delivered up as hostages for the payment of these considerations.

M1390.6

The Clann-Murtough and Teallach Dunchadha the Mac Kiernans of Tullyhunco emigrated, in despite of the O'Rourkes, into Fidh-ua-Finnoige, Slieve-Corrain, and Kinel-Luachain. But as soon as O'Rourke, who was at that time in Glenn-Gaibhle, received notice of this, he took his scouts with him to the upper part of Kinel-Luachain, where he made an attack on them, and forced them to fly before him, killing both cattle and people on their route from Beal-atha Doire-Dubhain to the summit of the Breifnian hills.

M1390.7

O'Reilly, i.e. Thomas, the son of Mahon, died; and John, the son of Philip O'Reilly, assumed the lordship.


p.721

M1390.8

The castle of Cill Barrainne was demolished by Donnell,the son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo.

M1390.9

Brian Mac Egan, Ollav of Breifny in judicature, died; and John (i.e. the Official Mac Egan),successor to this Brian, was slain four nights before Christmas Day.

M1390.10

Duigen O'Duigennan, Ollav of Conmaicne in History, died

M1390.11

Farrell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died.

Annal M1391.

M1391.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1391. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-one.

M1391.1

O'Rourke (Tiernan), with a small body of troops, repaired to Drumlahan to meet O'Reilly (John). When the Clann-Murtough O'Conor heard of this, they met him, with all their forces, at Bealach-an-Chrionaigh; but O'Rourke, with his small body of troops, defeated them, and made them retreat before him; having slain with his own hand John, the son of Mahon O'Conor, and Donough, son of Hugh an-Cleitigh, exclusive of the number of others whom his forces had slain.

M1391.2

Donnell Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died; and his son, Teige, assumed the lordship after him.

M1391.3

O'Hanlon, Chief of the Oriors, was treacherously slain by his own kinsmen.


p.723

M1391.4

Mac Gill-Muire (i.e. Cu-Uladh O'Morna), Chief of Hy-Nerca-Chein and Lecale, was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1391.5

Teige, son of Gilla-Columb O'Higgin, and Bebinn, daughter of O'Mulconry, an illustrious ollave in poetry and humanity, died after penance.

M1391.6

Cormac Mael O'Farrell was treacherously slain by the English.

Annal M1392.

M1392.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1392. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-two.

M1392.1

Gregory O'Mochain, Archbishop of Tuam, a pious and charitable man, died. Henry Aimhreidh, the son of Niall More O'Neill, Roydamna of Kinel-Owen, and a good materies for a monarch of Ireland for his justice, nobility, and hospitality, died on the festival day of St. Brendan, after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance.

M1392.2

Donnell, the son of Henry O'Neill, was taken prisoner by Turlough an-Fhiona O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, who, on the same day, committed great depredations and ravages on the people of the said son of Henry.

M1392.3

A great army was led by Niall O'Neill, King of Tyrone, with the chiefs of the whole province about him, against the English of Tragh Bhaile and Dundalk.


p.725

He acquired power over them on this occasion; and Seffin White, who had engaged with him in single combat, was slain by him.

M1392.4

A great army was conducted by O'Conor Don (with the greater part of the chiefs of Connaught) into Hy-Many, and burned and totally plundered the territory. O'Conor Roe pursued them; and Cathal, the son of Hugh O'Rourke, who was in the rear of O'Conor Don's army, was taken prisoner by O'Conor Roe, and many of his people were slain.

M1392.5

The Countess of Desmond, daughter of the Earl of Ormond, a bountiful and truly hospitable woman, died after the victory of Penance.

M1392.6

Turlough Mac Brien of Hy-Cuanagh; Rory, son of Donough O'Carroll, Tanist of Ely; and Finola, the daughter of Manus, son of Cathal O'Conor, died.

M1392.7

Dermot Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

M1392.8

A great army was led by O'Neill (Niall) and the sons of Henry O'Neill, with all the Ultonians, into Tirconnell, against O'Donnell (Turlough). Another army was led by Donnell, the son of Murtough, and his kinsmen, against O'Donnell also. The spoils of the territory were carried into the wilds and fastnesses of the country; and O'Donnell, with his forces, remained behind to protect his people. The Connacian army did not halt until they arrived at Ceann-Maghair; and they seized on the spoils of that neighbourhood. O'Donnell, with his forces, pursued and defeated them, and killed numbers of them, and, among others, Donough Mac Cabe. As to O'Neill and the sons of Henry O'Neill, and their army, they plundered O'Doherty's territory, as well churches as lay property, and marched on, without once halting, until they reached Fearsat-Mor, intending to give battle to O'Donnell. Here they remained for a long time face to face, but at length they made peace with each other.


p.727

M1392.9

O'Donnell committed great depredations on the sons of John O'Donnell; for it was they who had brought the Clann-Murtough into the country on the occasion of the last-mentioned incursion.

M1393.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1393. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-three.

M1393.1

John, son of Geoffry O'Reilly, Bishop of Breifny Kilmore, died.

M1393.2

Matthew O'Howen, Chaplain of Inis Caoin, died.

M1393.3

The priest O'Clery died.

M1393.4

Hugh, the son of Conor, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, Lord of Moyburg, died, after gaining the palm for hospitality and penance. His son Cathal was drowned shortly afterwards.

M1393.5

Mulrony, son of Farrell Mac Dermot, assumed the lordship of Moylurg, by means of the power and assistance of Tomaltagh Mac Donough.

M1393.6

An incursion was made by the sons of Hugh Mac Dermot into Cluain O'g-Coinden (at the callow of Lough Techet), against the Mac Dermot; and a conflict ensued between them, in which the sons of Hugh were routed, and Conor and Rory, two sons of Hugh Mac Dermot, were taken prisoners. Farrell, the son of Donough Reagh, was also taken; but he afterwards made his escape. Donnell Duv Mac Dermot and many others were slain around them on this occasion.


p.729

M1393.7

Brian, son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, Tanist of Hy-Many; Farrell Magauran, Chief of Teallach Eachdhach (Tullyhaw), a man of lavish hospitality towards the literati; and Manus O'Hara, Tanist of Leyny, died.

M1393.8

A peace was concluded by the chieftains of Moylurg with one another, on the subject of the apportionment of their lands, and the redemption of their hostages from captivity

M1393.9

Raghnailt, the daughter of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, a beautiful and humane woman; Maurice Cam, the son of Rory Mageoghegan; and Brian, the son of William Oge Mageoghegan, died.

M1393.10

Edwina, daughter of Cathal Oge O'Conor, and wife of Brian, son of Melaghlin O'Kelly; Donnell and Edmond, two sons of Melaghlin O'Kelly; and Dermot O'Flanagan, heir apparent to the chieftainry of Tuath-ratha in Fermanagh, died.

M1393.11

The monastery of Cill-Achaidh, in the diocese of Kildare, was founded for Franciscan Friars by O'Conor Faly.

Annal M1394.

M1394.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1394 The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-four.

M1394.1

Richard, King of England, came to Ireland in Michaelmas. He landed at Waterford, and proceeded from thence to Dublin.


p.731

M1394.2

Gilla-Downey O'Howen, Official of Lough Erne, and Parson and Erenagh of Inis Caoin; Matthew Mac Gilla-Coisgle, Vicar of Claoin-inis; and Lucas Mac Scoloige, vicar of Achadh-Urchair, died.

M1394.3

The Earl of March came to Ireland.

M1394.4

Teige, the son of Gilla-Isa O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-ratha, was slain by the sons of David O'Flanagan and the sons of Murtough O'Flanagan.

M1394.5

Hugh O'Dempsy, while in pursuit of a prey, was slain by the English.

M1394.6

Thomas O'Dempsy, heir to the lordship of Clann-Maoilughra, was slain by the English.

M1394.7

Mac Jordan (John, son of Meyler), Lord of Baile-atha-leathan, was slain by his own immediate kinsmen, namely, the sons of John de Exeter.

M1394.8

An army was led by Art Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, against the English; and he burned Ros-mic-Triuin, with its houses and castles, and carried away from it gold, silver, and hostages.


p.733

M1394.9

The Earl of Ormond mustered a force, and marched into Leinster to spoil it; and he burned and spoiled Gailine, and the territory of O'Kelly of Magh Druchtain, and then returned home.

M1394.10

Rory, son of Rory O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Henry O'Neill.

M1394.11

Mac Murrough, i.e. Art, the son of Art, waged war with the King of England and his people, and numbers of them were slain by him. He went at last to the King's house, at the solicitation of the English and Irish of Leinster; but he was detained a prisoner, on account of the complaint of the Lord Justice, i.e. the Earl of Ormond. He was afterwards liberated; but O'Brien, O'More and John O'Nolan, were kept in custody after him.

M1394.12

Mac William Burke, i e. Thomas, went into the King's house, and received great honour, and lordship, and chieftainship over the English of Connaught

M1394.13

Turlough, the son of Murrough na-Raithnighe O'Brien, of the race of Brian Roe, waged war with the people of the King of England in Munster and Leinster, and burned and plundered the county of Limerick.

M1394.14

Camcluana O'Dugan was slain at Dublin by the people of the King of England.


p.735

M1394.15

Brian, son of Mulrony, son of Farrell Mac Dermot, heir to the lordship of Moylurg, was slain by Melaghlin Cleireach Mac Dermot, his paternal uncle.

M1394.16

Teige O'h-Eachaidhen, a learned poet, was slain by the sons of Cuconnaught O'Daly, in a squabble about the ollavship of O'Neill.

Annal M1395.

M1395.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1395. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-five.

M1395.1

The young Bishop O'Mochain died on his way to Rome.

M1395.2

O'Flannelly, Vicar of Skreen-Adamnan, died.

M1395.3

The official O'Tuathail, who was Vicar of Imaidh-Fechin, a man who had kept a celebrated house of hospitality, died.

M1395.4

O'Neill Boy died, and was interred at Armagh.

M1395.5

Philip Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, the spender and defender of his territory, a man of whose fame and renown all Ireland was full, died, after the victory of Penance. Thomas Maguire, i.e. the Gilla-Dubh, son of Philip, assumed the lordship of Fermanagh.

M1395.6

Donnell, i.e. O'Muldoon of Lurg, was treacherously taken prisoner by the


p.737

sons of Art Maguire, at Tearmon-Daveóg, and delivered up as a captive to O'Donnell. He afterwards died in captivity.

M1395.7

Thomas, son of Hugh Roe Maguire, was taken prisoner by the Gilla-Duv, i.e. Thomas, and his brother, Hugh Maguire; but he afterwards escaped, i.e. he was carried away by his own son.

M1395.8

A party of the people of the King of England set out on a predatory excursion into Offaly. O'Conor pursued them to the causeway of Cruachain, where great numbers of them were slain, and sixty horses taken from them. Another party of the people of the King of England, under the conduct of the Earl Maruscal, set out upon a predatory excursion into Ely. O'Carroll and his people came up with them, killed many of the English, and took many horses from them.

M1395.9

Niall Oge, the son of Niall, son of Hugh O'Neill, and O'Brien, i.e. Brian, the son of Mahon, went into the King of England's houses.

M1395.10

Cobhlaigh Mor, daughter of Cathal, the son of Donnell O'Conor, King of Connaught, a rich and affluent woman, of good hospitality, died, after the victory of Penance, and was interred in the monastery of Boyle. It was she who


p.739

was commonly called Port na-d-Tri Namhat; for she was wife of O'Donnell, i.e. Niall, Lord of Tirconnell; of Hugh O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny; and of Cathal, the son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, Roydamna of Connaught

M1395.11

Una, daughter of Teige, son of Manus O'Conor, and wife of Maguire, died.

M1395.12

John, the son of Art Maguire, was taken prisoner by Maguire, and delivered up to the O'Muldoons of Lurg, who put him to death at Finntracht Droma-bairr, as he had previously deserved from them.

M1395.13

The King of England departed from Ireland in May, after a great number of the English and Irish chiefs of Ireland had gone into his house; and Mortimer was left by the King in Ireland as his representative. Although Mac Murrough had gone into the King's house, he did not afterwards keep faith with him.

M1395.14

Ardstraw and Clogher Mac Daimhin, with all their various riches, were burned.

M1395.15

Rory O'Kelly, heir to the lordship of Hy-Many, died.

M1395.16

Mac Jordan de Exeter was taken prisoner by the Clann-Mac-Jordan, and


p.741

delivered up into the hands of Mac William Burke. An army was led by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, and the Irish of Lower Connaught, into Mac William's territory, in consequence of the capture of Mac Jordan; and Mac Jordan was liberated, and peace was ratified between the English and Irish of the province on this occasion.

M1395.17

An army was led by O'Donnell (Turlough) into Tyrone, against the sons of Henry O'Neill, and committed great ravages and spoliations in the territory. The sons of Henry, with their forces, pursued them; and a battle was fought between both armies, in which the Kinel-Owen were at last defeated and slaughtered; and Brian, the son of Henry O'Neill, and thirteen of the chiefs of his army, were taken prisoners.

M1395.18

Another army was led by the same O'Donnell to Sligo, through Carbury of Drumcliff; and the country was plundered all around by them; and they destroyed every thing to which they came, and carried off many preys and spoils to their country without receiving any injury, except only that a few at the rear of the army were wounded.

M1395.19

An incursion was made by Donnell, the son of Henry O'Neill, upon Brian, the son of O'Neill; and he took him prisoner, and also committed great depredations upon him. Another incursion was made by Donnell, the son of Henry, into the town of O'Neill, and carried off O'Neill's wife, and other prisoners along with her, and took them with him to the English.

M1395.20

The English of Leinster attempted to make Mac Murrough (Art) prisoner, by treachery; but this was of no avail to them, for he escaped from them by the strength of his arm, and by his valour, so that they were not able to do him any injury.

M1395.21

Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, Lord of Carbury and Sligo, and lord also of that tract of country from the mountain downwards, died in the castle of Sligo, a week before Christmas.


p.743

M1395.22

Hugh, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, by the daughter of Torlogh O'Conor, and Maurice, son of Paul Ultach, Chief Physician of Tirconnell, died.

Annal M1396.

M1396.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1396. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-six.

M1396.1

Bishop O'Hara died.

M1396.2

Matthew O'Luinin, Erenagh of Arda, a man of various professions, and skilled in history, poetry, music, and general literature, died.

M1396.3

O'Conor Kerry was treacherously slain by his own tribe.

M1396.4

O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, died.

M1396.5

Irial O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe, was slain by Mac Girr-an-adhastair, one of his own tribe, in revenge of his foster-brother Melaghlin, whom he Irial had killed some time before.

M1396.6

Conor, the son of Owen O'Malley, went on an incursion with a ship's crew to West Connaught, and loaded the ship with the riches and prizes taken by


p.745

that adventure. But all, save one man only, were drowned between Ireland and Aran.

M1396.7

The victory of Creag was gained by O'Conor Roe and his kinsmen over O'Conor Don, Hugh O'Conor, Conn Mac Branan, and Hugh O'Hanly, Chief of Kinel-Dofa. In the conflict were slain Con Mac Branan, Chief of Corcachlann, John O'Teige, the son of John O'Hanly, and many others besides.

M1396.8

O'Donnell marched an army into Carbury; and a part of this army came up with the sons of Melaghlin Caech Mac Murtough, who were watching and guarding the country for the Connacians, with a great body of cavalry. They were defeated by O'Donnell; and they left the most of their horses behind them. Some of them were wounded, and others made their escape by means of their valour. Carbury was afterwards plundered by the army of O'Donnell, who returned home with their preys.

M1396.9

Melaghlin Caech, the son of Murtough, son of Donnell O'Conor, died.

M1396.10

A battle was gained by O'Toole over the Anglo-Irish and Saxons of Leinster, in which the English were dreadfully slaughtered; and six score of their heads were carried for exhibition before O'Toole, besides a great many prisoners, and spoils of arms, horses, and armour.

M1396.11

Cu-Uladh Magennis, heir to the lordship of Iveagh, was slain by the English.

M1396.12

O'Hanlon, Lord of Orior, was treacherously slain by a party of his own tribe.

M1396.13

Mary, the daughter of O'Kane, and wife of O'Doherty, died.


p.747

M1396.14

Brian, the son of Henry O'Neill, was ransomed from O'Donnell by O'Neill, who gave, as the price of his ransom, horses, armour, and much valuable property; and O'Neill delivered him over to the other son of Henry (i.e. to Donnell), together with other considerations, in ransom for his own son, namely, Brian, son of Niall.

M1396.15

An army was led by O'Donnell (Turlough, the son of Niall Garv) and Teige, son of Cathal O'Conor, to Sligo; and they burned the whole town, both its edifices of stone and of wood: and the son of Conor Moinmoy, with many others, was slain by them on this occasion. It was grievous that this town should have been burned, for its buildings of stone and wood were splendid.


p.749

Annal M1397.

M1397.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1397. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-seven.

M1397.1

A great army was mustered by Niall O'Neill, King of Kinel-Owen, to invade O'Donnell (Turlough) and the sons of Henry O'Neill. O'Donnell and the sons of Henry mustered another army to oppose him. They remained for some time face to face, without coming to any engagement. O'Neill and his army growing weary, they set out for home, unnoticed by the other army; but when the other army perceived this i.e. that they had disappeared, they sent skirmishing squadrons in pursuit of them; and some of O'Neill's people were killed, leaving many horses and other spoils to the Kinel-Connell and the sons of Henry on this occasion.

M1397.2

An army was led by Turlough O'Donnell, Lord of Kinel-Connell, into Fermanagh, and he carried many boats with him to Lough Erne, and, landing on the islands and islets of the lake, he plundered and preyed them all, except the churches or sanctuaries; and he carried away immense spoils, and returned without opposition.

M1397.3

Another army was led by O'Donnell into Carbury, to expel from thence the sons of Donnell, the son of Murtough; and he burned the whole territory as far as Cluain-Dearg-ratha.


p.751

M1397.4

Hugh Mac Mahon recovered his sight by fasting in honour of the Holy Cross of Raphoe, and of the image of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Ath-Trim.

M1397.5

Niall More, the son of Hugh O'Neill, King of Kinel-Owen, Contender for the crown of Ireland, Pillar of the dignity and preeminence of his principality, Pillar of resistance to every attack, Destroyer of the English, Uniter of the Irish, and Exalter of the Church and sciences of Ireland, died, after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance; and Niall Oge, his son, assumed his place.

M1397.6

Mac Donough of Tirerril repaired to Machaire-Chonnacht with all his forces. substance, and cattle, to assist O'Conor Don, and encamped with his people and cattle at Cuirrech-Chinn-eitigh, where O'Conor was. O'Conor Roe having heard of this, he assembled together, from every side, Mac William, Thomas, the son of Sir Edmond Albanagh, the sons of Cathal Oge O'Conor, the sons of Hugh Mac Dermot, the Hy-Many, and even the grandsons of Felim, with all the forces of each of them, and a body of gallowglasses besides; and these then marched to the Plain of Machaire Chonnacht. But O'Conor Don was not then along with Mac Donough, nor did Mac Donough perceive the army until O'Conor Roe had surrounded him with a large body of cavalry. A battle ensued between them, which was fiercely and determinedly maintained on both sides, until at length Mac Donough and his people were defeated; and the heroes by whom they were routed pursued and slaughtered them). In this engagement were slain Mac Donough, and Hugh Caech, the son of Hugh, son of Turlough O'Conor; Mac Sweeny, High Constable of Connaught from the Mountain downward, and his two brothers, Donough and Donslevy; Cuaifne,


p.753

the son of Cuaifne O'Conor; and Dermot Mac Donough, Tanist of Tirerrill; together with other chieftains and nobles of their kinsmen and people. Innumerable and indescribable were the spoils and valuable articles obtained by O'Conor Roe on this occasion, without mentioning horses, arms, and armour. This defeat of Cinn-eitigh was sustained on the first festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Autumn. When O'Conor Don had heard the news of this (which he did on the third day after the defeat), he came to the herds and stalls of O'Conor Roe and the Clann-Felim, which were situated in Leitrim, and having given them a migratory overthrow, which was called ‘an gheal-mhaidhm,’ he carried off from them immense preys and spoils on that occasion.

M1397.7

Felim, son of Cathal Oge, and Dowell Mac Donnell Galloglach, went to O'Donnell to request his assistance against their enemies; and O'Donnell, with the chiefs of Tirconnell, came on this occasion to assist the sons of Cathal Oge. The people of Carbury and Tirerrill fled before them into the fastnesses and places of difficult access of their country. O'Donnell arrived at Aenach-Tire-Oilella; and his people burned many houses and much corn, and committed great depredations on the son of Cormac, son of Rory. Mulrony Mac Dermot, Lord of Tirerrill, O'Dowda, and O'Hara, afterwards gave sureties and hostages, to O'Donnell and the sons of Cathal Oge as securities, that they would never again oppose them. Upon this condition O'Donnell concluded a peace with them, and returned, himself, to Tirconnell immediately afterwards. The sons of Cathal Oge, Muintir-Durnin, and Mac Donnell Galloglach, then went to Carbury, and halted at Lissadill, where they proceeded to parcel out the territory between them that night. But they disputed on this head; and on the morrow O'Donnell arrived there, with a small body of cavalry, to settle matters between them.

M1397.8

At this time Murtough Bacagh, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough


p.755

O'Conor, and the Mac Sweenys, were at Fassa Coille, together with the Western O'Hara, and the descendants of Flaherty O'Rourke; and they all set out early in the morning to Bun-Brenoige, opposite Lissadill, to attack the sons of Cathal Oge and O'Donnell. Squadrons of the cavalry of the sons of Cathal Oge advanced towards them the party of Murtough Bacach, on the way to Sligo; but the stream of Bun-Brenoige lay on one side of them, and, luckily and favourably for them, the sea had flowed on the other side, so that they could not be encompassed or surrounded. They afterwards came to a brisk engagement with each other, in which O'Donnell and the sons of Cathal Oge were defeated, and Marcus Mac Donnell, and Dugald his son, John Mac Sheely, and a great many others of their gallowglasses, were slain. Great ravages and depredations were then committed on the sons of Cathal; and they were again banished across the River Erne, in sadness and dejection, precisely on the Great Festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary.


p.757

M1397.9

Dermot, the son of Ivor O'Beirne, was in a fever, and was conveyed in a cot on a lake from his own house, towards the house of Murrough, the son of Thomas O'Beirne; and he leaped out of the cot, unobserved by any, into the lake, and was immediately drowned.

Annal M1398.

M1398.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1398. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-eight.

M1398.1

Thomas Mac Morrissy, Bishop of Achonry, died.

M1398.2

A great war broke out between O'Neill (Niall Oge) and O'Donnell (Turlough); and his own chieftains and tribe abandoned O'Donnell, so that he was reduced to great straits by the sons of Henry O'Neill, by the sons of John O'Donnell, by O'Doherty, and by the Clann-Sweeny. Niall Garv, the son of O'Donnell, and the sons of Donnell, son of Niall O'Donnell, went upon an excursion into Fanad, took John, the son of Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, prisoner, and committed a depredation. The English and Irish of the province of Ulster (O'Donnell only excepted) went into the house of O'Neill, and gave him hostages and other pledges of submission.

M1398.3

A great army was led by Niall Oge O'Neill, King of Kinel-Owen and the sons of Henry O'Neill, against O'Donnell, and arrived at Assaroe; and they plundered the monastery of all its riches, and all Tirhugh. A party of O'Donnell's people gave them battle; and Hugh, son of Farrell O'Rourke, was taken prisoner on this occasion. O'Neill returned in safety to Tyrone.


p.759

M1398.4

An army was led by Thomas Burke, Lord of the English of Connaught, and by O'Conor Roe and the sons of Cathal Oge, into Tirerrill, which they entirely plundered. Conor Oge, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, and his kinsmen, afterwards returned from this army to traverse Moylurg. On the same night Farrell Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, went to the monastery of Boyle, and took away all the provisions and other stores which he found in it to the town i.e. the castle called the Rock. The sons of Mac Dermot, discovering the track of his party, pursued them; and as soon as the others had notice of their being pursued, they proceeded onwards through the country until they reached Eachdruim Mac n-Aodha, in Tir-Briuin na Sinna. The sons of Mac Dermot burned the church of Aughrim over their heads. Conor Mac Dermot, i.e. the son of Farrell, was slain by them, and many of his people along with him; and Mulrony Mac Dermot was taken prisoner. They then took their horses, arms, and armour, as booty.

M1398.5

Murrough Bane, the son of John, son of Donnell O'Farrell, a worthy heir to the lordship of Annaly, and the most distinguished of his age of the race of Fergus for hospitality, renown, valour, and prowess, died, after the victory of penance, a month before Christmas, and was interred in the monastery of Leath-ratha in the tomb of his father and grandfather.

M1398.6

Maurice, son of Pierce Dalton, was slain by Murtough Oge Mageoghegan, and Brian, the son of O'Conor Faly.

M1398.7

Gleann da loch was burned by the English.


p.761

M1398.8

Murtough O'Conor of Sligo went to Tirhugh, and returned to Assaroe, without gaining much booty by the incursion. Hugh O'Duirnin came up with him there, and routed him and his people at Ballyshannon; Hugh's horse was wounded, and he himself thrown off, and afterwards killed.

M1398.9

Garrett, Earl of Desmond, a cheerful and courteous man, who excelled all the English, and many of the Irish, in the knowledge of the Irish language, poetry, and history, and of other learning, died, after the victory of penance.

M1398.10

The Earl of Kildare was taken prisoner by Calvagh O'Conor and a body of the cavalry of Offaly, and delivered up to Murrough O'Conor.

M1398.11

Sir John, Earl of Desmond, was drowned in the Suir, a short time after assuming the earldom.

M1398.12

A battle was given to the English by O'Byrne and O'Toole, in which the Earl of March was slain, and the English were slaughtered.

M1398.13

Finola, daughter of Ualgarg More O'Rourke, and wife of John More O'Hara, died.

M1398.14

David O'Duigennan, Ollav of the Clann-Mulrony in history, a general and select biatagh, and a man of learning and science, died.


p.763

M1398.15

O'Conor Roe and Mac Dermot marched with a great army against the Clann-Donough of Tirerrill, until they arrived at Magh-Tuiredh, where they committed great depredations. The Clann-Donough and Murtough, son of Donnell O'Conor. with all his forces, assembled, came up with them; and a battle was fought between them, in which O'Conor Roe was defeated, and Sorley Boy Mac Donnell and his people were killed.

M1398.16

Thomas, the son of Cathal, son of Murrough O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, bond of the hospitality and renown of the race of Ros, was slain at his own mansion-seat of Coillin Crubach, by the English of Meath and the Baron of Delvin, after he had been elected Lord of Annaly in preference to John O'Farrell, his senior kinsman. John was then installed into the lordship of Annaly.

M1398.17

A very great defeat was given by Mac Carthy of Carbery to O'Sullivan, and the two sons of O'Sullivan, Owen and Conor, together with many others, were slain in the conflict.

M1398.18

O'Brien Maol died of the plague in the English Pale.

M1398.19

The son of Maurice Boy O'More, Lord of Slieve-Margy, fosterer of the Iearned and destitute of Ireland, died.

M1398.20

Mac William Burke burned Sligo.


p.765

M1398.21

Cathal, son of Rory Maguire, was slain by Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill.

M1398.22

Art Cuile, the son of Philip Maguire, was slain by the people of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw.

M1398.23

The sons of Henry O'Neill, the sons of John O'Donnell, and the people of Fermanagh, mustered an army against O'Donnell; and O'Donnell, on the other hand, assembled his forces against them; and they remained for some time fronting each other, in two camps; but they afterwards departed without achieving any remarkable exploit.

Annal M1399.

M1399.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1399. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ninety-nine.

M1399.1

An army was led by O'Neill (Niall Oge) against the English, so that the greater number of them was plundered and expelled by him.

M1399.2

Conor Mac Cormac, Bishop of Raphoe, one of the O'Donnells of Corca-Bhaiscinn, died.

M1399.3

Cu-Uladh (i.e. Cu-Uladh Roe), son of Niall More, who was son of Hugh O'Neill, died of the plague.

M1399.4

Brian O'Brien (i.e. the son of Mahon), Lord of Thomond, died.

M1399.5

Turlough, the son of Murrough (i.e. Murrough Raithnighe) O'Brien, died.

M1399.6

Felim, the son of Cahir O'Conor, Tanist of Offaly, died of the plague at O'Reilly's house.

M1399.7

The sons of Henry O'Neill went upon an excursion against the English of Tragh-Bhaile. The English assembled to oppose them, and routed them, took Donnell, the son of Henry, prisoner, and killed great numbers of his people.


p.767

Donnell was sent to England in the following year, after his ransom had been refused.

M1399.8

John O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, an intellectual, ingenious, erudite, and learned man, illustrious for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1399.9

Hugh O'Donoghoe, Lord of Eoghanaght of Lough Leane; O'Byrne ( Gerald, son of Teige); Turlough, the son of Mulmurry Mac Sweeny of Fanaid; Auliffe, the son of Philip, son of Auliffe, son of Donn Carragh Maguire, Chief of Muintir-Feodachain in Fermanagh, died.

M1399.9

Hugh Mac Mahon died, after the loss of his eyes.

M1399.10

Donnell, the son of Gilla-Isa Roe O'Reilly, died.

M1399.11

Magennis (Murtough, the son of Murtough More), Lord of Iveagh, was slain by his own tribe.

M1399.12

Henry IV was made King of England on the 29th of September.

M1399.13

Boethius Mac Egan, a man extensively skilled in the Fenechus law, and in music, and who had kept a celebrated house of hospitality; and Gilla-na-naev, the son of Conor Mac Egan, Arch-Ollav of the Fenechus Law, died.

M1399.14

The Earl of Desmond (John, son of Garrett) was drowned at the ford of Ardfinnan, on the Suir.

Annal M1400.

M1400.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1400. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred.

M1400.1

Hugh O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall; Laighneagh, the son of Farrell Roe, son of Donough Mageoghegan; Donough Sinnach Fox, Lord of Muintir-Tadhgain,


p.769

and Chief of Teffia; and Dermot and Brian, two sons of Catharnach Mac an-t-Sinnaigh, died.

M1400.2

The castle of Dunamon was taken by Mac an-Abbaidh O'Conor. Hubert, the son of Edmond, son of Hubert Burke, was killed in it; and the grandson of Edmond O'Kelly, who was imprisoned in it, was set at liberty.

M1400.3

Gregory, son of Tanuidhe O'Mulconry, a man perfect in his hereditary art, and a good materies of an ollav of Sil-Murray, was accidentally killed, by one cast of a javelin from the hand of William Garv Mac David Burke, who mistook him for another. One hundred and twenty-six cows were afterwards given as an eric fine for his death.

M1400.4

Rory, the son of Art Magennis, Lord of Iveagh in Ulidia, was slain by the sons of Cu-Uladh O'Neill, assisted by Caffar Magennis, his own brother.

M1400.5

A great army was led by Niall Oge O'Neill into Tirconnell, and destroyed many fields and much corn. The Kinel-Connell came to oppose him; and a battle was fought between them, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and many of them slain; they were also deprived of many horses on this occasion.


p.771

M1400.6

Gillapatrick, the son of Manus Maguire,who was usually called Gilla-Buidhe, died, in his own house, in consequence of venesection.

M1400.7

John, son of Philip, son of Gilla-Isa-Roe O'Reilly, Lord of Breifny, the most hospitable and noble of his name, died of a sudden fit, in his bed at Tulach Mongain.

M1400.8

The son of the King of England came to Ireland.

M1400.9

Manus, the son of Cuconnaught O'Reilly, heir apparent to the lordship of Muintir-Maelmora, died.

M1400.10

Conor, the son of Donnell, son of Niall Garv, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, went on a predatory excursion over the mountain eastward, through Tirconnell; and he and Owen Roe Mac Sweeny fell by each other's hands.

M1400.11

The sons of Flaherty O'Rourke were banished from Breifny; and they went to Tirconnell, and brought some of the Kinel-Connell with them into Breifny, where they committed great depredations on O'Rourke, and carried away the spoils into Tirconnell.

Annal M1401.

M1401.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1401. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred one.

M1401.1

Melaghlin O' Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, a truly hospitable and humane man, and Thomas, the son of Sir Edmond Albanagh Burke, i.e. Mac William, Lord of the English of Connaught, died, after the victory of penance. After the death of this Thomas Burke, two Mac Williams were made, namely, Ulick, the son of Richard Oge, who was elected the Mac William; and Walter, the son of Thomas, who was made another Mac William, but yielded submission to Mac William of Clanrickard for his seniority.

M1401.2

Donnell O'Malley, Lord of Umallia, died, after having attained to a good old age.

M1401.3

Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain at Druim-chubhra, by Geoffry, the son of Melaghlin Mac Rannall.


p.773

M1401.4

Mulrony, the son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, was slain by the sons of the same Melaghlin, while in pursuit of a prey.

M1401.5

Conor Anabaidh O'Kelly assumed the lordship of Hy-Many after his father.

M1401.6

The Rock of Lough Key was taken by the sons of Cathal Mac Dermot, and many persons were slain and drowned around it. Its ward gave it up for a bribe.

M1401.7

Felim, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, was taken prisoner by the son of O'Conor Don.

M1401.8

A conference was held between O'Neill (Niall Oge) and O'Donnell (Turlough) at Cael-uisge; and they made peace with each other on that occasion.

M1401.9

A war afterwards broke out between O'Donnell and Brian, the son of Henry O'Neill; for Brian had led an army into Tirconnell, and had attacked the fortress of O'Donnell, and killed the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall Garv, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, and Melaghlin, son of Flaherty O'Rourke, and many others. On the same day O'Donnell, his sons, and Muintir Duirnin, went in pursuit of Brian, and overtook him as he was driving off a prey taken from O'Gormly (Henry), whom he had slain. A fierce battle was fought between O'Donnell and Brian O'Neill, in which Brian was killed by O'Donnell, and his people were routed, leaving the spoils of Kinel-Moen behind them. many others were slain along with Brian in this engagement. O'Donnell then returned home safely with his people, with great spoils, after victory and triumph.

M1401.9

Cormac Mac Branan, Chief of Corco-achlann, was treacherously slain by his own kinsman, i.e. Conor, the son of John Mac Branan, &c.

M1401.10

Donnell, the son of Henry O'Neill, was ransomed from the English.

Annal M1402.

M1402.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1402. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred two.

M1402.1

A great war broke out between O'Neill and the sons of Henry O'Neill: and the country was destroyed in every direction between them.

M1402.2

Murtough O'Flanagan, Archdeacon of Elphin, died.


p.775

M1402.3

A war broke out between the Earl of Ormond and the Earl of Desmond; and the two Mac Williams went to assist the Earl of Ormond.

M1402.4

The Rock of Lough Key was taken by Conor Oge, the son of Hugh, from the sons of Farrell Mac Dermot.

M1402.5

Farrell O'Rourke, heir to the lordship of Breifny, a powerful, energetic, comely, and truly hospitable man, was slain in his own house by the Clann-Caba, and was interred in the monastery of Sligo.

M1402.6

Niall Oge, the son of Niall More, son of Hugh O'Neill, King of Kinel-Owen, died, after the victory of hospitality and renown, Extreme Unction and Penance.

M1402.7

Brian, the son of Niall Oge, died of galar breac.

M1402.8

Murtough, the son of Donough O'Dowda, a man universally distinguished for his nobleness and hospitality, died, and was interred at Ardnarea.

M1402.9

Matthew O'Scingin died of fiolún.

M1402.10

Philip, the son of Brian More Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died; and Ardgal, another son of Brian, assumed the lordship after him.

M1402.11

Cuconnaught, the son of Manus, who was son of Cuconnaught O'Reilly, Tanist of Breifny, died. Una, the daughter of Turlough O'Conor, was his mother.

M1402.12

Brian, the son of Donnell O'Flaherty, heir to the lordship of Carn Gegach, died.

M1402.13

Felim, the son of Cathal Oge, was released frorm captivity.

M1402.14

The Abbey of Cuinche, in Thomond, in the diocese of Killaloe, was founded for Franciscan friars by Sheeda Cam Mac Namara, Lord of Clann-Coilein, who ordained that it should be the burial-place of himself and his tribe.

M1402.15

Hugh Seanchaidh O'Donnell, a learned historian, died.

M1402.16

A great war broke out between O'Donnell (Turlough, the son of Niall) and O'Kane (Manus); and during this war O'Kane's tribe was plundered, and the territory totally spoiled by O'Donnell.


p.777

M1403.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1403. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred three.

M1403.1

Donnell, the son of Henry O'Neill, assumed the lordship of Tyrone.

M1403.2

Teige, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, was slain on Machaire-na-nailech, by the sons of Turlough Oge O'Conor Don, and by Owen, the son of the Abbot, O'Conor, and was interred in the tomb of Donnell, son of Cathal, his grandfather.

M1403.3

Conor Anabaidh, the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, the Serpent of his tribe, and of all the Irish people, died, after Extreme Unction and Penance, and was interred in the monastery of St. John the Baptist in Tir-Many.

M1403.4

Finola, the daughter of Turlough, son of Hugh O'Conor, and the wife of Melaghlin O'Kelly (Lord of Hy-Many), died, after a virtuous life.

M1403.5

An army was led by O'Conor Don and Murtough Bacagh, the son of Donnell (Lord of Sligo), into Upper Connaught, by which they acquired dominion over Sil-Anmchadha. They afterwards proceeded to Clanrickard, to assist Ulick, the son of Richard Burke, against the Hy-Many; so that they obtained sway over both.


p.779

M1403.6

Murtough Bacagh, the son of Donnell, who was son of Murtough, Lord of Lower Connaught, died in autumn, in the castle of Sligo.

M1403.7

A war arose between the Breifnians and the Clann-Donogh, in which Tomaltagh Oge, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dorcy, the last Chief of Kinel-Duachain of that family, and Murtough Oge O'Healy, a wealthy brughaidh cedach, &c., were slain.

M1403.8

Maelmora, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Gilla-Isa Roe O'Reilly, became Lord of the Muintir-Reilly.

M1403.9

Manus, son of Cooey O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta, died.

M1403.10

Felim, son of Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, died.

M1403.11

Cu-Uladh, son of Gillapatrick Mac Cawell, was treacherously slain at an assembly by his own people.

M1403.12

Cormac, the son of Donough Mac Carthy, died.

M1403.13

O'Kennedy Don was slain by the sons of Philip O'Kennedy.

Annal M1404.

M1404.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1404. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred four.

M1404.1

Thomas Barrett, Bishop of Elphin, the most illustrious man in Ireland for wisdom and profound knowledge of divinity, died, and was interred at Airech Locha Con.

M1404.2

Conor Oge, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, a bear in vigour, died in Autumn; and Teige, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, assumed the lordship.


p.781

M1404.3

Cormac Mac Dermot was slain upon an incursion into Clanrickard, in a conflict with the cavalry of Clanrickard and Thomond.

M1404.4

The daughter of O'Conor Faly, and wife of Gillapatrick O'More, died.

M1404.5

The victory of Ath dubh was gained by Gillapatrick O'More, Lord of Leix, over the English, where many persons were slain, and great spoil was taken in horses, arms, and armour.

M1404.6

The Earl of Ormond, head of the prowess of the English of Ireland, died.

M1404.7

Donogh Bane O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray in history, died.

M1404.8

Gilla-Duivin Mac Curtin, Ollav of Thomond in music, died.

M1404.9

Carroll O'Daly, Ollav of Corcomroe; Donnell, the son of Donough O'Daly, who was usually called Bolg-an-Dana; Flann, the son of John O'Donnellann, Ollav of Sil-Murray in poetry; William O'Doran, Ollav of Leinster in judicature; Nuala, daughter of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, and wife of Farrell, the son of Cormac Mac Donough; and Donncahy, the son of Murray Mac Shanly, a wealthy brughaidh cedach farmer of Corco-Achlann, and chief servant of trust to Rory O'Conor, King of Connaught, died.

M1404.10

Owen, the son of Murrough, son of Cathaoir O'Conor Faly, was slain by the Earl of Kildare.

M1404.11

Andrew Barrott was slain by the O'Murphys.

M1404.12

A war broke out between Mac Carthy and O'Sullivan Boy. Turlough Meith Mac Mahon, who was at this time Mac Carthy's chief maritime officer, came up at sea with O'Sullivan and the sons of Dermot Mac Carthy, who were aiding O'Sullivan against Mac Carthy; and he drowned O'Sullivan, and made a prisoner of Donnell, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, on this occasion.

M1404.13

Mahon Mac Namara died on his way to Rome.


p.783

M1404.14

Melaghlin Mageraghty, Chief of Muintir-Rodiv, died.

M1404.15

Donough Mac Cawell, Chief of the two Kinel-Farrys, was slain by Maguire. Felim, the son of Hugh O'Tuathail, Lord of the Hy-Muireadhaigh, died.

M1404.16

Cathal, the son of Teige Mac Donough, heir to the lordship of Tirerrill, died.

M1404.17

Taichleach, the son of Donough O'Dowda; Tuathal, the son of Melaghlin O'Donnellan, intended ollav of Sil-Murray in poetry; and Teige, the son of Boethius Mac Egan, intended ollav of Lower Connaught in law,—the three died.

Annal M1405.

M1405.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1405. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred five.

M1405.1

An army was led by Teige, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, against the descendants of Conor, the son of Taichleach Mac Dermot, and all the other people of Airtech, to demand chiefry from them, as was always due to a man in his station. The people of Airtech drew O'Conor Don, the Clann-Murtough-Muimhneach, and the sons of Farrell Mac Dermot, to their assistance against Mac Dermot. They all assembled and met at Loch Labain, in the territory of Airtech, where a battle was fought between them. In the early part of the day Mac Dermot and Donough Mac Donnell, his constable, with the forces of both, routed the fourfold mixed army opposed to them, and killed many of their common people in the conflict. But a certain man of the soldiers of the routed part turned towards the spot where he thought that Mac Dermot was, and cast at him a terrific irresistible javelin, which struck directly in his throat, so that Mac Dermot (Teige) died of the wound a week afterwards in his own house. Rory, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, then assumed the lordship of Moylurg.

M1405.2

Manus, the son of Hugh O'Higgin, died.

M1405.3

Hugh O'Hanly, Chief of Kinel-Dofa, died, and was interred in Cluain Coirpthe.


p.785

M1405.4

Richard Butler, who was usually called Cos-cruaidh, was slain by the son of Faghtna O'More.

M1405.5

Mac Murrough waged war with the English; during which the Contae Reagh, together with Carlow and Disert-Diarmada, were plundered and burned.

M1405.6

Richard Mac Rannall, heir to the chieftainship of Muintir-Eolais, died of a surfeit in drinking.

M1405.7

O'Conor Kerry (Dermot, the son of Donough) was slain by Mac Maurice of Kerry.

M1405.8

The daughter of Donnell O'Brien, and wife of Philip, the son of Mahon Donn O'Kennedy, died.

M1405.9

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Rory O'Keenan, Ollav of Fermanagh in history,


p.787

died suddenly in the house of Neidhe O'Mulconry, in Cairbre-Gabhra, and was interred in the monastery of Leath-ratha Abbeylara.

M1405.10

Farrell, the son of Cormac Mac Donough, heir to the chieftainship of Tirerrill, died.

Annal M1406.

M1406.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1406. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred six.

M1406.1

The Coarb of St. Canice died.

M1406.2

O'Conor Don (Turlough Oge, the son of Hugh, son of Turlough, &c.), Pillar of the support and protection, of the hospitality and renown, of Connaught, was slain by Cathal Duv, the son of O'Conor Roe, assisted by John, the son of Hubert, son of Edmond, son of Hubert, son of Sir David Burke, whose mother was Beanmumhan, grand-daughter of Felim, in the house of Richard, son of John Boy, son of Edmond, son of Hubert, at Cregan, beside Fidhici in Clann-Conway; and John, the son of Hubert, fell by the hand of O'Conor on the same spot.

M1406.3

Mulrony, the son of Teige Mac Donough, Lord of Tirerrill, died in his own house, after the victory of penance, and was interred in the Abbey of Boyle.

M1406.4

A great defeat was given by Murrough O'Conor, Lord of Offaly, with his son Calvach, and the sons of O'Conor Roe, namely, Cathal Duv and Teige (who had come to Offaly, with a troop of cavalry, on a visit), to the English of Meath,


p.789

and to Owen, the son of the Abbot O'Conor, who had the retained kerns of Connaught with him. Both of these armies repaired to the upper part of Geshill; and Owen, the son of the Abbot, with his own band of kerns, went to Cluain-immurrois, and to the town of Gillaboy Mac Maoilcorra, where Calvagh, the son of Murrough O'Conor, and Cathal, the son of O'Conor Roe, attended by six horsemen, came up with Owen and his people as they were collecting the spoils of the town. The proprietor of this town had a cauldron, which he had borrowed from Calvagh, for brewing beer; and on seeing Calvagh coming towards him, he said: ‘There is thy cauldron with the kerns, O Calvagh! and I order it to be given to thee.’ ‘I accept of it where it is,’ said Calvagh. The cauldron was at this time on the back of a young man, one of the plunderers of the town; and Calvagh O'Conor flung a stone, which he happened to have in his hand, successfully at him, and which, striking against the cauldron, produced such a noise and sound as struck a sudden terror and panic in the hearts of all the plunderers, so that they instantly took to flight. They were swiftly

p.791

pursued, slaughtered, and vanquished. The son of the Abbot O'Conor was slain on the bog north of the town; and their loss was not less than three hundred persons, both English and Irish, in the route from thence to Cluain-Aine in Crioch-na-g-Cedach. It was on this expedition that the chief relic of Connaught, namely, the Buacach-Patraig, which had been preserved at Elphin, was taken from the English.

M1406.5

Teige, son of Donough O'Beirne, Chief of Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna, died.

M1406.6

Niall O'Gormly, heir to the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen, died.

M1406.7

Margaret, the daughter of Turlough, the son of Owen Mac Sweeny, and wife of John, the son of Donnell, son of Niall O'Donnell, died.

M1406.8

Hugh, the son of Donough, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, was slain by his own kinsmen, assisted by Manus Mac Donough and Hugh Boy Mac Donough.

M1406.9

Mac Namara, Chief of Clann-Cuilein, died.

Annal M1407.

M1407.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1407. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seven.

M1407.1

Murtough, grandson of Maine O'Kelly, Archbishop of Connaught, a man eminent for his wisdom, hospitality, and piety, died.

M1407.2

John, the son of Teige O'Rourke, heir to the lordship of Breifny, died in Moylurg, and was interred in Drumlane, in the county of Cavan.

M1407.3

The son of Teige, son of Mahon Don O'Kennedy, Lord of Upper Ormond, was slain by O'Carroll.

M1407.4

A battle was gained by the English over the Irish of Munster, in which O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, general patron of the literati of Ireland, was killed.


p.793

M1407.5

The battle of Cill achaidh was gained by O'Conor Roe, the sons of Melaghlin O'Kelly, and Mac Dermot, against Mac William of Clanrickard, and Cathal, the son of Rory O'Conor (who, after the killing of O'Conor Don, received the name of King of Connaught). Cathal O'Conor, William Burke, Redmond Mac Hubert, and O'Heyne, were taken prisoners, after the loss of many persons on both sides. Among the slain were Randal, the son of Donnell Oge Mac Donnell, and John Ballagh, son of Mac Henry. Many horses and coats of mail were left behind them after this defeat.

M1407.6

Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, and the Clann-Donough, were they who had inaugurated this Cathal King on Carn fraoich on a former occasion, when they visited Machaire Chonnacht, and when they also destroyed the castle of Tobar Tuillsce Tulsk.

M1407.7

Owen, son of Cathal, who was son of Hugh Breifneach, who was son of Cathal Roe O'Conor, died, and was interred in the monastery of Boyle.

M1407.8

Cormac O'Farrell died.

M1407.9

Cathal, the son of O'Conor Faly, was slain by the Clann-Feorais.

M1407.10

Hugh Magennis, Lord of Iveagh, was slain by his own relatives and tribe.

M1407.11

An army was led by O'Donnell (Turlough, the son of Niall) into Carbury, and he plundered that territory.

M1407.12

Hugh Maguire and Manus Eoghanagh Maguire were taken prisoners by Niall O'Donnell and Cathal O'Rourke, and brought before O'Donnell, who liberated Hugh on the guarantees of Owen O'Neill and Maguire.


p.795

M1407.13

Hugh, the son of Art Magennis, Lord of Iveagh, was banished by the sons of Cu-Uladh O'Neill, and his own kinsman, i.e. the son of Murtough Oge Magennis, from his own country into the territory of the Savadge; and they pursued him into that territory, but he defeated them, and slew Mac Gilla-Muire on this occasion.

M1407.14

Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died at an advanced age.

M1407.15

Owen O'Doherty, heir to the chieftainship of Ardmire, died.

Annal M1408.

M1408.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1408. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eight.

M1408.1

The Earl of Kildare was taken prisoner by the son of the King of England.

M1408.2

An army was led by the English of Dublin, under the conduct of the son of the King of England, into Leinster. Hitsin Tuite was slain upon this expedition, and he was a great loss.

M1408.3

Thomas, the son of Hubert, son of Edmond, son of Hubert, was slain with one cast of a javelin by Gilla-na-naev, the son of William Gallda O'Teige.

M1408.4

Manus Magauran was killed by the blow of a pole, thrown at him by Baethan Mac Gilroy.

M1408.5

Myles Dalton was slain by his own near kinsmen; and his son was afterwards slain, and his castle demolished, by the descendants of Cathal O'Farrell.

M1408.6

Farrell, the son of Cuconnaught O'Farrell, died.


p.797

M1408.7

Conor, the son of Ivor O'Hanly, was slain by the people of Corco-Achlann and the Kinel-Dofa themselves, on the bog of Cluain na-g-Cailleach, on Lá na-m-Bruach-n-Dubh (and that was a hard day to the sons of Ivor O'Hanly, and to Cathal Duv O'Conor), and was interred at Roscommon.

M1408.8

Owen O'Rourke and the sons of Donn Magauran went into Tirconnell, to make war against the Breifnians.

M1408.9

Mac Brian O'g-Cuanach was treacherously slain by the English, and by Breicleigheach.

M1408.10

Teige O'Grady, Chief of Kinel-Dunghaile, died.

M1408.11

John Cam O'Shaughnessy was slain by the son of O'Loughlin while playing on the green of Cluain Ramhfhoda.

M1408.14

O'h-Echeidhein was slain by the O'Dalys on the plain of Moinmoy.

M1408.15

Mac Gilla-Muire was treacherously slain at Carrickfergus by the Savadges.

M1408.16

Mac Murrough waged war with the English, in which he was victorious.

M1408.17

O'Conor Faly carried on a great war against the English, and he plundered and carried off great spoils from them.

M1408.18

Mac Ward of Cuil-an-Urtain, Ollav of Hy-Many, died.

M1408.19

The castle of Ballindoon in the county of Sligo was erected by Conor, the son of Teige Mac Donough.

M1408.20

The castle of Cuil-Maoile Coloony was erected by Murrough, the son of Cormac Mac Donough.


p.799

Annal M1409.

M1409.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1409. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred nine.

M1409.1

Brian, the son of John O'Hara, Bishop of Achonry, died, after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance.

M1409.2

The son of the King of England left Ireland, having liberated the Earl of Kildare before his departure.

M1409.3

Melaghlin More Mageoghegan was deprived of his chieftainship, and Farrell Roe, the son of Farrell Roe Mageoghegan, installed in his place.

M1409.4

The leg of Richard Burke was broken by a greyhound that rushed against him, while running at full speed; and he died in consequence.

M1409.5

The plundering of Belleck was accomplished by Tiernan O'Rourke against O'Donnell, Cathal O'Rourke, and Owen O'Rourke. O'Donnell and the Kinel-Connell were encamped on one side of the Cataract, and Cathal and Owen on the other; and he carried off the prey from both parties.

M1409.6

O'Conor Roe and O'Kelly pitched a camp around Roscommon, on which occasion they destroyed the corn of the town and of the monastery, and drove the friars out of the monastery, lest intelligence of their doings should reach the castle.

M1409.7

A great army was mustered by Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, by Mac Donough of Tirerrill, and by the sons of Tiernan O'Rourke; and they placed provisions and stores in the castle of Roscommon, in despite of the men of Connaught from the mountain upwards, all of whom, both horse and foot, had assembled together to oppose them. On the same night they returned to Airm, and on the next day to their own houses.

M1409.8

Muintir-Cuirnin committed slaughters on each other, i.e. John and Conla were slain by Dermot, the son of Murtough O'Cuirnin, in the house of O'Duigennan of Baile-Coillte-foghair; and Dermot went afterwards to the house of


p.801

Conor Crom, the son of Teige O'Rourke, his own lord and foster-brother; but Conor immediately took him prisoner for his evil deed, and delivered him up to the O'Rourkes and the O'Cuirnins; and he was kept in confinement for a fortnight afterwards, when he was killed by the son of John O'Cuirnin.

M1409.9

Murtough Mac Egan, Chief Brehon of Teffia, a learned and profound adept in his own profession, died.

M1409.10

Melaghlin, the son of Mulrony Mac Donough, and John Boy, his kinsman, made an incursion into Moylurg against Teige, the son of Mulrony, son of Gilchreest Mac Donough, and took him prisoner. A muster of the territory came up with them; and a battle ensued between both parties, in which Melaghlin, the son of Mac Donough, received a javelin, which caused his death.

M1409.11

A great war broke out between O'Brien and his sons and the sons of Brian O'Brien. They came to an engagement, and O'Brien was defeated; and the son of the Earl of Kildare, who happened to be along with him, was taken prisoner, as was also Dermot O'Brien; and O'Brien was banished from the province of Munster by the sons of Brian O'Brien.

M1409.12

Mac Carthy Cluasach, i.e. Donnell, the son of Fineen, son of Donough, son of Dermot Reamhar, died.

M1409.13

Fineen, the son of Maccon, son of Fineen O'Driscoll, died.

M1409.14

O'Driscol Oge died.

M1409.15

Murtough Mac Gilla-Ulltain, a learned historian, died.

M1409.16

Eigneach O'Duinin, intended ollav of Desmond, died of the plague.

Annal M1410.

M1410.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1410. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ten.

M1410.1

Donnell O'Neill, Lord of Tyrone, a man who had the title of King of his tribe, was taken prisoner by Brian Mac Mahon, as was not becoming, and by him delivered up, for a reward, to Owen O'Neill; and Owen sent him to Maguire, to be held in custody.

M1410.2

Rannall Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, died, after Extreme Unction


p.803

and Penance; and Cumscragh Mac Rannall was installed in the chieftainship after him; but he died in a fortnight after.

M1410.3

Felim Cleireach, the son of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, died.

M1410.4

Teige Carragh, the son of Turlough Don O'Conor, died.

M1410.5

Melaghlin, the son of Owen O'Rourke, was slain by the Kinel-Connell.

M1410.6

The castle of Dun-Cremhthannain was demolished by the men of Carbury and Breifny.

M1410.7

Thomas, the son of Mulmurry Magrath, Ollav of Thomond in poetry, died.

M1410.8

Sabia, the daughter of Conor O'Brien, and wife of Walter Burke, died.

M1410.9

Cormac Oge Mac Carthy died in captivity in which he was kept by his kinsman, Mac Carthy More.

M1410.10

Teige, the son of Melaghlin, son of William, son of Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, a charitable and benevolent chief, died, after the victory of penance.

M1410.11

Teige, the son of William, son of Conor Mac Branan, Chief of Corco-Achlann, died on Allhallows Day in his own house at Coille-mor-Cluana-Seancha, after Extreme Unction and praiseworthy Penance, and was interred in the Friars' monastery at Roscommon, in the tomb of his father and grandfather.

M1410.12

Donough, the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, assumed the lordship of Hy-Many after Teige.

M1410.13

Five hundred cows were carried off, about Allhallow-tide, by the sons of O'Conor Don, from the people of O'Conor Roe at Rath Brenainn.

M1410.14

Turlough and Teige, two sons of O'Molloy, and Donnell, the grandson of Hopkinn O'Molloy, were slain by the Clann-Maoilughra i.e. the O'Dempsys.

M1410.15

Melaghlin More, the son of Farrell, son of Farrell, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, died, after the victory of Extreme Unction and Penance.

M1410.16

Donnell, the son of Cormac O'Hara, heir to the lordship of Leyny, died.

M1410.17

O'Brien returned to Thomond, after having made peace with his kinsmen, the sons of Brian O'Brien.

M1410.18

The castle of Magh Breacraighe was taken by the English of Meath and the Justiciary from O'Farrell.


p.805

M1410.19

Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, was slain by the sons of Brian O'Flaherty, at a meeting of his own people.

M1410.20

An army was led by O'Donnell (Turlough) into Briefny-O'Rourke, and plundered and burned the country. The men of Breifny pursued and came up with him; and a battle was fought between both parties, in which the pursuers were defeated; and John, the son of Owen O'Rourke, and many others, were slain; and the Kinel-Connell bore off the prey.

Annal M1411.

M1411.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1411. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eleven.

M1411.1

The Holy Crucifix of Raphoe poured out blood from its wounds. Many distempers and diseases were healed by that blood.

M1411.2

Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, Tanist of Thomond, was slain by Barry More.

M1411.3

Owen, the son of Murrough O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

M1411.4

Maelmora, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Gilla-Isa O'Reilly, Lord of Breifny, died.

M1411.5

Cobhthach O'Madden, heir to the lordship of his own territory, died.

M1411.6

Murtough, the son of Cu-Uladh O'Neill, Roydamna of Kinel-Owen, died.

M1411.7

O'Sullivan More was treacherously taken prisoner, and blinded, and his son killed, by Donnell Duv O'Sullivan.

M1411.8

Thomas, the son of John, Earl of Desmond, was banished from Ireland by James, the son of Garrett.

M1411.9

Melaghlin, the son of Brian Mac Tiernan, Tanist of Teallach Dunchadha Tullyhunco, died.


p.809

M1411.10

Conor O'Casey, Erenagh of the lands of Muintir-Casey in Devenish, and Johannes Mac Sgoloige, Erenagh of his own lands at Ros-airthir Rosorry, in Fermanagh, died.

M1411.11

Murtough Midheach, the son of Brian O'Farrell, Lord of the Caladh in Annaly, a man who had never been reproached, died.

M1411.12

Conor, the son of Gilla-Mochuda O'Sullivan,was treacherously slain by his own kinsmen.

M1411.13

The monastery of Annadown in the county of Galway was burned.

M1411.14

Donnell Doidhiola O'Breaghan, a learned historian, died.

M1411.15

Dermot, the son of Gilla-Isa Magrath, Ollav of Thomond in poetry, died.

M1411.16

Donnell, the son of Cathal O'Rourke, died.

M1411.17

Taichleach Boy O'Hara died.

M1411.18

The Sheriff of Meath was taken prisoner by O'Conor Faly, and he exacted a great price for his ransom.

M1411.19

Mac Carthy More was banished by the O'Sullivans.

M1411.20

Mulmurry Mac Sweeny was taken prisoner by O'Donnell, in consequence of the accusations and complaints of some of his own people.

M1411.21

Teige (i.e. Caech na Moicheirge), the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, heir to the lordship of Desmond, was treacherously slain by Felim, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy.

M1411.22

Mac Manus of Tir Tuathail and his son were slain by the sons of Rory Mac Manus.


p.809

Annal M1412.

M1412.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1412. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twelve.

M1412.1

The Image of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Ath-Trim wrought many miracles.

M1412.2

Donnell, the son of Niall O'Donnell, died.

M1412.3

Hugh, the son of Henry O'Neill, made his escape from Dublin, after having been imprisoned for ten years; and he took with him on the occasion many other prisoners, among whom were the son of Maguire and the son of O'Neill (i.e. the son of his own brother); and it was for the sake of O'Neill that he had gone into prison. After his escape, the entire province was thrown into disturbance, in demanding O'Neill from Owen O'Neill, O'Donnell, Maguire, and the Orielians.

M1412.4

Tiernan Oge, the son of Tiernan More O'Rourke, heir to the lordship of Breifny, died, in the sixty-third year of his age, in the month of April.

M1412.5

Cuconnaught Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach Dunchadha Tullyhunco, was killed by the people of Fermanagh, in a nocturnal assault, in his own house at Cruachan Mhic-Tighearnain. And they massacred men, women, and children, and burned the whole town, and then returned home.

M1412.6

Donough, the son of Donnell Mac Gillafinnen, died.

M1412.7

Richard Barrett came upon a preying excursion into Coolcarney; but the gentlemen of the country overtook him, and drove him into the River Moy, in which he was drowned; and many of his people were also drowned, and others were taken prisoners.

M1412.8

Eda Leis and the son of the Earl of Kildare fell by each other at Cill-Mocheallog.


p.811

M1412.9

A great war broke out between O'Donnell on the one side, and O'Kane and the sons of John O'Donnell on the other; and O'Kane and the sons of John came with their forces into Tirconnell, and slew fourteen of O'Donnell's people, as also the son of Felim O'Donnell, and Cathal, the son of Randal O'Boyle.

M1412.10

A great army was led by Brian, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, about Lammas, first into Gaileanga, and thence into Clann-Cuain, Ceara, and Conmaicne Cuile Toladh, into which latter territory he brought the Clann-Maurice na-m-Brigh and their creaghts. The Clann-William Burke, the O'Flahertys, the O'Malleys, the Barretts, the inhabitants of the barony of Gaileanga, and the Costelloes, assembled to oppose them; but all these numerous as they were did not venture to give him either skirmish or battle, although Brian, in despite of them, burned their territories, destroyed their cornfields, and burned their fortresses, viz. Caislen-an-Bharraigh of Leth-inis, and Baile-Loch-Measca. He then left the Clann-Maurice, with their creaghts, in their own territory; and he obtained peace from the English and Irish on this expedition, and returned home in safety.

M1412.11

Another army was led by Owen, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, at the instance of the sons of Turlough O'Conor, into the Plain of Connaught, and devastated that part of the plain belonging to the grandsons of Felim, and took away many cows and prisoners afterwards.

M1412.12

Sabia, the daughter of Tiernan O'Rourke, and wife of Edmond, the son of Thomas, son of Cathal O'Farrell, died.


p.813

M1412.13

Rory, the son of Cathal O'Farrell, was slain by the cast of a javelin in Mahaire Chuircne.

M1412.14

Henry V was made King of England on the 20th of March.

M1412.15

An army was led by Brian O'Conor into Tirhugh; and he burned the country as far as Murvagh, and slew Coilin Mac Coilin at Ballyshannon.

M1412.16

Mac Brady, Chief of Cuil-Brighdin, Manus Mac Rannall, the son of Loughlin O'Rourke, and Cu-abha Mac Gorman, died.

M1413.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1413. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirteen.

M1413.1

Henry Barrett was taken prisoner in the church of Airech-Locha-Con by Mac Wattin (i.e. Robert), who carried him away by force, after profaning the place. But Mac Wattin passed not a night in which the saint of the place (Tigearnan of Airech) did not appear to him in a vision, demanding the prisoner, until he obtained his request at last; and Mac Wattin granted a quarter of land to Tighearnan Airich for ever, as an eric for having violated him.

M1413.2

Conor O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, and Lord of Inishowen, a man full of generosity and general hospitality to the wretched and the poor, died.


p.815

M1413.3

Tuathal O'Malley went, to be employed on military service, to the province of Ulster, where he remained one year; on his return home with seven ships and their crews, about the festival of St. Columbkille, a storm arose on the western sea, which drove them northwards to the right towards Scotland, where six of the ships, with all their crews, were sunk, among whom were the two sons of Tuathal O'Malley, Donough, son of Owen Connaughtagh Mac Sweeny, Donnell Ballagh, the son of Mac Sweeny Gearr, and two hundred and forty others. Tuathal himself, with much difficulty, effected a landing in Scotland.

M1413.4

Cathal, the son of Owen O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

M1413.4

Thomas Oge O'Reilly and the Mac Cabes went upon an excursion into Meath, and committed acts of conflagration and depredation there. The English overtook them, and Mahon Mac Cabe, Loughlin Mac Cabe, and a great number of their people, were slain. Thomas Oge O'Reilly received a javelin in the leg, in consequence of which he was lame ever afterwards.

M1413.5

Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Rory O'Connor, died on the 6th of the Calends of May.

M1413.6

Turlough, the son of O'Connor Faly, died of a fall.

M1413.7

Bebinn, the daughter of Rory, son of Tomaltagh Mac Donough, and wife of Owen, the son of Donnell O'Connor, died.

M1413.8

All Limerick, both stone and wooden buildings, was burned by one woman.

M1413.9

A victory was gained by Mac Murrough (Art, the son of Art Kavanagh), Lord of Leinster, over the English of Contae Reagh; and great numbers of them were slain, and others taken prisoners.

M1413.10

A great victory was likewise gained by O'Byrne over the English of Dublin, some being killed, and others taken prisoners.

M1413.11

Colla, the son of Teige O'Kelly, heir to the lordship of Hy-Many; Melaghin, the son of Manus Mac Donnell; O'Meagher, Chief of Hy-Cairin; and Mac Egan of Ormond, a man learned in the Fenechus, all died.

M1413.12

O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, was slain by the son of Murtough O'Flynn.


p.817

Annal M1414.

M1414.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1414. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fourteen.

M1414.1

Donnell O'Howen, Dean of Lough Erne, died on the third of the Nones of October.

M1414.2

The monastery of Sligo was burned by a candle in the Spring of this year.

M1414.3

The sons of Henry O'Neill attacked Owen, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, and took him prisoner as a hostage for the liberation of O'Neill, who was then the prisoner of Owen. Both were set at liberty, the one being given in exchange for the other; and O'Neill, i.e. Donnell, reassumed his own lordship.

M1414.4

A great defeat, was given to the English of Meath by Murrough O'Conor, Lord of Offaly, and Farrell Roe Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach mic-Neill, at Cill-Eochain, where the Baron of Skreen, together with a great number of nobles and plebeians, were slain, and where the son of the Baron of Slane was taken prisoner, for whose ransom fourteen hundred marks were obtained. Dardis the Lawless was also taken prisoner, together with a number of others, for whose ransom twelve hundred marks were obtained, besides the usual fines called Luach-leasa and Luach-impidhe.

M1414.5

Hugh, the son of Cathal O'Conor, died.

M1414.6

Mac Carthy Cairbreach, i.e. Donnell, the son of Donnell, died.

M1414.7

The Earl of Desmond came to Ireland, bringing with him many of the Saxons, to devastate Munster.

M1414.8

The Earl of Ormond came to Ireland from the King of England.


p.819

M1414.9

John Stanley, the Deputy of the King of England, arrived in Ireland, a man who gave neither mercy nor protection to clergy, laity, or men of science, but subjected as many of them as he came upon to cold, hardship, and famine. It was he who plundered Niall, the son of Hugh O'Higgin, at Uisneach, in Meath. Henry Dalton, however, plundered James Tuite and the King's people, and gave the O'Higgins out of the preys then acquired a cow for each and every cow taken from them, and afterwards escorted them to Connaught. The O'Higgins, with Niall, then satirized John Stanley, who lived after this satire but five weeks, for he died of the virulence of the lampoons. This was the second poetical miracle performed by this Niall O'Higgin, the first being the discomfiture of the Clann-Conway the night they plundered Niall at Cladann; and the second, the death of John Stanley.

M1414.10

Conor, son of Geoffrey O'Flanagan, heir to the chieftainship of Clann-Cathail, died six days before Allhallowtide.

M1414.11

Eochy Mac Mahon, Tanist of Oriel, was taken prisoner by Brian Mac Mahon and the English.

M1414.12

Murrough O'Hennessy, Lord of Clann-Colgain, died.

M1414.13

Art Kavanagh, heir to the kingdom of Leinster, died.


p.821

M1414.14

Mulrony, the son of Farrell Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg died.

M1414.15

O'Driscoll More was treacherously slain by the crew of a merchant's ship.

Annal M1415.

M1415.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1415. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifteen.

M1415.1

Edmond Mac Finnvar, Prior of Inis-Mor-Locha-Gamhna, died on the 27th of April.

M1415.2

Lord Furnival came to Ireland as Lord Justice. Leix, O'More's territory, was devastated by him, and he took the castle of the son of Faghtna O'More. He carried off great preys of cows, horses, and small cattle, from the people of Oriel; and he spoiled and plundered Mic na m-Breathnach, and hanged Garrett, the son of Thomas Caech, of the Geraldine blood. He also plundered a great number of the poets of Ireland, namely, O'Daly of Meath (Dermot), Hugh Oge Magrath, Dubhthach Mac Keogh the learned, and Maurice O'Daly. In the ensuing Summer he plundered O'Daly of Corcumroe, i.e. Farrell, the son


p.823

of Teige, son of Aengus Roe. He plundered Bruighean-da-Choga in Machaire Chuircne. And not only this, but he gave no protection to either saint or sanctuary while he abode in Ireland.

M1415.3

A great prey was taken by O'Malley, i.e. Hugh, from Dermot O'Malley. Dermot in retaliation took O'Malley's Island, upon which Hugh went in pursuit of Dermot; and a battle was fought between them, in which Hugh O'Malley, Lord of Umallia, was slain by Dermot and his son Conor, and also the son of Thomas O'Malley, and Donnell, the son of Dermot O'Malley. The chieftainship of Umallia was thenceforth wrested from the descendants of Hugh; and Dermot assumed the lordship.

M1415.4

Tomaltagh Roe, the son of Conor, son of Maurice Mac Dermot, died.

M1415.5

The Clasach O'Coffey, a man eminent for poetry and humanity, died.

M1415.6

Dermot, son of Dermot, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, was slain by the sons of O'Conor Don, and was interred in the monastery of Ath-da-laarg the Abbey of Boyle.

M1415.7

Cahir, the son of Donough O'Farrell, died.

M1415.8

Hugh, son of Donough O'Kelly, died.

M1415.9

Tomaltagh, the son of Teige O'Beirne, was slain by Farrell, the son of Dermot Mac Rannall, in a nocturnal attack at Cluain Sithe, in Baile Ella, in the house of Mac an-Donnanaigh; and the daughter of Loughlin O'Hanly was burned there also, on the sixth of the Ides of January.

M1415.10

Conor, the son of Brian, son of William Mageoghegan, was slain at Cill-Cuairsighe.


p.825

M1415.11

A war broke out among the people of Leyny; they gave battle to each other, and the inhabitants of the eastern part of the territory were defeated, and some of them killed; and Art, the son of O'Hara, was taken prisoner, and hanged by them at their own house.

M1415.12

The sons of Dermot Duv O'Flaherty were partly slain and partly taken prisoners by their own kinsmen, and by Gilladuv O'Flaherty.

Annal M1416.

M1416.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1416. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixteen.

M1416.1

Adam Lexid, Bishop of Ardagh, an English friar, was burned at Raithe-aspuig; and Conor,the son of Farrell,son of Cuconnaught O'Farrell,was elected in his place by the Chapter of Ardagh.

M1416.2

The Dean of Killala (i.e. O'Hainmche) died.

M1416.3

Maurice O'Coineoil, Coarb of Drumcliff, was burned in his own house by robbers.

M1416.4

Thomas Mac an-Oglaigh, Erenagh of Cill-Oiridh, and chief Professor of Law in Connaught, died after the victory of penance.

M1416.5

Lucas O'Trevor, Erenagh of Cill-Fearga, died, after spending a virtuous life.

M1416.6

The monastery of Sligo was re-erected (having been burned some time before) by the Friar Brian, the son of Dermot Mac Donough.

M1416.7

Gormlaidh, the daughter of Niall More O'Neill, and wife of John O'Donnell, died.

M1416.8

Ardgal, the son of Brian More Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died.

M1416.9

Art Kavanagh (King of Leinster), the son of Art Kavanagh, who was son of Mortogh Kavanagh, son of Maurice Kavanagh, &c., only choice of the Irish of Ireland for hospitality and activity at arms, died in his own fortress, after the victory of penance.


p.827

M1416.10

Cu-meadha, the son of John Mac Namara, heir to the chieftainship of Clann-Cuilein, died.

M1416.11

An attack was made by Mac Jordan de Exeter and his kinsmen upon the sons of John O'Hara. O'Hara himself, and Turlough Carragh, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, with the cavalry of Carbury, met the van of this army of Mac Jordan: and O'Hara was killed; and Manus, the son of Donough, son of Murtough O'Conor, the son of Hugh Mac Donough, and Turlough Carragh, were wounded. After this Mac Jordan plundered the country, but the people of the whole territory assembled together, and went in pursuit of him; and Mac Jordan was defeated, and slain, together with Hugh O'Rowan, and O'Rowan himself, the two sons of Thomas Mac Meyler, Mac Duarcan, Lord of Cul-neiridh, and many others.

M1416.12

A war broke out between the people of Fermanagh and the men of Breifny, concerning the rents of Cathal, the son of Hugh O'Rourke, who at this time sided with the men of Fermanagh; and the people of Hugh Maguire and Cathal O'Rourke were defeated by Teige and Donnell O'Rourke in a conflict, in which Teige, the son of Farrell O'Rourke, and nine others, were slain; and eleven horses were taken from them on that occasion.

M1416.13

Another incursion was made by Hugh Boy and Teige O'Rourke, and by Mac Cabe, into Muintir-Pheodachain. The people of Fermanagh, dwelling west of Lough Erned, came up with them, as did also Cathal O'Rourke and Owen O'Rourke. The sons of O'Rourke sustained the attacks of the overwhelming numbers that pursued them, until they arrived at the place where they had left their gallowglasses in ambush; both parties then turned upon their pursuers, and slew Donough and John O'Rourke, and the two sons of Melaghlin, the son of Flaherty O'Rourke, together with forty-eight of the men of Fermanagh.

M1416.14

Donnell, the son of Tiernan More O'Rourke, died of galar breac. The death of this man was a great loss to Gairbthrian Connacht.

M1416.15

Grainne, daughter of Flaherty O'Rourke, died.


p.829

M1416.16

Teige Oge, the son of Teige Roe Mac Dermot Gall, Lord of Airteach, died, a short time after Michaelmas, in the Friars' House at Roscommon, and was interred in the monastery.

M1416.17

The church of Inis Mor, in Lough Gill, was burned; and Screaptra ui Chuirnin, and the Leabhar Gearr of the O'Cuirnins, as well as many other precious articles, were burned also.

M1416.18

James, son of Richard Mac Feorais Bermingham, died.

M1416.19

John Mac Costello set out upon a predatory expedition against Edmond Mac Costello of the Plain, and carried off a great prey; but he himself was slain by an arrow, after depositing the prey in a fastness.

M1416.20

John O'Canavan, Parson of Tireragh of the Moy, died.

M1416.21

Felim, the son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by the sons of O'Conor Don.

M1416.22

Great depredations were committed by Edmond Burke upon Mac Feorais Bermingham; and Mac Feorais was taken prisoner by Edmond, and sent to Ballyloughmask to be there confined.

M1416.23

O'Donnell and Brian O'Conor made peace with each other.

M1416.24

A great defeat was given by O'Conor Ealy to the English of Meath; and he took from them considerable spoil, consisting of prisoners, horses, and armour.

M1416.25

Many Saxons came to Ireland.

M1416.26

A victory was gained by Mac Murrough over the English of Contae Reagh the county of Wexford, of whom he killed or took prisoners three hundred and forty; and on the following day a peace was made with him, and hostages were given him.


p.831

Annal M1417.

M1417.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1417. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventeen

M1417.1

Art, the son of Art, son of Murtough, son of Maurice, Lord of Leinster, a man who had defended his own province against the English and Irish from his sixteenth to his sixtieth year; a man full of hospitality, knowledge, and chivalry; a man full of prosperity and royalty; the enricher of churches and monasteries, by his alms and offerings, died (after having been forty-two years in the lordship of Leinster) a week after Christmas. Some assert that it was of a poisonous drink which a woman gave to him, and to O'Doran, Chief Brehon of Leinster, at Ros-Mic-Briuin, that both died. Donough, his son, assumed his place after him.

M1417.2

Master John, Parson of Devenish, died.

M1417.3

Dermot Lávderg, the son of Art Kavanagh i.e. the son of the King of Leinster, died.

M1417.4

Rory (i.e. the O'Dowda), the son of Donnell, son of Brian, son of Taichleach, Fountain of the prosperity and wealth of Tireragh, died in his own town, after the festival of St. Bridget (at the end of the first month of Spring); and Teige Reagh, his brother, assumed his place.

M1417.5

Rory, the son of Murrough O'Flaherty; Rory, the son of Dermot Duv


p.833

O'Flaherty, and sixteen others of the O'Flahertys, were drowned in the bay of Umallia.

M1417.6

Thomas, the son of Mac Maurice of Kerry, was slain by James, the son of the Earl of Desmond.

M1417.7

Matthew, son of Cuconnaught O'Farrell, Lord of Magh Treagha, died.

M1417.8

Cormac Ballagh, the son of Farrell, son of Cuconnaught O'Farrell, was slain by the English.

M1417.9

A great war broke out between O'Neill and the Kinel-Connell. O'Neill made a nocturnal assault upon the fortress of Naghtan O'Donnell at Carn-glas, between Raphoe and Donaghmore; and, finding those within it asleep, he took away from them forty horses, and obtained other great spoils, consisting of armour, arms, and apparel. Eleven men were either killed or taken prisoners; but Naghtan O'Donnell himself made his escape, by force of his valour, prowess, and bravery.

M1417.10

Una, the daughter of Donnell O'Neill, and wife of Neill Oge O'Neill, died.

M1417.11

A great war broke out in Leinster between the English and Irish.

Annal M1418.

M1418.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1418. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighteen.

M1418.1

The Bishop O'Driscoll, Maccon O'Driscoll (his brother), Lord of Corca-Laighe, and Dermot Mac Carthy Cluasach, Tanist of Hy-Cairbre, died.


p.835

M1418.2

Great depredations and plunders were committed by Niall O'Donnell upon O'Neill, whom he banished eastwards across the Bann to Mac Quillin.

M1418.3

Great depredations were committed by Lord Furnival upon Hugh Magennis, Lord of Iveagh, in Ulidia. Magennis and Mac-I-Neill Boy set out in pursuit of the English and the preys, and defeated them, after they had left the preys behind. Countless numbers of the English were slain and taken prisoners on this occasion by Magennis.

M1418.4

Brian Ballagh, the son of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, a man who never refused anything in his power to give, died, and was interred at Roscommon.

M1418.5

Owen, the son of Tiernan More O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, was drowned shortly after Christmas, as he was going in a boat from Inis-na-d-torc, an island on Lough Finvoy, to visit his father, who was then lying ill of a mortal disease.

M1418.6

Tiernan More, the son of Ualgarg O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, the bravest and most puissant man that had come of the Hy-Briuin race, a man who had wrested his principality from his enemies by the strength of his arm, died at an advanced age, about the festival of St. Bridget, and was interred in the monastery of Sligo. Hugh Boy O'Rourke assumed his father's place.

M1418.7

Teige (i.e. the Mac Clancy), the son of Cathal, son of Teige, Chief of Dartry, died, having retired into a monastery a fortnight previously; and his son Cathal assumed his place.

M1418.8

Richard, the son of Thomas O'Reilly, Lord of East Breifny, was drowned in Loch Silean; and with him were also drowned, his son, Owen O'Reilly,


p.837

Philip, the son of Gilla-Isa, son of Godfrey O'Reilly, Dean of Drumlane, and Vicar of Eanach-garbh, and many other distinguished persons. Finola, however, daughter of Mac Rannall, and wife of O'Reilly, escaped by swimming.

M1418.9

The Small Castle was erected at Roscommon, by William O'Kelly, in the space of fifteen days, opposite the Great Castle, in despite of those English and Irish of Connaught (who were opposed to him, and were assisting the sons of Turlough O'Conor), in the summer of this year.

M1418.10

A great army was led by the sons of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, and the Clann-Donough, to demolish the Small Castle; and they did not halt until they encamped about it on every side; this, however, was of no use to them, for the castle was bravely defended against them; and, as they were unable to do it any injury, they laid up a store of provisions in the Great Castle, and burned the church of Cuil-Silinne on that occasion.

M1418.11

Lasarina, the daughter of Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, and wife of Melaghlin, the son of Flaherty O'Rourke, died.

M1418.12

A peace was concluded between the Clann-Donough of Tirerrill, to last while Mac Donough (Conor) should be lord over them.

M1418.13

Donnell, son of Melaghlin, son of Maurice Mac Donough, died.

M1418.14

A great war broke out between Mac-I-Neill Boy, the Scots, and the English of Ulidia and the Route.

Annal M1419.

M1419.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1419. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred nineteen.

M1419.1

John Mac Carmac, Bishop of Raphoe, died.

M1419.2

Hugh O'Flanagan, Prior of Lisgool, died.


p.839

M1419.3

A great war arose between O'Neill (Donnell, the son of Henry Aimhreidh) and Owen, the son of Niall Oge, Roydamna of Tyrone. Owen repaired to O'Donnell (Turlough), and formed a league of friendship with him; and they mustered a very great army to march into Tyrone. Brian Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, and Thomas Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, came to join this army; and when they had come to one place, to meet Turlough O'Donnell, they all marched into Tyrone, totally plundered the country, and expelled O'Neill from Tyrone with disgrace, and drove him over across the Bann, to the English; and Mac-I-Neill Boy committed depredations upon him in the Glynns.

M1419.4

A great army was led by Brian O'Conor and all the people of Lower Connaught, with many of the English, at the request and solicitation of O'Neill; and they spoiled all Tirhugh, from Ath na-n-Gall to Ballyshannon, including its grass, corn, and buildings; and burned Murvagh, O'Donnell's fortress, while O'Donnell was with his forces in Tyrone. Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough, and his forces, then returned to their homes.

M1419.5

Hugh Boy O'Rourke, who was Lord of Breifny for one year and a half; died; and Teige O'Rourke was elected in his place by the O'Rourkes from Slieve-an-ierin West. But Art, son of Teige, son of Ualgarg, was elected in opposition to him from Slieve-an-ierin East, by the O'Reillys, the people of Teallach Donnchadha, and the descendants of Melaghlin Mac Rannall; so that the entire of Gairbhthrian Connacht was thrown into commotion by the contests between them.

M1419.6

Cathal, son of Hugh Maguire, worthy heir to the lordship of Fermanagh, a man of greatest fame, and noblest deeds, of his age and time, in his territory, died.


p.841

M1419.7

Cucogry, the son of Niall O'Molloy, died.

M1419.8

Ferceart, the son of Higgin, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Higgin, the Kennfinè of the race of Gilla-na-naev O'Higgin, died.

M1419.9

David, the son of Tany O'Mulconry, died of the plague, in his own house, at Coill-mor na-m-Breathnach, after Penance and Extreme Unction, and was interred in the monastery of St. John the Baptist at Trim. This David was the son of the Ollav of Sil-Murray.

M1419.10

Dermot Roe, the son of Turlough Oge O'Conor, died.

M1419.11

Murrough, the son of Brian O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died.

M1419.12

O'Neill went to the house of Owen O'Neill, and they concluded a charitable and amicable peace with each other; and his own lordship was given restored to O'Neill.

M1419.13

Teige, the son of Donnell O'Kelly, Lord of Clann-mac-Eoghain died.

M1419.14

O'Driscoll More, and the White Knight, with his son, died.

M1419.15

Calvagh O'Conor Faly was treacherously taken prisoner by the son of Sir Libiner Prene, and sold to Lord Furnival, the Deputy of the King of England in Ireland; but the night after his capture, the person who was confined along with him escaped with him to his own house.

M1419.16

Mac Murrough, Lord of Leinster (Donough, son of Art Kavanagh), was taken prisoner by Lord Furnival, and this was a great misfortune to the Irish.

M1419.17

Thomas Bacagh, the son of the Earl of Ormond, went to assist the King of England in the war with France, and died while on the expedition with the King of England. The greater number of those who went with him from Ireland died likewise, either in England or France.

M1419.18

Feradhach, the son of Teige, son of Donnell O'Kelly, was slain by the grandson of William Oge O'Kelly.

M1419.19

Donough, the son of Murtough O'Conor, died of a fall in the doorway, of the castle of Sligo.

M1419.20

Murtough O'Conor, heir to the lordship of Offaly; Cathal, the son of Hugh


p.843

Maguire; Dermot Roe, the son of O'Conor Don; and Mac-Maurice-na-mBrigh, a man eminent for wisdom and knowledge, died.

M1419.21

O'Duvdirma, and Murtough, son of Cathal, who was son of Hugh Breifneach, died.

M1419.22

Gilla-na-naev O'Meehin, Coarb of Bealach, died.

M1419.23

Tomaltagh Mac-Clancy died.

M1419.24

Barry More and O'Sullivan died.

Annal M1420.

M1420.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1420. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty.

M1420.1

The monastery of St. Francis at Eas-Gephtine, in Munster, on recte near the bank of the Shannon, in the diocese of Limerick, was founded for Franciscan Friars by the Earl of Desmond, who erected a tomb in it for himself and his descendants.

M1420.2

Matthew O'Brannain, Master, Parson, and Erenagh of Doire-Maelain, died on the sixth of the Ides of September.

M1420.3

The castle of Bun-Drobhaoisi was commenced by Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor; but the Kinel-Connell, with their forces, came to prevent the work. Brian assembled another army to resist them, namely, his own kinsmen, O'Rourke, i.e. Teige, and Mac Donough, with their forces; so that the Kinel-Connell did not dare to proceed eastwards across the Urscatha on that occasion, but remained encamped by the Bay of Assaroe. The sons of O'Donnell, Niall Garv, Donnell, and Naghten, proceeded with a troop of cavalry to the Moy; and the sons of Brian O'Conor set out at the


p.845

same time with another troop of cavalry to reconnoitre Ballyshannon, so that both parties thus met face to face. The Kinell-Connell charged and routed the Carbury men, and killed John, the son of Brian O'Conor; Hugh Boy Mac Donough; Cathal, son of Dermot, son of Cormac, son of Rory O' Conor; and Owen O'Dowda. Brian O'Conor (on hearing of this ill news) advanced with his troops to Magh-Eni; and on the fifth night afterwards, Owen and Turlough Carragh O'Conor, the sons of Donnell, son of Murtough, crossed the ford of Assaroe with a large body of cavalry, on a nocturnal excursion. The sons of O'Donnell were at this time stationed with a squadron of cavalry at Port-na-Long, at the yonder side of the Cataract, and they had been drinking wine. After Owen had received information of this he made an attack upon them, and killed Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Donnell, heir to the lordship of Tirconnell, and others not enumerated. Niall O'Donnell went to the harbour, and swam to one of the merchant vessels lying in it. After that victory Brian O'Conor returned home.

M1420.4

Owen, the son of Rory O'Conor, died on the third of the Calends of May, and was interred at Clonmacnoise.

M1420.5

Teige, the son of Farrell O'Hara, Tanist of Leyny, died.

M1420.6

Cathal, son of Teige Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry, was slain in his own house, together with Hugh Boy Mac Clancy, about the festival of St. Bridget, by their own kinsmen, Teige, Maurice, and Henry.

M1420.7

The Earl of Ormond, Justiciary of Ireland, waged war with the Ultonians, to obtain dominion for O'Neill; and he reduced Magennis under submission to O'Neill, and delivered up his hostages to him.

M1420.8

William, the son of Melaghlin, son of William O'Kelly, heir to the lordship of Hy-Many, a man full of prosperity and prowess, died, after the victory of Unction and Penance.


p.847

M1420.9

O'Neill was banished from the province of Ulster by Owen O'Neill, Mac-I-Neill Boy, Niall Garv O'Donnell, and the other chiefs of the province; and he went to Sligo, to the house of Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough, Lord of Lower Connaught.

M1420.10

A war broke out in Fermanagh between Hugh Maguire and Maguire himself; and Donnell, the son of Hugh, was slain in this war.

M1420.11

Barry More, i.e. John, died.

M1420.12

O'Fallon (Hugh Boy) died.

M1420.13

Gilla-na-naev O'Heerin, a learned historian; Roderic, son of David O'Duigennan, another learned historian; and Farrell O'Daly, Ollav of Corcomroe in poetry, died.

M1420.14

The bishopric of Raphoe was procured for O'Gallagher.

M1420.15

Eachmarcach Roe Mac Conmidhe Mac Namee, a learned poet, died.

Annal M1421.

M1421.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1421. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred four.

M1421.1

Nicholas Mac Brady, Bishop of Breifny, a man distinguished for wisdom, piety, chastity, and purity, died.

M1421.2

Thomas Oge O'Reilly, a materies of a lord, who, of all the descendants of Aedh Finn, was the most distinguished for hospitality and prowess, died in his own house.

M1421.3

Rory, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, a man of universal hospitality, who never refused the countenance of man, died in the castle of


p.849

the Rock, on the eleventh of the Calends of May, and was interred in the Abbey of Boyle; and Tomaltagh Oge, son of Conor, assumed his place.

M1421.4

Murrough O'Conor, Lord of Offaly, a man who had gained many victories over those English and Irish who opposed him, after vanquishing the world and the devil, died at his own mansion-seat, and was interred in the monastery of Killeigh.

M1421.5

A war arose between the O'Rourkes and the Clann-Donough. O'Rourke mustered and collected a great army to one place; and O'Donnell (Turlough) came with his forces to aid and support him, as did Hugh Maguire and his muster. O'Rourke himself, with his people, and all these his allies, proceeded into Tirerrill, and burned the country, and slew Cathal, the son of Mac Donough, and many others besides, on that occasion.

M1421.6

Niall O'Donnell and his army, and O'Rourke with his creaghts, went to the harbour of Assaroe; and the Clann-Donough, and Cathal, the son of Rory O'Conor, went in their absence to the fortress of O'Rourke, and burned the town, and pulled down and demolished the castle, and destroyed all that side of the country. The army of the Kinel-Connell were at this time encamped at Ardfearna; and the people of Carbury were under the castle of Bundrowes; and many men and horses were daily killed and wounded in the conflicts between them. Murtough Boy, the son of Cosnamach O'Dowda, O'Maonaigh, and the son of Donough Caemhanach, were slain by the Kinel-Connell on this occasion; and Hugh, son of Murray Roe Mac Loughlin, was drowned in the ford of Ballyshannon. They afterwards concluded a peace.

M1421.7

A nocturnal attack was made by Cathal O'Rourke and his sons upon Mac Clancy, on Inis Caoin, an island in Lough Melvin; and the guards of the lake,


p.851

namely, the Mag-Gollaighs, delivered up the boats of the lake to Cathal and his sons. And Mac Clancy Oge was taken prisoner by them; and they took possession of Lough Melvin and its castle. Five of the sons of Mac Clancy, and a great number of the men of Dartry, were slain by them, after which the rest of the sons of Mac Clancy went to Carbury.

M1421.8

More, the daughter of Brian O'Brien, and wife of Walter Burke, and who had been married to Teige O'Carroll, the most distinguished woman in her time, in Leath Mogha, for knowledge, hospitality, good sense, and piety, died. She was usually called Mor-Mumhan-na-Muimhneach.

M1421.9

Cormac na Coille Mac Carthy of Carbery, the best son of a lord of the Momonians in his time, was slain hy the sons of Owen Mac Carthy.

M1421.10

Gillareagh O'Clery, a learned historian, died, after spending a good life.

M1421.11

Owen O'Neill was taken prisoner by Mac-I-Neill Boy, while on his way to Dundalk to meet the Earl.

M1421.12

Mac Gillapatrick and the son of Libned a Frene, one of the English, set out with twelve score soldiers on a predatory excursion into Leix, and did not halt until they reached the monastery of Leix; but O'Conor Faly happened to come in contact with them in that country, and attacked Mac Gillapatrick and the English, and defeated and slaughtered them, and his people obtained great spoils of the armour, arms, and accoutrements of the English. O'Conor (Murrough) then returned home; but he was attacked by a dangerous disease, whereupon he retired among the friars in the monastery of Killeigh, and took the habit of a friar; but before his death he appointed his own kinsman, Dermot O'Conor, in his place. O'Conor was only a month among the friars, when he died, after a well-spent life.

M1421.13

Art, the son of Teige O'Rourke, was made O'Rourke, in opposition to Teige, the son of Tiernan.


p.853

Annal M1422.

M1422.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1422. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-two.

M1422.1

Turlough, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, took the habit of a monk in the monastery of Assaroe, after gaining victory over this present world; and his own son, Niall Garv, was inaugurated in his place.

M1422.2

Rory O'Conor (i.e. the son of Conor), Lord of Corcomroe, was slain in his own town of Caislen-na-Dumhcha, by his own kinsmen, the sons of Felim O'Conor.

M1422.3

Owen O'Neill was ransomed from Mac-I-Neill Boy by his wife and sons.

M1422.4

Dermot, son of Teige Mac Dermot, was slain.

M1422.5

Donnell Finn O'Flaherty was slain by the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty.

M1422.6

An army was mustered by O'Donnell (Niall), O'Neill, Owen O'Neill, and Mac-I-Neill Boy, with the other chiefs of the northern province. They burned and plundered the entire territory of Carbury as far as Sligo. Owen O'Conor, Turlough Carragh, and O'Rourke, mustered their forces to oppose them at Sligo, and there gave battle to the eastern army, of which seven men fell by the Connacians. From thence they the Ultonians went into Tirerrill, and devastated the entire territory.

M1422.7

Cosnamhach Oge Mac Egan, Ollav of the Kinel-Fiachach, and of O'Conor


p.855

Faly in judicature, was slain, in a mistake, by the sons of O'Melaghlin, with one cast of a javelin.

M1422.8

Niall Garv, the son of Turlough, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, went into Fermanagh, subjugated Maguire, Mac Mahon, and Magennis, and brought them with him to O'Kane, who also submitted to him. From thence they proceeded, attended by the sons of O'Kane, to Mac-I-Neill Boy, and completely plundered the Glynns of Antrim and Mac Eoin Bisset, and burned the country; and they proceeded into Clannaboy and Moylinny, the spoils of which territories they carried off to Carrickfergus, and afterwards returned home in safety.

M1422.9

Owen O'Neill was ransomed by his wife and family from Mac-I-Neill Boy, by giving him cows, horses, and other gifts.

M1422.10

Henry VI. was made King of England on the 31st of August.

M1422.11

An army was led by Niall O'Donnel, O'Neill, and the chiefs of the entire province, against O'Neill Boy, and penetrated through his woods and fastnesses, until they obtained the mastery over him, so that he gave hostages to O'Neill; and he was despoiled of all the equivalents which he had obtained for the ransom of Owen O'Neill, and of other valuable things.

M1422.12

The same Niall O'Donnell assembled together all the chiefs of the province, namely, O'Neill, and the sons of Henry O'Neill; Owen O'Neill, with his sons and kinsmen; the sons of Cu-Uladh Roe O'Neill; the people of Fermanagh and Oriel, under the conduct of Mac Mahon and Maguire; Magennis, O'Hanlon, and Mac-I-Neill Boy, with his forces; the O'Kanes and the Kinel-Connell themselves, with their gallowglasses, and also the English of the province; and they all set out upon an expedition into Connaught. They were drawn upon this expedition by the sons of Cormac Mac Donough, and the sons of Mulrony Mac Donough, who had been banished from their country by their paternal uncle, Mac Donough, by Conor Mac Donough and his sons, and by Cormac Oge


p.857

Mac Donough. For Mac Donough had erected a castle in the territory of the sons of Mulrony Mac Donough, that is, at Caiseal Locha-Deargain, and had entirely destroyed their crops and fields, and afterwards banished them to Mac William Burke; wherefore, they drew this great army to devastate Lower i.e. North Connaught.

M1422.13

This great army arrived in Carbury, wounded and killed many persons at the castle of Bundrowes, burned and spoiled the country, and then proceeded to Sligo. Here Owen, the son of Donnell, and Turlough Carragh, came up with them, and routed the rere of the army, killed seven of them, and wounded men and horses. The Ultonian army remained in Cuil-irra for that night, and, on the next day, marched into Tireragh to spoil that country. O'Dowda met them and made peace with Niall O'Donnell, and delivered him hostages in behalf of his territory. From thence they went into Tirerrill and Corran, and burned and destroyed the country. The sons of Cormac and the sons of Mulrony (Mac Donough) were at the same time burning the upper part of the territory, and were overtaken by Tomaltagh Oge and the sons of Mac Donough, near Cluain gad, where they gave battle to each other, in which Maurice, the son of Cormac, Dermot, the son of Mulrony Mac Donough, and the son of Donnell, son of Hugh na Gaobhcha, were slain. The Ultonian army remained that night at Caisiol-Locha-deargain ravaging the country. From thence they went to O'Rourke, and took him prisoner; and then they returned home, crossing the Erne.

M1423.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1423. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-three.

M1423.1

Conor O'Coineoil, a bishop, died.

M1423.2

O'Beollain, Coarb of Drumcliff, died.


p.859

M1423.3

Maurice, the son of Matthew, son of Osgar Maguire, Archdeacon of Clogher, Parson of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, and Lord of Claoin-inis Cleenish and Ros-airthir Rossorry, died on the sixth of the Calends of May.

M1423.4

Turlough, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Kinel-Moen, and Inishowen, a peaceable, affluent, and graceful man, died in the habit of a monk, in the monastery of Assaroe, after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1423.5

An army was led by O'Neill (Donnell), O'Donnell (Niall), Owen, son of Niall, with the Irish of Ulster in general, against the English. They first marched to Traigh-Bhaile Dundalk, to Machaire-Oirghiall, to the town of Louth, and from thence into Meath. They gave battle to the Deputy of the King of England, in which the knight who was the chief commander of the English army was slain (i.e. by Mulmurry Mac Sweeny Connachtach, O'Donnell's Constable, and it was by him the English were routed), and many others of his people besides him (one hundred was the number of the slain). They obtained great spoils on that occasion, and afterwards made peace with the English, and left Traghbhaile, and all the English dwelling in its vicinity under tribute).

M1423.6

The castle of Ath-Seanaigh was erected by Niall, son of Turlough O'Donnell.

M1423.7

O'Kennedy Finn, Lord of Ormond, died.

M1423.8

Faelan Mac-an-Gowan, a learned historian, died.


p.861

Annal M1424.

M1424.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1424. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-four .

M1424.1

Conor O'Farrell, Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, a man of dignity, honour, intelligence, learning, charity, and benevolence, died.

M1424.2

Gilla-lsa, the son of Brian Mac Tiernan, heir to the chieftainship of Teal-lach-Eachdhach, who had kept a house of general hospitality, died, after the victory of penance.

M1424.3

Donough, the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was slain by a cast of a javelinn, while interposing to pacify his own people.

M1424.4

A great war broke out between the O'Rourkes after the death of Hugh Boy O'Rourke. Teige, the son of Tiernan O'Rourke, made peace with the O'Reillys, and with Owen, the son of John O'Reilly, whereupon the entire lordship of Breifny was given to Teige. But this was not until after he had made an incursion against Art into Magh-Angaidhe, and burned the town. Art made submission to him after they had been at variance with each other for a period of four years.

M1424.5

Melaghlin Mac Cabe, Constable of the two Breifnys, and also of Fermanagh and Oriel, died of the plague.

M1424.6

Many Saxons came to Ireland with the Earl of Ormond, in consequence whereof the English of Ireland acquired great strength. Great depredations were committed by the Earl, by his Saxons, and the Galls of Meath in Machaire


p.863

Arda Macha, and Machaire Mucnamha. Another excursion was made by them against Magennis, and they demolished his castle of Loch Bricrenn; and killed the Constable of his Gallowglasses, and almost the whole of the ward in the castle. War and great disturbance were kindled in Ulster on this occasion by the English. The greater part of nobles of the province, both lords, dynasts, and toparchs, with O'Neill, O'Donnell (Niall), and Owen O'Neill at their head assembled their forces to oppose the English. Some of the nobles of the province, however, went over to the English in this war, namely, Mac-I-Neill Boy, O'Hanlon, and Manus Mac Mahon. Magennis was banished from his territory by Mac-I-Neill Boy, and the English and he went over to the Irish of the province.

M1424.7

Magennis (Hugh) died of the plague, and his son Rory was elected in his place.

M1424.8

Mac William of Clannrickard (Ulick Burke) died in his own house, after having vanquished the Devil and the world.

M1424.9

O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, i.e. Donough, the son of Melaghlin, son of William, son of Donough Muimhneach, was slain by the sons of William O'Kelly, his own brother, while endeavouring to make them submit to his chieftainship.

M1424.10

Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, Constable of Tirconnell, weapon of the protection and bravery of the province, died.

M1424.11

Gilla-Isa, the son of Brian Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach Dunchadha, died.

M1424.12

The Earl of March (the King's Deputy) came to Ireland about Michaelmas, and the English of Ireland rose up at his summons.

M1424.13

Rory Mac Sweeny, son of Mac Sweeny Connachtach, and other Gallowglasses,


p.865

were slain by Cathal Duv O'Conor; and Conor, the son of Murtough, son of Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, was also slain on this occasion.

Annal M1425.

M1425.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1425. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-five.

M1425.1

Bishop Tomin, i.e. Thomas, son of William Duv, son of Maigeog, died, a week before the festival of St. Bridget. He was a man full of wisdom, knowledge, and intelligence.

M1425.2

The Earl of March, the King of England's Deputy in Ireland, died of the plague, about the festival of St. Bridget.

M1425.3

O'Neill and Owen O'Neill, Naghtan O'Donnell and Mac-I-Neill Boy, Mac Quillin, Mac Donnell Galloglagh, and O'Mellan, Keeper of the Bell of St. Patrick's Will, who happened to be in the house of the Earl, were taken prisoners by Lord Furnival (an English Earl), after the death of the Earl of March; and he conveyed these chieftains as prisoners to Dublin.

M1425.4

O'Molloy (Niall, the son of Rory), Lord of Tircall, died.

M1425.5

The King, recte Regent of Scotland, i.e. Muireadhach Stewart, and his


p.867

son, Walter Stewart, and the Great Steward of Leamhain, were slain by the King of Scotland, i.e. by the son of the lame King; and the King's other son, i.e. James Stewart, and the sons of the Great Steward of Lennox, were banished into Ireland.

M1425.6

Owen O'Neill was ransomed from the English.

M1425.7

Brian Ballagh Mac-I-Neill Boy, the most distinguished man of his own time for hospitality and bounty, knowledge and skill in various sciences, was killed by the peasantry of Carrick i.e. Carrickfergus. John, the son of Henry O'Neill, was slain along with him.

M1425.8

Gormlaidh, the daughter of Donnell O'Conor, and wife of Tiernan O'Rourke, died after penance.

M1425.9

Teige O'Fallon, Chief of Clann-Uadach, was treacherously slain by his kinsmen in his own castle.

M1425.10

Rory Roe O'Higgin, a learned poet, died.

M1425.11

Magrath, i.e. the son of Flann Magrath, Ollav of Thomond in poetry, a prosperous and wealthy man, died.

M1425.12

Mac Gowan of the Stories, i.e. Thomas, son of Gilla-na-naev Mac Gowan, Ollav to O'Loughlin of Corcomroe in history, died.

M1425.13

Brian Garv and Manus, two sons of Mac Donough of Tirerrill, i.e. of Mulrony, the son of Teige Mac Donough, were slain by the sons of Cathal Mac Donough, i.e. of their paternal uncle.

Annal M1426.

M1426.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1426. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-six.

M1426.1

Naghtan O'Donnell, who had been imprisoned by the English, was ransomed by O'Donnell (Niall), his brother. It would be difficult to reckon or recount all the property given for his ransom, besides hostages given in his place.


p.869

Turlough O'Donnell, who had been left as a hostage in lieu of Naghtan, made his escape, together with four other hostages.

M1426.2

O'Conor Roe (Turlough, the son of Hugh, son of Felim), Destroyer and Defender of Connaught, illustrious for his knowledge and his skill in all the sciences, died, after the victory of penance, and after having gained victory over the world and the Devil.

M1426.3

Felim, the son of Murtough, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, died. He was heir to the lordship of Lower Connaught.

M1426.4

Conor Brian, Lord of Thomond, died, at an advanced age, on Easter Saturday, and Teige, son of Brian O'Brien, was inaugurated in his place

M1426.5

Turlough Mac Mahon Bodhar, Lord of Corca-Baiscinn, was killed and burned, at an advanced age, in a nocturnal assault, by his own kinsmen.

M1426.6

Conor Crom, the son of Teige O'Rourke, died.

M1426.7

Rory (i.e. the Magennis), son of Hugh Magennis, was slain in his own house by Brian Magennis.

M1426.8

Henry Caech Mac-I-Neill Boy was blinded by his own kinsmen, i.e. the sons of Brian Ballagh Mac-I-Neill Boy.

M1426.9

Teige Mac Gillafinnen and his son, Hugh, were slain by Art, the son of Owen O'Neill.

M1426.10

O'Duigennan of Kilronan, i.e. Philip, the son of David, died. He was Ollav of Clann-Mulrony in History.

M1426.11

O'Healy More, i.e. Conor Caech O'Healy, died.

M1426.12

A peace was made by the Clann-Neill with each other, i.e. by Owen and the O'Neill. Owen went into the house of O'Neill, and made submission; and they proceeded to recover by force all the lands which had been alienated during their contentions.

M1426.13

Kian, son of Gilla-Oilbhe Mac Gowan, a learned Historian, and a man who had kept a house of general hospitality, was killed by a kick from a horse.

M1426.14

Bebinn, the daughter of Tiernan 0'Rourke, lord of Breifny, died

M1426.15

Richard Mac Jordan of the Wood was taken prisoner by Owen, son of Flaherty, and delivered up to Mac Jordan Duv, who destroyed him.


p.871

M1426.16

Feradhach, the son of Brian O'Kelly, died of the plague.

M1426.17

John, son of Mac Feorais Bermingham, was slain by Thomas, his own brother's son.

Annal M1427.

M1427.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1427. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-seven.

M1427.1

O'Molloy (Farrell), Lord of Fircall, died; and the son of Niall O'Molloy was installed in his place.

M1427.2

Rory O'Dunne, Chief of Hy-Regan, died.

M1427.3

Donnell, son of Art, son of Gilchreest O'Rourke, died.

M1427.4

Murrough, son of Torlogh, who was son of Murrough-na-Raithnighe O'Brien, was slain by his own brother.

M1427.5

Dermot O'Mahony, Lord of Fonn Iartharach, a truly hospitable man, who never refused to give any thing to any one, died, after the victory of penance.

M1427.6

Cormac Oge Mac Dermot died.

M1427.7

Catherine, daughter of Ardgal Mac Mahon, and wife of O'Neill (Owen, son of Niall Oge), died.

M1427.8

Una, the daughter of Hugh Maguire, and wife of O'Rourke, i.e. Teige, a woman the most distinguished of her time for hospitality, charity, and piety, in Lower North Connaught, died at the end of Lent.

M1427.9

Farrell Mac Tiernan, heir to the chieftainship of Teallach Dunchadha Tullahunco, in the county of Cavan, died.

M1427.10

Brian, son of Farrell Magauran, son of the chieftain of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1427.11

Brian O'Devine, Chief of Tir-Kennedy, died.

M1427.12

Aine, daughter of O'Beirne, and wife of Mac Rannall (Geoffrey), died.

M1427.13

The son of Donnell, son of Mahon Don O'Kennedy, Lord of Upper Ormond, was slain, with one cast of a dart, by Walter Tobin.

M1427.14

An army was led by O'Donnell (Niall), Lord of Tirconnell, into Trian-Chongail, against O'Neill, and to assist the Mac-I-Neill Boys. On this expedition O'Donnell defeated Mac Quillin, and killed a great number of his people; and


p.873

the two sons of Donough Mac Sweeny, who were assisting Mac Quillin, were taken prisoners by O'Donnell. The people of O'Donnell and of the sons of Mac-I-Neill Boy became possessed of great spoils and immense booty on that day.

M1427.15

An army was led by the Earl of Ormond into the territory of Muintir-Maelmora. O'Reilly's town was burned by him, and the castle demolished.

M1427.16

Hugh O'Malley (i.e. the son of Dermot), heir to the lordship of Umallia, went with a fleet to Tirconnell; but he was slain by one shot of a javelin in the rear of his own people, as he was returning to his ship.

Annal M1428.

M1428.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1428. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-eiqht.

M1428.1

Mac Murrough, Lord of Leinster (Donough, the son of Art Kavanagh), who had been imprisoned in England for a period of nine years, was ransomed by his own province; and this was of great advantage to the Irish

M1428.2

Dermot O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Creeve, a man full of triumphs and great honours, died.

M1428.3

Robert, Coarb of Caillin, died.

M1428.4

Hugh the Hospitable, son of Philip Maguire, the most famous and illustrious man of his time for hospitality, died at Kinsale, the first night after his arrival in Ireland, after performing the pilgrimage of St. James, on the third of the Ides of August, and after rigid penance for his sins. Thomas Oge Maguire, who was along with him, conveyed his body to Cork, where he was interred.

M1428.5

Mac Namara, Chief of Clann-Cuilein, a charitable and truly hospitable man, who had suppressed robbery and theft, and established peace and tranquillity in his territory, died.

M1428.6

Cormac O'Beirne, Chief of Tir-Briuin, died.

M1428.7

Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by Mac Gillafinnen and the sons of Donough Ballagh Magauran.

M1428.8

The castle of the sons of Hugh Maguire was taken by Maguire and his sons; and the sons of Hugh were banished from the territory, and their people totally plundered.


p.875

M1428.9

John, the son of Thomas O'Reilly, was treacherously slain by his own sons.

M1428.10

Gilbert O'Flanagan, heir to the chieftainship of Tuath-ratha, died.

M1428.11

An incursion was made by Mac Jordan de Exeter and John Mac Costello into Tirawley, against Thomas Barrett and the sons of Mac Wattin, and committed depredations. Richard Barrett was slain while in pursuit of the prey; and John Finn Mac Costello was slain on the same occasion.

M1428.12

Henry Barrett Mac Wattin died.

M1428.13

Ivor, the son of Edmond Mac Rannall, heir to the chieftainship of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by Cathal, the son of Mac Rannall.

Annal M1429.

M1429.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1429. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred twenty-nine.

M1429.1

James Stuart, son of the King of Scotland, and Roydamna of Scotland, who had been banished from Scotland to Ireland, died, after the arrival of a fleet from the men of Scotland to convey him home, that he might be made king.

M1429.2

Niall O'Doherty, Chieftain of Ardmire, died.

M1429.3

Grainne, the daughter of Niall More O'Neill, and wife of O'Donnell (Turlough an Fhina), died.

M1429.4

O'Flanagan of Tuath-ratha (Gilla-Isa) was slain by the sons of Hugh Maguire in his own house, in a nocturnal assault.

M1429.5

A war broke out between O'Rourke (Teige) and O'Reilly (Owen). The descendants of Mahon O'Reilly and the English of Meath joined O'Rourke against O'Reilly, and burned O'Reilly's town, whereupon O'Reilly prevailed upon O'Neill to come to his relief; and O'Neill, with the forces of Oriel and Fermanagh, and his own creaghts, marched as far as Achadh-Chille-Moire. Thither they were pursued by O'Rourke, the sons of Mahon O'Reilly, the Baron of Delvin, and Mac Cabe; and O'Neill and his sons and gallowglasses, in conjunction


p.877

with the forces of Fermanagh, and O'Reilly and his kinsmen, then engaged, and defeated the enemy in the battle of Achadh-Chille-Moire, in which the Baron of Delvin, Mac Cabe, Henry Mac Cabe, Dermot O'Rourke, and many others, were taken prisoners or slain by O'Neill.

M1429.6

Donough Mac Gillafinnen died.

M1429.7

Hugh Direach, the son of Turlough-an-Fhina O'Donnell, and his son, were slain by Turlough, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, on the eighth of February; and Rury O'Doherty died within a quarter of a year afterwards, at Fathan-Mura-Othna.

M1429.8

A great number of the men of Breifny were disabled and slain by Muintir-Feodachain, on the hill of Odhra, in Sliabh-da-Chon. They lost no less than forty men, together with Conor, the son of Donnell Mac Sweeny, who had gone on that incursion through folly and youth. Some of the men of Dartry, and others of the people of the Clann-Hugh Maguire, were slain there.

M1429.9

Murrough, the son of O'Byrne, died.

M1429.10

Melaghlin, son of Conor Anabaidh O'Kelly, who was the son of the Lord of Hy-Many, was slain with one cast of a javelin, by John Cam O'Teige, one of O'Conor's people.

M1429.11

Melaghlin O'Malley, heir apparent to the lordship of Umallia, was slain by the sons of O'Malley.

M1429.12

Matthew, the son of Thomas O'Cuirnin, Ollav of Breifny, and universally learned in history and music, died in his own house.

M1429.13

O'Coffey, i.e. Melaghlin, the son of Clasach O'Coffey, was slain by Edmond, the son of Hubert Dalton.


p.879

Annal M1430.

M1430.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1430. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty.

M1430.1

Gilla-na-naev O'Leannain, Canon and Sacristan of Lisgool, died.

M1430.2

A great army was led by Owen, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, into the plain of Machaire Oirghiall, and he plundered, laid waste, and burned the English settlements of the entire plain. He also burned the fortresses of Traigh-Bhaile Dundalk, and made the inhabitants of that town tributary and submissive to him; after which he returned home with victory and triumph.

M1430.3

Another great army was led by Owen O'Neill, with the chiefs of the province about him, into Annaly. He went first to Sean Longphort, and from thence to Caill-Salach, where he abode for some time. He afterwards went to Freamhainn, in Meath, to which place the Irish of the South, namely, O'Conor Faly, i.e. Calvagh, O'Molloy, O'Madden, Mageoghegan, and O'Melaghlin, came to meet him, and accept of stipends from him. The whole of West Meath, including Kilbixy, was burned by these forces, upon which the Baron of Delvin, the Plunketts, the Herberts, and the English of Westmeath in general, came to meet O'Neill, to pay him his demands for sparing their country. These they afterwards paid, and they made peace. Owen returned home after victory and triumph, bringing with him the son of O'Farrell, i.e. the son of Donnell Boy, to Dungannon, as a hostage for O'Farrell's lordship.

M1430.4

Maguire (Thomas, surnamed Gilla-Duv), Lord of Fermanagh for the period of thirty-six years, a man of universal hospitality towards poor and mighty, founder of monasteries, churches, and regleses, and maker of many images, pacifier of territories and chieftains, and protector of his territory against his neighbours, a man beloved by the clergy and the laity for the goodness of his


p.881

government, died, after the victory of Unction and Penance. His son, Thomas Oge, was installed in his place by the election of the laity and clergy.

M1430.5

Niall, the son of Henry O'Neill, died.

M1430.6

A great war broke out between Mac Carthy Reagh and the Earl, i.e. James. The castle of Cill-Britain was taken by the Earl from Mac Carthy, and given to Donough Mac Carthy, Mac Carthy's own brother, who was along with him in storming the castle.

M1430.7

An army was led by Mac William of Clanrickard, Mac Donough of Tirerrill, and Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo, into Conmaicne Cuile, where they caused great conflagrations, and slew Hugh, son of O'Conor Roe, and Carbry, the son of Brian O'Beirne; and then they returned home in triumph.

M1430.8

The castle of Tulsk was taken by Cathal, the son of O'Conor Roe, from the sons of Turlough Oge, the son of Hugh, son of Turlough O'Conor.

M1430.9

Brian, the son of Tiernan Oge O'Rourke, was slain by the sons of Melaghlin Mac Rannall, at Maethail-Mhanchain; and Donough Mac Tiernan was driven into the monastery of Maethail. Donough, however, came out of his own accord, for sake of his people, on Mac Rannall's guarantee, and made peace between them; and eric was given to O'Rourke for the death of Brian.

M1430.10

Art O'Rourke, heir to the lordship of Breifny, was treacherously slain in his own house, just one week before Easter, by his brother's son, i.e. Manus, the son of Conor O'Rourke.

M1430.11

Teige, the son of Donough, son of Murtough O'Conor, died.

M1430.12

William Roe, the son of Loughlin O'Rourke, died.

M1430.13

Donough Oge, the son of Mac Loughlin, died.

M1430.14

Farrell, the son of Boethius, son of Teige Mac Egan, Ollav of Lower Connaught


p.883

in Law, universally learned in every art, and who kept a house of hospitality for all who came to visit him, died, after a good life.

Annal M1431.

M1431.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1431. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-one.

M1431.1

The Bishop O'Martain, i.e. Bishop of Clogher, died.

M1431.2

The Bishop O'Mullagan, i.e. Bishop of Leighlin, died.

M1431.3

Teige O'Howen, Official of Lough Erne, a man of literature, died.

M1431.4

Simon Mac Garaghan, a canon of the family of Lisgool in Fermanagh, died.

M1431.5

O'Conor of Corcumroe, i.e. Murtough, was slain by the sons of his own brother.

M1431.6

Con O'Melaghlin, Roydamna of Meath, was slain by the people of Annaly and the English of Westmeath; and his brother Corc was taken prisoner.

M1431.7

Gerald Kavanagh, Roydamna of Leinster, a man illustrious for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1431.8

Mac Rannall, i.e. Geoffrey, an illustrious man, and the head of his own tribe, died.

M1431.9

John, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Philip Maguire, was slain by the people of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, after he had, at their own invitation, gone into their country. Brian Caech, the son of Magauran, was the man who cormmitted this act of treachery towards him; but this was of no profit to Brian, for he himself and a number of his people were slain. John was attended by only seven persons, while his opponents were forty; and being overpowered by numbers, he was thus slain.

M1431.10

Maguire, i.e. Thomas, proceeded with a great host into Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, to take vengeance on the inhabitants for the death of his kinsman. He plundered, spoiled, and ravaged the territory, and slew many of the chiefs of it. He also burned Ballymagauran, and then he returned home in triumph.

M1431.11

Great depredations were committed upon the English, and many of their people were slain, by Manus Mac Mahon.


p.885

M1431.12

A great army was led by Owen O'Neill, Maguire, and O'Reilly, against Mac Quillan, and they plundered and spoiled his territory. Owen, with his army and creaghts, remained in that territory half a quarter of a year, destroying the corn, and burning the dwellings, after which he returned to Tyrone.

M1431.13

Henry, the son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill, was taken prisoner by Naghtan O'Donnell. Owen O'Neill and Naghtan afterwards came to a conference, and having settled their disputes, they made peace with each other; and Henry was set at liberty.

M1431.14

Naghtan O'Donnell went to assault the castle of Loch Laoghaire, and took it from Turlough O'Donnell; and all the spoils that he found in it he carried off

M1431.15

A large body of English cavalry set out to plunder the territory of the Clann-Kee O'Reilly. On the same day Manus, the son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, set out to plunder the English districts, and on obtaining intelligence of the proceedings of the English, he expeditiously pursued them, and found them engaged in guarding their prey; whereupon he attacked them, deprived them of their spoils, took some of their chiefs prisoners, and slew others, and returned home victoriously.

M1431.16

Donnell Mac Gillapatrick, the son of the Lord of Ossory, died.

M1431.17

Barrduv, the daughter of O'Rourke, a pious and truly hospitable woman, died.

M1431.18

Aine, the daughter of O'Rourke, and wife of O'Farrell, died.

M1431.19

Mac Carmaic of Fermanagh, i.e. Gillapatrick, and Murtough, the son of Philip Mac Carmaic, were slain by Donough Mac Carmaic and his people.

M1431.20

Moen, the son of Henry O'Gormly, was slain by Donnell, son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge, and O'Duirnin.

M1431.21

Gilbert O'Duigennan, and Owen O'Fialain, a learned poet, died.

M1431.22

Donnell, the son of David O'Toole, died.

M1431.23

Connell, the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, set out on a predatory excursion into Tirhugh on Mac an-Ultaigh; but the O'Gallaghers and the sons of Mac an-Ultaigh met and opposed him, and he was slain by one shot of a javelin.


p.887

M1431.24

Mac Murrough, Lord of Leinster, i.e. Donough, the son of Art Kavanagh, made an incursion into the county of Dublin, and the English rose up to oppose him. In the early part of the day Mac Murrough routed the English, killed numbers of them, and deprived them of much booty; but the English re-assembled on the same day, and having overtaken Mac Murrough's people in the evening, when they were possessed of great spoils, defeated them, and killed many of their soldiers, who were under the conduct of Mac-an-Mhidhigh, the son of Teige, one of the O'Briens, and the two sons of O'Conor Kerry. O'Toole was taken prisoner.

Annal M1432.

M1432.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1432. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-two

M1432.1

Art Mac Cawell, Bishop of Clogher, a pious man, who had kept a house of public hospitality for the poor and indigent of the Lord, died, after penance.

M1432.2

O'Neill, i.e. Donnell Bog, the son of Henry Aimhreidh, was slain in O'Kane's country by the two sons of Dermot O'Kane, i.e. Donnell and Aibhne, assisted by the O'Kanes in general, after they had taken by assault the house in which he was. Donnell O'Neill, Patrick O'Mulholland, and the son of O'Mellain, were also slain. Owen, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, was inaugurated his (O'Neill's) successor on Leac na Riogh, at Tullaghoge.

M1432.3

O'Neill (Owen) and the sons of Donnell Mac Murtough O'Conor of Sligo came to a conference at Cael-Uisge. The sons of Donnell and the sons of Mac


p.889

Donough had fourscore horsemen at this conference. O'Donnell, i.e. Niall, sent his people to guard the strait, and prevent the meeting; so that when O'Neill and Maguire advanced to the strait, they were met by O'Donnell's people; and as soon as Maguire's troops had landed, they were routed all over Miodhbholg; and many of them were killed and wounded by the Kinel-Connell. The sons of Donnell, son of Murtough, nevertheless, proceeded onward to the place where O'Neill was; and they gave one another their hands, in token of their keeping mutual friendship and amity.

M1432.4

A great war arose between O'Neill and O'Donnell; and Henry, the son of O'Neill, went to Sligo for the sons of Donnell, son of Murtough; but O'Donnell and O'Rourke (Teige), with the sons of Hugh Maguire, were on the watch for them, while Henry was in the West. Henry and the Carbury men proceeded to Magh-Ene, and Maguire went for them, taking a fleet with him to Cael-Uisge on the Erne, and he conveyed them in safety to his house.

M1432.5

A great army was led by O'Neill, Maguire, and the Mac-I-Neill Boy, into Kinel-Moen, confronting O'Donnell; and they remained there face to face from the festival of the Holy Cross to Lammas. During this time many persons were wounded and killed in the affrays between them; and the town of O'Donnell, and the town of Naghtan (O'Donnell), were burned on this occasion. Both parties returned to their homes without peace or cessation from hostilities.

M1432.6

Great and frequent depredations were committed by Manus Mac Mahon upon the English, many of whom he slew; and he placed their heads upon the stakes of the garden of Baile na Lurgan, Mac Mahon's own mansion-seat, hideous and horrible spectacles to the beholders.


p.891

M1432.7

Owen, son of Mac Carthy Reagh, went upon a predatory incursion to Kinsale, and was killed by one shot.

M1432.8

Mac Mahon (Brian, the son of Ardgal) turned out against O'Neill and his own kinsmen, Rury and Manus, and took with him his creaghts over to the English.

M1432.9

The English mustered an army, and marched with Mac Mahon into Oriel, where they burned Dartry-Coininse in the county of Monaghan. From thence they passed to Machaire Ardamacha, and having carried away all the provisions which they found in the churches, they burned them on the Green of the town. They obtained great gifts from the clergy and students of the town, as considerations for refraining from burning their churches. The English and Mac Mahon then returned to their homes.

M1432.10

Melaghlin Maineach Mac Namara, Chief of Clann-Cuilein, died.

M1432.11

Teige O'Mahony, heir apparent to the lordship of Corca-Baiscinn, Maelmora O'Reilly, and Turlough, the son of John O'Reilly, died.

M1432.12

Turlough, the son of John O'Reilly, died.

M1432.13

Cathal, the son of Thomas O'Farrell, died.

M1432.14

O'Duigennan of Kilronan, i.e. Matthew Glas, a learned Ollav in history, died.

M1432.15

Gregory, the son of John O'Mulconry, an intended historian, died.

M1432.16

Teige, the son of Donnell, son of Brian O'Dowda, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach, a man who had restored the hereditary possessions in his territory to their lawful proprietors, both lay and ecclesiastical, and had maintained a respect for learned men and poets, died on the 16th of January.

M1432.17

Niall Roe, son of Henry O'Neill, died.

M1432.18

Walter Burke, grandson of the Earl of Ulster, a charitable and humane man, died.


p.893

M1432.19

Great depredations were committed by O'Donnell upon O'Neill; and on the same day another depredation was also committed upon O'Neill by Brian Oge O'Neill.

M1432.20

A great war broke out between O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, and the Earl of Ormond; and the Earl marched at the head of a great army into Ely, ravaged the country, and demolished O'Carroll's two castles.

M1432.21

Mac Murrough, Lord of Leinster, greatly ravaged the territory of the English; and the English made an attack upon Mac Murrough, but they were routed, and Walter Tobin was taken prisoner in the conflict; and many others were wounded, killed, or taken prisoners.

M1433.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1433. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-three.

M1433.1

A great war broke out between the Kinel-Owen and the Kinel-Connell; and O'Donnell (Niall Garv, the son of Turlough an Fhina) marched with his forces into Duibhthrian to assist Mac Quillin. O'Neill, i.e. Owen, set out with a great army in pursuit of O'Donnell and Mac Quillin; and Mac Donnell of Scotland arrived at the same time with a large fleet, and went to where O'Neill was, to aid him. The Scots proceeded to attack the creaghts of Mac Quillin and of Robert Savadge, worsted them, and caused great slaughter and loss of men upon Mac Quillin and Robert; and those that made their escape from the territory of Duibhthrian were almost all cut off at the Pass of Newcastle.

M1433.2

O'Neill, Henry his son, and Mac Donnell, afterwards went to Ardglas, which they burned; and Mac Donnell and his Scots afterwards went in their ships from Ardglas to Inishowen, while O'Neill marched by land to meet them, with intent to plunder Tirconnell. Naghtan O'Donnell and the daughter of O'Conor Faly, the wife of O'Donnell, and the sons of the chieftains of Tirconnell, repaired to Inishowen to meet them; and they made peace with O'Neill, without leave from O'Donnell.


p.895

M1433.3

In the meanwhile O'Donnell and Mac Quillin went to the English of Meath, to make a treaty of alliance and friendship with them and the deputy of the King of England. They led a great army to Machaire-Ardamacha, and the English attacked the monastery, but afterwards returned without gaining any strength by that expedition. O'Donnell then proceeded round through Meath, west to Athlone, from thence into Hy-Many, and afterwards across Machaire Chonnacht, to Mac Dermot of Moylurg and O'Rourke (Teige, son of Tiernan). O'Rourke went with him over the River Erne; and O'Neill and Maguire came to Cael Uisge to meet O'Donnell; and they concluded a charitable peace with one another. The English of Machaire Oirghiall entertained Mac Quillin among them, after he had been banished by O'Neill.

M1433.4

Egneaghan O'DonneIl (the son of Turlough) went to take a prey from his brother, Donough na Coille O'Donnell; but Donough followed in pursuit of the prey, and slew Egneaghan at Bel-atha-Caelain.

M1433.5

A war broke out between Mac Rannall of the Moy and the sons of Melaghlin. The sons of Melaghlin took the sons of Mahon Mac Cabe into their pay to assist them; and they made an incursion into the Moy, and burned the town of Cathal Mac Rannall. But on leaving the town they were overtaken by a strong body of troops; and the sons of Mahon Mac Cabe being in the rear, three of them, Ross, Donough, and Brian, were slain on the spot, together with many other persons. Rory, their eldest brother, was taken prisoner, and he half dead; but Turlough, who was the fifth son, and whose mother was Una, the daughter of John O'Reilly, escaped.

M1433.6

Mac Manus Maguire, i.e. Cathal, who kept a house of general hospitality, died; and his son, Cathal, was installed in his place by O'Neill and Maguire.

M1433.7

Cathal Duv, the son of O'Conor Roe, died.


p.897

M1433.8

Two general invitations of hospitality were given to the colleges and professional men by Margaret, the daughter of O'Carroll, and wife of O'Conor Faly (Calvagh).

M1433.9

There was a famine in the Summer of this year, called, for a very long time afterwards, Samhra na mear-aithne, because no one used to recognize friend or relative, in consequence of the greatness of the famine.

M1433.10

O'Kane, i.e. Godfrey, the son of Cooey, died.

M1433.11

Mac Namara, i.e. Maccon Ceann-Mor, Chief of Clann-Cuilein, died.

M1433.12

Mac Quillin was banished by the sons of Mac-I-Neill Boy from his own territory, and he took shelter in Ard-Uladh, with Savadge.

Annal M1434.

M1434.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1434. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-four.

M1434.1

Felim, the son of Mahon O'Loughlin, Bishop of Kilfenora, died.

M1434.2

A war arose between O'Donnell (i.e. Niall) and his brother Naghtan, in consequence of the death of Egneaghan O'Donnell. Many depredations were committed, and many lives were lost in the contests between them; and Naghtan went over to the sons of Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor of Sligo. O'Donnell took a prey in the Moy (Maghene), and in the territory of Carbury, from the sons of Donnell, son of Murtough, and from Naghtan; and Naghtan and Brian, son of Donnell, with the other sons of Donnell, in revenge of the taking of this prey, made an incursion into the Moy, and into Tirhugh, where they burned houses, and seized inanimate spoils, and numbers of small cattle. Naghtan went a second time into Tirconnell, and committed depredations on Conor, the son of O'Donnell; and Conor in return made an incursion into Carbury, and plundered the whole territory.

M1434.3

The same war was continued between O'Donnell and Naghtan; and the latter went to Mac Quillin and Brian Oge O'Neill, to induce them to declare war against O'Donnell. O'Donnell and O'Neill attacked Naghtan's castle,


p.899

namely, Caislen-na-Finne, and continued to besiege it for some time, but were, nevertheless, unable to take it.

M1434.4

Lucas O'Leannain, Prior of Lisgool, and Matthew O'Conghaile, Erenagh of Rossory, died.

M1434.5

O'Neill (i.e. Owen) and O'Donnell (i.e. Niall), with the whole forces of the province, marched to Meath to destroy and plunder the English there. The English of Traigh-Bhaile Dundalk came to O'Neill, and paid him his rent, and gave him also many articles of value; and O'Neill and O'Donnell then proceeded to set fire to Machaire-Oirghiall.

M1434.6

In the meanwhile the sons of O'Neill Henry and Hugh went to burn the fortresses in the possession of some of the English; and while they were engaged in this work of conflagration, they observed nothing of danger until the King's Deputy came up to them with his forces. The sons of O'Neill, Henry and Hugh, then sent their people before them, while they themselves covered the retreat, and thus they escaped, none of their men being killed or harmed.

M1434.7

O'Donnell and his son, Turlough, heir to the lordship of Tirconnell, and Mac Cawell, went in search of plunder and booty in another direction; and their evil fortune brought them into collision with a large body of English cavalry, who surrounded them. They contended with them for a long time, until Turlough O'Donnell, Mac Cawell, Hugh Mac-an-Easpuig Mac Cawell, and many others, were slain (and this was on the day after Michaelmas). After the loss of his people, O'Donnell was taken prisoner, and delivered up to the son of John Stanley, the King's Deputy, who had shortly before arrived in


p.901

Ireland, and who sent him to be imprisoned in Dublin. The son of Manus, Caech O'Donnell, was taken along with him on this occasion.

M1434.8

O'Rourke, i.e. Teige, son of Tiernan, died.

M1434.9

Donn Cahanagh Maguire died.

M1434.10

O'Byrne, i.e. Donough, died.

M1434.11

Mac Conmidhe (Maelisa), Ollav and Chief Poet to O'Neill, and Mac Curtin (i.e. Sencha Mac Curtin), Ollav of Thomond in history, and a man generally skilled in each art, died.

M1434.12

Dermot, the son of Murtough Garv O'Shaughnessy, was killed by his own horse, as he was being shod.

M1434.13

O'Kelly, Mac Dermot, and Teige, the son of O'Conor Roe, set out to attack Ballintober; and a battle was fought between them and the people of that town, in which many were wounded, both within and without the town. One of the party who were without took a chip from the end of a wattle which he held in his hand, and, having tied this chip to the end of the wattle, he set fire to it, and then cast the wattle into the bawn. It stuck in the side of a house, which caught fire, and was burned, as was the adjoining house, and finally the greater part of the town. The bawn was also burned, and a vast deal of every kind of property which was in the town was destroyed and consumed on this occasion.

Annal M1435.

M1435.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1435. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-five.

M1435.1

The Red Bishop O'Hara, Bishop of Achonry, died.

M1435.2

O'Donnell (Niall Garv) was taken to London.

M1435.3

An unusual frost and ice occurred in this year, so that people used to traverse the lakes and rivers of Ireland on the solid ice.


p.903

M1435.4

O'Farrell, Donnell, son of John, Chief of Muintir-Annaly, died.

M1435.5

Bran O'Byrne, heir to the lordship of Crioch-Branach, died.

M1435.6

O'Neill proceeded with an army into Fermanagh, and pitched his camp at Craev-Ua-bh-Fuadachain, where he remained three nights and days. The inhabitants of Fermanagh sent their cattle and all their moveables westward across Lough Erne; and it was not in boats that they conveyed them, but over the ice, which was then so great that steeds and horses carrying burdens were wont to cross the lake upon it. Maguire mustered an army to oppose O'Neill, but afterwards made peace with him, and joined him. O'Neill then proceeded with his forces into Tirconnell, burned and plundered a great part of it, and slew John, the son of Donnell, by a shot of a javelin, and then returned home in triumph.

M1435.7

Donnell, the son of Owen Mac Carthy, a general supporter of the poor and the destitute, was slain by Teige, the son of Cormac, son of Dermot Mac Carthy.

M1435.8

Donn, the son of Cuconnaught Maguire, died in canonical orders at Clones, after the victory of penance, having some time before retired from the world, for the love of the Lord.

M1435.9

Brian Oge O'Neill and Naghtan O'Donnell united to make war on O'Neill (Owen) and his sons, Henry and Owen; and O'Neill and his sons set out with their creaghts for Kinel-Moen, to oppose Naghtan and Brian, and did not halt until they pitched their camp in the Rasa. As soon as Naghtan and Brian Oge heard of this, they expeditiously collected their forces together, for the purpose of making an attack on O'Neill's camp; and they did not halt on their course until they arrived at the camp in which O'Neill was, where they made battle, and dislodged O'Neill from his camp, remaining in it themselves.

M1435.10

Now O'Neill, his sons, and Mac Donnell Galloglagh, felt shame and disgrace at their expulsion from the position in which they were fortified; and the resolution they adopted, at the request and solicitation of Henry O'Neill, was, that they should attack the camp, and use their boldest exertions to re-take


p.905

it. Henry's exciting exhortation had great effect upon the minds of the youths, and they attacked the camp vigorously, silently, and fiercely, Henry being the foremost in the van, until they made their way into the very centre of their enemies. Mac Donnell Galloglagh and Mac Sweeny Fanad then came to an engagement, in which heroes were mangled and slaughtered between them on both sides; and such was the confusion that prevailed, owing to the darkness of the night, and the closeness of the combatants to each other, that friend could not be distinguished from foe. Sparks of fire flashed from the helmets of the heroes and the armour of the champions. Hugh O'Neill and Brian O'Neill came to a personal rencounter with each other; and Hugh made a thrust of his spear at Brian, and wounded him severely, after which Brian and Naghtan withdrew from the contest, and left their gallowglasses behind them. When Mac Sweeny the leader of the gallowglasses perceived that Naghtan and Brian Oge had gone away from him, he sent his people before him, and remained himself in the rear to cover their retreat, and left the place without O'Neill's knowledge; but when Henry and his kinsmen observed this, they pursued Mac Sweeny to Slieve Truim, and there defeated him, and took himself and many of his people prisoners. O'Neill was victorious on this expedition.

M1435.11

Naghtan O'Donnell had given the castle of Ballyshannon to Brian Oge O'Neill, on his having consented to assist him in his war with O'Neill. Brian afterwards acted traitorously towards Naghtan, for he went to O'Neill without Naghtan's permission, and left his warders in the castle of Ballyshannon. As soon as Brian made his appearance before O'Neill, he was taken prisoner by him, and one of his feet and one of his hands were cut off; his two sons were also maimed in the same manner, and one of them immediately died.

M1435.12

O'Gara was slain by his own kinsmen, on Inis bolg, an island in Loch Techet.

M1435.13

Donnell, the son of Farrell Caech O'Hara, was slain by the son of Manus, the son of Dermot Mac Donough.

M1435.14

O'Rourke's castle was taken, by Donough Bacagh O'Rourke, from the sons


p.907

of Teige O'Rourke. Depredations were afterwards committed by the sons of Tiernan O'Rourke upon Donough Bacagh, at Coill-an-anma.

M1435.15

Loughlin, the son of Teige O'Rourke, was nominated the O'Rourke.

M1435.16

Naghtan O'Donnell committed great depredations on O'Neill.

M1435.17

The son of Brian Oge, son of Henry O'Neill, made a predatory incursion into Tirhugh; but some of the household of O'Donnell (Niall) overtook him, despoiled him of the prey, took himself prisoner, and slew a great number of his people.

M1435.18

O'Donnellan, Cormac, son of Melaghlin; O'Higgin, Donnell Bacagh; and Carbry O'Cuirnin, died.

M1435.19

Mac Wattin, i.e. Robert Barrett, Lord of Tirawly, a charitable, humane, and truly hospitable man, who had protected his patrimonial territory in despite of the English of Connaught, died.

Annal M1436.

M1436.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1436. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-six.

M1436.1

A great war was waged by O'Conor Faly against the English, during which he did much injury by burning, plundering, and slaying, to revenge O'Donnell, his relative by marriage, whom the English had in confinement.

M1436.2

Niall, the son of Owen O'Neill, was slain, together with many of his people, in a contest in his own house, by the Clann-Kenna of Trough, assisted by the sons of Henry O'Neill and the people of Oriel.

M1436.3

Conor, the son of John 0'Reilly, i.e. the son of the Lord of Breifny, a truly hospitable man, died.

M1436.4

The Crannog of Loch-Laoghaire was taken by the sons of Brian O'Neill. O'Neill and Henry came to the Lough, and sent messengers to Maguire, Thomas Oge, on whose arrival they set about constructing vessels, to land on the Crannog, in which the sons of Brian Oge then were; but these on perceiving their intentions came to the resolution of giving up the Crannog to O'Neill,


p.909

and made peace with him. O'Neill and Maguire then made an incursion into Tirhugh, where they committed many depredations, obtained great spoils, and killed many persons; after which they returned home.

M1436.5

Murrough, the son of Cormac Mac Donough, heir to the lordship of Tirerrill, died.

M1436.6

An incursion was made by the sons of Mac Donough and the sons of Tomaltagh Oge Mac Donough into Cuil O'bh-Finn, against O'Gara and Teige Mac Donough; but the sons of Mac Donough were routed, and seven of them killed, together with Conor Cam O'Gara, who had some time before treacherously slain his own brother, O'Gara.

M1436.7

Manus Roe, the son of Melaghlin, who was son of Flaherty O'Rourke, died.

M1436.8

Gilla-Isa Mac Egan, Ollav to Mac Wattin in law, a pious, charitable, and humane man, and the superintendent of schools of jurisprudence and poetry, died.

M1436.9

Geanann Mac Curtin, intended Ollav of Thomond in history, was drowned. There was not in Leth-Mogha in his time a better materies of a historian than he.

Annal M1437.

M1437.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1437. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-seven.

M1437.1

The Archbishop of Connaught i.e. of Tuam died. He was of the Clann-Feorais.

M1437.2

A peace was made between O'Donnell and Naghtan O'Donnell.

M1437.3

An incursion was made by Conor O'Donnell against the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, on which occasion the two sons of Owen Roe Mac Sweeny, and numbers of others, were slain.

M1437.4

A war broke out between Cahir O'Conor, brother of O'Conor Faly, and O'Conor Faly himself. Cahir went over to the English, whom he afterwards brought into Offaly, and burned the town of Dermot O'Conor, and other towns besides; and he killed and wounded many persons.


p.911

M1437.5

O'Conor Faly carried on a great war against the English, during which he committed many depredations, and slew many persons.

M1437.6

Henry O'Ryan, Lord of Idrone, died.

M1437.7

Mac Costello (Edmond of the Plain) died.

M1437.8

A great war broke out between Mac Mahon and Manus Mac Mahon. Manus went over to O'Neill and his sons, and Mac Mahon went over to the English.

M1437.9

A great war broke out between O'Neill and Brian Oge O'Neill.

M1437.10

Melaghlin O'Mulconry died.

M1437.11

Giollapatrick, the son of Conor O'Carmaic, died.

Annal M1438.

M1438.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1438. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-eight.

M1438.1

O'Gallagher, i.e. Loughlin, Bishop of Raphoe, died.

M1438.2

The Prior of Kilmainham died. He was grandson of the Earl of Kildare.

M1438.3

The Abbot of Cill-na-manach and Nicholas O'Maonaigh O'Meeny, Vicar of Caislen-mic-Conchubhair, both died of the plague.

M1438.4

Donough na Coille O'Donnell was slain by Conor Don O'Donnell in Tir-Enda, after he had plundered that territory.

M1438.5

Cahir O'Doherty died.

M1438.6

Philip Maguire was taken prisoner by Maguire.


p.913

M1438.7

Conor, the son of Murtough O'Dowda,Lord of the Clann-Donough O'Dowda, was treacherously slain by his own kinsmen, i.e. by Taichleach, the son of Cormac, son of Donough O'Dowda; Rory, the son of Taichleach; and Loughlin, the grandson of Loughlin O'Dowda; and Henry Barrett. And three of Conor's sons were slain along with him on the same night.

M1438.8

William, the son of Rory O'Dowda, died.

M1438.9

O'Conor Faly continued to wage war with the English of Meath, in revenge of O'Donnell.

M1438.10

The son of Mac Clancy, Henry Ballagh, was slain by a party of the inhabitants of Fermanagh, at the town of Brian O'Higgin, in Magh-Ene.

M1438.11

John, the son of Edmund Burke, died of galar breac small-pox.

M1438.12

William Barrett, i.e. the son of Mac Wattin, died.

M1438.13

William, the son of John Burke, died in his own house.

M1438.14

Peace was made between the two brothers, O'Conor Faly and Cathaoir O'Conor.

M1438.15

O'Brien, i.e. Teige, the son of Brian O'Brien, was deposed by his brother Mahon, who was thereupon styled the O'Brien.

M1438.16

The son of Mac Feorais (Bermingham), i.e. Richard, died.

M1438.17

Jordan, the son of John Mac Costello, died.

M1438.18

O'Clumain, Chief Poet to O'Hara, died.

M1438.19

Donough, the son of Siry O'Cuirnin, a learned historian; O'Daly of Breifny, Chief Poet to O'Reilly; and Conor Mac Egan, Ollav of Clanrickard in law, died.

Annal M1439.

M1439.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1439. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred thirty-nine.

M1439.1

A Justiciary, i e. a Deputy of the King of England, came to Ireland, and was taken prisoner by Cahir, son of O'Conor Faly; but after remaining for some time in custody, he was ransomed by the English of Dublin, who gave the son of Plunket up to Cahir in his stead.


p.915

M1439.2

O'Donnell (Niall) was taken to the Isle of Mann, that he might be ransomed from the English; and one hundred marks were paid for information of the price of his ransom.

M1439.3

O'Donnell (Niall Garv) died in the Isle of Mann in captivity. He was the chosen hostage of Kinel-Connell and Kinel-Owen, and of all the North of Ireland, and the chief theme of conversation in Leth-Chuinn during his time, the harasser and destroyer of the English (until they took revenge for all that he had committed against them), and the protector and defender of his tribe against such of the English and Irish as were opposed to him, both before and after he assumed the lordship. Naghtan O'Donnell, his brother, was installed in his place.

M1439.4

Maguire was taken prisoner in his own town by Donnell Ballagh Maguire; and Philip Maguire was on the same day set at liberty by Donnell; and the fetters with which Philip had been bound were made use of to bind Maguire himself, in his own house. As soon as Henry O'Neill heard that Maguire was a prisoner, he assembled his forces, and marched to Port-abhla-Faelain against Philip and Donnell, by whom Maguire was there held in detention. Maguire was then liberated; and in his stead hostages were delivered up, namely, his own son, Edmond Maguire, and the daughter of Mageoghegan, Maguire's wife, with others besides; and the castle of Enniskillen was given up to Donnell Ballagh Maguire on that occasion.

M1439.5

Teige Caech, the son of Hugh, son of Philip na Tuaighe Maguire, died.

M1439.6

Feradhach, son of Donn, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, was slain by the Orielians.

M1439.7

Henry Roe, son of Brian Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir-Pheodachain, died.

M1439.8

More, daughter of Hugh Magauran, and wife of Brian Mac Manus, died.

M1439.9

O'Conor of Connaught, i.e. the King of Connaught (Cathal, son of Rory), died on the 19th of March; and Teige, the son of O'Conor Roe, was then called the O'Conor by the descendants of Felim, while Hugh, the son of O'Conor Don, was called the O'Conor by Brian, son of Donnell Mac Murtough O'Conor Sligo, in consequence of which a war broke out in Machaire-Chonnacht


p.917

immediately afterwards between the grandsons of Felim and the sons of Turlough.

M1439.10

O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, i.e. John Balv, the son of Conor, died; and his brother Donnell assumed his place.

M1439.11

Dermot O'Dowda, i.e. the son of the O'Dowda (Donnell), heir to the lordship of Hy-Fiachrach, died.

M1439.12

O'Hara Duv, Donough, the son of John O'Hara, entered among the friars in the monastery of Beann-fhoda, and resigned the lordship to his brother Cormac, who was then styled the O'Hara; and Cormac's place was then given to John Mac-an-Easpuig O'Hara.

M1439.13

The son of O'Hara of the Plain, i.e. Cormac, son of Teige, died.

M1439.14

Hugh, the son of Dermot Mac Donough, died.

M1439.15

The son of Niall Reagh O'Conor was slain by Donnell, the son of Murtough, son of Donnell O'Conor.

M1439.16

The plague raged virulently in Dublin, so that three thousand persons, both male and female, large and small, died of it, from the beginning of Spring to the end of the month of May. Donough, the son of O'Dowda, i.e. the son of Teige; Conor, the son of Donnell, son of Cormac Mac Donough, and his wife, the daughter of Teige Mac Donough; the Vicar of Imleach Iseal, Donough, son of Tomaltagh O'Beollain; Edmond Burke, the son of Mac William of Clanrickard, and heir to the lordship of Clanrickard, all died of the plague.

M1439.17

Owen O'Flaherty was treacherously slain in his own bed at night, by a farmer of his own people.

M1439.18

Donnell, the son of Rory, son of Taichleach O'Dowda, was blinded and hanged by Donough, the son of Murtough O'Dowda; and Cathal, son of Cormac O'Dowda, and his son, were slain by Teige Roe, the son of Murtough O'Dowda, on the same day, at the instigation of the aforesaid Donough.

M1439.19

A depredation was committed by O'Conor, i.e. Hugh, the son of O'Conor Don, upon Mac Costello Roe.

M1439.20

O'Meehin of Ballagh, Coarb of St. Molaisse, died.


p.919

Annal M1440.

M1440.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1440. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty.

M1440.1

Mac William Burke, i.e. Walter, the son of Thomas, son of Sir Edmond Albanagh, Lord of the English of Connaught, and of many of the Irish, died of the plague a week before the Festival of the Holy Cross, in Autumn; and Edmond Burke, his brother, was styled Mac William in his place.

M1440.2

O'Donnell, Naghtan, and O'Neill, Owen, made peace with each other.

M1440.3

O'Doherty, Donnell, the son of Conor, Chief of Ardmire, died; and two O'Dohertys were nominated in his place, namely, Edmond, the son of Conor, and Hugh, the son of John.

M1440.4

Magrath,Matthew, son of Marcus, Coarb of Termon-Daveog, died; and John Boy was elected in his stead.

M1440.5

Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, Lord of Lower Connaught, and star of the valour and bravery of the Irish of his time, died, two days before the Festival of St. John, after having been thirty-seven years in the lordship.

M1440.6

Manus Eoghanagh Maguire, son of Philip, and Catherine, daughter of Donn, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, and wife of Mac Manus Maguire, died.

M1440.7

Ross, the son of John Maguire, and Felim Roe, the son of Donough Roe Maguire, were slain.

M1440.8

Donnell O'Breslen, a learned Brehon, and intended Ollav of Fermanagh, died.

M1440.9

Duigen Gruamdha O'Duigennan, a learned historian, died.

M1440.10

Manus, the son of Donnell O'Donnell, was slain at Bun-leacaigh, by the sons of Mac Sweeny Connaughtagh; and Conor Mac-Eoin-Easpuig, i.e. Mac-an-Easpuig of Tirconnell, and Dermot, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Seanchaidh


p.921

O'Donnell, were slain on the same day. Another son of Donnell O'Donnell, and a party of the Kinel-Connell, slew the son of Mac Sweeny, Conor Mac Sweeny in revenge of his kinsman.

M1440.11

Grainne, the daughter of O'Kelly, and wife of Teige O'Brien, died.

M1440.12

The castle of Ballyboyle was taken by the son of Donnell, who was son of O'Donnell, at a time where he found it unguarded; and he found therein great spoils in money, apparel, and armour. The same castle was again taken by O'Donnell, and given back to O'Boyle; and the sons of Donnell O'Donnell were taken prisoners therein, and detained in captivity by O'Donnell for their evil deeds.

M1440.13

O'Rourke, i.e. Loughlin, the son of Teige, was taken prisoner by the sons of Art O'Rourke, who gave him up to Donough Ballagh Magauran and his sons, who gave him up to the sons of Tiernan O'Rourke. A war afterwards broke out between the sons of Tiernan O'Rourke and the sons of Teige O'Rourke, so that they disturbed the territory by the contests between them.

M1440.14

Finola, the daughter of O'Doherty, and wife of O'Donnel, died.

M1440.15

O'Conor Faly, his sons, and his brother Cahir, went upon a predatory incursion into Leix, O'Moore's territory; but, after having sent the prey on before them, they were overtaken by the Earl of Desmond, and by Mac Gillapatrick, who defeated O'Conor, and killed his son Con, together with sixty of his soldiers.

M1440.16

O'Doherty's castle, i.e. the castle of Cuil-mic-an-treoin, was taken by O'Donnell.

M1440.17

Mac Wattin, i.e. Thomas, son of Henry Barrett, Lord of Tirawley, died on the l5th of July; and the son of Maigiu Barrett was then nominated the Mac Wattin.


p.923

M1440.18

The son of O'Rourke, i.e. Hugh, the son of Hugh Boy, heir to the lordship of Breifny, was treacherously slain by the son of Dermot-na-nGamhnach O'Rourke, at Druim-da-ethiar, the town of Donough Bacagh O'Rourke.

M1440.19

Donnell, the son of Cormac Mac Donough, heir to the lordship of Tirerrill; O'Dugan, the historian (John, son of Cormac); and Dulgen Gruamdha O'Duigennan, Ollav to Mac Donough in history, died.

Annal M1441.

M1441.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1441. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-one.

M1441.1

The Archbishop of Connaught Tuam, i.e. Thomas O'Kelly, died.

M1441.2

Gillapatrick O'Maeluire, Abbot of Clogher, died.

M1441.3

Murtough, son of Cathal More Mac Manus, Archdeacon of Clogher, and Parson of Airech Moelain, a select ecclesiastic, died.

M1441.4

Donnell O'Moghan, Abbot of the monks of Boyle, head of the wisdom, knowledge, and instruction of Connaught, died.

M1441.5

Conor, the son of Teige Mac Donogh, Lord of Tirerrill, General Patron of the literati of Ireland in his time, died, after having vanquished the world and the Devil.

M1441.6

Mac Donnell of Clann-Kelly was slain by the sons of Cuconnaught Maguire.

M1441.7

Maguire, i.e. Thomas, committed great depredations on the sons of Annadh Mac Donnell, on which occasion he slew Edmond Mac Donnell.

M1441.8

Conor Oge Maguire died, after having retired from the world.

M1441.9

O'Mulconry, i.e. Maoilin, the son of Tany, son of Paidin, Ollav of SilMurray, the most highly respected and honoured of all the poets of Ireland in his time, died on the 13th of February, and was interred with honour in the church of Cluain Coirpthe; and Dermot Roe, the son of Donough Bane O'Mulconry, died a month after.


p.925

M1441.10

Piarus Cam O'Luinin, a learned historian and poet, and Erenagh of Ard, and of the third part of Airech-Moelain Derryvullan, a man greatly reverenced and honoured, died.

M1441.11

O'Kennedy Roe, i.e. Rory, the son of Philip, Half-Lord of Ormond, died.

M1441.12

Thomas, son of O'Kennedy Don, died.

M1441.13

O'Madden's castle, i.e. the castle of Port-an-Tulchain on the Shannon, was taken by Mac William Uachtrach and the Clann-Rickard from O'Madden; and the son of O'Madden and fourteen hostages who were in the castle were taken, together with much spoil in armour and arms.

M1441.14

Cormac Magauran took a great prey from the sons of Donough Ballagh Magauran.

M1441.15

O'Higgin, Mahon Roe, a learned poet, died.

Annal M1442.

M1442.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1442. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-two.

M1442.1

Mac Carthy Reagh, Lord of Ivahagh in Munster, died.

M1442.2

The Abbot O'Carthy died.

M1442.3

The son of William Barrett, Dean of Killala, died.

M1442.4

The Dean Mac Mulrony, the son of Gilchreest Mac Donough, died.

M1442.5

Brian, the son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died, after a good life.

M1442.6

John and Donnell Maguire, the sons of Philip, died.

M1442.7

O'Flaherty, i.e. Gilladuv, the son of Brian, Lord of West Connaught died.


p.927

M1442.8

Maguire (Thomas Oge) gave up the castle of Enniskillen to Philip Maguire, after having set Edmond and Thomas Oge at liberty.

M1442.9

Henry, the son of Owen O'Neill, repaired to the English, and brought a very great army of the English to Castlefin; and O'Neill, his father, with all his forces in full muster, went to meet Henry and the English at the same place. O'Donnell, i e. Naghtan, went to oppose them; but as he had not an equal number of forces to hazard the issue of a battle, he made peace with O'Neill, giving up to him the castle, the territory of Kinel-Moen, and the tribute of Inishowen. Henry left warders in the castle, and then returned home with O'Neill in triumph.

M1442.10

Donnell Glas Mac Carthy, Lord of Hy-Carbery, died.

M1442.11

O'Driscoll More (Mac Con), Lord of Corca-Laoighe, died.

M1442.12

Teige, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, was slain with the cast of a javelin by one of the people of Cathal Mac Rannall, on the Green of Cill-Tathchomharc.

M1442.13

A war arose between O'Kane and Mac Quillin, in which Mac Quillin and the sons of Brian Oge O'Neill routed O'Kane, and killed thirty-two of his people.

M1442.14

The same war continued between O'Kane and Mac Quillin; and in the course of it many depredations and slaughters were committed: the son of Mac Quillin was slain by O'Kane, and depredations were committed by Mac Quillin on Aibhne O'Kane.

M1442.15

The English of Dublin and of Meath made an incursion into the country of the Byrnes, and committed great depredations. But the Byrnes and Tooles overtook the English, defeated them, killed eighty of them, and stripped them of countless spoils.


p.929

M1442.16

The son of Mac Murrough, Lord of Leinster, i.e. Murtough Kavanagh, heir to the lordship of Leinster, was slain by the English of Contae-Riabhach the county of Wexford. Mac Murrough, after the death of his son, made war against the Contae-Riabhach and the English of Leinster, so that they were forced to liberate the seven prisoners who had been taken on the day on which Murtough was killed, and pay Mac Murrough eight hundred marks as an eric for his son.

M1442.17

A war broke out between Hugh Boy O'Neill and Mac Quillin; and O'Neill rose up to assist Mac Quillin against Hugh Boy.

M1443.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1443. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-three.

M1443.1

Aengus Mac Gillafinnen, Abbot of Lisgool, died.

M1443.2

Manus Mac Mahon, heir to the lordship of Oriel, for his hospitality and prowess died

M1443.3

Ever Mac Mahon was slain by O'Neill, i.e. Owen, son of Niall Oge.

M1443.4

Fineen and Dermot, two sons of Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory, were treacherously slain at Kilkenny, at the instigation of Mac Richard Butler.

M1443.5

Brian, son of Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Cathal O'Farrell, was slain and drowned as he was endeavouring to make his escape, by force, from the Island of Port-an-ghuirtin, where he had been held in confinement for two years and a half by Donnell Boy O'Farrell

M1443.6

Mulrony, the son of Teige O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, died.


p.931

M1443.7

Teige O'Dowda, the son of the Lord of Hy-Fiachrach, was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1443.8

Great depredations were committed by Hugh Boy O'Neill upon Murtough Roe O'Neill, his senior kinsman, who gave him his demand for a restoration of the preys. They then made full peace with each other.

M1443.9

O'Flynn of Sil-Maelruain and some of his kindred were slain by the Clann-Costello at the house of O'Killeen.

M1443.10

Mulrony, the son of Mulrony O'Dowda, was treacherously slain by his own brother.

M1443.11

Mac Egan of Ormond, i.e. Gilla-na-naev, the son of Gilla-na-naev, son of Hugh, Ollav of Munster in law, a man generally skilled in each art, and who kept a house of public hospitality for all, died.

M1443.12

Hugh Mac Egan, the son of Farrell, son of Boethius, died, in the springtide of his prosperity. He was the most fluent and eloquent of the Irish of his times. He was Ollav of Lower Connaught in law.


p.933

Annal M1444.

M1444.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1444. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-four.

M1444.1

Richard, son of the Great Dean, son of Donnell, son of John Gallda O'Farrell, Bishop of Ardagh, died.

M1444.2

William O'Hetigen, Bishop of Elphin, and a great number of the clergy of Connaught, went to Rome, where the majority of them died, namely, Teige, son of Teige Mac Donough, who had been appointed to the abbacy of Boyle; William, son of the Dean O'Flanagan, Prior of Roscommon; the son of Melaghlin, son of Cormac Mac Donough, Abbot of Ballysadare; and many also of the clergy of Ulster.

M1444.3

Hugh Boy, the son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, Roydamna of Ireland, the most renowned, hospitable, and valorous of the princes of Ireland in his time, and who had planted more of the lands of the English, in despite of them, than any other man of his day, was wounded by the cast of a javelin in Iveagh; and he continued in the agonies of death for twenty-four days, i.e. from Spy-Wednesday to the second day of summer, when he expired, on Saturday precisely, having vanquished the world and the Devil.

M1444.4

After the death of Hugh, a great army was led by Owen, son of Niall Oge


p.935

(i.e. the O'Neill); and the greater number of the chieftains of Ulster, O'Donnell excepted, marched with a numerous army to plunder and destroy the Clann-Hugh-Boy. Murtough Roe O'Neill, Henry O'Neill, Mac Quillin, and all their auxiliaries, assembled to oppose this army in the territory of Duibhthrian Dufferin. They cut a passage through the wood, in the direction which they conceived they the enemy would approach them. O'Neill with his forces advanced to this narrow passage, when the others charged them, and slew Mac Donnell Galloglagh, who was in the rear of the army, amongst the baggage. The army became much discouraged at this, so that they delivered up to the sons of Mac-I-Neill Boy all such hostages as they chose to select, namely, Hugh, the son of O'Neill, the son of Henry O'Neill, the son of Mac Mahon, the son of O'Mellan, and fifteen other hostages besides, on condition of being themselves permitted to return home through the passage already mentioned. This being agreed to, they took their way homeward in sorrow and disgrace.

M1444.5

Owen, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, Lord of Sligo, and of the territory of Carbury, was slain with a cast of a javelin by one of the sons of Cormac Mac Donough; for the son of Melaghlin, who was son of Cormac Mac Donough, had been previously slain in a quarrel by the grandson of John O'Hart; and it was on this account that Owen, the son of Donnell, was slain.

M1444.6

A great army was led by O'Neill, i.e. Owen, into the English settlements of Oriel, and he plundered and burned many of them; he also plundered the street-town of Dundalk, and obtained sixty marks and two tons of wine as a recompense for not burning the town itself


p.937

M1444.7

A great miracle was wrought by the image of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Trim, namely, it restored sight to a blind man, speech to a dumb man, and the use of his feet to a cripple, stretched out the hand of a person to whose side it had been fastened, et foeminam gravidatam feles eniti fecit.

M1444.8

O'Neill encamped against the English, and destroyed a great part of their possessions; and he received great rewards for making peace with them for half a year. Before this was concluded, the son of O'Neill, Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Owen O'Neill, made a predatory incursion into the English settlements, on which Brian himself was killed by one cast of a stone, Edmond Mac Mahon was taken prisoner, and others of his people were also killed.

M1444.9

Turlough, the son of Owen, son of Rory O'Conor, was slain with the cast of a,javelin by one of the Clann-Conway.

M1444.10

John, the son of Brian, son of Edmond O'Farrell, and eight others along with him, were slain by John O'Farrell and the sons of Donnell O'Farrell on the mountain called Sliabh-Calraighe-Bri-leith.

M1444.11

Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Cathal O'Farrall, died.


p.939

M1444.12

Manus Mac Mahon, heir to the lordship of Oriel, died, and was interred at Clones.

M1444.13

Ever, son of Brian Mac Mahon, heir to the lordship of Oriel, died.

M1444.14

Teige O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, died.

M1444.15

Sioda Cam Mac Namara, Chief of Clann-Cuilein, general protector of the men of Ireland, died between the two Christmases.

M1444.16

Duvcovla, daughter of Thomas Maguire (Lord of Fermanagh), and wife of Owen Mac Cawell, a humane, charitable, and truly hospitable woman, died.


p.941

Annal M1445.

M1445.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1445. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-five.

M1445.1

Thomas O'Leannain, Canon and Sacristan of Lisgool, died.

M1445.2

A great army was led into Sligo by O'Donnell, Philip Maguire, the sons of Hugh Maguire, and the sons of Owen O'Conor. They the troops burned Sligo, then in possession of Turlough Carrach, son of Donnell, who was son of Mortogh O'Conor, and slew Mac Donough, Tomaltagh, son of Donough, Lord of Tirerrill, and many others.

M1445.3

William, the son of John, son of Donnell O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died, after a long and virtuous life; and two chieftans were then set up in Annaly: Rossa, son of Murtough Midheach, son of Brian O'Farrell, was called the O'Farrell by all the descendants of Murrough O'Farrell; and the two Clann-Hughs, and the Clann-Shane O'Farrell, and all his other friends on every side, proclaimed


p.943

Donnell Boy, the son of Donnell, son of John O'Farrell, chief of his tribe. The territory was destroyed during the contests between them, until at last they made peace, and divided Annaly equally between them.

M1445.4

Rory, son of the Lord of Fermanagh, Thomas Maguire, died.

M1445.5

Mac Gillafinnen, i.e. Brian, Chief of Muintir-Pheodachain, a hospitable man, and the defender of his rights against his neighbours, died.

M1445.6

Donough Ballagh Magauran, heir to the chieftainship of Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1445.7

Dermot O'Toole, Lord of Clann-Tuathail, was slain by the grandsons of Tomaltagh O'Dempsey, in the eightieth year of his age, and while in pursuit of a prey.

M1445.8

Conor, the son of O'Conor Kerry, was slain by his kinsman, Mahon O'Conor, as both were going in a boat to the island of Inis-Cathaigh.

M1445.9

Richard Mac Quillin was slain.

M1445.10

Thomas Dillon and Richard Oge Dillon died.

M1445.11

Laighneach, son of Hugh Boy Mageoghegan, was slain at Coill-an-Chonaidh by the sons of Murtough Oge Mageoghegan.

M1445.12

Donough Bacagh O'Rourke died; and the people of West Breifny proclaimed Donough, the son of Tiernan Oge, the O'Rourke, in opposition to Loughlin, the son of Teige O'Rourke.


p.945

Annal M1446.

M1446.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1446. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-six.

M1446.1

John O'Leannain, Prior of the Monastery of Lisgool, died.

M1446.2

Rory, the son of Ardgal More Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died; and his son, Hugh Roe, was elected his successor by O'Neill.

M1446.3

O'Donnell marched with a great army into Connaught, to assist his friends; he went first to the territory of O'Rourke, and from thence through Magh-Nisse, across the Shannon, into Moylurg, through Machaire-Chonnacht, and


p.947

through Clann-Conway; and Mac William came to Dunamon for him, and conducted him afterwards into Conmaicne Cuile Toladh.

M1446.4

Cucogry, the son of Many, son of Niall Sinnach Fox, Lord of the men of Teffia, died.

M1446.5

Edmond O'Brain O'Byrne, Lord of Hy-Faelain, died; and Dunlaing O'Brain was elected in his place.

M1446.6

Donough, the son of Art, son of Donnell, Lord of Hy-Kinsellagh, was slain by the O'Byrnes.

M1446.7

A great war broke out between O'Conor Faly and the English of Meath. During this war a great part of Meath was plundered and burned; many of its inhabitants were slain; and marauding parties were accustomed to come northward, as far as Tara, and eastward, as far as Cul-Maighe-Claraigh. Brian, son of Calvagh O'Conor, was taken prisoner in the course of this war by the English.

M1446.8

A war broke out between the two O'Conors in Machaire-Chonnacht, in the course of which Dermot Roe, son of Teige O'Conor, was slain at Cuil Ua bh-


p.949

Fionntain by O'Conor Don, aided by the Mac Maurices na-m-Brigh of Brize, and some of the sons of Felim.

M1446.9

A great war broke out in Thomond, by which all Thomond was spoiled. O'Brien himself was taken prisoner; but Mac William of Clanrickard went to Thomond, and having rescued O'Brien by force, he set all to rights.

M1446.10

The Clann-Donough, Turlough Carragh O'Conor, and O'Conor Don, repaired to Mac William of Clanrickard, in order to elect one Mac Donough. They did not, however, return until they had finally agreed on the election of two Mac Donoughs, dividing the territory equally between them, namely, John, the son of Conor Mac Donough, and Teige, the son of Tomaltagh More Mac Donough.

M1446.11

Felim, the son of John O'Rourke, was slain the midlle of the church of Fenagh by his own kinsmen, namely, the sons of Loughlin O'Rourke.

M1446.12

The son of Donnell O'Rourke was slain by the sons of Donough, the son of Tiernan O'Rourke.

M1446.13

Thomas, the son of Thomas Oge O'Reilly, was slain on Great Christmas Day by the sons of Redmond, son of Gilla-Isa O'Reilly.

M1446.14

Donnell O'Coffey, a good captain, and his two sons, were slain on Cro-inis, an island on Loch-Ainninn-mic-Neimhidh, by the grandsons of Art O'Melaghlin, and the grandsons of Fiacha Mageoghegan.

M1446.15

Tany, son of Maoilin, son of Tany O'Mulconry, died in the territory of the Clann-Feorais, between the two Easters, and was interred in the monastery of Baile-Ui-Bhogain.


p.951

M1446.16

Teige Mac Clancy was slain by Cormac, the son of O'Flanagan.

M1446.17

Edmond, son of Mac Maurice of Kerry, was slain by Cormac, the son of Owen Mac Carthy.

M1446.18

Brian O'Dowda was slain by the people of Tirawly.

M1446.19

Dermot, the son of Ir, son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, was slain.

Annal M1447.

M1447.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1447. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-seven.

M1447.1

The Coarb of Fenagh, who kept a house of public hospitality for all comers, died.

M1447.2

In the Summer and Autumn of this year there raged a great plague, of which the Prior of Ballyboggan, the Prior of Connala, the Baron of Calatruim,


p.953

Garrett, son of Mac Walronta, and a great number of others in Meath, Leinster, and Munster, died. Some say that seven hundred priests died of this plague.

M1447.3

The church of Achadh-Urchair was roofed and its eastern gable re-erected by Thomas Oge Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, in honour of God, St. Tighernach, and St. Ronan, and for the weal of his own soul.

M1447.4

Donnell Ballagh, son of Thomas, son of Philip Maguire, was slain by John, son of Philip Maguire, assisted by the sons of Art Maguire, the sons of Mac Oirghiallaigh Mac Errilly, and the sons of O'Davine, for this Donnell had been at enmity with Maguire, and with Philip, the Tanist of the territory; and on his return from Breifny O'Reilly to the town of Henry O'Neill, he was seized upon, and killed. He was interred in the monastery of Lisgool.

M1447.5

Hugh, the son of Thomas Oge Maguire, i.e. son of the Lord of Fermanagh, died.

M1447.6

Felim, the son of John, son of Philip O'Reilly, worthy heir to the lordship of Breifny, by reason of his noble deeds and hospitality, went to Trim, to meet Lord Furnival, the then Deputy of the King of England, by whom he was taken prisoner. He afterwards died of the plague, after the victory of Unction and Penance, and was interred in the monastery of Trim.

M1447.7

Finola, the daughter of Calvagh O'Conor Faly, and of Margaret, daughter of O'Carroll, who had been first married to O'Donnell, and afterwards to Hugh Boy O'Neill, the most beautiful and stately, the most renowned and illustrious woman of her time in all Ireland, her own mother only excepted, retired from


p.955

this transitory world, to prepare for life eternal, and assumed the yoke of piety and devotion, in the monastery of Cill-achaidh.

M1447.8

Hugh, son of Murtough Oge Mageoghegan, helmsman of the valour of the Southern Hy-Nials, and heir to the lordship of all Kinel-Fiachach, died of a short fit of sickness.

M1447.9

Edmond, the son of Edmund Burke, died.

M1447.10

Felim, the son of Murrough Mac Rannall, died.

M1447.11

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Aireachtach, who was son of Solomon Mac Egan, the most learned Brehon and Professor of Laws in Ireland, died.

M1447.12

William O'Deorain, chief Brehon of Leinster, and his wife, died.

M1447.13

Owen, the son of Petras, who was son of Saerdalach O'Breislein, chief Brehon of Fermanagh, and Erenach of Airech-Moelain Derryvullan, died.

M1447.14

Conor, the son of John Mac Branain, resigned his lordship, and Tomaltagh Carragh, the son of Con, son of Hugh, was elected in his place.

M1447.15

The monastery of Laoighis in Leinster, in the diocese of Leighlin, was founded, in honour of St. Francis, by O'More, who selected a burial-place for himself and his descendants in it.


p.957

Annal M1448.

M1448.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1448. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-eight.

M1448.1

A great plague raged in Meath, of which Conor, son of Hugh O'Farrell, Dermot Mac Conmaighe, and Henry Duv Mac Techedain, three friars of Longphort-Ui-Feargail, died.

M1448.2

Conor Mac Faolchadha, bishop of Ros-ailithir, died.

M1448.3

The abbot of the monastery of the Holy Trinity on Lough Key died.

M1448.4

James Oge, son of James Gallda, i.e. son of the Earl of Ormond, died.

M1448.5

Cathal, son of O'Conor Faly, was slain by the English of Leinster.

M1448.6

Cuconnaught, son of Philip Maguire, died, after the victory of penance, and was interred in the church of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher.

M1448.7

O'Hara Reagh was slain.

M1448.8

O'Loughlin, Lord of Burren, died.

M1448.9

Niall O'Molloy was slain by the Hy-Regan O'Dunnes.


p.959

M1448.10

Conor, the son of John, son of Eachmarcach Mac Branain, Lord of Corco-Achlann for a period of thirty-seven years, died at Dumha-Sealga in Magh-Ae, having resigned his lordship the year before, and was buried at Roscommon.


p.961

M1448.11

Cathal, son of Felim, son of Rory O'Conor, was slain by the sons of Rory, son of Cathal O'Conor, i.e. by Turlough and Dermot.

M1448.12

Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Gilla-Colaim O'Higgin, chief Preceptor of the Poets of Ireland and Scotland, died, after penance, at Cill-Connla, and was interred in the monastery of Ath-leathan.

M1448.13

Dermot, the son of Owen, son of Mahon O'Daly, Ollav of all Meath, a learned poet, died, and was interred in Durrow-Columbkille.


p.963

Annal M1449.

M1449.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1449. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred forty-nine.

M1449.1

Donough, the son of Tiernan Oge, Lord of West Breifny, died, after having laboured a year under pulmonary consumption; and Tiernan, son of Teige O'Rourke, was elected in his place by the people of West Breifny.

M1449.2

Owen, the son of John, Lord of the district called Muintir-Maelmora, died; and his son, John O'Reilly, was elected in his place by O'Neill and the sept of John O'Reilly; but Farrell O'Reilly (i.e. the son of Thomas More) being elected by the sept of Mahon O'Reilly and by the English, war and disturbances arose between them the candidates. The Lord Justice and the Earl of Ormond came to assist Farrell O'Reilly; but John O'Reilly and his forces suddenly charged the van of their army, and slew or made prisoners of sixty of them, among whom were the son of Turlough and the son of Donnell Bane O'Reilly.

M1449.3

Brian Oge O'Neill died.

M1449.4

More, daughter of Hugh, son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, and the wife of Art, son of Owen O'Neill, died.

M1449.5

Manus Boy, the son of Carbry, son of Don Maguire, died.

M1449.6

A sudden defeat was given to Murtough Roe O'Neill, in which the son of


p.965

Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, O'Neill's constable, Aengus, the son of Mac Donnell of Scotland, and many others, were slain.

M1449.7

A great war broke out among the Kinel-Connell themselves, in the course of which much property was destroyed.

M1449.8

O'Fialain and Gilchreest Mac Ward died.

M1449.9

Hugh, the son of Loughlin, son of Geoffry O'Flanigan, who had been for a long time Lord of the race of Cathal, the son of Muireadhach Muilleathan, died, having first resigned his lordship for the love of God, and consented that the son of Geoffrey O'Flanagan should be appointed to his place.

M1449.10

The Duke of York arrived in Ireland, and was received with great honour; and the Earls of Ireland went into his house, as did also the Irish adjacent to Meath, and gave him as many beeves for the use of his kitchen as it pleased him to demand.


p.967

Annal M1450.

M1450.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1450. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty.

M1450.1

The Archbishop of Connaught, Mac-an-Phearsuin, the son of Mac Seoinin Burke, died at Galway.

M1450.2

Pierce Maguire, Bishop of Clogher, died at Cleenish, and was interred at Lisgool in Fermanagh.

M1450.3

Bishop O'Gallagher died.

M1450.4

Edmond, Abbot of Assaroe, died.

M1450.5

Conor O'Donnell, Tanist of Tirconnell, died.

M1450.6

Nicholas O'Flanagan, Parson of Devenish, died at Rome, whither he had gone on a pilgrimage.

M1450.7

Maguire, Thomas, son of Thomas, son of Philip na Tuaighe, went on a pilgrimage to Rome. A week afterwards Donough Dunchadhach, Maguire's (Thomas Oge) step-brother, went to Cathal, son of Maguire, took him prisoner at his own place (or house) at Cnoc-Ninnigh, and brought him and his spoils to Gort-an-fheadain, where he put him to death; after which he proceeded to Teallach Dunchadha Tullyhunco, to make war against Edmond and Donough Maguire. In some time afterwards Donough Dunchadhach came to a conference with Edmond and Donough, and they made peace with one another; but notwithstanding this, Edmond in the end took Donough Dunchadhach prisoner at Gabhail-liuin, and brought him with him to Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, where he cut off one of his feet and one of his hands, in revenge of the killing of Cathal.


p.969

Murtough O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-ratha, went on a pilgrimage to Rome, where he died, after the victory of penance; and his brother Cormac assumed his place.

M1450.8

An army was led by Henry O'Neill, Art O'Neill, and the son of Owen O'Neill, into Trian Chongail, to assist Mac Quillin.

M1450.9

Niall, son of Henry, son of Owen, went upon a predatory incursion against Murtough Mac-I-Neill Boy, and seized on preys; but he was overtaken by Mac-I-Neill Boy and Owen, the son of Brian Oge O'Neill, who routed his people. On this occasion Henry, the son of Brian Oge, son of Brian More, son of Henry Aimhreidh, gave Niall two thrusts of his spear, of which he died, and was interred at Armagh with great honour.

M1450.10

A peace was made by John, the son of Owen O'Reilly, and Donnell Bane O'Reilly, with each other; and Farrell, the son of Thomas O'Reilly, was deposed of his lordship; and the chieftainship of all Breifny was conferred upon John, the son of Owen; and Farrell received wages from him.

M1450.11

Teige, the son of Philip, son of Thomas Maguire, was slain by the sons of Cormac Magauran, and interred in the monastery of Lisgool.

M1450.12

Andreas, the son of Gilchreest O'Droma, a wise and pious man, died, after his return from Rome.

M1450.13

O'Cassidy of Cuil (Teige, son of Joseph), Ollav of Fermanagh in medicine, died.

M1450.14

O'Higgin, i.e. Tuathal, chief preceptor of the poets of Ireland, died of a sudden illness.

M1450.15

Great depredations were committed by the son of Mageoghegan upon the


p.971

English. He plundered and burned Rath-Guaire, Cill-Lucain, Baile-Portel, Baile na n Gall-Oirghiallach, and Kilbixy. In the course of this war he made a prisoner of Carbry, the son of Laoiseach, son of Ross, and slew the two grandsons of Theobald Mac Hobert. He also slew Brian, son of Laoiseach, who was son of Ross, at Eaile-Mor Locha-Semhdidhe. In fine, it would be impossible to enumerate all that were destroyed (by him) during that war. The English of Meath and the Duke of York came with the standard of the King of England to Mullingar; and the son of Mageoghegan went the next day, with a strong body of cavalry, to Bel-atha-glas-arnarach, to oppose them, whereupon the English, having held consultation, thought it advisable to make peace with him; and, in consideration of obtaining peace from him, they forgave him all the injuries he had done them.

M1450.16

Donough O'Gallagher, Coarb of Adamnan, died.

Annal M1451.

M1451.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1451. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-one.

M1451.1

Redmond, son of William Mac Feorais Bermingham, died on his way from Rome, after having obtained the bishopric of Tuam.

M1451.2

The monastery of Cavan was burned.


p.973

M1451.3

Margaret, daughter of O'Carroll (Teige), and wife of O'Conor Faly (Calbhach), the best woman in her time in Ireland, for it was she who had given two invitations of hospitality in the one year to those who sought for rewards, died, after the victory of Unction and Penance, triumphant over the world and the Devil; and Felim O'Conor, son of Calvagh by this Margaret, and heir to the lordship of Offaly, a man of great fame and renown, died, having been for a long time ill of a decline. Only one night intervened between the deaths of both.

M1451.4

Murrough O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, the most powerful in his own territory, of mightiest arm, and best jurisdiction, died.

M1451.5

Rory, son of Maelmora Reagh O'Conor, died.

M1451.6

Owen, son of Connor Mac Gillafinnen (i.e.) son of the chieftain of Muintir-Pheodachain, and Gillapatrick Boy Mac Gillafinnen, were slain by Cuconnaught, the son of John, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, on the sixth of the Ides of February.


p.975

M1451.7

A great war broke out among the Hy-Many; and O'Conor Don went to protect O'Kelly, who gave up his son and two other hostages to him, as pledges for the perpetual payment of twenty marks annually, viz. fourteen marks for the land of Sith, which the Hy-Many had purchased some time before from Turlough Oge, and which Hugh O'Conor now redeemed; and six marks due by Makeogh in this war. And he defended O'Kelly on that occasion.

M1451.8

The castle of Coradh-finne was erected by Mac William of Clanrickard.

M1451.9

Cathal Duff, son of Tomaltach Oge Mac Donough, was killed.

M1451.10

Cathal, son of Brian Mac Donough, was killed by his own father with a cast of a knife, as the former was in the act of violating his guarantee.

M1451.11

The three sons of Melaghlin O'Beirne, Teige, William, and Donough, were slain at Cluain Creamha, within the space of one hour, by the descendants of Melaghlin Mag-Rannall and Donnell, the son of Brian O'Beirne.

M1451.12

A prey was taken by Felim O'Conor from O'Gara, and a prey was taken by O'Gara from the people of Ballymore-I-Flynn.

M1451.13

Dermot, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Mac Carthy, was slain; and Dermot, the son of O'Sullivan More, was slain in revenge of him.

M1451.14

Cathal Roe, son of Cathal Duv O'Conor, died.

M1451.15

Gillapatrick Oge O'Fialan, a learned poet, died.


p.977

Annal M1452.

M1452.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1452. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-two.

M1452.1

Naghtan, son of Turlough-an-Fhina O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Kinel-Moen, Inishowen, and the neighbouring territories, a brave and protecting man, and arbiter of the peace and war of the North, was slain in the darkness of the night, on the festival of St. Brendan, by Donnell and Hugh Roe, the sons of Niall O'Donnell, his brother, because he had some time before banished these sons of Niall from Tirconnell. Naghtan was sixty years of age when he was killed.

M1452.2

Great war and dissensions arose in Tirconnell between Donnell, the son of Niall Garv, and Rory, the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, concerning the lordship of Tirconnell, so that the country was thrown into confusion between them, and that the friends and abettors of either party plundered and harassed one another; and men were slain and destroyed, and many depredations and spoliations were committed between them on both sides.

M1452.3

An army was led by O'Neill (Owen) into the Feadha, to make war against the English of Machaire-Oirghiall in the county of Louth, and was joined by Maguire on that hosting. The son of O'Neill (Owen Oge) and Maguire's people then proceeded to Cloch-an-bhodaigh to plunder the English; and they carried off the prey to their camp. Upon this the English and Mac Mahon's people, and his kinsmen, pursued them to their camp; and here O'Neill, Maguire, and their people, rose up against them; and a battle ensued between them, in which Mac Donnell Galloglagh, i.e. Sorley More, and numbers of others along with him were slain, and others of the forces taken prisoners. O'Neill returned


p.979

to his camp that night in great wrath; upon hearing of which, Henry, his son, came to meet him; and Mac Mahon afterwards came to O'Neill and his sons, and they made peace with each other; and O'Neill obtained an eric for the dishonour he had received, and also an eric for the death of Mac Donnell.

M1452.4

The Earl of Ormond, Lord Justice of Ireland, broke down the castle of Owny upon O'Mulrian, and took the castle of Leix from the O'Dempsys, who permitted him to pass to Airem, to rescue the son of Mac Feorais Bermingham, who was imprisoned there. He then burned Airem, and from thence proceeded to Offaly, whereupon O'Conor came into his house, as an assurance that the son of Mac Feorais should be set at liberty. From thence he proceeded into Annaly, where O'Farrell came into his house, and promised him ninescore beeves, as the price of obtaining peace from him. From thence both proceeded to Magh-Breaghmaine, demolished the castle of Barrcha, and destroyed the greater part of the corn. From thence they marched to Fore, and from thence to Magh-Maine, where the O'Reillys came to his house, and acceded to all


p.981

his conditions. From thence he marched into Machaire-Oirghiall in the county of Louth, where Mac Mahon gave him his demands. After this he marched to meet the Clanna-Neill, and caused Henry O'Neill to put away the daughter of Mac William Burke, whom he had taken to wife after the death of her former husband, O'Donnell, and to take back to him again his own lawfully wedded wife, the daughter of Mac Murrough, and the Earl's own step sister. And thence he proceeded to Baile-atha-fhirdia-mic-Damain, where he died, between the two feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary (from the 15th of August to the 8th of September), having accomplished these journeys in half a quarter of a year.

M1452.5

The daughter of the Earl of Kildare, the Countess of Ormond, died three weeks before her husband, the above-named Earl.

M1452.6

The peace concluded between the English and Irish became null after the death of the Earl, and Sir Edward Eustace was appointed Lord Justice.

M1452.7

More, daughter of O'Conor Faly, and wife of Mac William of Clanrickard. died of a fall.

M1452.8

A sure wonderful presage occurred in this year, some time before the death of the Earl, namely, part of the River Liffey was dried up, to the extent of two miles.

M1452.9

John Mac Donough Liath, Half Chief of Tirerrill, died.

M1452.10

Teige, the son of Dermot Roe O'Conor Don, died.

M1452.11

Turlough Roe, the son of Brian Ballagh O'Conor; Turlough, the son of Teige, son of Turlough Roe O'Conor; and Henry of Crumthann, son of William Mac David, were slain in the Summer of this year on Coirrshliabh na Seaghsa the Curlieus, by the army of the Clann-Donough.

M1452.12

David O'More, son of the Lord of Leix, was killed by a fall.


p.983

M1452.13

Cathal, the son of William, son of John, son of Donnell O'Farrell, was slain by the cast of a javelin, after having burned Fore.

M1452.14

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Hugh O'Hanly, Lord of Kinel-Dofa, died at Cluain Coirpthe, where he had been blind for a long time, after having resigned his lordship.

M1452.15

Loughlin Oge O'Hanly, Chief of Kinel-Dofa, was treacherously slain in the crannog of Lough Leise by the son of Murrough, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Hanly, and the son of Owney, son of Gilla-na-naev, having been betrayed to them by his own people, namely, by Donnell Carragh O'Maelbrighde, and his son, and by Thomas, the son of Gilla-Crossagh O'Maelbrighde. Rory Boy, the son of Gilla-na-naev, was then elected Chieftain; and he hanged, for their evil deeds, these three stewards of his own people, who had acted treacherously towards Loughlin.

M1452.16

Teagh-Munna was plundered and burned by Farrell Mageoghegan.

M1452.17

Mac Carthy Reagh Donough, Lord of Hy-Carbery, died; and Dermot an Duna was inaugurated in his place.

M1452.18

Brian, the son of Calvagh O'Conor, by Margaret, was killed by a fall.

M1452.19

Farrell Roe Oge, the son of Farrell Roe, son of Farrell Roe, son of Donough, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, a captain of great repute and celebrity, was killed and beheaded at Cruach-abhall, by the son of the Baron of Delvin, and the grandsons of Pierce Dalton. They carried his head to Trim, and from thence to Dublin, for exhibition; but it was (afterwards) brought back, and buried along with the body in Durrow-Coluim-Chille.

M1452.20

Melaghlin, the son of Irard O'Mulconry, died of an internal disease on Michaelmas Day, which fell on Friday.


p.985

M1452.21

O'Coffey, i.e. Hugh Mac-an-Chlasaigh, a learned poet, who kept a house of hospitality, died of the plague in Feara-Tulach.

M1452.22

Cuconnaught O'Fialain and Gilla-Isa O'Fialain died.

M1452.23

O'Duigennan of Baile-Caille-foghair, i.e. Manus, the son of Melaghlin Roe, died.

M1452.24

Hugh, the son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh, son of Philip na Tuaighe of the Battle-axe Maguire, was slain on the sixth of the Ides of April, in the castle of O'Rourke, i.e. Tiernan, son of Teige, son of Tiernan, by Brian, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire.

M1452.25

Conor Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir-Pheodachain, died on the sixth of the Calends of April.

M1453.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1453. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-three.

M1453.1

Mac Mahon, Hugh Roe, son of Rory, an affable and pious man, well skilled in each art, distinguished for his prowess and noble deeds, died in his own


p.987

house, at Lurgan, on Easter night, and was interred at Clones; and Felim, the son of Brian Mac Mahon, was elected to succeed him as Lord over the Oriels.

M1453.2

Cormac, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Hugh, son of Philip, son of Donn Carragh Maguire, died on the 16th of the Calends of July.

M1453.3

Rory, the son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by the son of John Burke, in the territory of Conmaicne-Dunmore.

M1453.4

Rory, the son of Cathal, son of Rory O'Conor, died in the castle of Roscommon.

M1453.5

Murtough, the son of Owen, son of Donnell O'Conor, was slain by his own kinsmen, Donnell and Cathal.

M1453.6

Owen, son of Donnell Bane O'Reilly, died; and Edmond, the son of Turlough O'Reilly, was slain by the English.

M1453.7

The Clann-Hugh-Boy O'Neill sustained a great defeat at Ardglass from the Savadges, assisted by the English of Dublin. A fleet of Welsh ships of war had plundered the fleet of Dublin, and taken the Archbishop prisoner; and the English of Dublin having pursued them with a large fleet, as far as the north sea, Henry Mac-I-Neill Boy met them on their return at Ardglass, but was taken prisoner by the English; and Cu-Uladh, the son of Cathbharr Magennis, heir to the lordship of Iveagh, Hugh Magennis, Mac Artan, and fifteen captains from the territory of the Route, were slain. The total loss on the side of the Irish amounted to five hundred and twenty.

M1453.8

Brian, the son of Conor Mac Donough, assumed the lordship of Tirerrill; and Teige Mac Donough was abandoned by his own friends.


p.989

Annal M1454.

M1454.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1454. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-four.

M1454.1

Donnell, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, was installed in the lordship of Tirconnell, in opposition to the real O'Donnell (Rury, the son of Naghtan). And not long after this Donnell was treacherously taken prisoner in his own house by O'Doherty, who sent him to be imprisoned in the castle of Inis. As soon as Rury had received tidings of this, he mustered an army. O'Kane and Mac Quillin came without delay to his assistance, bringing all their forces with them; and they proceeded to demolish the castle in which Donnell was imprisoned, with a few persons about him to guard the place, among whom was Cathal O'Duvdirma. Rury and his army burned the gate and door of the castle, and set the stairs on fire; whereupon, Donnell, thinking that his life would be taken as soon as the army should reach the castle, entreated (it being his dying request) that he might be loosed from his fetters, as he deemed it treacherous to be killed while imprisoned and fettered. His request was granted, and he was loosed from his fetters; after which he ascended to the battlements of the castle, to view the motions of the invading army. And he saw Rury beneath, with eyes flashing opposition, and waiting until the fire should subside, that he might enter, and kill him. Donnell then, finding a large stone by his side, hurled it directly down upon Rury, so that it fell on the crest of his helmet, on the top of his head, and fractured it, so that he instantly died. The invading forces were afterwards defeated, and by this throw Donnell saved his own life, and acquired the lordship of Tirconnell.

M1454.2

Donnell, son of John O'Reilly, died.

M1454.3

John Boy and Giollapatrick, sons of Auliffe, who was son of Donn Carragh Maguire, were treacherously slain by Niall, son of Cormac, who was son of Gilduff,


p.991

who was son of Hugh (from whom are descended the Slicht-Aedha of Clann-Awley), son of Auliffe, son of Philip, son of Auliffe, son of Auliffe, who was son of Donn Carragh, &c.

M1454.4

Brian Mac Donough, Chief of Tirerrill, died on the Friday before the Calends of January, after Unction and due Penance, and was interred in the monastery of Sligo.

M1454.5

Hugh, son of Niall O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall, died; and his son, Cucogry, assumed his place. Cucogry proceeded with his forces to the east of Fircall, to oppose Theobald O'Molloy, who was trying to obtain the chieftainship for himself, and seized upon great spoils, Theobald having left his fastnesses and his cows to them. The army marched off with their spoils, and O'Molloy's son was left, attended only by a few, in the rear of the prey. Theobald, the sons of Hugh Boy Mageoghegan, and the Hy-Regan, followed in pursuit of the preys, and, overtaking O'Molloy's son on the borders of a bog, they slew him, and many others, on the spot. They took Teige O'Carroll prisoner. Theobald and the grandson of Cosnamhach O'Molloy were then set up as chiefs, in opposition to each other.

M1454.6

O'Donnellan, Flann, the son of Cormac, died.

M1454.7

Dunadhach, the son of Cathal O'Madden, was slain by the sons of William O'Kelly.

M1454.8

Sir Edward Eustace, Lord Justice of Ireland, died; and the earldom of Kildare was assumed by the son of John Cam, i.e. the son of tile Earl, who was appointed Lord Justice after the death of Sir Edward Eustace.

M1454.9

O'Byrne was treacherously slain by the son of his own brother, as he was leaving Cill-Mantain.


p.993

M1454.10

Farrell Roe Mageoghegan resigned his lordship, and retired into the monastery of Durrow-Columbkille, having lost his sight; and Niall Mageoghegan assumed his place.

M1454.11

Turlough Dall, the son of Turlough Oge O'Conor, died of a short fit of sickness.

M1454.12

Turlough, the son of Murtough, son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by the Clann-Keherny.

Annal M1455.

M1455.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1455. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-five.

M1455.1

Thomas O'Cairnen, Prior of Athlone, the most eminent man of his time in Connaught for wisdom and knowledge, died.

M1455.2

Turlough Carragh, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough, Lord of Sligo, died.

M1455.3

Cahir, the son of Murrough O'Conor Faly, was slain by Teige, the son of Calvagh O'Conor; and Cuilen O'Dempsey was slain by him on the same day.

M1455.4

Cumhscrach, son of Conor O'Reilly, died.

M1455.5

A war broke out between Philip, the son of Thomas Maguire, heir to the lordship of Fermanagh, and Magauran. Philip pitched his camp at Beann-Eachlabhra; and Brian and Tuathal, Philip's sons, went forth with twelve


p.995

horsemen and thirty-seven infantry, burned Magauran's town, and the greater part of his territory, and killed Melaghlin Duv Magauran and a great number of his people; after which he returned home triumphantly.

M1455.6

Turlough, the son of Philip Maguire, went to Loch Melge, and took and plundered Mac Clancy's crannog on it.

M1455.7

Owen O'Neill was banished from his lordship by his own son, Henry.

M1455.8

The successor of St. Patrick i.e. the Archbishop of Armagh, Maguire, Mac Mahon, and all the O'Neills, went with Henry, the son of Owen, who was son of Niall Oge, to Tullyhoge, to inaugurate him; and they called him O'Neill after the lawful manner.

M1455.9

Henry Mac-I-Neill Boy made his escape from the English, by whom he had been held in fetters.

M1455.10

The castle of Athlone was taken from the English, having been betrayed by a woman who was in it.

M1455.11

Caislen-na-Sraide was demolished by O'Farrell; and the son of Mac Herbert was slain by him while taking the castle.

M1455.12

Mulrony, the son of Connor, who was son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, died.

M1455.13

Geoffrey, the son of Murrough Oge, son of Murrough More, son of Cathal, Lord of Clann-Hugh of the Mountain, died.

M1455.14

Owen Mac Dermot Roe, Lord of the Woods, was slain by his own kindred.

M1455.15

Maine, the son of Melaghlin Mac Cabe, materies of a Constable of the two Breifnies, of Oriel, and Fermanagh, died.

M1455.16

O'Cassidy of Cuil, i.e. Dermot Roe, son of Niall Roe, died.


p.997

Annal M1456.

M1456.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1456. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-six.

M1456.1

O'Neill, Owen, the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall More, died.

M1456.2

A great war broke out between Donnell, the son of Niall Garv, Lord of Tirconnell, and O'Neill, Henry, after the expulsion of the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell, by O'Donnell, into Tyrone. O'Neill and Maguire went with the sons of Naghtan into Inishowen, and marched, without halting, until they pitched their camp near the confines of Cuil-Mic-an-treoin. When O'Donnell heard of this, he and his brother, Hugh Roe, and Mac Sweeny Fanad (Mulmurry), proceeded expeditiously on horseback, and, unattended by any others, to place warders in the castle of Cuil-Mic-an-treoin, to oppose this great army, which the sons of Naghtan had drawn into the territory. But when O'Donnell left the town with his small number of attendants, the other party espied them, and followed them as quickly as they could, until they overtook them; and then they did not shew them the rights of men, nor did they oppose to them an equal number of their forces, but the many rushed upon the few, so that O'Donnell, Donnell, the son of Niall Garv, was slain (on the l8th of May, which fell on Friday), and Hugh Roe and the son of Mac Sweeny were taken prisoners. Turlough Cairbreach, the son of Naghtan, then assumed the lordship of Tirconnell.

M1456.3

Farrell, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg, and Lasarina, daughter of the same Farrell, and wife of Carbry O'Conor, died.

Annal M1457.

M1457.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1457. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-seven.

M1457.1

Brian, the son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, son of the Lord of Fermanagh, died, after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1457.2

A war broke out between Maguire and Rury Mac Mahon; and Maguire assembled the forces of his country to march into Oriel. When the sons of


p.999

Mac Mahon had heard of this, they went with their cattle into their fastnesses, namely, into Eoghanach and Sliabh Mughdhorn. Maguire and Philip proceeded to Dartry-Coininsi, but not finding any spoils there, they burned all Dartry, and burned the town of Owen, the son of Rury Mac Mahon, namely, Lis-na-nGabhar; after which they returned home.

M1457.3

Philip, the son of Thomas Maguire, and his sons, marched with an army into Breifny O'Rourke; and O'Rourke, before their arrival, sent his cows into the fastnesses of the country. Philip advanced to O'Rourke's town, and burned it, as well as the entire country around it. O'Rourke however came up with Philip; and a battle was fought between them, in which Tiernan, the son of Teige O'Rourke, and the son of Manus Grumach, son of Cathal Bodhar O'Rourke, and many others, were slain by the men of Fermanagh.

M1457.4

Brian, the son of Murtough Oge O'Farrell, Lord of the Clann-Auliffe O'Farrell, died.


p.1001

Annal M1458.

M1458.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1458. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-eight.

M1458.1

The church of Achadh-beithe, with many valuable books, was burned on the official, i.e. Niall, son of Magrath Mac Mahon.

M1458.2

A hosting was made by O'Donnell, Turlough Cairbreach; and O'Neill, Henry, came to join his muster. They first went to Lower Connaught, and from thence they proceeded into Breifny; and they spoiled and burned that part of the territory lying from the mountain westwards; and they also burned O'Rourk's town, Druim-da-Ethiar Drumahaire. They obtained the hostages of Lower Connaught, who were given into the hands of O'Donnell; after which they returned home.

M1458.3

O'Conor Faly, Calvagh More, son of Murrough-na-madhmann, Lord of all Offaly, a man who never refused the countenance of many, and who had won more wealth from his English and Irish enemies than any lord in Leinster, died; and Con O'Conor, his son, was elected in his place, before his father was buried in (the monastery of) Killeigh.

M1458.4

O'Rourke, i.e. Loughlin, the son of Teige Liath, Lord of Breifny, died.

M1458.5

Art O'Neill, the son of Owen, son of Niall Oge, the most eminent man of Tyrone for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1458.6

Magauran, Thomas, the son of Farrell, died.

M1458.7

Tomaltagh, the son of Cathal Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, Airtech, Tir-Tuathail, &c, general patron of the learned of Ireland, and who had been very bountiful to the soldiery and other stipendiaries, died on the night before the


p.1003

festival of St. Bartholomew, and was interred in the Abbey of Boyle, with his worthy son, Cathal Mac Dermot, who had died a fortnight before him. Hugh, son of Conor Mac Dermot, succeeded Tomaltagh.

M1458.8

Geoffry, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas O'Farrell, was slain by John, the son of Donnell, son of John O'Farrell, assisted by the sons of Conor Laoighseach, &c.

M1458.9

Edmond Burke, Lord of the English of Connaught, and of many of the Irish of the same province, the choice of the English of Ireland for his personal shape, comeliness and stature, noble descent, hospitality, clemency, and veracity, died at the end of this year.

M1458.10

Farrell Roe Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, died on the 17th of February.

Annal M1459.

M1459.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1459. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred fifty-nine.

M1459.1

0'Brien (Turlough), Lord of Thomond, died.

M1459.2

Cumara Mac Namara was treacherously slain.

M1459.3

Conla Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain by the sons of Art O'Melaghlin.

M1459.4

O'Beirne (Brian), Chief of Tir-Briuin, died.

M1459.5

Farrell, the son of Thomas 0'Reilly, died.

M1459.6

A great defeat was given by the Earl of Kildare to O'Conor Faly, Con, the son of Calvagh, in which Con himself was taken prisoner; and the grandson of William O'Kelly, and many others of his people, were slain.

M1459.7

The spoils of Kinel-Duachain were carried off by Brian, the son of Philip, son of Thomas Maguire.

M1459.8

The spoils of Magh Slecht were seized on by Maguire (Thomas Oge); and Ballymagauran was burned by him on this occasion.


p.1005

M1459.9

Glasny, the son of Conor O'Reilly, was slain by the sons of Rory Mac Mahon.

M1459.10

O'Neill, Henry, the son of Owen, brought an army of the English against the castle of Oghmhagh, to take it from the sons of Art O'Neill; but they made peace with each other.

M1459.11

John Cam, the son of Cu-Uladh Mac Ward, died.

M1459.12

O'Cuirnin, Manus, Chief Historian to O'Rourke, died.

M1459.13

Mulmurry O'Keenan, a materies of a historian and poet, died.

M1459.14

Murtough O'Daly, a learned poet, died.

Annal M1460.

M1460.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1460. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty.

M1460.1

The monastery of Maighin in Tirawley, in the diocese of Killala, in Connaught, was founded by Mac William Burke, at the request of Nehemias O'Donohoe, the first Irish provincial vicar of the order of St. Francis de Observantia.

M1460.2

O'Brian, Bishop of Killaloe, was killed by Brian-an-Chobhlaigh, the son of Donough, son of Mahon O'Brien of Inis-Cluana-ramhfhoda.

M1460.3

Rory, the son of Manus O'Mochain, Provost of Elphin, died.

M1460.4

Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, and the son of Mac Sweeny Fanad (Mulmurry), were liberated from prison by O'Neill (Henry), after they had been detained by him as prisoners for four full years; for the sons of Naghtan who during this time enjoyed the chieftainship were dearer to him than the sons of Niall.


p.1007

M1460.5

A great defeat was given to the English by O'Conor Faly, Con, the son of Calvagh, in which the Baron of Galtrim, and many others besides, were slain.

M1460.6

The English defeated O'Reilly, John, the son of Owen, son of John, son of Philip, son of Gilla-Isa-Roe; and in the conflict O'Reilly himself, his brother Hugh, Owen Caech, the son of Mahon Mac Cabe, and a great number of others, were slain. Cathal, the son of Owen, assumed his place.

M1460.7

Magauran, Owen, died.

M1460.8

Rory Ballagh, the son of Murtough O'Conor, died.

M1460.9

Thomas, the son of Thomas Burke (who became Mac William on the death of Edmond Burke), died.

M1460.10

Mac Cabe, Henry, the son of Gilchreest, went with O'Farrell into Annaly, where he died of a short fit of sickness at Lisaird-abhla Lissardowlin. He was carried to Cavan, to be interred there, attended by two hundred and eighty gallowglasses, armed with battle-axes.

M1460.11

Mac Manus of Tir-Tuathail, Rory, the son of Owen Roe Mac Manus, fully worthy to be Lord of that territory, was slain by Con, the son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough-an-Fhiona O'Donnell, and Teige, the son of Teige O'Rourke, while in pursuit of the spoils of the territory. O'Donnell's people carried the spoils with them to Airged-glenn; but, after the killing of Mac Manus, the chiefs of the Clann-Manus deprived them of their preys in that valley.

M1460.12

Donnell, the son of Dermot O'Malley, William O'Malley, and John O'Malley,


p.1009

went on a maritime expedition, with the sons of O'Brien, to Corca-Bhaiscinn, against Mac Mahon; but the three were slain before they could reach their ships; and Donnell O'Brien was taken prisoner, and Mahon O'Brien, as they were on their way to their ship; and Mahon was drowned before he could reach his own ship. Their people were slaughtered on this occasion.

M1460.13

Brian O'Mailly was slain by his brother, Hugh O'Mailly, in a dispute which occurred between them. These were two sons of Teige O'Mailly.

M1460.14

A monastery was founded for Franciscan Friars in Inis-Arcain, in Munster, in the diocese of Cork. Inis-Arcain is in O'Driscoll's country.

M1460.15

The monastery of Inis-Corthadh, in Leinster, in the diocese of Ferns, on the margin of the river called Slaine, was founded for Franciscan Friars.

M1460.16

Edward IV. was make King of England on the 4th of March.

Annal M1461.

M1461.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1461. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-one.

M1461.1

Felim, son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill, died of a sudden fit. He was eminent for his hospitality and prowess; he was a protector of the learned and the exiled, and a man who had purchased more poetry, and had a larger collection of poems, than any other man of his time. He died after having overcome the world and the Devil.

M1461.2

Hugh, the son of Turlough Oge O'Conor, Half Lord of Connaught, in opposition


p.1011

to Teige O'Conor, and worthy to be King of Connaught for his personal shape and comeliness, his valour, his warfare, and his hospitality to learned men, and all who stood in need of it, died at Baile-tobair-Bhrighde, in the sixty-third year of his age, during the Ides of May, after Unction and Penance, and was interred at Roscommon.

M1461.3

The sons of Niall Garv O'Donnell, Hugh Roe, Con, and Owen, assembled all their forces, and proceeded into Fanad to the son of Mac Sweeny, Mulmurry, because O'Donnell (Turlough Cairbreach) was wreaking his animosities on the son of Mac Sweeny and all Fanad, for their friendship to the sons of Niall. The sons of Niall and the son of Mac Sweeny held a council, to consider how they should act, in order to defend themselves against the sons of Naghtan and their forces, who were ready to wreak their vengeance and enmity on them. When O'Donnell and the sons of Naghtan were informed that the sons of Niall had arrived in Fanad, he set out after them with his brothers, his troops, and a battalion of Scotsmen then in his service, and pitched his camp at Ceann-Maghair, to watch and check the sons of Niall O'Donnell and Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, who was passing with them out of the territory. The sons of Niall O'Donnell and the people of Fanad having heard of this, they consulted with one another; and they came to a determination not to abandon or cede the pass to any host or army that should oppose them: and when this resolution was adopted, the sons of Niall O'Donnell, Mulmurry MacSweeny, Owen Bacagh Mac Sweeny, and all the people of Fanad who adhered to them, proceeded to Ceann-Maghair to meet and oppose the forces of O'Donnell and the sons of Naghtan; and as they i.e. the hostile parties approached each other, they did not hesitate to attack each other, in consequence of their enmities and hatred, provocations and animosities; and they met each other in a furious and obstinate battle, in which O'Donnell, i.e. Turlough Cairbreach, and the sons of Naghtan, were defeated. O'Donnell himself was taken prisoner, and his brother Manus, and numbers of others, were slain. Turlough Cairbreach was afterwards maimed. After this defeat at Ceann-Maghair, these victorious chieftains


p.1013

went to Cill-Mic-Nenain, and Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, was styled lord after the lawful manner; and the O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, called Mulmurry Mac Sweeney the Mac Sweeny Fanad.

M1461.4

Manus, the son of Brian, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, Lord of Carbury, died.

M1461.5

Mac Cawell, i.e. Brian, Lord of Kinel-Farry, died; and Owen Mac Cawell was made lord.

M1461.6

Farrell O'Gara, Tanist of Coolavin, was slain by Mac Costello.

M1461.7

The Dean O'Malone, the most learned man in all Ireland, died at Cluain-muc-Nois-mic-Fidhaigh.

M1461.8

Aengus Magrath, a learned poet, Niall O'Higgin, and Niall, son of Farrell Oge O'Higgin, died.

M1461.9

Mahon, son of William O'Farrell, died.

M1461.10

William O'Flannagan, Priest and Canon Chorister of Elphin, died.

M1461.11

In the beginning of this year Felim Finn O'Connor was taken prisoner by


p.1015

his own kinsmen, i.e. the sons of Brian Ballagh and Rory O'Conor Don, so that after this capture war and disturbances arose in Sil-Murray, and Teige O'Conor himself was taken prisoner by his kinsmen.

M1461.12

An army was led by Mac William Burke and his kinsmen into Machaire-Chonnacht, to release Felim Finn from the son of Brian Ballagh; and they gave him his own demand for his ransom, and the chiefs of Connaught as guarantees for the payment of it, whereupon Felim was set at liberty. He took those chieftains with him to Carn-fraoigh-mhic-Fiodhaigh-foltruaidh; and Mac Dermot put on his shoe, after having purchased him; and they obtained the hostages of the descendants of Ona, the son of Aengus, and those of the Hy-Briuin. Mac Williain left these hostages with the son of Brian Ballagh, and returned home. As soon as the sons of O'Conor Roe had heard of this, they ransomed Teige O'Conor from O'Conor Don, by giving the half townland of Baile-an-chlair for him; and they afterwards went over to Conor Mac Branan.

M1461.13

A great war broke out between the English of Meath and those of Leinster, during which war a great part of Meath was destroyed. O'Conor Faly and Mac Richard Butler went to Druim-Tuirleime with one thousand horsemen, or more, all wearing helmets, and remained there, without fear or dread, shoeing their steeds; and their army and marauding parties were plundering and burning Meath in every direction. It was in this war that the son of Felim, who was son of Calvach O'Conor, was taken prisoner by John, son of Mac Thomas.


p.1017

O'Conor however obtained great rewards from the English for making peace with them, as had been usual with his predecessors.

M1461.14

Great depredations were committed by Mageoghegan on the Baron of Delvin. Great depredations were also committed by him on the Ledwiches, so that he plundered the country as far as the River Inny.

M1461.15

The sons of Irial O'Farrell plundered Port-Lomain.

M1461.16

Melaghlin, son of Flann O'Donnellan, died.

M1461.17

Theobald O'Molloy, Lord of half the territory of Fircall, was slain by O'Molloy of the Wood.


p.1019

Annal M1462.

M1462.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1462. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-two.

M1462.1

A monastery for Friars Minor was commenced at Muineachan, while Felim, the son of Brian, son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, was Lord of Oriel.

M1462.2

The Prior of Devenish, i.e. Bartholomew, the son of Hugh O'Flanagan, died on Lough Derg.

M1462.3

Brian, the son of Philip Maguire, the most hospitable and chivalrous man of all the men of Ulster of his age, was killed, while in pursuit of a prey, by the sons of Art O'Neill, i.e. Rory and his brothers, after they had promised to protect him, and after he had been in their hands for some time. Edmond Roe, the son of John Maguire, was slain by the same Rory.

M1462.4

Teige, the son of Owen O'Conor, Lord of Carbury, died.

M1462.5

Teige O'Conor and his kinsmen defeated the sons of Brian Ballagh. Dermot, the son of Donough, son of Brian, and John, the son of Teige Mac Tiernan na Corra, were slain in the battle. The sons of Brian Ballagh were then driven from their country, and spoiled of all their property. The two sons of Brian himself went over in dismay to Conor Mac Branan to Greanach; but Mac Branan was forced to abandon them, so that they were proclaimed and driven from country to country, and Mac Branan himself was banished from his country into Annaly, where O'Farrell received him, and gave him lands for his cattle, and coigny to his peoples in his territory.


p.1021

M1462.6

An army was led by Mac William of Clanrickard into Hy-Cairin, where O'Meagher, i.e. Teige, and his confederates, rose up to oppose him. The son of O'Meagher slew William Burke, the son of Mac William, by one cast of a javelin; and it was this cast that saved O'Meagher and his army. This O'Meagher, Chief of Hy-Cairin, died a short time afterwards, and his son assumed his place.

M1462.7

Mac Branan, i.e. Tomaltagh Carragh, son of Con, son of Hugh, died at an advanced age.

M1462.8

The young Earl of Ormond came to Ireland with a great number of Saxons i.e. Englishmen. A great war broke out between the Earls of Ormond and Desmond, in the course of which Garrett, the son of the Earl of Desmond, was taken prisoner by the Butlers. Waterford was also taken by them. They i.e. both Earls afterwards agreed to give battle to each other, and they came to an engagement; but it was against the will of the Earl of Ormond that Mac Richard went to fight the battle on that day. Howbeit he was defeated, and taken prisoner; and, according to some accounts, there were four hundred and ten of the


p.1023

slain of his people interred, besides the number who were devoured by dogs and birds of prey. The Geraldines took Kilkenny and the other towns in the country of the Butlers, after the slaughter of the latter in this battle; but the young Earl of Ormond remained with his Englishmen in a fortified town, which could not be taken. Another brother of the Earl came to Ireland, and on the sea took four ships, with their crews, belonging to the Earl of Desmond; and, in consequence of this, the Butlers acquired great power.

M1462.9

O'Farrell was defeated by the son of Con O'Melaghlin, the Dillons, and Laoighseach, the son of Ross, at Nuachongbhail, where Edmond, the son of O'Farrell, and eleven men of the descendants of Murtough Oge O'Farrell, were taken prisoners. They i.e. the vanquished lost in all seventy men, including the prisoners and the slain.

M1462.10

Thomas, the son of Cathal, son of Thomas O'Farrell, Tanist of Annaly, was slain at Bel-atha-na-Pailise, at night, while in pursuit of a prey, which the party of the Dillons, the Clann-Conor, and the sons of Murtough, were carrying off. They bore away his head and his spoil with them, having found him with merely a few troops, a circumstance of rare occurrence with him.


p.1025

M1463.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1463. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-three.

M1463.1

Gilchreest Mac Edigen, Vicar of St. Patrick's Church at Elphin, and a Canon Chorister, died.

M1463.2

Conor, the son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, Lord of Clann-Bibsaigh, died.

M1463.3

James, son of Garrett, Earl of Desmond, died.

M1463.4

Dermot More, son of Dermot O'Conor, was slain by the sons of Teige O'Conor at Eas-Da-Conna, on the River Boyle.

M1463.5

Cuilen O'Dempsy was slain by the English.

M1463.6

Cormac Ballagh, the son of Conor Mac Donough, and son of a chieftain, the most illustrious for hospitality and prowess, and the most profoundly skilled in every science of all the Irish of Lower Connaught in his time died, after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1463.7

William Burke, the son of Richard, marched to attack the castle of Muilenn-Adam, in revenge of the loss of his eye. He was pursued to the borders of Ballymote, where he turned round on his pursuers, and killed fifteen of them, with the son of Manus, son of Dermot Mac Donough, and with the sons of O'Neill, who had some time before put his eye out at that castle.

M1463.8

The son of Main Barrett, Lord of Tirawley, and Siacus Cam, the son of Farrell, Lord of the Clann-Auliffe O'Farrell, died.


p.1027

M1463.9

Grainne, the daughter of Teige O'Rourke, and wife of Mac Donough, died.

M1463.10

Teige, the son of Donnell More Mac Donough, Lord of half the territory of Tirerrill, died.

M1463.11

Henry, the son of Felim O'Reilly, was slain by Thomas, son of Donough Oge Maguire.

M1463.12

Hugh, the son of Gillapatrick Maguire, died.

M1463.13

The King of England sent presents to O'Neill, Henry, the son of Owen, i.e. forty-eight yards of scarlet, a chain of gold, &c.

M1463.14

O'Neill gave wages to Teige, son of Turlough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond.

Annal M1464.

M1464.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1464. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-four.

M1464.1

Fearsithe Mac Duibhne, Bishop of the two Breifnys Kilmore, died.

M1464.2

Dermot Mac Murchadhain, a worthy priest, died.


p.1029

M1464.3

Teige O'Conor died on the Saturday before the first Festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and was interred with honour at Roscommon, among the descendants of Cathal Crovderg from the East and West, and the other septs of Sil-Murray

M1464.4

Kedagh O'More, Lord of Leix, died of the plague.

M1464.5

Donnell O'Rourke; John, son of the Official, son of Murtough Oge O'Farrel; Melaghlin, the son of Brien, son of Murtough Oge O'Farrell, and his wife More, daughter of James O'Kennedy; and wife of Mageoghegan, with her daughter; and Murtough, the son of John O'Duigennan, all died of the same plague.

M1464.6

Murtough, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, and his wife, daughter of O'Coffey, and three others besides, died in one day from having seen a horse that had perished of the same spasms.

M1464.7

Redmond, son of Prior, who was son of Loughlin O'Farrell, died of the plague.

M1464.8

Donnell Cam, the son of Conor Mac Donough, died.

M1464.9

Mac Dermot Roe, i.e. Dermot, the son of Melaghlin; Cathal Bacagh, son of Cormac of Formaoil; and Beanmumhan, the daughter of O'Flanagan, died.

M1464.10

Con, the son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, and Aengus, son of Niall O'Donnell were slain by Egneghan, the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, at Findruim, on the 8th day of May.

M1464.11

A plundering army was led by O'Neill and the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell into Tirconnell, after the killing of Con O'Donnell; and they burned the country as far as Ballyshannon, and seized upon many horses and cows. This, however, did not pass unrevenged, and for what they carried off they left a dear price behind them, for Brian, the son of Conor Oge, son of Conor Roe Maguire, one eminent for hospitality and prowess, and who had kept a house of general hospitality, was slain together with twenty-eight of the army.


p.1031

M1464.12

Breasal, the son of Donough O'Kelly, and Melaghlin, the son of William O'Kelly, who were in contest with each other for the lordship of Hy-Many, both died within the one week, at the end of April. When Melaghlin's servant came to see Breasal in his last sickness, Breasal said, ‘I shall meet Melaghlin in the presence of the Lord of us both at the end of a week;’ and both did attend that meeting.

M1464.13

A great war broke out between the sons of William O'Kelly and the sons of Donough O'Kelly, after the death of Melaghlin.

M1464.14

Mac Richard Butler, the most illustrious and renowned of the English of Ireland in his time, died.

M1464.15

Ir, the son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, Tanist of his own territory, and worthy to become lord of it for his clemency and veracity, died, a week before Michaelmas; and in the same week Ir, the son of William Mac Rannall, was slain by Gilla-Glas Dillon, while he was with his mother's brother, William Dalton.

M1464.16

Donnell, the son of Murtough Bacagh O'Conor, Lord of Carbury-Drumcliff; with his kinsmen, except a few, was slain by the sons of Owen O'Conor; and Rory, the son of Brian O'Conor, was made lord in his i.e. Donnell's place.


p.1033

M1464.17

Felim, son of Donough, who was son of Tiernan Oge O'Rourke, was taken prisoner by O'Rourke; and Hugh, son of Teige O'Rourke, was taken prisoner by Tiernan Oge, son of Donough, in revenge of him Felim.

M1464.18

Tomaltach O'Gara was slain, in a nocturnal attack on Sliabh Lugha, by Maurice, the son of Cormac Mac Dermot Gall, and Edmond-an-Mhachaire Mac Costello.

M1464.19

Loughlin, the son of Maoilin O'Mulconry, died, after a long sickness, and after the victory of penance, and was interred at Elphin.

M1464.20

Loughlin, son of Feirceirtne O'Higgin, died.

M1464.21

Thomas Greannach and Donnell, two sons of Don Maguire, were slain by their brother, Rory Glas.

M1464.22

A sudden predatory excursion was made by the sons of O'Kelly, i.e. by Colla, Prior of Teach-Eoin, and Rory O'Conor, at the instigation of Brian O'Breen of Brawny, and of the sons of Ross, the son of Murtough Midheach O'Farrell; but both met the fate they deserved for what they had done, for both were slain, together with sixteen of their people.

M1464.23

Brian O'Breen, with ten of his people, and ten others of the inhabitants of Caladh, under the conduct of William, son of Donough, son of the Prior O'Farrell, were slain by Magawly.

M1464.24

O'Donnell, Mac William Burke, and many of the Irish and English of Ireland, repaired to Dublin to meet Thomas, Earl of Desmond, at that time Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, and entered into a league of friendship and fealty with him.

M1464.25

Tir-Tuathail was plundered by Hugh Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg. Mac


p.1035

Dermot Gall and the nobles of Tir-Tuathail set out in order to prevent him from carrying off the prey; and they gave hostages to Hugh, for they had continued tributary to the Mac Donough from the death of Tomaltach Mac Dermot until that time.

M1464.26

Nine of the Lord Justice's people were slain in Fingal, at the instigation of the Bishop of Meath; and, thereupon, the Chief Justice, the Bishop, and Preston, went over to the King of England's palace to make complaints against one another.

M1464.27

Thomas, Earl of Desmond, returned from the King of England, having been appointed the King's Deputy, and bringing great presents from the King.

M1464.28

Felim O'Rourke and Hugh were set at liberty on both sides, and a peace was concluded in Breifny.

M1464.29

William, the son of Maine, son of Hugh, Lord of the descendants of Conor Mac Branan, died.

M1464.30

Donnell Cam, son of Conor Mac Donough, died.

M1464.31

A Franciscan monastery was founded at Ath-dara, in Munster, in the diocese of Limerick, on the banks of the River Maigh, by Thomas, Earl of Kildare, and his wife Joan, daughter of James, Earl of Desmond, who erected a tomb for themselves in it.


p.1037

Annal M1465.

M1465.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1465. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-five.

M1465.1

Thomas, the son of Maurice, son of Matthew, Abbot of Lisgool, died.

M1465.2

Gormlaith Kavanagh, the daughter of Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, and wife of O'Neill, died.

M1465.3

Hugh, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, died; and Conor Oge, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, was appointed in his place by the suffrages of the descendants of Hugh Mac Dermot, both clergy and laity, excepting only the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, who, however, suffered for their opposition; for they appointed a day to meet on Carn Fraoich, O'Conor Don, Donough O'Kelly, and the sons of Rory, on the one side, and Mac Dermot and his adherents on the other; and a battle ensued between them, in which Dermot, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, was slain, a great cause of sorrow in his territory. Teige, the son of Rory Boy, was taken prisoner, and O'Conor Don defeated.

M1465.4

John Duv, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by John, the son of Philip Maguire.

M1465.5

John, the son of Alexander, son of John More Mac Donnell, was slain by Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill.

M1465.6

Melaghlin O'Beirne, Chief of Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna, and his young son, the


p.1039

Gilla-Duv (Melaghlin was his real name), were slain and burned by their own kinsmen and tribe, on the Sunday before Allhallowtide; and Melaghlin's other son, Carbry O'Beirne, was killed by one discharge of an arrow at Bearnach Balbh, by the same people, in the same month.

M1465.7

Mac Consnava and his son were treacherously slain by O'Rourke and his sons, who then settled in his country.

M1465.8

Hugh, the son of Teige O'Rourke, died.

M1465.9

Cormac Mac Dermot Gall, Lord of Airtech, died.

M1465.10

Hugh, son of Naghtan O'Donnell, died.

M1465.11

The monastery of Cill-Credhe in Munster, in the diocese of Cork, was founded for Franciscan Friars by the Mac Carthys; and they erected an honourable tomb in it for the interment therein of their gentlemen and chieftains.


p.1041

Annal M1466.

M1466.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1466. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-six.

M1466.1

Brian, the son of Gillapatrick Maguire, Abbot of Lisgool, and Donnell O'Leannain, a Canon of the family of Lisgool, died.

M1466.2

Felim, the son of Brian Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died.

M1466.3

Brian, the son of Auliffe Maguire, the chief of his own tribe, and Lord of Clann-Awley, died.

M1466.4

Aine, the daughter of Mageoghegan, and wife of Maguire, died.

M1466.5

Conor, son of O'Conor Roe, died.

M1466.6

Brian Duv, the son of Teige O'Conor, died on the 15th day of March.

M1466.7

Richard, the son of Edmond Tyrrell, and Thomas Gillda, the son of Edmond Tyrrell, died.

M1466.8

William, son of Walter Burke, and William Burke, son of John, the son of Mac Walter, died.

M1466.9

O'Duigennan of Kilronan (Farrell) and Maurice the Canon, son of Conaing, the Canon O'Mulconry, and Conor, the son of Teige Mac Branan, died.

M1466.10

Owny, the son of Farrell O'Reilly, died.

M1466.11

Donough, the son of Murtough O'Daly, died.

M1466.12

Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, gained a great victory over the English of Machaire Oirghiall.

M1466.13

An army was led by the English of Meath and Leinster into Offaly. O'Conor


p.1043

Faly, i.e. Con, the son of Calvagh, assembled his forces to oppose them; and, first of all, he slew John Mac Thomas, the best and most illustrious captain of the English, whose death was an omen of ill success to the English, for the Earl and his English were defeated next day, and the Earl himself was taken prisoner, and stripped of his arms and armour. Teige O'Conor conveyed the Earl, his own brother-in-law, and a great part of his army along with him, to Castle-Carbury. Christopher Plunket, and the Prior of the House of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Trim, William Oge Nugent, Barnwall, and many others along with them; but the English of Dublin came and carried off all that had, after this defeat, been sent unto the castle of Carbury, in despite of their enemies. After this, marauding parties from Offaly were in the practice of going northwards as far as Tara, and southwards as far as Naas; and the inhabitants of Breifny and Oriel continued for some time afterwards to devastate Meath in all directions, without opposition or pursuit.

M1466.14

Teige O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, marched with a great army across the Shannon in the Summer of this year, and plundered the Irish of Desmond and West Munster. The English of Leinster gave him his demands. He then returned to his house. This O'Brien, after having possessed himself of the territory of Clann-William and the county of Limerick, both of which the Earl made over to him as a condition of obtaining peace from him for himself and


p.1045

his country, and after having obtained a perpetual tribute of sixty marks yearly from the inhabitants of Limerick, died of a disease at his own house; and Conor, the son of Turlough O'Brien, was installed in his place.

M1466.15

Rickard, the son of Mac William Burke, i.e. the son of Richard Oge, Tanist of Clanrickard, died.

M1466.16

O'Dowda and his son were treacherously slain by the sons of Mulrony, the son of Rory O'Dowda.

M1466.17

The English of Meath gained a great victory over Mac Mahon, in a battle in which many were slain, and Hugh Oge Mac Mahon and Mac Donnell of Clann-Kelly taken prisoners.

M1466.18

Owen and Hugh Duv, two sons of Rory, the son of Cathal Duv O'Conor, and Teige, the son of Brian, son of Cathal, were slain by Dermot, the son of Teige O'Conor, and the sons of Dermot Roe, son of Teige O'Conor, on Easter Monday, on the moor of Leitrim.

M1466.19

Melaghlin and John, two sons of Owen Mac Dermot Roe, died within one fortnight.

M1466.20

Owen, the son of John Mac Donough, and Murtough, son of Cuconnaught O'Daly, died.

M1466.21

The monastery of Trinity Island in Lough Key, and the image of the Trinity there, were burned by a candle.


p.1047

Annal M1467.

M1467.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1467. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-seven.

M1467.1

James O'Farrell, Abbot of Leath-ratha Abbeylara, a charitable and truly hospitable doctor, died.

M1467.2

Niall, son of Mahon Magrath, Official of Lough Erne, and Parson of Inis-Caoin, died.

M1467.3

Owen, the son of Rury Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died; and Redmond, the son of Rury, assumed the lordship after him.

M1467.4

Turlough Roe, the son of O'Neill (Henry), died.

M1467.5

O'Reilly, i.e. Cathal, son of Owen, died.

M1467.6

Mac Cathmhaoil, Owen, died.

M1467.7

Hugh, son of Brian O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Maine, died, and was interred at Athlone; and Hugh-na-Coille, the son of William O'Kelly, assumed his place.

M1467.8

Donnell Boy O'Farrell, Chief of Annaly and Laoighseach, the son of Ross, son of Conor, son of Cathal O'Farrell, died. Irial O'Farrell was installed in his place; and John took the place of Irial.

M1467.9

Hugh Duv, son of Donough, who was son of Brian Ballagh, Teige, his brother, Teige, the son of Brian, and Hugh Roe, the son of Dermot More, son of Dermot O'Conor, were slain in a nocturnal assault by Dermot O'Conor, the sons of Dermot Roe, son of Teige O'Conor, and Cathal, the son of Rory Oge O'Conor.

M1467.10

Colla, the son of Manus Mac Mahon, and eleven of his people, were slain while in pursuit of a prey which the Breifnians were carrying off from him.

M1467.11

David Mac Costello was slain by Thomas Mac Feorais Bermingham.

M1467.12

Donough, son of John, who was son of Melaghlin O'Ferrall, died on his way to Rome.

M1467.13

John, son of Edmond, who was son of Farrell O'Reilly, died.

M1467.14

The son of Mac William of Clanrickard died of a sudden fit of sickness. There is no worldly glory but ends in gloom.


p.1049

M1467.15

Christopher Plunkett; Pierce, son of Pierce Dalton; James Oge, the son of James Dalton; and the son of Petit of Mullingar, i.e. the Prior of Mullingar, died of the plague.

M1467.16

John, the son of the Dalton, was slain by his own tribe.

M1467.17

Turlough, the son of Cathal O'Conor was slain at Roscommon by the sons of Donnell, son of Manus Cam O'Kelly.

M1467.18

O'Neill (Henry) marched with an army into Oireacht Ui-Chathain O'Kane's territory. It was on this expedition that Philip Maguire, the best man of his country in his time, was slain.

M1467.19

O'Kelly and the sons of William Burke were defeated at CrosMoighe-Croin, by Mac William of Clanrickard, and by the O'Briens. William Caech Burke, the son of Mac William, two sons of O'Kelly, Hugh Boy, son of Turlough Mac Donnell, Constable of their Gallowglasses, and ten of the gentlemen of the Clann-Donnell who were along with him, were slain in the conflict. One hundred and sixty gallowglasses, and numbers of others, were also slain. O'Donnell i.e. Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, went to Connaught, to take revenge for this defeat, for Mac William and O'Kelly were his friends and confederates. He forced the Clanrickards to make peace, and then returned home in safety.

M1467.20

The island of Lough Cairrgin was taken from its keepers by O'Conor Don and the grandsons of Felim.

M1467.21

Teige O'Conor, Mageoghegan, and Mac Feorais Bermingham, committed innumerable depredations in the plain of Teffia, and plundered the country from Imper to Baile-mic-William.


p.1051

M1467.22

The castle of Cuil Maoile (Coloony) was taken by the sons of Cormac Ballagh Mac Donough from the descendants of Cormac Mac Donough.

M1467.23

An English Justiciary arrived in Ireland, and Thomas Earl of Desmond was removed, an occurrence which wrought the ruin of Ireland.

Annal M1468.

M1468.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1468. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-eight.

M1468.1

Conor O'Melaghlin, Bishop of Elphin, died.

M1468.2

Thomas, Earl of Desmond, the son of James, son of Garrett, who had been Lord Justice of Ireland, the most illustrious of his tribe in Ireland in his time


p.1053

for his comeliness and stature, for his hospitality and chivalry, his charity and humanity to the poor and the indigent of the Lord, his bounteousness in bestowing jewels and riches on the laity, the clergy, and the poets and his suppression of theft and immorality, went to Drogheda to meet the English Lord Justice, and the other English of Meath. These acted treacherously by him, and, without any crime on his part, they beheaded him; the greater number of the men of Ireland were grieved at the news of it. His body was afterwards conveyed to Traigh-Li, and interred in the burial-place of his predecessors and ancestors with great honour and veneration.

M1468.3

O'Rourke, Tiernan Oge, the son of Teige, worthy Lord of the Hy-Briuin, and of all the race of Aedhe-Finn, died, after having overcome the world and the Devil; and Donnell, the son of Teige O'Rourke, was elected in his place by O'Donnell and his other friends. But the descendants of Tiernan, the son of Tiernan More, son of Ualgarg, unjustly rose up against him Donnell, the son of Tiernan More; and they themselves, and the people of Carbury, and the Clann-Donough, inaugurated Donough Losc, the son of Tiernan More. O'Donnell, when he had heard of this, crossed the Erne with a numerous army, and destroyed Lower Connaught. He seized on great spoils in the east of Tir-Fiachrach of Cuil-Cnamha and Coillte-Luighne, which spoils he afterwards carried home. Mac William Oughter, i.e. Ulick, son of Ulick-an-Fhiona, and O'Conor Don, with the English and Irish forces of both, marched to the relief of Lower Connaught; and they burned the town of O'Rourke. But this was all the good they did; and they returned home without battle or booty.

M1468.4

Rory, the son of Conor Mac Donough, Lord of Tirerrill and of Baile-an-duin, died, after having gained the victory over the world and the Devil.


p.1055

M1468.5

Turlough, the son of John O'Reilly, was elected to the lordship of Breifny.

M1468.6

O'Kane, i.e. Manus, died.

M1468.7

Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal Roe Mac Rannall, full Chieftain of Muintir-Eolais, died in his own house on the first Sunday in Lent, after the victory of Unction and Penance; and his son, i.e. Teige Mac Rannall, was nominated Chief, but William Mac Rannall was called another chieftain by the descendants of Melaghlin Mac Rannall.

M1468.8

Art, son of Con O'Melaghlin, Lord of Meath, was slain at Cnoc-Ui-Choscraigh, on Easter Tuesday precisely.

M1468.9

O'More and Mac Gillapatrick died of the plague.

M1468.10

Benmumhan, the daughter of Owen O'Conor, and wife of O'Kelly, i.e. Hugh, the son of Brian, died.

M1468.11

Edmond of the Plain Mac Costello was slain by his brother, William Mac Costello.

M1468.12

Conor Boy, the son of Conor Mac Branan, died.

M1468.13

Owney Mageoghegan was killed by one cast of a javelin in the castle of Cnoc-Ui-Chosgraigh Knockycosker..

M1468.14

Rory, the son of Dermot Roe, son of Teige O'Conor, and his wife, the daughter of Carbry O'Conor, died of a short sickness.

M1468.15

Teige Mac Tiernan, a rich and flourishing Brughaidh-Cedach farmer, and his wife Nuala, the daughter of the son of Donough Reagh, i.e. Farrell, died.

M1468.16

Gilla-duv, the son of Cormac Boy Mac Donough, died.

M1468.17

Conor, son of Edmond, who was son of Melaghlin O'Hanly, died on Low Saturday.

M1468.18

Torna O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray in history and poetry, died in his own house at Lis-Fearbain, shortly after the festival of St. Patrick, and after the victory of penance, and was interred at Elphin. Erard O'Mulconry assumed the ollavship of Sil-Murray after him.

M1468.19

O'Conor Faly, Con, was taken prisoner by the English.

M1468.20

The castle of Bundrowes, which had been in O'Donnell's possession, was restored by him to the descendants of Murtough Bacagh.

M1468.21

Richard Burke went to Moylurg, and made peace with Mac Dermot; and


p.1057

both set out to oppose O'Donnell, but before they could arrive at where he was, he had crossed the Erne, so that they did not meet one another on this occasion. Richard returned to Machaire-Chonnacht, and took hostages from the sons of O'Conor Roe; and he made prisoners of the descendants of Felim, because they would not consent to give him hostages.

M1468.22

Clann-Conway was plundered by Edmond, the son of William himself, and by his sons, through pride and arrogance.

M1468.23

Felim Finn O'Conor took great preys from O'Conor Don, and carried them with him into Moylurg. He also took great preys from Hy-Many, and a prey from the descendants of Felim Cleireach, and a prey from Muintir-Beirne, all which he carried off to Kill-Athrachta, to meet Richard Burke and his army; and he kept this army from dispersing for the space of a week, and maintained them solely by his own provisions; and he would have kept them longer, if they had remained with him. Another great prey was carried off by Felim from Ciarruighe-Mic-Keherny; and he slew the grandson of Hugh Caech O'Conor on the same day. Edmond Mac William rose up against him at Imaire-Uarain, with sixty gallowglasses, and sixty retained kerns, and the cavalry of his own territory; many were wounded between them, and Felim was stripped of the prey, and also of his horses.

M1468.24

Much destruction was caused by Garrett, the son of the Earl of Desmond, in Munster and Leinster, in revenge of the death of Thomas, the Earl.

M1468.25

O'Reilly's mansion-seat and the monastery of Cavan were burned by the English and the Saxon, by whom the Earl of Desmond had been beheaded.

M1468.26

A great victory was gained by Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, over the English of Lecale at Beann-uamha, where Murtough Roe O'Neill, Lord of Clannaboy, was taken prisoner, and Aengus, the son of Alexander Mac Donnell, the son of Robert Savadge, Lord of Lecale, and many others, both English and Irish, were slain.

M1468.27

Great depredations were comitted by Felim Finn and Mac Dermot, Conor, the son of Cormac, in Ballintober; but O'Conor himself, with all his assembled


p.1059

forces and tribes, overtook them. Rory O'Conor, with all his forces, and a great party of the Clann-Conway, and all the descendants of the son of Felim at this side, rose up to oppose both. The sons of Dermot, son of Rory Mac Dermot, and the sons of Cormac Oge Mac Dermot, who had been encamped at Beola-Coille, also came up with them. Felim, with all his forces, marched in triumph as far as Scor-mor in Clann-Chathail-mic-Murray; and he and Mac Dermot afterwards engaged them with bravery and success, and routed and dispersed them, so that no man of them would give to his neighbour the loan of a rod. Owen, the son of Turlough Dall, son of Turlough Oge O'Conor, and Felim, the son of Turlough Roe, son of Brian Ballagh, and many other nobles, were slain. Felim carried off the spoil, and returned home victorious, and in triumph, leaving his enemies in grief and sorrow.

M1468.28

Donough, the son of Thomas Maguire, made an incursion against Philip, the son of Cuconnaught Maguire, into Tir-Kennedy, and carried off a great prey. Donough's people proceeded with their prey into Clann-Kelly, leaving Donough in the rear, attended only by a few troops. Philip overtook him in the pursuit; but Donough turned upon the son of Cuconnaught (i.e. Philip), and slew him and his son on this occasion.

M1468.29

Rory, the son of Godfrey Roe Maguire, and Melaghlin, the son of Donough, son of Godfrey, died.

M1468.30

A great number of the Clann-Caffry were slain by the sons of Hugh, the son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire; among whom was Mac Caffry himself, i.e. Donough, as also the son of Felim and his brother John, Dermot, son of this John, and three others besides.


p.1061

Annal M1469.

M1469.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1469. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred sixty-nine.

M1469.1

John Boy, the son of John More Magrath, Coarb of Termon-Daveog, died; and Dermot, the son of Marcus, son of Maurice Magrath, was made Coarb in his place.

M1469.2

Mac Carthy More, Lord of Desmond, died.

M1469.3

Hugh, the son of William O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, the most eminent in Ireland for hospitality, a man who had never refused the countenance of man was treacherously slain by the descendants of Donough O'Kelly, i.e. the sons of Breasal and Teige, the son of Donough, on Shrove-Tuesday, the second day before the festival of St. Berach; and two O'Kellys were nominated to succeed him, i.e. William, the son of Hugh, son of Brian, and Teige Caech, the son of William O'Kelly.

M1469.4

Richard Oge O'Reilly, Tanist of Breifny, died.

M1469.5

Donnell, the son of Brian, son of Philip, son of Gilla-Duv Maguire, and Gilla-Isa, the son of Cormac, son of Gilla-Isa O'Flanagan, were slain by the sons of Hugh Maguire, and by Muintir-Manchain, at the port of Achadh-Inbhir, on the 9th of the Calends of September.

M1469.6

An incursion was made by the sons of Philip Maguire and the sons of Thomas Oge into Midhbholg, against the sons of Hugh Maguire. They carried off a great prey on this occasion; and Brian Maineach, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by them.

M1469.7

Another incursion was made by the sons of the same Philip into Lurg, against the sons of the same Hugh, during which they slew Owen, son of Hugh Maguire, and Flaherty, his son.

M1469.8

Turlough, the son of Cathal Oge, son of Manus Maguire, died.

M1469.9

Teige Dubhshuileach, the son of Magrath Maguire, was slain by the sons of Hugh Maguire.

M1469.10

Margaret, the daughter of Philip, son of Gilla Duv Maguire, and wife of Mac Gillafinnen, Teige, the son of Brian, died.


p.1063

M1469.11

Mac-an-t-Sabhaoisigh, i.e. Patrick Oge, was taken prisoner by the Whites; and Patrick White, by the aid of O'Neill (Henry) and Mac Quillin, assumed the lordship of Lecale; and they banished all the Savadges who had survived.

M1469.12

O'Gara, i.e. Owen, the son of Tomaltagh Oge, son of Tomaltagh More, Lord of Coolavin, died between the two festivals of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in Autumn; and his worthy son, Owen, died soon afterwards of a short illness: and Dermot, his other son, assumed the lordship in his father's place.

M1469.13

Teige, the son of Manus, son of John Mac Branan, Lord of Corco-achlann was treacherously slain by his own brother and his brother's sons, a week after Michaelmas; and his place was taken by two chieftains, namely, Donnell, the son of Cormac, by whom he had been slain, and William, the son of Hugh, grandson of Hugh.

M1469.14

O'Flynn, Lord of Sil-Maelruain, and his brother, were slain by Melaghlin O'Flynn, who afterwards assumed the lordship.

M1469.15

Mac Dowell (Owen, son of another Owen) was treacherously slain in his own house by the sons of Colla Mac Dowell.

M1469.16

Hugh, son of Owney O'Hanly, and Teige, the son of Murtough, grandson of Tomaltagh O'Hanly, died; and Teige, the son of Brian, son of Tomaltagh, assumed the chieftainship.

M1469.17

Owen, the son of Hogh Boy Mageoghegan, Tanist of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain by the Clann-Colmain.

M1469.18

Richard, son of Thomas Burke, resigned his lordship; and Richard, son of Edmund Burke, was appointed in his place.

M1469.19

A great army was mustered by O'Donnell (Hugh Roe), with the chiefs of Tirconnell, joined by the rising out of Lower Connaught, and marched, without halting, until he reached Mac William Burke i.e. Richard, the son of Edmond, who came with submission to O'Donnell. These chieftains afterwards held a consultation, and resolved on marching against Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, son of Ulick-an-Fhiona), to wreak their vengeance on him for the defeat


p.1065

of Cros-Moighe-Croinn, which Mac William of Clanrickard had some time before given to Mac William Burke; and being unanimous on this resolution, they proceeded into Clanrickard. Machaire-Riabhach was the first place burned and destroyed by them. They were for a night encamped at Baile-an-Chlair, the town of Mac William, which they afterwards burned; and they continued for some time destroying and laying waste the country on every side. Mac William (i.e. Ulick), however, drew and gathered to his assistance the sons of O'Brien, i.e. Gilla-Duv, the son of Teige, and Murtough Garv, the son of Teige, and a body of the Dalcassian chieftains along with them. Mac William, with his own troops and muster, came up with O'Donnell as he was leaving the country; and Mac William's cavalry and the O'Briens made the first charge on the rear of O'Donnell's army, at Baile-an-Duibh. This was vigorously responded to by O'Donnell's cavalry, and in particular by Egneghan, the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, who was in the rear of O'Donnell's army, so that the cavalry of Mac William and of the O'Briens were finally defeated; and Donnell, the son of O'Conor of Corcomroe, and many others not enumerated, were slain on the occasion. Mac William and the O'Briens, however, rallied their forces, and, placing themselves in array and order, they pursued with one accord the army of O'Donnell. This, however, was of no profit to them, for O'Donnell's army wheeled round on Mac William's and the O'Briens' cavalry at the river which is called Glanog, and there routed them again; and the defeated left many men, horses, and things of value, behind them, and fled in an inglorious retreat This was called The Defeat of Glanog.

Annal M1470.

M1470.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1470. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy.

M1470.1

Philip, the son of Thomas, son of Philip, son of Hugh Roe Maguire, heir to the lordship of Fermanagh, son of a chieftain, the most charitable and humane


p.1067

man, and the best warrior, of his time, and O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-ratha, i.e. Cormac, son of Gilla-Isa, died.

M1470.2

A great army was led by O'Neill ( Henry, the son of Owen) into Clannaboy, to assist Mac Quillin of Duibhthrian; and Mac-I-Neill Boy set out to take a prey from Mac Quillin. O'Neill and Mac Quillin, with their forces, overtook them; and they gave battle to each other, in which the Clann-Hugh-Boy were defeated, and Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Boy, Mac Sweeny na Coille, and John Roe Mac Sweeny, were taken prisoners. O'Neill on this occasion made a prisoner of Art, the son of Donnell Cael O'Neill, and took the castle of Sgath-deirge which he delivered up into the keeping of Mac Quillin.

M1470.3

Brian, the son of Teige Mac Donagh, Lord of Ath-Cliath-an-Chorainn, was slain by Teige, the son of Brian Mac Donough, who had taken his creaghts from him, and slain a great number of his people. The son of the eastern Mac Donough was also slain in a skirmish on the same day.

M1470.4

Rory Bacagh, son of O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Art O'Neill and the descendants of Henry Aimreidh. To avenge him, Henry and Brian, two sons of Art O'Neill, and four of the descendants of Henry, were slain in one day by Con, the son of O'Neill. O'Neill and his sons took the castle of the sons of Art, i.e. the castle of Oghmhagh.

M1470.5

Owen O'Donnell, and the sons of Naghten, joined and formed a league with the sons of Art, against O'Neill.

M1470.6

John, the son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire, was slain by Rory, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire.

M1470.7

Donnell and Donough, two sons of Owen, the sons of O'Conor Roe, were slain by Rory, the son of O'Conor Don. Moreover, Con, the son of Teige O'Conor, and Cathal, the son of Felim Finn, were taken prisoners by him.

M1470.8

Connla, the son of Hugh Boy Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain on Achadh-Buidhe, at Tigh-Bhrighde, in Baile-atha-an-Urchair, by the


p.1069

son of Art, son of Con O'Melaghlin, and the Clann-Colman, in revenge of his father, Art, who had been slain some time before by this Connla.

M1470.9

The castle of Sligo was taken by O'Donnell from Donnell, son of Owen O'Conor, after having besieged it for a long time, and O'Donnell obtained on this occasion his own demands of gifts, besides receiving submission and tribute from Lower Connaught. It was on this occasion that he obtained the book called Leabhar-Gearr, and another called Leabhar-na-h-Uidhri, and the chairs of Donnell Oge, which had been brought westwards in the time of John, the son of Conor, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell.

M1470.10

An army was led by O'Donnell and O'Rourke to go upon the hill of Cruachan-Ua Cuproin to inaugurate O'Rourke. O'Reilly, the English, and the people of Teallach-Dunchadha the Mac Kernans opposed them at Beal-atha-Chonaill, where Edmond, the son of Hugh O'Reilly, and the son of the Bishop O'Gallagher, were slain, and many men and horses wounded. O'Donnell and his army returned, being prevented from going to Cruachan on this occasion.

M1470.11

The Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Clarence cut into quarters the wreck of the maledictions of the men of Ireland, namely, the Saxon Justiciary,


p.1071

by whom the Earl of Thomond had been destroyed; and it was in revenge of the death of Thomas that this ignominious punishment was inflicted on him; and the Earl of Kildare was then appointed Lord Justice.

M1470.12

Felim Finn O'Conor made peace with the sept of O'Conor Roe, and with all in general.

M1470.13

A Franciscan monastery was founded at Lis Laichtnin in Munster, in the diocese of Ardfert, by O'Conor Kerry, who selected a burial-place for himself in it.

Annal M1471.

M1471.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1471. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-one.

M1471.1

A monastery was commenced by Franciscan Friars in Gallbhaile Eatharlach, in the diocese of Emly, in Munster, but was destroyed the next year.

M1471.2

O'Conor of Corcomroe (Conor, son of Brian Oge) was slain at Leithinnsi by the sons of his own brother, i.e. by the sons of Donough O'Conor.

M1471.3

Teige, son of O'Conor Faly (Calvagh) by Margaret an Einigh the hospitable O'Carroll, plunderer of the English and Irish, died of the plague.

M1471.4

Teige Mac Dermot Roe, Lord of Coillte Chonchobhair, died.

M1471.5

Hugh, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, was slain by the army of Richard Burke, which had been mustered at the instance of Rory, the son of Brian O'Conor.

M1471.6

Donnell, the son of Cormac, son of Manus Mac Branan, was treacherously slain at Lis-Ua n-Dubhthaigh, in violation of the guarantee of the lords and


p.1073

chieftains of Sil-Murray, by Con, the son of Teige Mac Branan, who had submitted to him some time before. Edmond, son of Brian, son of Manus, was slain along with him.

M1471.7

Dermot, the son of Murtough, son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by Felim, the son of O'Conor Don.

M1471.8

Hugh, the son of Turlough, son of Rory, son of Cathal O'Conor, was treacherously slain by the descendants of Owen, son of Rory.

M1471.9

An inroad was made by Brian, the son of Felim O'Reilly, into Clankee, against Farrell, the son of John O'Reilly. They sent preys before them; but Farrell overtook them, and a conflict ensued, in which Cathal, the son of Irial, son of Felim O'Reilly, was slain; and Farrell was taken prisoner by the rest of the party.

M1471.10

O'Donnell and the sons of Owen O'Conor committed vast depredations on the creaghts of Carbury, and on the Mac Donoughs on this side of Sligo. A great army was led by Mac William Burke into Lower i.e. North Connaught, to assist Rory, the son of Brian O'Conor; and they attacked the castle of Sligo. the sons of Owen O'Conor were at this time with O'Donnell. Donnell, son of Owen, went into the castle, but Mac William broke down the tower of the gate, after which they made peace.

M1471.11

The son of the Earl Thomas was styled Earl, but was soon after taken prisoner by the Mac Carthys.

M1471.12

Showers of hailstones fell in May this year, accompanied by lightning and thunder, so that the blossoms and fruits were destroyed. Each of these hailstones measured two to three inches in circumference, and they inflicted wounds and sores upon the persons whom they struck.

M1471.13

An army was led by O'Donnell into Lower Connaught; and he plundered and burned that part of Tireragh possessed by the son of Cosnamhach O'Dowda.

M1471.14

A prey was carried off by the sons of O'Conor Faly from the Kinel-Fiachach, on which occasion Owney, the son of Mageoghegan, the son of Niall Mac-an-t-Sinnaigh, and many others, were slain by them.

M1471.15

The castle of Omagh was taken by O'Neill, Henry, the son of Owen. It was taken in the following way. In the beginning of the Winter the sons of


p.1075

O'Neill and the sons of Art O'Neill gave battle to each other; and the sons of Art were defeated, and two of them, and many others of their men, were slain, as we have before stated; and O'Neill and his sons sat round the castle. Sile, the daughter of O'Donnell, i.e. Nial Garv, and wife of Nial, the son of Art O'Neill, was in the castle with a body of troops. Nial himself, and his brothers, had gone over to O'Donnell and the Kinel-Connell; and O'Neill remained before the castle from the beginning of Autumn to the end of Spring. The sons of Art afterwards came from Tyrconnell to O'Neill, and delivered the town up to him; and he O'Neill gave it up to his own son, Con, and then returned to his own house.

M1471.16

All Trian-Chongail was taken by Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and its chieftains came and submitted to him, namely Mac Neill, Mac Quillin, and Henry, the son of Brian Ballagh.

M1471.17

A great war broke out in Offaly between O'Conor and Teige O'Conor. Teige went over to the English and brought an English army with him into Offaly; and the whole country was spoiled by them.

M1471.18

The Earl of Kildare and the English of Meath made an incursion into Fearnmhagh, and committed great depredations on Mac Mahon. Mac Mahon afterwards assembled the forces of his country, and committed great depredations, burnings, and slaughters on the English in revenge of their preys.

M1471.19

Rory, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by Colla, the son of Hugh Maguire, and his sons, at the house of Magrath, at Alt Ruaidhin,


p.1077

in Termon Daveog, but Donough Oge, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire, pursued Colla, and slew him and his son the next day at the same place, through the merits of God and St. Daveog.

M1471.20

An army was led by O'Neill into Tir-Breasail, and he burned the country. The sons of the Chiefs of Tirconnell, and the sons of Art O'Neill, overtook them, and O'Neill returned home from that expedition.

M1471.21

Maguire, i.e. Thomas Oge, the son of Thomas, resigned his lordship, after having spent the greater part of his life in acts of charity, hospitality, and nobleness; and he gave the lordship to his son Edmond; he left another son as Tanist; and the third son, Rossa, was in the bishopric of Clogher.

M1471.22

Murtough, the son of Owen O'Neill, died.

M1471.23

Hugh, the son of Brian, son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, died on the 16th of the Calends of March.

Annal M1472.

M1472.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1472. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-two.

M1472.1

Mahon, the son of Turlough 0'Brian, Tanist of Thomond, died.

M1472.2

O'Kane, Rory Ainsheasgar, was treacherously slain by Mac Quillin, i.e. Seinicin Carragh. Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, assembled his forces, and Godfrey O'Kane, the brother of this Rory, proceeded along with him into the Route to take vengeance on Mac Quillin for the death of Rory. A battle was fought between them, in which Godfrey O'Kane, a man full of charity, hospitality, and nobleness, was slain by Rury Mac Quillin with one cast of a javelin. On the next day the same Con made an incursion into the Route, and gave the Mac Quillins a great defeat, and killed Mac Quillin himself; i.e.


p.1079

Cormac. Rory was called the Mac Quillin, and a peace was made with Con, son of Hugh Boy. They then made an appointment for a conference with the O'Kanes, and Mac Quillin went into a small cot at the mouth of the River Bann, intending to present himself before O'Kane; but as he was landing he was attacked by a party of O'Kane's people, who slew him, and drowned him in the Bann.

M1472.3

Donough, the son of Thomas Oge Maguire, was taken prisoner in his own town by his own brother, Edmond (i.e. the Maguire), who afterwards exacted a great price for his ransom.

M1472.4

Mac Sweeny Fanad, Mulmurry, was slain at the breach of Tapadan, as was also Donnell, the son of Felim O'Doherty, by the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell, and by O'Neill; and his son, Rory Mac Sweeny, assumed his place.

M1472.5

Brian, the son of Felim, son of Donn, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, was slain by the sons of John Boy Mac Mahon, and by the Clann-Donnell of Clan-kelly.

M1472.6

O'Driscoll More, Fineen, the son of Maccon, son of Maccon, son of Fineen, son of Donough God, died in his own house, after having performed the pilgrimage of St. James, and his son Teige died penitently one month after the death of his father, after having returned from the same pilgrimage. The sons of Mac Rannall, Conor and Melaghlin, the two best chieftain's sons in Connaught in their time, for hospitality and nobleness, were slain on the one day by the descendants of Melaghlin Mac Rannall, three weeks before Christmas, after they had slain the son of Conmac, son of Seoinin Mac Rannall, and taken possession of the country as far as Sliabh-Cairbre, and after they had gained the victory in every contest up to that day.

M1472.7

Owen, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, died on the Wednesday before the Feast of St. Bearach.

M1472.8

Murtough, the son of Tomaltagh, son of Ivor O'Hanly, died.


p.1081

M1472.9

Dermot, the son of John, son of Melaghlin O'Farrell, was slain by the sons of John, son of Donnell O'Farrell.

M1472.10

Tomaltagh, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, was slain by the sons of Dermot, son of Rory Mac Dermot, at Bel-atha-Chaisil-Bracain, on Passion Sunday.

M1472.11

William, the son of Teige Caech, son of William O'Kelly, was slain by the son of Teige, son of Donogh O'Kelly.

M1472.12

A great attack was made by O'Kelly upon Muine-Liath. The English of Westmeath, viz., the Tuites, Petits, Tyrrels, Darcys, and Daltons, came up with him. O'Kelly was defeated; Donough O'Kelly and many others were taken prisoners, and a party of their foot soldiers and kerns were slain.

M1472.13

A wonderful animal was sent to Ireland by the King of England. She resembled a mare, and was of a yellow colour, with the hoofs, of a cow, a long neck, a very large head, a large tail, which was ugly and scant of hair. She had a saddle of her own. Wheat and salt were her usual food. She used to draw the largest sled-burden by her tail. She used to kneel when passing under any doorway, however high, and also to let her rider mount.

M1472.14

The young Earl of Desmond was set at liberty by the Mac Carthys; and he disabled Garrett, the son of the Earl.

M1472.15

Maine Sionach Fox Lord of Muintir-Tadhgain, was slain; and his son Teige took his place.

M1472.16

Ualgarg, the son of Cathal Ballagh O'Rourke, was slain by the people of Owen, the son of Loughlin O'Rourke

M1472.17

An army was led by Mac William Burke into Hy-Many, to assist Teige Caech O'Kelly; but after having subdued the Hy-Many from the Suck westwards, and obtained hostages from them, he at last suffered a great loss, for twenty-six of his people privately deserted from his army, among whom were the son of Mac Walter Burke, the sons of Maurice, the sons of Mac Jordan, the son of Mac Anveely, &c. The Hy-Many made prisoners of or slew all these, excepting only Mac Jordan, who made his escape through main strength of arm, though he was severely wounded. Mac William returned home in sorrow.

M1472.18

Gilla-Glas, the son of O'Higgin, died in the autumn of this year.


p.1083

M1473.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1473. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-three.

M1473.1

Donough, the son of Hugh, son of Philip Maguire, died in his own house, after having gained the victory over the world and the Devil.

M1473.2

Art, the son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire, died after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1473.3

Cathal Reagh, the son of Don Cahanagh, son of Manus Maguire, and Rory, the son of Art O'Neill, died.

M1473.4

Thomas, son of Maguire (i.e. Edmond, the son of Thomas), was treacherously slain by the sons of Cathal Maguire.

M1473.5

Randal, the son of Geoffrey Mac Rannall, heir to the chieftainship of Conmaicne, died.

M1473.6

Murtough, the son of O'Conor Faly, was slain.

M1473.7

Edward, son of the Baron of Delvin, was put to death in Dublin for his misdemeanours.

M1473.8

Mac William Burke (i.e. Richard) died, having some time before resigned his lordship for the sake of God.

M1473.9

Thomas Mac Feorais Bermingham, Lord of Athenry and of Conmaicne of Dunmore, died at a venerable old age; and his own son, Thomas Oge, took his place; but the title was given to the son of Richard Mac Feorais, in opposition to him.

M1473.10

Rory, son of Hugh, who was son of Torlogh Oge O'Conor, heir presumptive to the government of Connaught, was slain by William, son of Edmond Mac William, at Cill-Bruigh of Baile-an-Turlaigh.

M1473.11

Edmond, the son of Matthew, son of Cuconnaught O'Farrell, died.

M1473.12

William Mac Rannall, half chieftain of Muintir-Eolais, died.

M1473.13

Felim Mac Coghlan, heir to the lordship of Delvin, died.

M1473.14

Mulrony, the son of Farrell Mac Dermot, died.

M1473.15

Mulrony, the son of Cathal, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, was slain by Cormac, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, at Bealach-na-hurbron.


p.1085

M1473.16

Donough, the son of Farrell, son of Owen, son of Tiernan More O'Rourke, was slain by his own tribe.

M1473.17

Conor, the son of Dermot O'Conor Faly, died.

M1473.18

Edmond, the son of Donnell Boy O'Farrell, died.

M1473.19

A great war broke out in Muintir-Eolais; and much was destroyed between thern, both by burning and slaying. An attack was made by Mac Rannall on the town of Mac Shanly, and the town was burned, and Donough, the son of Donough Mac Shanly, and many others, were slain by him. The descendants of Melaghlin assembled at Tulach, and burned the town. Mac Rannall, Rory Mac Donough, and the sons of Cormac Ballagh, son of Mac Donough, Walter Mac Dowell, and Donough, the son of Turlough Mac Dowell, came up with them, so that a battle was fought between both parties at Doire-Bhaile-na-Cairrge, in which the descendants of Melaghlin were defeated. On this occasion Farrell, the son of Murrough Mac Rannall, worthy of being sole Lord of Conmaicne, was slain, as were also Dermot, the son of William Mac Rannall; Cathal, the son of Owny, son of Murrough; Brian, the son of Dermot Mac Rannall; Brian Mac Shanly, Richard Mac Sherry, and many others besides these.

M1473.20

An army was led by O'Donnell into Lower Connaught, so that he obtained for himself the rents of O'Conor.

M1473.21

The son of Mac Donnell of Scotland, i.e. Gilla-Easpoig, the son of Donnell, son of John of Ilay, died.

M1473.22

O'Dwyer, i.e. Thomas, the son of Conor, son of Thomas, was slain by the O'Kennedys.

M1473.23

O'Higgin, i.e. Gilla-na-naev, son of Rory More, died.

M1473.24

Brian, the son of Robert Mac Egan, ollav to O'Conor Don and O'Hanly, died.

M1473.25

The town of Gaillimh was burned on the second day of the month of June, which fell on Friday, and much property was destroyed in it.

M1473.26

O'Farrell, Irial, was blinded.


p.1087

Annal M1474.

M1474.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1474. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-four.

M1474.1

The monastery of Donegal was commenced by the O'Donnell, i.e. by Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garve O'Donnell, and his wife, Finola, the daughter of O'Brien (Conor-na-srona), and was granted by them to God and the friars of St. Francis for the prosperity of their own souls, and that the monastery might be a burial-place for themselves and their descendants; and they not only granted this, but also conferred many other gifts upon them.

M1474.2

The Bishop of Derry, i.e. Nicholas, died.

M1474.3

O'Conor Faly, i.e. Con, the son of Calvagh, died in Autumn; and his son Cahir was inaugurated in his place.

M1474.4

Mageoghegan, i.e. Cucogry, the son of Niall, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain by Hugh, the son of Farrell Mageoghegan. The country was ravaged by O'Conor Faly, and he demolished the castle of Baile-nua, and expelled the descendants of Farrell Roe.

M1474.5

Mac Mahon, i.e. Rury Oge, died, after having gained the victory over the world and the Devil.

M1474.6

Don Roe, the son of Cuconnaught Maguire, was slain by the son of Richard Mac Cawell.

M1474.7

Flaherty, the son of Thomas Oge Maguire, died in his own house, after the victory of penance.

M1474.8

Farrell, the son of John O'Reilly, died.

M1474.9

Great depredations were committed by O'Donnell upon the people of O'Neill, i.e. of Hugh Ballagh, the son of Donnell. A great war broke out between O'Neill and O'Donnell; and the sons of Hugh Boy O'Neill and the O'Neill marched with an army into Tirconnell, and burned Tirhugh, and then returned home again unharmed.

M1474.10

An irruption was made by O'Neill into Tuaisceart, against the son of Hugh


p.1089

Boy and the sons of Art O'Neill, and sent great preys before him. The people of the whole territory of Trian-Chongail overtook him, but O'Neill carried away the preys, and returned safe to his house.

M1474.11

A day was appointed for the holding of a conference between O'Conor Don, i.e. Felim, the son of Turlough, and O'Kelly; but, when they met, a breach of the peace happened between them, and they came to a battle, in which O'Conor was defeated and wounded; and his son, i.e. Owen Caech, was taken prisoner, as was also Turlough Caech Mac Sweeny. Owen Caech Mac Sweeny and the son of Dowell Cruama Mac Sweeny were slain. Mac Donough's constable was taken prisoner, and all the gallowglasses were either slain or taken prisoners. O'Conor afterwards died of his wounds, and two lords were nominated in his place, namely, Donough Dubhshuileach, and Teige, the son of Owen O'Conor.

M1474.12

The son of O'Brien, i.e. Teige, the son of Conor, and Dermot, the son of the Bishop O'Brien, had a meeting on account of a dispute they had about land, and Teige wished to take Dermot prisoner, but Dermot gave Teige a stroke of his sword on the top of the head, and let out his brains. Teige's people, however, took Dermot prisoner and gave him protection. Teige died immediately, and Dermot was afterwards hanged by O'Brien, in revenge of his son.

M1474.13

Gilla-Duv O'Hara (i.e. O'Hara's son) was slain by his own brother, Owen.

M1474.14

Teige O'Brien, Lord of Ara, died.

M1474.15

Laighneach, the son of Neill Mageoghegan, died.

M1474.16

Melaghlin, the son of Hugh Mac Branan, and Edward Plunkett, the very best of the English of Meath, died.


p.1091

M1474.17

Donough, the son of Murtough, son of Hugh O'Conor, of the remnant of the descendants of Murtough Muimhneach, died at Tobar-Oilbhe in Magh-Aoi.

M1474.18

John, the son of Melaghlin O'Farrell, and Dermot Gall, the son of Mac Dermot Gall, died.

M1474.19

Dermot, the son of Conor, son of Geoffrey O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Cathail, died on the Friday before Michaelmas Day.

M1474.20

Carbry, the son of Hugh, son of Rory, son of Brian Ballagh, was slain by the descendants of Teige O'Conor.

M1474.21

Gilla-Finn Mac Egan, Ollav to O'Conor Faly, and Thomas, the son of Donnell O'Coffey, died.

M1474.22

O'Daly of Meath, i.e. Carbry, died.

M1474.23

The chieftainship of Annaly was assumed by John O'Farrell, in preference to his brother, who was blind.

Annal M1475.

M1475.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1475. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-five.

M1475.1

Donough, the son of Hugh Mac Sweeny, Prior of Derry, died.

M1475.2

Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Owen Oge O'Neill, a man full of hospitality, prowess, nobleness, and illustrious actions, Roydamna of Kinel-Owen, died in his own house, after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1475.3

Hugh, the son of Naghtan O'Donnell, was drowned in a cot, at the mouth of the River Bann.

M1475.4

Conor, the son of Brian Mac Donough, died in the month of January.

M1475.5

Donnell, the son of John O'Farrell, was slain by the sons of Cathal, son of William O'Farrell, who were themselves (afterwards) banished to the English.

M1475.6

Murrough, the son of Owen O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, and Dermot, the son of Brian O'Beirne, died.

M1475.7

John O'Farrell, Chief of Annaly, died at Granard, after his inauguration


p.1093

feast had been prepared, but before he had partaken of it, and was buried in the monastery of Leath-ratha Abbeylara.

M1475.8

Rury, the son of Ross, son of Murtough Midheach, son of Brian O'Farrell, died, just as he was about to take possession of the chieftainship of Annaly; and the title was bestowed on Rury, the son of Cathal, son of Thomas, in opposition to the descendants of John, the son of Donnell O'Farrell.

M1475.9

Sinnach Fox of Muintir-Tadhgain was slain by Murrough, the son of Art O'Melaghlin.

M1475.10

Edmond, the son of Melaghlin O'Hanly, worthy of being Chief of the three Tuathas, died the fourteenth day before the festival of St. Michael, the day of the week being Thursday.

M1475.11

A great war broke out between Mac Mahon, i.e. Redmond, the son of Rury, and the sons of Hugh Roe Mac Mahon. The sons of Hugh Roe migrated by force into the territory of Fearnmhagh, whither an English army repaired to their assistance. Mac Mahon went into Eoghanach, but again returned into Fearnmagh, whereupon the sons of Hugh went over to the English. Mac Mahon and his forces made an incursion against the English; but the sons of Hugh Roe and the English of Machaire Oirghiall overtook and defeated him, and took himself and Brian, the son of Rury Mac Mahon, prisoners; and a great many others of his people were slain and made prisoners on that occasion.

M1475.12

A circuitous hosting was made by O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, accompanied by Maguire, O'Rourke, and the chiefs of Lower Connaught. They proceeded first to Beal-atha-Chonaill, to rescue Brian, the son of Felim O'Reilly, who was O'Donnell's friend and confederate, and to make peace between O'Rourke and O'Reilly. O'Reilly came to Beal-atha-Chonaill to O'Donnell, who reconciled O'Rourke and O'Reilly with each other, and also Brian, the son of Felim; and Philip O'Reilly was given up to O'Donnell, to be detained and kept by him as a hostage for the observance of this peace, besides such others as he himself wished to demand. After this O'Donnell marched to Fenagh-Moy-Rein, whither Mac Rannall came to him. From thence he went to Annaly, to assist the sons of Irial O'Farrell, who were his friends; and he spoiled and burned Annaly, excepting only that part of it which belonged to


p.1095

the sons of Irial, whom he left in power and might. He afterwards proceeded through Westmeath, and burned the castle-towns of Delvin, and all the circumjacent country. He remained for one night encamped in Cuircne, in Meath; and the Dillons and Daltons came into his house, and made peace with him. He then proceeded to Offaly, at the request of O'Conor Faly, who was his relative, i.e. Cahir, the son of Con, son of Calvagh, to take vengeance on the English for his father, Niall Garv. He remained for some time in Offaly, plundering and ravaging Meath on each side of him. He demolished and burned Castle-Carbury and Bally-Meyler; he also burned and plundered the territories of Tir-Briuin and Fertullach, and obtained presents from the inhabitants of Mullingar, as a condition for sparing their town from pillage, the country on all sides of it having been already destroyed. Afterwards, at the instance of Colman O'Melaghlin, he proceeded to Coillte-an-rubha, and commenced spoiling Clann-Colman, i.e. O'Melaghlin's country; he burned the castle of Magh-Tamhnach, and the castle of Magh-Eille. It was on this occasion that O'Donnell gave O'Melaghlin, with all his muster and forces, the defeat of Garbh-Eisgir. This was otherwise called the defeat of Bealach-na-g-Corr-Ghad, from the gads or withes which the people of the country suspended about the necks of some of the army, in consequence of the narrowness of that passage. It was on the same day that O'Donnell gained the battle of Baile-Locha-Luatha, where the

p.1097

son of Magawley and many others were slain; and he remained encamped for a night there. The next day O'Donnell proceeded with his army to the Shannon. Some of the O'Kellys, who accompanied him on this expedition, collected and brought together all the vessels they found in the neighbourhood, so that in these O'Donnell, with his army, crossed the Shannon into Hy-Many, and there he remained until he rested and recruited himself after his long expedition. He then proceeded through Clanrickard, Conmaicne-Cuile, and Clann-Costello, and marched back again through Machaire-Chonnacht, and from thence to his own country, having received submission, and gained victory and triumph in every place through which he had passed.

M1475.13

Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Cathal O'Conor, William, son of Teige O'Kelly, and Hubert, the son of Rury, son of Rossa O'Farrell, died.

M1475.14

The Baron of Delvins died.

M1475.15

The two sons of Art O'Melaghlin were slain by Colman, the son of Art O'Melaghlin.

M1475.16

The castle of Caladh was taken by Mac William of Clanrickard, and delivered up to the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, who was the son of his Mac William's own daughter.

M1475.17

Cormac O'Cuirnin, Preceptor of the learned of Ireland, and Gilla-na-naev, the son of Melaghlin O'Higgin, died.

M1475.18

Felim, the grandson of O'Neill, and Mac-an-t-Sabhaoisigh Savadge, were taken prisoners by Con, the son of Hugh Boy; but Savadge afterwards made his escape from him.


p.1099

Annal M1476.

M1476.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1476. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-six.

M1476.1

The Bishop Magauran died; and John, son of Brian, succeeded him.

M1476.2

Geffrey, the son of Siacus O'Farrell, Prior of Mainistir-Derg, died.

M1476.3

Owney, the grandson of Cathal O'Conor, Light of the wisdom of Ireland, and Chief Master of the sciences, died.

M1476.4

Maguire, i.e. Teige, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas, was treacherously slain by his own brother, Rory.

M1476.5

Donough, the son of Thomas, son of Thomas, son of Philip Maguire, heir to the lordship of Fermanagh, a man full of knowledge, hospitality, and renown, died after the victory of penance.

M1476.6

Tuathal, the son of O'Neill, was slain by the English of Machaire-Oirghiall.

M1476.7

Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, died.

M1476.8

Hugh, son of O'Kelly (i.e. William), was slain at Athlone by his own brother, Teige.

M1476.9

O'Hara Reagh the Western, i.e. William, died.

M1476.10

Teige, the son of Owen, son of Rory O'Conor, was treacherously slain by three of his own people, i.e. Rory Roe, the son of Owen, grandson of Cathal, and the son of Cahir, grandson of the Abbot O'Conor, and the son of Donough O'Teige; and they took the castle of Roscommon, but it was taken from them immediately afterwards.

M1476.11

Edwina, the daughter of Donnell, son of Murtough, and wife of O'Conor Don, died.

M1476.12

Dervorgilla, the daughter of Felim Finn O'Conor, and wife of O'Conor Don, died.

M1476.13

Brian, the son of Farrell Roe O'Higgin, head of his own tribe, superintendent of the schools of Ireland, and preceptor in poetry, died on Maunday-Thursday, and was interred at Ath-leathan.

M1476.14

Donnell Reagh, the son of Gerald Kavanagh, Lord of Leinster, died.


p.1101

M1476.15

An incursion was made by O'Neill into Oriel; and the sons of Mac Mahon, i.e. the sons of Redmond, and Brian, the son of Rury, and all the people of Oriel from the Eoganach inwards, fled westwards to the plain of Tulach; and great spoils and booties were carried away by O'Neill from them from the said plain, and from the borders of Breifne: he then returned home victorious and triumphant.

M1476.16

A great army was led by O'Neill against the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and attacked the castle of Bel-feirste, which he took and demolished, and then returned to his house.

M1476.17

John, the son of O'Hanlon, was slain by his own brother.

M1476.18

A great army was led by Mac William Burke into Lower Connaught; and another army was led by O'Donnell to oppose him. O'Donnell advanced to Cuil-Cnamha, and Mac William to Coillte-Luighne. Mac Dermot went over to assist Mac William, and Mac Donough joined O'Donnell. O'Donnell crossed the pass of Finn-tragha; and he was deprived of horses and men on his passage over to Carbury; Mac William pursued him across thither, and they remained for some time face to face, until at last they made peace. They divided Lower Connaught into two parts between them, i.e. O'Dowda's country, the territory of Leyny, and the half of Carbury, was ceded to Mac William, and the other half to O'Donnell.

M1476.19

A great army of the English of Meath marched into Magh-Breaghmaine, so that they demolished Rath-Riabhach, took possession of Pailis, and burned


p.1103

the monastery of Sruthair. They destroyed the crops and corn of the country, and returned without having made peace. Mac Rannall went to Magh Breaghmhaine, and destroyed all the corn of that country which had escaped the English.

M1476.20

A great war broke out between the English of Meath and the English of Leinster; and during this war the son of John, son of Mac Thomas, was slain, as were also his three brothers; and the son of Art, son of Con O'Melaghlin, and the son of Maurice, the son of Mac Pierce, were taken prisoners by O'Conor Faly.

Annal M1477.

M1477.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1477. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-seven.

M1477.1

Garrett, the son of the Earl of Desmond, was slain, and eighteen of the Geraldines were afterwards put to death.

M1477.2

Brian, son of Maurice Mac Dermot, was slain by his own tribe.

M1477.3

Ailbhe, the daughter of Hugh Maguire, a woman who, a year before her death, had retired with all her fortune to the monastery of Lisgool, died.

M1477.4

Hugh, the son of Donough, son of Thomas Maguire, and Brian, the son of Conor Oge Maguire, died.

M1477.5

Rory, son of Edmond Maguire, was treacherously slain by Cuconnaught, the son of Redmond Reagh, son of Don, son of Cuconnaught Maguire.

M1477.6

Don, the son of Owen, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by Donough Oge, the son of Donough, son of Donough, son of Hugh.

M1477.7

Mathew O'Luinin, Erenagh of Arda, a learned historian, died.

M1477.8

Feuds and dissensions arose between O'Donnell and the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell; and on this occasion Niall, the son of Donnell O'Donnell, and Felim, the son of Turlough O'Donnell, were slain by the sons of Naghtan; and much injury was done between them. O'Neill went upon an expedition into Tirhugh, at the instance of the sons of Naghtan, and ravaged and burned Tirhugh, and returned to his house in victory and triumph.


p.1105

M1477.9

Cormac, the son of Donough, son of Mac Carthy Reagh, was taken prisoner by Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Cormac, son of Dermot Reamhar of Muscraighe, and by the sons of Dermot-an-Dúna, the sons of his father's brother. In consequence of this killing recte capturing, war arose throughout Munster; and all the south was all destroyed, both English and Irish.

M1477.10

The son of Owny O'More was slaine at Baile-Daithi by Mac Pierce Butler and Art O'Conor.

M1477.11

There was a great storm on the night of the festival of St. John the Baptist in this year, which destroyed great numbers of stone and wooden buildings, of crannogs, and many stacks throughout Ireland.

Annal M1478.

M1478.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1478. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-eight.

M1478.1

The Bishop O'Higgin, i.e. Bishop of Mayo-na-Saxon, died.

M1478.2

Bishop Magauran died.

M1478.3

Thomas Duv O'Carbry, Vicar of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, a wise and pious man, died.

M1478.4

The Earl of Kildare died, and Garret, his son, took his place.

M1478.5

Richard, the son of Edmond Mac Richard Butler, was slain by Fineen Roe, the son of Fineen, one of the Ossorians, in the doorway of the church of St. Canice.

M1478.6

Cormac, the son of Donough Mac Carthy, was blinded by his relatives, after having been for some time in their hands.

M1478.7

Donough, the son of Brian Ballagh O'Conor, and Turlough, the son of Turlough Roe O'Conor, died.


p.1107

M1478.8

Gilla-Duv, the son of Brian, son of Felim O'Reilly, died.

M1478.9

Thomas, the son of Pierce Butler, was slain.

M1478.10

Thomas O'Concannon, Lord of Hy-Diarmada, was slain by the son of his own brother.

M1478.11

A great plague was brought by a ship into the harbour of Assaroe. This plague spread through Fermanagh, Tirconnell, and the province in general. Mac Ward (Godfrey) of Tirconnell died of it, and great injury was done by it through all the province.

M1478.12

Macrifferty, i.e. Ciothruadh, Ollav to Maguire in poetry; Teige Finn O'Luinin, a learned physician and historian; O'Breislen, i.e. Teige, son of Owen, Ollav to Maguire in judicature, and O'Coffey, i.e. Murtough Bacagh, died.

M1478.13

An incursion was made by Hugh Oge Mac Mahon and his household, against Brian, the son of Redmond Mac Mahon. Great depredations were committed by him, and Brian was taken prisoner as he was following in pursuit of the prey.

M1478.14

Melaghlin, the son of Hugh Boy Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain, while asleep in the castle of Leath-ratha, by two of his own people, who were afterwards burned for their crime.

M1478.15

Edmond, the son of Conor Mac Rannall, died.

M1478.16

William, the son of John O'Farrell, was killed by the stroke of a pole, cast at him by one of his own people.

M1478.17

A great plague raged throughout all Ireland, of which the Baron of Delvin and Mac Maurice Airig died.

M1478.18

Faghtna O'Farrell was slain by the son of Edmond, son of Hubert Dalton.

M1478.19

Art, son of Colman O'Melaghlin, and Magauran, i.e. Cathal, the son of Donough Ballagh, died.

M1478.20

The son of Farrell O'Gara and Manus Mac David were slain by the descendants of Rory Mac Dermot.


p.1109

M1478.21

Edmond, the son of Teige, son of Loughlin O'Hanly, was slain by his own tribe.

M1478.22

The castle of Sligo was taken by Mac William Burke from O'Donnell's warders, and given up to the son of Brian O'Conor. Mac William Burke afterwards proceeded to Moylurg, and destroyed that part of it which belonged to Rory Mac Dermot. To avenge this Rory proceeded to Croghan, to oppose Conor Mac Dermot, who was the Mac Dermot, and Mac William's confederate; and he afterwards sat round and besieged the Rock. Engines were sent to him, which had been constructed by carpenters from Fermanagh; and Mac Dermot's only son was slain by the shot of an arrow discharged from one of these engines; and the Rock was taken by means of that shot. The full lordship of Moylurg was assumed by Rory, and Conor was banished.

M1478.23

A great war broke out in the Plain of Connaught between Felim Finn and O'Conor Don, on one side, and the young sons of Teige O'Conor, the sons of Felim, and the sons of O'Conor Roe, on the other side; and all the Plain, both ecclesiastical and law property, was destroyed between them. Turlough Roe, the son of Rory, son of Felim O'Conor, a choice son of a king, was slain in this war.

M1478.24

Teige, the son of Dermot Roe O'Conor, was treacherously slain by the descendants of Brian Ballagh.

M1478.25

A great tempest arose on the night of Epiphany, which was a night of general destruction to all, by reason of the number of persons and cattle destroyed, and trees and houses, both on water and land, prostrated throughout Ireland


p.1111

Annal M1479.

M1479.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1479. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred seventy-nine.

M1479.1

The monastery of Meelick was founded by O'Madden, on the bank of the Shannon, in the diocese of Clonfert, for Franciscan Friars; and he chose a burial-place for himself in it.

M1479.2

Piarus, the son of Nicholas O'Flanagan, who had been a canon chorister at Clogher, a parson and a prior of Culdees, a Sacristan at Devenish, an official on Lough Erne, a charitable, pious, truly hospitable, and humane man, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1479.3

A great war broke out between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen, for the sons of Art O'Neill went into Tirconnell to make war upon O'Neill, and many injuries were done between them.

M1479.4

O'Neill set out upon an excursion into Tirconnell, and carried off great preys from the sons of Art and from the Kinel-Connell by that enterprise.

M1479.5

Brian, the son of Felim O Neill, was taken prisoner by O'Neill, who afterwards liberated him, having obtained great remunerations for his ransom, and


p.1113

his two sons as hostages in his stead to ensure his fidelity. Brian however repaired to O'Donnell to wage war with O'Neill again.

Annal M1480.

M1480.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1480. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty.

M1480.1

Maguire, i.e. Thomas Oge, the son of Thomas More, son of Philip, son of Hugh Roe, the most charitable, pious, and hospitable man of his day, the protector of his country against extern tribes, the founder of monasteries and churches, and the maker of chalices, a man who had been once at Rome, and twice at the city of St. James on his pilgrimage, died, and was interred in the monastery of Cavan, which he had selected as his burial place.

M1480.2

Mac Manus Maguire, i.e. Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal More, son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Magnus, a select brughaidh, died, after the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1480.3

Manus Roe O'Donnell was slain by the sons of Felim Reagh O'Donnell.

M1480.4

O'Neill went upon an excursion into Tirconnell, where he caused great conflagrations and did many injuries.

M1480.5

O'Donnell went upon an excursion into Tyrone, accompanied by the sons of Art O'Neill, and the sons of Felim O'Neill, and committed great depredations on Mac Cawell in Kinel-Farry, and slew Brian, the son of Turlough Roe, son of Henry O'Neill, and the son of Mac Cawell, i.e. James. O'Neill and his sons happened to be in their neighbourhood at that time, and the sons of O'Neill and Mac Cawell pursued the preys, and slew the son of Art O'Neill, a distinguished captain, who was along with O'Donnell. O'Donnell, however, carried off the preys, and returned in triumph to his residence with numerous spoils.

M1480.6

Owen O'Donnell, son of Niall Garv, was slain by the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell, at Cluain-laegh, on the 29th of September; and Owen Caech, the son of Manus O'Conor, was slain along with him, and the son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor was taken prisoner.


p.1115

M1480.7

Rory, the son of Rory, son of Naghtan O'Donnell, was slain by the sons of Niall O'Donnell.

M1480.8

O'Donnell held a conference with the sons of Naghtan and Con O'Neill, at Caislen-na-Finne, and they made peace with each other; and the tanistship of Tirconnell was given to Egneghan O'Donnell.

M1480.9

Redmond Reagh, the son of Donn, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, and Mac Gillafinnen (i.e. Teige, the son of Brian), a chieftain who had kept the best house of hospitality in his neighbourhood, died.

M1480.10

O'Hosey, i.e. Aengus, the son of John, a learned poet, and Farrell Makeogh, another good poet, died.

M1480.11

Cormac, son of Art Cuile Maguire, and Philip Reagh, son of Auliffe Maguire, died.

M1480.12

Art, the son of Rury Mac Mahon, was slain while following in the rear of a prey, which he had taken from the Feadha on the lands of Cu-Uladh, the son of Hugh O'Neill.

M1480.13

A war broke out between the sons of Hugh Roe Mac Mahon and the sons of Redmond Mac Mahon; and great depredations were committed on the sons of Redmond, and they were driven into Breifny to O'Reilly.

M1480.14

A spirited engagement took place between the sons of Edmond Burke and the sons of Richard Burke, in which the sons of Edmond were routed; and the son of Mac Dowell Mac Dugald of Scotland, i.e. Colla, was slain by one cast of a dart, and many others were slain along with him.

M1480.15

John Mac-Gillafinnen, i.e. the son of Brian, and thirty of the people of Brian, son of Philip Maguire, were slain at Bealach-Ui-Mithidhein, by the sons of O'Rourke, i.e. Tiernan and Brian Roe, the sons of Tiernan, son of Teige, son of Tiernan.

M1480.16

An English army came into Tyrone with Con O'Neill, to attack the castle of John Boy O'Neill. This army consisted of the Earl of Kildare, the King


p.1117

of England's Deputy in Ireland, and the English of Meath. John Boy himself was in the castle, and kept and maintained the town in despite of the army; and the army returned, and John Boy afterwards made peace with the O'Neill.

Annal M1481.

M1481.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1481. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-one.

M1481.1

Brian, the son of Felim O'Reilly, protector of the learned and the destitute, and who had kept a house of general hospitality, died.

M1481.2

Turlough, the son of Philip, son of Thomas Maguire, was treacherously slain in his own castle on the 5th of October, by Donough Oge, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire. He was a general and perfect gentleman for hospitality, knowledge, and nobleness. He was interred in the monastery of Donegal, which had been selected by him as his burial-place.

M1481.3

O'Hanlon, Felim, was slain. He was a captain distinguished for his nobleness and great deeds.

M1481.4

Cahir Kavanagh, the son of Mac Murrough, was slain by the inhabitants of Contae Reagh Wexford.

M1481.5

Mac-an-t-Sabhaoise (Patrick) was taken prisoner by Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and was blinded by him.

M1481.6

Slaine, the daughter of O'Brien, and wife of Mac William of Clanrickard, a vessel full of charity and hospitality, and who excelled the women of her time, died, after having gained victory over the world and the Devil.

M1481.7

Cuconnaught, the son of John, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, and Felim, the son of Donn, son of Cuconnaught, son of Philip, son of Hugh Roe Maguire, died.

M1481.8

A great war arose in Tyrone between O'Neill and John Boy O'Neill; the sons of Art O'Neill and the sons of Felim O'Neill opposed O'Neill in this war. The sons of Art took a prey from the sons of O'Neill, and the sons of O'Neill carried off a prey or two from John Boy; the sons of John Boy pursued them,


p.1119

and slew Hugh, the son of Cathal, son of Felim O'Conor, and the son of Gilla-Patrick Mac Cawell, with many others not enumerated.

M1481.9

Con, the son of O'Neill (i.e. Henry), was taken prisoner by the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and given up into the hands of O'Donnell.

M1481.10

James, son of Meyler Mac Herbert, was slain by Garrett, the son of Edmond Geangcach Mac Herbert (Fitzherbert).

Annal M1482.

M1482.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1482. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-two.

M1482.1

A figure of the Holy Cross of the Lord removed, and was found on the margin of the lake of Baile-an-Chuilinn; and many wonders and miracles were wrought by it.

M1482.2

Gilchreest O'Fiaich, Vicar of Aire-Broscaigh, a learned clergyman, who had kept a house of general hospitality for the space of eleven years, died.

M1482.3

Con, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, fountain of hospitality, and general patron of the literati of Ireland and Scotland, head of the war and protector of the rights of his tribe, and Roydamna of the province, died, after the victory of penance.

M1482.4

Henry, the son of Cu-Uladh, son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by the English.


p.1121

M1482.5

Art, the son of Donough Maguire, died.

M1482.6

Maelmora, the son of Cathal O'Reilly, was slain by the sons of Hugh O'Reilly. The sons of Hugh returned to their country with conditions of peace; but the sons of Cathal attacked them, took a house upon them, and slew the two sons of Felim, son of Hugh, and some others.

M1482.7

Brian, the son of Felim O'Neill, was slain by the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, and the descendants of Henry Aimhreidh. This Brian was illustrious for hospitality and dexterity at arms, and for his purchases of poems and songs.

M1482.8

Donough Oge, son of Donough Maguire (by whom Turlough, the son of Philip Maguire, had been slain), was slain by one cast of a javelin.

M1482.9

Murrough, the son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge Mac Rannall, was slain by the descendants of Art O'Rourke.

M1482.10

Dermot, the son of Loughlin Oge O'Hanly, heir to the chieftainship of Kinel-Dofa, was treacherously slain by his kinsmen, the descendants of Gilla-na-naev O'Hanly, in violation of a treaty entered into before the relics of Connaught, and of the guarantees of some of its chieftains.

M1482.11

Rory Boy O'Hanly, Chief of Kinel-Dofa, died at a venerable old age; and Teige, his kinsman, took his place.

M1482.12

An army was led by Rory Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, and Teige Mac Rannall, Lord of Conmaicne of Moy Rein, against Kinel-Dofa, to take revenge of them for having violated their guarantees, and they burned the house of O'Hanly, and slew Donough, the son of Siacus Carragh, and the son of O'Conor, grandson of Cormac. They were however routed by the inhabitants of the territory and pursued as far as Bel-an-atha-fada, whither Felim Finn O'Conor came to check the pursuers and stopped the flight.

M1482.13

Brian Oge, the son of Brian, son of Cathal Duv O'Conor, was slain by the descendants of Teige O'Conor at Cuirrcach-an-Aragail.

M1482.14

Art O'Conor defeated Oliver Plunkett at Ath-na-gCeannaigheadh, slew many of his people, and took himself prisoner.


p.1123

M1482.15

Donnell, son of Rury O'Conor, Lord of Corcomroe-Ninais, died, and his relative, Dermot, took his place.

M1482.16

Felim, the son of Felim O'Conor of Corcomroe, was treacherously killed by the sons of Conor O'Conor. Carbry, son of O'Conor Roe, a brave and warlike man, and presumptive heir to the lordship over the descendants of Conor Roe, died.

M1482.17

Erard O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray in history and poetry, who was learned in Latin and Irish, died, after having gained the victory over the world and the Devil, and was interred at Elphin. Seery O'Mulconry succeeded him.

M1482.18

Murtough Mac Clancy, intended Ollav of Thomond, and Cosnamhach, son of Conor Oge Mac Clancy, died.

M1482.19

Hugh, the son of Carbry O'Conor, was slain by a party of his own people.

M1483.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1483. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-three.

M1483.1

Rossa, the son of Thomas Oge Maguire, Bishop of Clogher, a man eminent for wisdom and piety, who had kept a house of public hospitality for all, died, and was interred in the church of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, according to his own selection.

M1483.2

Mahon O'Greefa, Bishop of Killaloe, fountain of hospitality and wisdom, died, and was honourably interred in the monastery of the Canons, in Corca-Baiscinn.


p.1125

M1483.3

Donough, the son of O'Kelly, and O'Farrell, i.e. Cumara, died.

M1483.4

Con O'Neill was ransomed by his father and kinsmen from O'Donnell and the Clann-Hugh-Boy; and this Con was afterwards inaugurated Lord of Tyrone with the consent of his father and of Tyrone in general.

M1483.5

A great war arose between O'Donnell (Hugh Roe) and O'Neill (Con). O'Donnell assembled the Kinel-Connell and the forces of Lower Connaught; and Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, came to join him with all his forces. They proceeded directly on their march (without thanks to any enemy that was before them on the way) to Traghbhaile of Dundalk; and they plundered and burned that town, and the surrounding country. The Lord Justice (Garrett, the son of Thomas, Earl of Kildare), with a great English army, pursued, defied, and overtook them. The others, however, undauntedly sustained the attack of the powerful pursuers, routed them, and slew a great number of the English; but the Mac Quillin and the son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor were killed on their own side. O'Donnell afterwards proceeded to Baile-Lugh-mhaigh with his forces, and burned that town, and he received rewards and payment for sparing and protecting it. O'Donnell then returned, and parted with Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Boy, who proceeded towards Trian-Congail, through Glenree. He O'Donnell himself proceeded on his way through Tyrone, and spoiled and burned the country on each side of him, as he passed along, until he arrived at the river of Abhann-mhor; and here they his forces,


p.1127

or pioneers cut down and felled dense and impervious woods, which impeded their progress, on the brink of that river, so that they formed a free and open passage for the army through these woods. He ordered his army to construct a strong wicker bridge across the river, which being done, his whole army, both infantry and cavalry, crossed the stream, without man or horse being drowned. They then let the bridge float down the stream, so that their enemies could only view them from the opposite side. O'Donnell returned to his own house, after victory and triumph.

M1483.6

Another hosting was made by O'Donnell against John, the son of Philip Maguire, and he carried off great preys and booties. And another depredation was committed by Donnell O'Neill, on the following day, upon the same John.

M1483.7

Art, the son of Con, son of Calvagh O'Conor Faly, defeated Con, the son of Art, son of Art O'Melaghlin, in a battle, in which the two sons of Rory Carragh O'Carroll, and many others, were slain.

M1483.8

O'Keenan, i.e. Rory, Ollav to Maguire in history, and Conor Oge Mac Clancy, Ollav of Thomond, a man accomplished in literature and poetry, died, and Hugh Mac Clancy succeeded him.

M1483.9

Conor Mac-an-Brehon, intended Ollav of Muintir-Maelruain, died after a long sickness.

M1483.10

Edward V. was made King of England on the 9th of April. He reigned two months and eighteen days.

M1483.11

Richard III. was made King of England on the 22nd of June.


p.1129

Annal M1484.

M1484.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1484. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-four.

M1484.1

Nicholas Weston, Bishop of Derry, died.

M1484.2

John O'Farelly, a canon of the family of Drumlane, and Brian O'Farrelly, a priest who had commenced building an anchorite's cell at the Great Church of Drumlane, died.

M1484.3

Niall, son of the Coarb Mac Mahon, died on his way from Rome.

M1484.4

Redmond Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died in captivity at Drogheda.

M1484.5

James, the son of Redmond Tyrrell, Lord of Fertullagh, died.

M1484.6

Donough O'Kelly, Tanist of Hy-Many, died after a long sickness.

M1484.7

The son of O'Conor Faly (Murrough, the son of Cahir, son of Con, son of Calvagh), was slain by one of the sons of Edmond Darcy, in Crioch na g-Cedach, by one cast of a javelin.

M1484.8

Teige, the son of William, son of Hugh, son of Brian O'Kelly, was slain by Brian O'Kelly, his own brother, and William O'Murray, his own foster-brother, who were afterwards hanged by O'Kelly for their misdeeds.

M1484.9

Hugh, son of Brian, son of Brian Ballagh O'Conor, was slain by the descendants of Teige O'Conor.

M1484.10

Donnell Mac Gorman of Ibrickan, one of O'Brien's servants of trust, and the richest man in Ireland in live stock, died.

M1484.11

Hugh, the son of Brian O'Brien, and his wife Sabia, daughter of Teige O'Brien, died.


p.1131

M1484.12

Rory Oge, the son of Rory Boy O'Hanly, died.

M1484.13

Melaghlin, son of Conor O'Gormly, and Conor, his brother, were slain by the sons of Owen, son of Niall O'Donnell.

M1484.14

Brian Roe, the son of Cathal, son of Owen, son of John O'Reilly, died.

M1484.15

A great war broke out between O'Neill (Con, son of Henry) and O'Donnell (Hugh Roe), during which great injuries were done between them.

M1484.16

Gilla-Patrick, the son of Maguire (Edmond, the son of Thomas), was treacherously slain by his own five brothers, namely, Don, John, Edmond, Art Carragh, and Hugh, at the altar of the church of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher; and, in consequence of this, two Maguires were nominated, i.e. John, the son of Philip, son of Thomas Maguire, and Thomas, the son of Thomas Oge, son of Thomas More. John set out upon an excursion against the sons of Donough, the son of Thomas Maguire, i.e. Philip and Felim, and slew Gilla-Patrick, the son of Thomas, son of Donough, and his son Felim, and many others along with them. Mac Gilroy, i.e. Brian, the son of Donnell, the two sons of Mac Donnell of Clankelly (Cormac and Art), and numbers of others, were taken prisoners. This was done on Wednesday, the thirteenth of the Calends of September. Maguire, i.e. John, returned home that day with victory and with booty.

M1484.17

Flaherty, the son of Thomas, son of Philip Maguire, was slain by Thomas Oge, son of Thomas Oge, son of Thomas More, with a cast of a javelin, at Port-Airidh-Broscaidh.

M1484.18

The victory of Moin-Ladhraighe was gained by the sons of Edmond Maguire over the sons of Brian, the son of Philip Maguire, where the three sons of Brian, Cathal, Cuconnaught, and Edmond, were slain, as were also Hugh, the son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill; Owen, the son of Turlough, son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, and his son Turlough; Redmond, son of Gilbert, son of Cormac O'Flanagan, and many others; and where also were taken prisoners, Philip, the son of Turlough, son of Philip Maguire; Philip, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire; and Gilla-Patrick, son of Cathal Oge, son of Manus Maguire, &c. The total number of the slain was twenty, and that of the prisoners ten.


p.1133

Annal M1485.

M1485.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1485. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-five

M1485.1

Nicholas O'Grady, Abbot of Tuam-Greine, a charitable and truly hospitable man, and the twelfth man who was free in Limerick, died.

M1485.2

Donough Mac Coilidh, Erenagh of Bearach, who kept a house of public hospitality, died.

M1485.3

Owen Caech (i.e. O'Conor Don), the son of Felim O'Conor, a successful and warlike man, died after a long sickness; and Hugh, the son of Hugh O'Conor, was nominated Lord in his place.

M1485.4

Ulick Burke, Lord of Clanrickard, heir of the Earl of Ulster, a general patron of the learned of Ireland, died; and his son, another Ulick, took his place. An army was led by this son into Machaire-Chonnacht, and into Hy-Many, and burned and destroyed corn and towns; and, among other things, he burned and demolished the castle of Tulsk, and the prison.

M1485.5

Rory, the son of Brian Ballagh O'Conor, was slain by the descendants of Teige O'Conor.

M1485.6

Celia, daughter of Mac Jordan, and wife of Richard Burke, the most pre-eminent of the women of Connaught, died.

M1485.7

Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, Lord of Trian-Chonghail, went upon a predatory excursion into Lecale; but he was overtaken by the English, and slain by one cast of a javelin.

M1485.8

O'Sullivan Beare, i.e. Donnell, O'Conor of Corcomroe, and O'Conor Kerry and his wife, died.

M1485.9

O'Boyle, Turlough, resigned his lordship; and his son Niall took his place.

M1485.10

A great war broke out between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen. The sons of Art O'Neill (Niall and his brothers) joined O'Donnell; and the sons of Naghtan O'Donnell (Egneghan and his brothers) joined O'Neill. O'Donnell marched with an army into Muintir-Luinigh, for it was there that the


p.1135

creaghts and the people of the descendants of Naghtan were. O'Neill, i.e. Con, was encamped in Muintir-Luinigh, and the descendants of Naghtan were with him, protecting their country and their people. O'Donnell, however, did not heed them, until he had taken great preys and prodigious spoils. He passed by the side of the camp of O'Neill and the descendants of Naghtan, and he carried off the preys from them to his own country, without receiving the slightest injury about them.

M1485.11

Hugh, Oge, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Rury, son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, was inaugurated Lord of Oriel.

M1485.12

The town of Cu-Uladh, the son of Hugh O'Neill, was burned by Brian-na-Coille, the son of Owen O'Neill. The land and town of the same Brian were burned, in revenge of it, by Cu-Uladh, by the sons of Redmond, son of Rury Mac Mahon (Glasny and Brian), and by the son of the young Mac Mahon, i.e. Gilla-Patrick.

M1485.13

The descendants of Maelmora of Mullagh were banished from their country, and the sons of Glasny O'Reilly settled in their territory, and erected a castle therein. The others drew the Earl of Kildare (Garrett, son of Thomas) against the sons of Glasny, and fifteen herds of cattle were taken from them as a prey; and Gilla-Isa, the son of Glasny, was taken prisoner on this occasion.

M1485.14

Felim, son of Glasny, who was son of Conor O'Reilly, died of the plague.

M1485.15

O'Reilly, i.e. Turlough, the son of John, son of Owen, went into Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, and burned the town of Magauran (i.e. Felim), and the town of his brother Donough. On the following day Magauran, with his kinsmen, went in pursuit of the army, and deprived them of sixteen men, who were killed or taken prisoners, and two hundred horses.

M1485.16

Mac Donnell, i.e. Colla, Constable of the gallowglasses of O'Neill, died.

M1485.17

Redmond, the son of Glasny, son of Redmond Mac Mahon, went into the English settlements of Machaire-Oirghiall, and slew John, son of the Taa; but Con, son of Manus O'Conolly, the son of Cormac O'Conolly, and the grandson of Ardgal Mac Mahon, were slain of his people; and upwards of twenty horses were taken from himself and his people. Cahir, the son of Irial, son of


p.1137

Philip, and Owen, son of James, son of Eochy More Mac Mahon, were taken prisoners; but Owen afterwards made his escape.

M1485.18

Art-an-Bhogain, the son of O'Conor Faly (i.e. Con), was killed with one cast of a javelin by his brother Cahir, son of Con, son of Calvagh.

M1485.19

The young sons of Edmond Maguire (Hugh Art and Gilla-Isa), and the sons of Turlough Maguire (Teige, Philip, and Gilla-Duv), took a prey from Donnell, son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Edmond Maguire. Donnell himself was slain, while in pursuit of the prey, by Melaghlin Mac Geaveny; and the same Melaghlin was killed on the spot immediately afterwards.

M1485.20

Maguire, i.e. John, took a prey from Midhbholg, from the sons of Donough, son of Hugh Maguire, and from the sons of Mac Ualgairg, twice in one week.

M1485.21

Gilla-Patrick O'Higgin, the son of Brian, son of Melaghlin, a man who had kept a general house of hospitality for the mighty and the indigent, died.

M1485.22

O'Cuirnin, Athairne, died.

M1485.23

Henry VII. was made King of England on the 22nd of August.


p.1139

Annal M1486.

M1486.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1486. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-six.

M1486.1

The monastery of Kilcullen, for Friars Minor de Observantiâ, was commenced on the bank of the Liffey, by Roland, son of Sir Edward Eustace.

M1486.2

The Prior of Maethail, Farrell, the son of Robert Mac Rannall, died.

M1486.3

Philip, son of the Coarb (i.e. James, son of Rury, son of Ardgal) Mac Mahon, a canon chorister at Clogher, Coarb of Clones, Parson of Dartry, &c., died.

M1486.4

A general chapter of the province was held at Drogheda, on the Ides of July, by the Archbishop of Armagh, i.e. Octavianus Italicus, and the bishops and clergy of all the North of Ireland.

M1486.5

Rory, son of Rory Caech Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, Airtech, and Tir-Tuathail, died of a short fit of sickness, in the church of Lough nGasan, in Clann-Cathail-mic-Murray; and Conor, the son of Cormac, son of Tomaltagh the Hospitable, was installed in his place.

M1486.6

Cumara Mac Namara was exultingly slain by the sons of Donough Mac Namara.

M1486.7

Teige, the son of Cathal Oge Mac Rannall, full Chief of Muintir-Eolais, renowned for hospitality and prowess, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world, and was interred at Fenagh.

M1486.8

Teige O'Mulvey, heir to the chieftaincy of Muintir-Carolan, was slain by the sons of Melaghlin Mac Rannall and the sons of Mulrony Mac Rannall.

M1486.9

Owen, the son of Ir, was taken prisoner by the sons of Mulrony Mac Rannall; and the sons of Teige O'Mulvey, the son of William Mac Manus, and many others, were slain.


p.1141

M1486.10

Melaghlin and Rory, two sons of Mac Donough of Tirerrill (each worthy of the chieftainship of Tirerrill), were slain by the sons of Donnell Cam and the sons of Rory Mac Donough.

M1486.11

A numerous army was led by O'Donnell into Connaught, and another by Mac William of Clanrickard, to oppose him. On coming together, however, they agreed to conditions of peace and amity. Felim Finn O'Conor repaired to these armies, and gave himself up into the hands of O'Donnell, in behalf of his territories and chieftains. The peace of Sil-Murray was concluded on this occasion; and the son of Felim Finn was taken as a hostage, instead of Felim Finn himself, by O'Donnell, who took him with him into Tirconnell, by the advice of Mac William of Clanrickard.

M1486.12

The people of Mac Rannall routed the sons of O'Rourke and the descendants of Cathal Roe, at Moin-lesg, where Melaghlin Oge, son of Melaghlin Mac Cabe, a man who for his years bore the greatest name as a leader of gallowglasses in Leath-Chuinn, was slain.

M1486.13

The sons of John, son of the Prior Mac Rannall, were plundered; and Gilchreest, one of these sons, was slain by the descendants of Melaghlin Mac Rannall.

M1486.14

Neidhe O'Mulconry, head of the inhospitality of Ireland, died. It was he who solemnly swore that he would never give butter and bread together to guests.

M1486.15

An army was mustered by O'Donnell, and marched into Tirawley. The Lower Mac William went to oppose him; and a battle was fought between them, in which upwards of one hundred of Mac William's people were slain, and John Mac Jordan, Ulick, the son of Richard, son of Thomas Burke, with many others, were taken prisoners.

M1486.16

John, son of the Prior Mac Rannall, died.

M1486.17

Barry More John, the choicest of the English youths of Ireland, was slain on Christmas Day by Donogh Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Ealla, after he had gone on a predatory excursion against him .

M1486.18

Garrett, son of the Earl of Desmond, died.


p.1143

M1486.19

Felim Boy, the son of Carbry O'Conor; Owny, the son of John Carragh Mac Branan; Donough, the son of Cormac, son of Matthew; and Hugh, the son of Rory Duv, son of Matthew, were slain by the sons of Melaghlin Mac Rannall.

M1486.20

Teige Caech, the son of William O'Kelly, the second lord who was over Hy-Many, died in the habit of the third order.

M1486.21

Celia, the daughter of Hugh, son of William O'Kelly, and wife of O'Madden, died.

M1486.22

Loughlin, the son of Gilla-claen O'Hanly, died.

M1486.23

Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Brian O'Beirne, and Melaghlin, the son of Dermot Mac Rannall, died.

M1486.24

Owen, son of Loughlin O'Rourke, expectant Lord of Breifny, died.

M1486.25

James, the son of Mac Richard Butler, the representative of the Earl of Ormond, died.

M1486.26

Breasal and Dermot, two sons of Murrough O'Madden, were treacherously slain by Cobhthach Coffey O'Madden, their own brother.

M1486.27

Raghnailt, daughter of John Mac Namara, and wife of Turlough. son of Teige O'Brien, Lord of East Thomond, died.

M1486.28

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough Midheach, Lord of Cala-na-h-Anghaile, died at an advanced age.

M1486.29

Teige Mac Egan, Ollav of Annaly, was slain in an abominable manner by the descendants of Irial O'Farrell.

M1486.30

Flann, the son of Flann O'Donnellan, died.

M1486.31

Brian, the son of Rury, son of Ardgal, son of Mac Mahon, Lord of Dartry, was slain by the English of Machaire-Oirghiall.

M1486.32

Donnell Oge, the son of Mac Artan, a hospitable gentleman, died.


p.1145

M1486.33

John Boy, the son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill, died.

M1486.34

Donough, the son of Thomas, son of Farrell Magauran, died.

M1486.35

Eight and twenty ballies of the possessions of the English of Machaire-Oirghiall were burned by Mac Mahon, i.e. Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh, son of Rury.

M1486.36

O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, marched with an army, sometime before Samhain, into Machaire-Oirghiall, and caused great conflagrations and injuries.

M1486.37

A great depredation was committed by Brian, the son of Edmond, son of Rury Mac Mahon, upon Edmond, the son of Thomas Oge, and his sons, at Cuil-na-n-Oirear, and slew Edmond Oge, son of Edmond, at Doire-Cenainn.

M1486.38

Edmond,the son of Thomas Greannach the hirsute, son of Don, son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, died; and his brother Owen, son of Thomas Greannach, Manus, son of Muldoon, and Rury, son of Conor, son of Don Maguire, were slain at Baile-an-Oireacht, by Felim, son of Donough Maguire, in a nocturnal assault. Catherine, the daughter of O'Farrell (Donnell Boy, the son of Donnell, son of John), and wife of the Mac Manus Maguire, i.e. Cathal Oge, son of Cathal More, died.

M1486.39

Art Roe, son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Edmond Maguire, was slain by a dart cast at him by one of the sons of Turlough, son of Philip Maguire.

M1486.40

Hugh, the son of Niall, son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, died.

M1486.41

Edmond Oge, the son of Edmond, son of Cu-Uladh O'Neill, and Cormac, the son of Art Carragh, son of Melaghlin O'Neill, died.

M1486.42

The sons of Maguire (Edmond), i.e. Hugh and Art Carragh, were ransomed; and on the same day their father resigned his lordship to John, son of Philip Maguire.

M1486.43

Don Maguire, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas Oge, was treacherously slain in the gateway of the churchyard of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, by the sons of Thomas Oge Maguire, i.e. Thomas, Conor, and Rory, and the sons of Flaherty, son of Thomas Oge, i.e. Gilla-Patrick, Cuconnaught, and Brian Crosagh.


p.1147

Annal M1487.

M1487.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1487. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-seven.

M1487.1

Melaghlin, son of Muruough O'Flanagan, Dean of Elphin, died; and Thomas O'Heidigein took his place.

M1487.2

Teige, the son of Brian, son of Auliffe Maguire, who had first been Parson of Botha, and Vicar of Cill-Laisre, died.

M1487.3

Brian O'Corcran, Vicar of Claoin-Inis Cleenish, and Denis Mac Gilla Coisgle, Erenagh and Vicar of Airidh-Brosca Derrybrusk, died.

M1487.4

O'Melaghlin (Laighneach, the son of Corc), Lord of Clann-Colman, was slain by Con, the son of Art, son of Con, son of Cormac Ballagh O'Melaghlin.

M1487.5

O'Reilly, i.e. Turlough, the son of John, son of Owen, died suddenly in his castle of Tullymongan, on the first day of the month of September; and his son John was nominated O'Reilly in his place.

M1487.6

Brian, the son of Brian Ballagh, son of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, worthy of the kingdom of Connaught, died.

M1487.7

Hugh, the son of Rory, son of Brian O'Conor, died.

M1487.8

Seery O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray, head of the cheerfulness and jocularity of the men of Ireland, died; and two Kenfinès of the tribe were set up in his place, namely, Donnell and Mulconry, the son of Torna.

M1487.9

Maurice, the son of Loughlin O'Mulconry, teacher of his own art poetry, died in Tirconnell, after a long illness, and after the victory of penance, and was interred at Donegal.


p.1149

M1487.10

Donnell O'Dugan and his wife, daughter of O'Mulconry, died.

M1487.11

O'Mullally, head of the wisdom of Hy-Many, died.

M1487.12

The EarI of Desmond was treacherously slain by his own people at Rath-gaela, at the instigation of John, his own brother. John and the other perpetrators of the murder were banished by Maurice, son of the Earl.

M1487.13

William, the son of Hugh, son of Brian O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was treacherously taken prisoner by his own kinsmen, and he afterwards died in chains; and two lords were set up in his place, namely, Melaghlin, the son of Hugh, son of Brian, and Donough, the son of Breasal O'Kelly.

M1487.14

Hugh, the son of Donough O'Kelly, was slain by Melaghlin, son of William O'Kelly.

M1487.15

Conor, son of Teige Caech O'Kelly, was treacherously taken prisoner by Teige, the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly.

M1487.16

Cathal Duv, the son of Donnell, son of Owen O'Conor, was slain by the Costelloes, after having gone upon a predatory incursion against them. But Calvagh, his other brother, carried off the prey in triumph.

M1487.17

Donnell O'Conor made an incursion into Leitir-Mac-Philip, routed some of the people, and slew the two sons of Donnell, son of Brian Mac Donough. and many of their gentlemen and people in general.

M1487.18

Brian Roe, the son of Tiernan, son of Teige, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, was slain by a dart cast at him by the son of the O'Rourke, i.e. Owen, the son of Felim, son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge. ln consequence of this death O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, marched into Breifny, and laid siege to O'Rourke's town, i.e. Caislen-an-Chairthe, which he took, and three of O'Rourke's people were slain; and Brian, son of Cathal, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, was slain by Godfrey, the son of Hugh Gallda O'Donnell, by the


p.1151

shot of a ball. The castle was demolished by O'Donnell; and O'Rourke, i.e. Felim, was banished from his country into Fermanagh; but O'Donnell afterwards permitted O'Rourke to come back into his country, and he made peace among the men of Breifny, and compelled the country to rebuild the castle.

M1487.19

Mulrony, the son of Teige Mac Dermot, was treacherously taken prisoner, on Trinity Island, by Tomaltagh, the son of Rory Mac Dermot; and the son of Brian Mac Dermot was slain there.

M1487.20

Alexander, the son of Colla, son of Turlough, and some of the chiefs of his gallowglasses, were slain by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot.

M1487.21

John Mac-an-Airchinnigh, head of his own tribe, who had kept a house of general hospitality for strangers, and Erenagh of St. Patrick's at Elphin, died.

M1487.22

Hugh, the son of Philip Roe Mac Namara, a brave and warlike man, died.

M1487.23

John Duv Mac Costello, Lord of Sliabh-Lugha, died; and two lords were set up in his place, namely, William, the son of Edmond of the Plain, his own brother, and Jordan, the son of Philip Mac Costello.

M1487.24

John, the son of Conor Mac Egan, Ollav of Clanrickard, and Hugh, the son of Brian, son of Farrel Roe O'Higgin, died.

M1487.25

Cahir Mac Coghlan was treacherously slain by the son of his brother, Fineen Roe.

M1487.26

Edmond, the son of Richard Burke, was treacherously taken prisoner by the Barretts, but was afterwards triumphantly rescued by his kinsmen.

M1487.27

An army was led by O'Donnell into Breifny O'Rourke. The cause of this hosting was: O'Rourke, i.e. Felim, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan, and


p.1153

his town, had been treacherously taken by his own kinsmen. Upon O'Donnell's arrival in Breifny, he pitched his camp around Caislen-an-Chairthe, and, after a siege of considerable length, finally took it; on which occasion he slew Tiernan Duv, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge. And having reconciled the men of Breifny with one another, O'Donnell left O'Rourke, Felim, in Caislen-an-Chairthe. O'Rourke levied a protection tribute upon the territory of Breifny, to be paid to O'Donnell and his successors.

M1487.28

Tiernan Oge O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, was slain by the sons of Mulrony Mac Rannall and the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, at Ucht-na-n-Eangadh.

M1487.29

An army was led by Hugh Roe O'Donnell into Moylurg, by which he destroyed corn, and burned many castle-towns. He burned and demolished the castle of the sons of Mac Dermot, namely, Baile-na-huamha. O'Donnell himself, with a strong body of his forces, sallied forth privately by night from their camp, and committed great depredations in Doire-Cua. Felim Finn O'Conor, i.e. the son of Teige, son of Turlough Roe O'Conor, went to O'Donnell on this occasion, and made a perpetual peace with him. Rory-an-Doire, the son of Maurice, son of Hugh Mac Dermot, who was in O'Donnell's army on this expedition, violated the church of Ceall Braighe-Uallaighi, and carried off great booties from it; but O'Donnell made full restitution to the priests of the church which had been violated.

M1487.30

An army was led by Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Ulick of the Wine) into Hy-Many, by which he destroyed the bawn of Athliag Maenagan, and destroyed much corn and many towns throughout Hy-Many and


p.1155

Machaire-Chonnacht. Rossa, the son of Felim Finn, was slain by one shot of a dart by a man of this army. The sons of Felim Finn O'Conor (i.e. Hugh, Turlough, and Conor) passed by them to Baile-tobair-Bhrighde, which they burned and plundered. Dermot, the son of Donnell, son of Turlough Dall O'Conor, while pursuing them, was slain at Roscommon; but his people followed them into Clann-Conway, and took some horses from them. It was at the instance, of O'Conor Don (i.e. Hugh, the son of Hugh, son of Turlough Don) that this incursion was made. The Sil-Murray concluded a peace among themselves, after having refused to do so, by the advice of their friends.

M1487.31

Treacherous depredations were committed by Rory O'Conor upon Felim Finn, who, in revenge, committed great depredations upon the descendants of Teige Oge.

M1487.32

The peace of Sil-Murray was again ratified; and the lordship of the descendants of Cormac O'Beirne, the half townland of Baile-an-Chlair, and the five townlands of Ceann-Coradh, being part of the share of i.e. allotted to Cormac Oge, were given, by consent of the descendants of Turlough Oge, to Felim O'Conor. A portion of the territory of Clann-Chathail-mic-Murray, which had been for some time in the possession of the Clann-Maelruain, was given to Felim Finn O'Conor.

M1487.33

Tiernan Carragh, the son of Tiernan, son of Teige, son of Tiernan O'Rourke; Feradhach, the son of John, son of Turlough Maguire; and Donnell, the son of Don, son of Donnell, son of Art Maguire, were slain in the territory of Muintir-Eolais, by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot and the son of Mac Dermot Roe, and Donnell Bearnach Magauran was also slain on that occasion.

M1487.34

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh, proceeded into Moylurg in Autumn. He burned


p.1157

many houses and much corn; and the church of Druim-Conaille was at the same time, without the permission of O'Donnell, burned by Farrell Carragh, the son of Donnell, son of Teige O'Rourke; and as O'Donnell was not able to overtake Farrell Carragh, to avenge that evil doing upon him, he delivered up the grandson of Tiernan of Buannaid to the clergy of the church, to be detained by them as a pledge for that burning.

Annal M1488.

M1488.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1488. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-eight.

M1488.1

The Abbot of Ath-Trim died.

M1488.2

A great plague raged in Machaire-Chonnacht, of which died Cathal Mac Edigen, Vicar of Patrick's Church, and a canon chorister in Elphin; Aengus O'Reachtadhain, Coarb of St. Finnen at Cluain Creamha; Dermot Mac Conchagaidh, a select priest; and the Deaf Vicar O'Colla.


p.1159

M1488.3

Cathal Roe, the son of Rory, son of Brian Ballagh O'Conor, died of the same plague. Donnell, the son of Brian O'Beirne; Dermot, the son of Donnell, son of Brian; Donnell, son of Farrell; and Cormac, son of Donnell Cananagh O'Beirne, also died of it.

M1488.4

Donnell, the son of Donnell, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, was taken prisoner by the sons of Hugh Gallda, son of NiaIl Garv, and executed on the following day, as his misdeeds deserved.

M1488.5

O'Kelly (Melaghlin, the son of Hugh, son of Brian) died half a quarter of a year after he had assumed the lordship; and Conor, his kinsman, took his place.

M1488.6

Magennis, i.e. Brian, the son of Art, died; and his brother Hugh was inaugurated in his place.

M1488.7

Edmond, the son of Thomas Maguire, who had been Lord in Fermanagh, died.

M1488.8

Don, the son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire, died.

M1488.9

O'Flanagan of Tuath-ratha, Turlough, son of Gilla-Isa, died,

M1488.10

O'Toole (Edmond) was treacherously slain by the sons of Teige O'Byrne.

M1488.11

The son of Murchadha, Lord of Hy-Felimy (Mahon, son of Teige), was treacherously slain by Donough, the son of Art, son of Donough Mac Morogh, Lord of Hy-Kinsellagh.

M1488.12

Dermot, the son of John of Lurg, son of Turlough of the Wine O'Donnell, died.

M1488.13

Brian, the son of Hugh Boy, who was son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, died of galar-breac.

M1488.14

Teige, the son of Melaghlin, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, and Mac Rannall, i.e. Conor, the son of Murrough, of the descendants of Melaghlin, died; and Melaghlin, son of William of the same race, was made Mac Rannall in his place.

M1488.15

O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, and Maguire, i.e. John, the son of Philip, son of Thomas, went to the house of O'Donnell; and O'Neill and O'Donnell made a charitable and amicable peace.

M1488.16

O'Neill and the sons of John Boy O'Neill made peace with each other, after the latter had been released from captivity.


p.1161

M1488.17

Donnell, the son of Niall O'Neill, was slain at Finntamhnach, by Rory, the son of Art, and the sons of Niall, son of Art O'Neill.

M1488.18

Conmac, the son of John, son of Donnell, was nominated O'Farrell, in opposition to Rory the son of Cathal O'Farrell.

M1488.19

Melaghlin, the son of Mac Clancy, was slain by the sons of Teige, the son of Cathal, son of Tiernan Oge O'Rourke.

M1488.20

Owen, the son of Ir Mac Rannall, was slain by his own brother William, son of Ir, and his son, and Manus, son of Ir.

M1488.21

Turlough, the son of Teige Mac Mahon, a man full of grace, and of the gift of wisdom from the Holy Spirit, the bestower of jewels and riches, died after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1488.22

Rory, the son of O'Conor Don, died.

M1488.23

Cu-Uladh, the son of John Boy O'Neill, was slain by Art, son of Henry, who was son of Owen.

M1488.24

Art, the son of Niall Carragh, son of Murtough Oge O'Neill, was slain in a nocturnal attack by the sons of Henry, the son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1488.25

Owen, the son of O'Rourke, i.e. Felim, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge, son of Tiernan More, was slain during an armistice by another Owen, the son of O'Rourke, i.e. the son of Tiernan, son of Teige, son of Tiernan More.

M1488.26

Owen, son of Maelmora O'Reilly, Lord of Mullagh-Laoighill, died.

M1488.27

Donough Dubhshuileach O'Conor (i.e. O'Conor Roe), died at an advanced age, and after a well-spent life; and Felim Finn O'Conor was inaugurated in his place by O'Donnell, Mac William, and Mac Dermot (O'Conor), in as meet a manner as any lord had for some time before been nominated; and his shoe was put on him by Mac Dermot.


p.1163

M1488.28

A peace was concluded between O'Donnell and Mac William Burke, O'Conor and Mac Dermot being as sureties and guarantees between them.

M1488.29

O'Donnell and Mac Dermot (i e. Conor) laid siege to the Rock of Lough Key, which was in the possession of the sons of Rory Mac Dermot. They destroyed and consumed the corn of the country. O'Donnell went away, having failed to take it the Rock; but Mac Dermot's fortress was taken by his own gallowglasses, it having been left under their protection; and they brought all the boats of the lake to the Rock, and took it.

M1488.30

William, the son of Hugh Mac Branan, Chief of Corco-Achlann, died on the eighth of February, after the victory of penance, and was interred at Elphin.

M1488.31

John Manntach, the chief instigator of the murder of the Earl of Desmond, was put to death by Maurice, the son of the Earl. Maurice, the son of the Earl, was nominated the Earl.

M1488.32

A wonderful child was born in Dublin, who had all his teeth from his birth. He grew to an enormous size soon after being born, and so large a child had not been heard of since the time of the heroes.

M1488.33

A whirlwind attacked a number of persons, as they were cutting turf on the bog of Tuaim-Mona, which killed one of them, and swelled the faces of the rest; and four others were killed by the same wind in Machaire-Chonnacht.

M1488.34

Edmond, son of Richard Burke, choicest of the English youths of IreIand, died.

M1488.35

John Oge O'Hara and his son were treacherously slain by the sons of O'Hara, i.e. Rory and Hugh, the sons of his own brother, on Sunday, in the monastery of Banada.


p.1165

M1488.36

Donough Mac Mahon, Lord of Corco-Baiscinn, died; and two Mac Mahons were set up in his place, namely, his own son, Brian, and Teige Roe, the son of Turlough Mac Mahon.

M1488.37

Farrell Mac-an-Ruagaire died. This Farrell took food like others for the space of twenty years, but had not the evacuation of his body during this time.

M1488.38

Rory O'Conor, i.e. the son of Felim, a man who was expected by many to, succeed his father, died at Ballytober-Bride, in the month of August.

M1488.39

A plundering army was led by the Earl of Kildare into Kinel-Fiachach-mic-Neill; and he demolished the castle of Bile-ratha upon the sons of Murtough Mageoghegan, after having brought ordnance to it.

M1488.40

Melaghlin, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, and Maurice, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot, died.

M1488.41

Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Turlough O'Conor, the most select of the youths of the descendants of' Brian Luighneach, died precisely on Easter night.

M1488.42

Dermot, the son of Teige O'Conor, Tanist-Lord of his own tribe, a man who had slain more enemies by his own hand than any other man in Ireland in his time, died of the gravel, after a long illness.

M1488.43

Conor, the son of Duffy O'Luigennan, was drowned in Lough Bradan, in Muintir-Eolais.

M1488.44

Mulconry, the son of Torna O'Mulconry, died of a short fit of sickness at Cluain-na-hoidhche.

M1488.45

Mulmurry, the son of Teige Oge O'Higgin, Chief Preceptor of Ireland in Poetry, and Mac Ward of Oriel, died.


p.1167

Annal M1489.

M1489.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1489. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred eighty-nine.

M1489.1

Nicholas O'Casey, Vicar of Devenish in Lough Erne, and Teige O'Maithgen, one of the monks of Boyle, died.

M1489.2

O'Neill, i.e. Henry, son of Owen, son of Niall Oge; Mac Gillapatrick, i.e. Geoffrey, Lord of Ossory; O'Carroll, i.e. John, Lord of Ely; O'Boyle, i.e. Turlough; Manus, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Rury Mac Mahon; and Conor, the son of Glasny O'Reilly, died.

M1489.3

A great plague raged in this year, of which great numbers died. It was so devastating that people did not bury the dead throughout Ireland.

M1489.4

Redmond, the son of Owny, son of Farrell, son of Thomas, son of Mahon, son of Gilla-Isa Roe O'Reilly, died of it

M1489.5

Felim Oge, the son of Felim, son of Farrell, son of Thomas, son of Mahon, son of Gilla-Isa Roe O'Reilly; Donnell, the son of Torna O'Mulconry, intended Ollav of Sil-Murray; Donnell Cananach i. e the Canon, the son of Teige O'Birn; Cormac O'Conolly, head of the gallowglasses of O'Conor's rear guard; Ineen-duv, the daughter of O'Conor, i.e. Donough the black-eyed; Hugh Boy and Donnell Caech, two sons of O'Hanly; Rury Glas, the son of Rory, son of Mac Hugh; Mac Donough Reagh, i.e. Hugh; and Finola, the daughter of Mac Dermot Roe, all died of the plague.

M1489.6

Melaghlin, the son of Murtough, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Brian-na-Coille, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1489.7

Rury, the son of David O'More, Tanist of Leix, died.

M1489.8

Ross, the son of Owny O'More, was slain by Cahir, the son of Laoighseach, son of Cahir O'Dempsey.

M1489.9

O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, went into O'Kane's territory, where he did great injuries, and took away with him their hostages.

M1489.10

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, proceeded with an army into Trian-Chongail, in harvest time. He committed great depredations and


p.1169

devastations in the Route upon Mac Quillin, without receiving any injury, excepting that his son Con was wounded. He went from thence to Belfast, and took and demolished the castle of Belfast; and he then returned safe to his house, loaded with immense spoils.

M1489.11

O'Reilly, i.e. John, the son of Turlough, son of John, and O'Farrell, i.e. Cormac, the son of John, son of Donnell, committed a depredation in Magh-Breaghmhaine. Donough, the son of Brian Caech, son of Donnell Boy O'Farrell, was slain on that occasion.

M1489.12

Tomaltagh, the son of Brian Mac Donough, was slain by Hugh, son of Donnell Cam Mac Donough, and his sons.

M1489.13

Hugh, the son of Felim Finn O'Conor, was taken prisoner by the sons of O'Kelly.

M1489.14

Turlough, the son of Felim Finn O'Conor (of his years the best son of a lord born for a long time before of his tribe), was slain in Caislen-Riabhach, by the sons of Rory, son of Felim, and the son of Mac Dermot, the descendants of O'Conor Roe, and the son of Hugh, son of Rory.

M1489.15

War was conjointly waged against O'Conor by Rory, the son of Felim, by the descendants of Teige Oge and of Teige Roe, and also by the descendants of Rory Mac Dermot. They made a conjoint incursion against him into Ard-an-Choillin, where they struck and knocked down Cathal Roe O'Conor, but his own cavalry triumphantly rescued him. O'Conor himself, with his cavalry and gallowglasses, came up with them, and deprived them of spoils which they had taken from his creaghts; and he pursued them thence to Tulsk, where he slew Donough Cleireach, son of Teige Mac Dermot. But his own gallowglasses acted treacherously towards O'Conor, and turned against him, and defeated him; and they slew Conor Boy, the son of Cormac, and many others of his side, and also took from him a party of his creaghts. O'Conor, however, made a becoming, heroic, and triumphant retreat, and took his creaghts with him into Hy-Many.

M1489.16

Owen, the son of Felim (i.e. of Felim, son of Owen, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor), son of the Lord of Carbury, and the two sons of Murtough, son of Owen, i.e. Murtough Oge and John, were treacherously slain by Calvach


p.1171

Caech, the son of Donnell, son of Owen; and O'Donnell, who was the guarantee between them, plundered and ravaged Carbury, in revenge of their misconduct, and the violation of his surety and guarantee.

M1489.17

Colman, the son of Art, son of Cormac Ballagh O'Melaghlin, was slain by Con, the son of Art, son of Con, son of Cormac Ballagh O'Melaghlin.

M1489.18

Calvach, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, died.

M1489.19

Murrough, the son of Rory Mac Sweeny, was slain by the Earl of Desmond (Maurice, the son of Thomas), in Ely O'Carroll; and, moreover, his brother Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, was taken prisoner by him.

M1489.20

The son of Mac Carthy, i.e. Dermot, the son of Teige, son of Donnell Oge, was slain by the same Earl.

M1489.21

Thomas Butler Mac Richard was slain by John, son of Edmond Mac Richard Butler.

M1489.22

Richard, the son of Felim, son of Farrell O'Reilly, was slain by the son of John Oge Plunkett.

M1489.23

Paitricin, the son of the Knight of Kerry, was slain by Mac Carthy More (Teige, the son of Donnell Oge).

M1489.24

A depredation was committed by Niall and Art, the two sons of Con, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, upon Henry, the son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill. Cahir O'Conor was slain on that occasion.

M1489.25

Mac Quillin, i.e. Jenkin Roe, the son of Richard, was treacherously slain by Walter, the son of Cormac, son of Jenkin Mac Quillin.

M1489.26

Mac Bulby, Lord of Crioch-Bhulbach along the Barrow, died.

M1489.27

O'Gowan, i.e. Mahon, son of Turlough, died.

M1489.28

Dermot, son of Brian Duv O'Conor, was slain by Hugh, son of Conor, and the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, at Ath-leime-na-girre, where Hugh himself was


p.1173

severely wounded by Dermot; and Brian, son of Conor, son of O'Conor Roe, a worthy Tanist, was slain, in revenge of him, by Teige Boy, the son of Cathal Roe O'Conor, at Magh-Murchadha.

M1489.29

Con, son of Turlough Roe O'Conor, died.

M1489.30

A great war broke out between the two O'Conors; and O'Conor Roe marched an army to Ballytober-Bride, and demolished the bawn of the town, and thereupon the chieftains of the race of Teige Oge, namely, O'Flynn, Mac Keherny, and O'Mulrenin, came into his house, and gave him hostages.

M1489.31

O'Conor led an army to Bel-Coille, and cut down the road; and he obtained hostages from the inhabitants of Airtech.

M1489.32

The sons of O'Conor were defeated at Seoghais the Curlieus by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot.

M1489.33

An army was led by O'Conor against the sons of William O'Kelly, by which he cut down the pass of Cluainin, and cut and destroyed much corn. In revenge of this the sons of O'Kelly did many injuries to O'Mulconry and his relatives.

M1489.34

Hugh, the son of O'Conor, and Owen, were taken prisoners, through treachery, by the sons of William O'Kelly. Dubhthach O'Mulconry was taken prisoner along with them, and put in confinement.

M1489.35

Conor Mac Derrnot was taken prisoner by Turlough O'Conor.

M1489.36

A great war broke out among the people of Annaly themselves; and they committed many depredations and inflicted many injuries upon one another, until the Lord Justice made peace among them, and divided the chieftainship of Annaly between the son of John and the son of Cathal O'Farrell.


p.1175

M1489.37

The descendants of Laoighseach, the son of Rossa O'Farrell, plundered Cluain-tuaiscirt-na-Sinna; in revenge of which the O'Hanlys triumphantly plundered Tir-Licin upon the descendants of Laoighseach.

M1489.38

There was a violation of the peace between the two O'Farrells; and the son of John committed a great depredation upon the son of Cathal, son of Thomas.

M1489.39

The title of Mac Branan was conferred on John Mac Branan by O'Conor and Mac Dermot; and on that day he remitted to the O'Mulconrys the half mark which his predecessors had from them for a long period, for Baile-an-bhealaigh.

M1489.40

Melaghlin, son of Loughlin O'Mulconry, died while on his bardic circuit through Munster.

M1489.41

Celia, the daughter of Dermot an Duna Mac Carthy, and wife of Turlough O'Brien, worthy of being Queen of Cashel, died.

M1489.42

The sheep of that part of Meath from Dublin to Drogheda ran, in despite of their shepherds, into the sea, and did not come back.

M1489.43

O'Fialain died.

Annal M1490.

M1490.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1490. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety.

M1490.1

Mathew Mac Conaing, Vicar of Leath-ratha Abbeylara; Fergus, the son of John, son of Mathew O'Howen, Anchorite of Inis-Caoin; the Canon Mac Tiernan of Drumlane; and Gilchreest Mac-an-Fhirleighin, a young priest, who belonged to Cluain-lis-Floinnabhrait, died.


p.1177

M1490.2

[gt ] A depredation was committed by O'Conor in Hy-Many, at Turlach-na-m-Bruigheol, upon Rory, the son of Turlough. Another depredation was committed by O'Conor upon the sons of Rory Boy, at Muine-Fraechnat, Druim-Turlach, and Cluain-Gamhnach. The sons of Rory, and all those of his own tribe who were opposed to him, met him, with their gallowglasses, on the plain of Croghan; and they gave each other a fierce and furious battle, in which they remembered their old and recent enmities towards one another, for there were persons here arrayed against each other who had slain each other's fathers and kinsmen. O'Conor, however, defeated them; and Tomaltagh, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg, and Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Rory Boy, were slain. Donough, the son of Turlough Mac Dowell, and many of their gallowglasses and kerns, were taken prisoners.

M1490.3

O'Conor, i.e. Felim Finn, the son of Teige, son of Turlough Roe O'Conor, a brave and warlike man, who had spread the terror of his name through every territory around him, and a man whom the Sil-Murray expected one day to unite Connaught, died on Easter Monday, in the house of Mageraghty, and was interred in the burial-place of his ancestors, at Roscommon.

M1490.4

Turlough, the son of Turlough O'Boyle, was thrown from his horse, while racing at the ridge of Murbhach, and died in consequence.

M1490.5

O'Gormly (Murtough, the son of Henry, son of Conor Roe, son of Gillapatrick Maguire), died.

M1490.6

Rory, son of Philip, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, was slain by the sons of Brian, son of Conor Oge Maguire, and all the descendants of Conor.

M1490.7

O'Kane, John, the son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, was taken by the crew of a ship, who came from Inbher-Air.

M1490.8

Hugh, the son of Maelmora, son of John O'Reilly, was taken prisoner by the sons of Glasny, son of Conor O'Reilly, after he had plundered the town of Thomas, the son of Glasny O'Reilly.


p.1179

M1490.9

James Oge Savadge was slain by the sons of the Seneschal Savadge.

M1490.10

Colla, the son of Rury, son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, was slain by the descendants of Cu-Uladh, the son of Niall More O'Neill.

M1490.11

Felim, the son of Rory, son of Jenkin Mac Quillin, was slain at Aendruim, by the sons of Brian, son of Hugh.

M1490.12

The castle of Edan-dubh-Cairrge, i.e. the castle of Niall, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, was taken and demolished by Felim, grandson of Niall Boy; and the same Felim committed great depredations on the sons of Con, son of Hugh Boy, and slew Godfrey O'Maelcraoibhe.

M1490.13

Great depredations and spoliations were committed by Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, upon the sons of Donough, the son of Hugh Maguire; and he carried the preys, consisting of four hundred cows, to Ballyshannon, where he slaughtered them all, for the warders of the town (i.e. the sons of Hugh Gallda O'Donnell) had given up the castle of Ballyshannon to Hugh Oge, without consulting O'Donnell.

M1490.14

O'Donnell and O'Neill remained face to face in two camps from the 1st of November until Christmas, O'Donnell at Druim bo, and O'Neill at Cairrgin,


p.1181

during which time they concluded neither peace nor armistice, and came to neither battle nor contest.

M1490.15

O'Daly of Breifny, i.e. John, the son of William, who was son of Hugh, a learned poet; Rory and Hugh Magrath, the two sons of Donnell, son of Hugh Oge, the two principal learned men of the Clann-Crath; Thomas O'Lorcan, intended Ollav to O'Madden; and Finn O'Haughluinn, Chief Tympanist of Ireland, died.

M1490.16

O'Higgin, i.e. John, the son of Farrell Oge, Chief Poet of Ireland, died.

M1490.17

O'Cassidy of Coole in Fermanagh, and Catherine, the daughter of Conor, son of Cathal Mac Rannall, and wife of Teige, the son of Turlough Maguire, died.

M1490.18

Donough, the son of Melaghlin Caech O'Beirne, and his two sons, one of whom was only seven years of age, were treacherously slain by the rest of the descendants of Cormac O'Beirne.

M1490.19

Cathal, the son of Donough, son of Hugh, was slain in Tir-Briuin na-Sinna, by Con Kittagh, the son of Hugh, son of Owen, and the people of Conor Mac Dermot.

M1490.20

The descendants of Teige O'Conor and his creaghts came out of Hy-Many, and sat before Clár; and Teige Roe, son of Carbry O'Connor, was taken prisoner by them. The sons of Rory Mac Dermot made an attack on them on the very same night, in which attack Rory, the son of Cormac Mac Dermot, was slain.

M1490.21

Rory, the son of Felim O'Conor, was elected in the place of Felim Finn.

M1490.22

O'Donnell came with the descendants of Teige O'Conor to Tulsk, but failed to take the castle.

M1490.23

A depredation was committed by the descendants of Teige O'Conor upon O'Conor, and upon the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, in the Grey Road of Baisleac.

M1490.24

The descendants of Teige O'Conor went with their creaghts into Moylurg, and cut down its fields of corn, which they prepared for themselves, and expelled its inhabitants thence.


p.1183

M1490.25

A hosting was made by the descendants of Teige O'Conor and Mac William against the descendants of Brian Ballagh O'Conor, and took their castles, and drove themselves out of the country.

M1490.26

A depredation was committed by Fergus, the son of Edmond, son of Laoighseach O'Farrell, upon Cathal, the son of Thomas, and the Clann-Auliffe. Another depredation by him upon O'Melaghlin, and another depredation in Cuirrin Connaghtagh, upon the sons of Gilla-na-naev, son of Donnell.

M1490.27

Edmond Duv, son of Ross, Lord of Cala-na-h-Anghaile, died; and Felim, son of Gilla-na-naev, who was son of Donnell, took his place.

M1490.28

Dermot Boy, the son of O'Hanly, was slain by Fergus, the son of Edmond, at Coill-na-Cloiche; and O'Hanly, his father, i.e. Teige, the son of Gilla-na-naev, lost his sight through grief for him. Murtough, the son of Owny O'Hanly, was called the O'Hanly in his place.

M1490.29

Joan, the daughter of Murrough, son of Teige Glae, and wife of Donnell Mac Gorman, died.

M1490.30

Melaghlin, the son of William O'Kelly, was treacherously taken prisoner by Teige, the son of Donough O'Kelly; and the son of O'Mannin, one of his people, was slain in his presence; and Melaghlin was afterwards liberated.

M1490.31

Edmond Dillon, Lord of Machaire-Chuircne, died.

M1490.32

Brian, the son of Teige (i.e. the Mac Rannall), son of Cathal Oge Mac Rannall, was treacherously slain at Liathdruim by the descendants of his own grandfather (i.e. by Teige, the son of Conor, and the two sons of Melaghlin), who had been foster-sons of his father.


p.1185

M1490.33

The castle of Liathdruim was taken by Hubert, the son of Teige Mac Rannall, and the descendants of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot. Cathal, the son of Melaghlin Mac Rannall, was slain in the castle by Hubert, in revenge of his brother. The castle of Liathdruim was afterwards taken by Owen O'Rourke.

M1490.34

The castle of Athlone was taken by the Dillon.

M1490.35

Gerald, son of Dunlaing O'Byrne, Lord of the Branaghs, died; and Cathaoir O'Byrne took his place.

M1490.36

John Oge, the son of John More of Ilay, was treacherously slain by Dermot Mac Carbry, an Ultonian harper, who was one of his own servants; but Mac Carbry was quartered for this crime.

M1490.37

Finola, the daughter of Rory Mac Namara, and wife of Turlough, the son of Murrough O'Brien, died.

M1490.38

Con, the son of Donnell O'Conor of Corcomroe, was slain by Cathal, the son of Conor O'Conor.

M1490.39

There was an earthquake at Sliabh Gamh, by which a hundred persons were destroyed, among whom was the son of Manus Crossagh O'Hara. Many horses and cows were also killed by it, and much putrid fish was thrown up; and a lake, in which fish is now caught, sprang up in the place.


p.1187

Annal M1491.

M1491.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1491. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-one.

M1491.1

Owen, the son of Murtough, son of Niall Oge O'Neill; Murtough, the son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill; and John Roe, the son of Rory Maguire, died.

M1491.2

O'Kane, i.e. John, the son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, was released from captivity; and his creaghts were taken by him from the sons of Manus O'Kane, before any person of his own country had heard of his liberation.

M1491.3

Felim, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by Brian, the son of Rury, son of Edmond Mac Mahon; in revenge of which, Art O'Neill, Felim's brother, took a prey in Teallach-Gealagain, where he burned and slew many persons.

M1491.4

A great war broke out between O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, and O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, so that they could not be reconciled; and they went to the Lord Justice, the Earl of Kildare, but they returned without agreeing to terms of peace or armistice. During this war Brian, the son of Hugh Gallda, son of Niall O'Donnell, was slain by Henry, the son of Henry O'Neill. This Henry defended and protected the country while the O'Neill was in the English house.

M1491.5

Echmily, the son of Magennis, i.e. the son of Hugh, son of Art, was slain in his own house, in a nocturnal assault, by the sons of Melaghlin, the son of Murtough, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1491.6

O'Reilly (John, the son of Turlough, son of John), a kind, bountiful, and truly hospitable young man, died in the very beginning of his prosperity, and was interred in the monastery of Cavan; and John, the son of Cathal, son of Owen, was styled O'Reilly.

M1491.7

Cathal, the son of Turlough O'Reilly, drew the Earl of Kildare against the young O'Reilly and his kinsmen; and much damage was done to the corn, flocks, and herds of the country, by the English army. And the son of Mac Balronta was taken prisoner from the English by the sons of Cathal; but the son of Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Felim O'Reilly, was slain by these forces.


p.1189

M1491.8

Great depredations were also committed by the Earl (James, the son of Thomas) upon the sons of Glasny, son of Connor O'Reilly.

M1491.9

Rory, the son of Dermot, son of Marcus, was made Magrath of Tearmann.

M1491.10

Hugh and Rory, the two sons of Donnell, son of Hugh Oge, son of Randal, son of Donough Alainn Magrath, died.

M1491.11

Murrough, the son of Owen Magrath, died.

M1491.12

Henry, the son of Hubert, son of James Dillon, killed his own father, Hubert, by a cast of a knife; in consequence of which he himself went to Rome.

M1491.13

There was much wet and unfavourable weather in the Summer of this year, and in the ensuing Autumn; it resembled a deluge, so that the corn crops of Ireland decayed.

Annal M1492.

M1492.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1492. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-two.

M1492.1

The Official O'Dwyer, i.e. Hugh, died.

M1492.2

Rory, i.e. O'Conor Roe, son of Felim O'Conor, a man happy in peace, and brave in war, died at a venerable old age, and was buried at Tulsk.

M1492.3

O'Hanly, i.e. Gilla-na-naev, the son of Donnell, Chief of Kinel-Dofa, was slain by his own tribe.

M1492.4

A very great war broke out between the young O'Reilly, i.e. John, son of Cathal, who was son of Owen, and Cathal, the son of Turlough, son of John, son of Owen. Great depredations were committed by Cathal upon O'Gowan; O'Gowan pursued him, but died before he could return.


p.1191

M1492.5

A peace and an armistice were concluded between O'Donnell and O'Neill until May.

M1492.6

Con, the son of Art, son of Con O'Conor, was slain by the people of the Earl of Kildare, for having in jest thrown a pole at the Earl.


p.1193

M1492.7

Con, the son of O'Donnell, was put in fetters by his father.

M1492.8

John, the son of Carbry O'Neill, was slain by the sons of O'Hanlon and the sons of Redmond O'Hanlon, at Traigh-Bhaile of Dundalk.

M1492.9

Felim, the son of Turlough, son of Hugh O'Neill, was slain by Henry, the son of Brian-na-Coille, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1492.10

Cormac, the son of Hugh, son of Philip Maguire, died.

M1492.11

Colla, the son of Donough Mac Donnell, was killed by a flash of lightning in his own house, and the house also was burned; and three or four other persons were nearly killed by the same flash.

M1492.12

Brian, the son of Edmond Mac Donnell, and his sons, were slain by the sons of Mac Mahon and the sons of John Boy Mac Mahon.

M1492.13

Aibhne, the son of Aibhne O'Kane, and Godfrey and John Gallda, two sons of John (i.e. the O'Kane), son of Aibhne, son of Dermot, were slain by Walter Mac Quillin, John Cahanagh, son of John, son of Donnell Ballagh, and Thomas O'Kane, their own father's brother, at whose instigation they came to commit that slaughter.

M1492.14

Mac Gillafinnen, i.e. Turlough, the son of Brian, son of Henry Crossach, and Felim Roe, the son of Donough, who was son of Mac Gillafinnen, died.

M1492.15

Magrath, i.e. Dermot, son of Marcus, son of Maurice, son of Nicholas, son of Andreas, Coarb of the church of St. Daveog, died.

M1492.16

Philip, the son of William Maguire, was slain by O'Cathalain, in the town (or residence) of Richard, son of Belle the Knight.


p.1195

M1492.17

Turlough, the son of O'Conor Faly, i.e. the son of Con, son of Calvagh, and Mac Namara, i.e. Cumeadha, the son of John Mac Namara, died.

M1492.18

Calvagh, the son of O'Conor Faly, i.e. the son of Cahir, son of Con, son of Calvagh, was slain by one of the people of the Earl of Ormond (James, the son of John, son of James Butler), i.e. by Master Gart; and Master Gart was himself taken prisoner immediately afterwards by the Earl of Kildare.

M1492.19

Great depredations were committed by Cathal, son of Turlough O'Reilly, and by the sons of Mac Mahon (i.e. Redmond), Glasny and Brian, and by Gilla-Patrick, the son of Hugh Oge Mac Mahon, at the instance of Cathal O'Reilly, upon O'Reilly, i.e. John, the son of Cathal, son of Owen, and upon all his relatives.

M1492.20

Other great depredations were committed by O'Reilly upon the sons of Glasny O'Reilly; and the son of John Boy Mac Mahon, i.e. Owen, was slain by the sons of Glasny, in the pursuit of the preys; and Garrett, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Felim O'Reilly, was taken prisoner in the same pursuit.

M1492.21

John Boy, the son of Owen, son of Rury, son of Ardgal Mac Mahon, died on the festival-day of St. Tighernach.

M1492.22

Donnell, the son of Henry, son of Owen, and Gilla-Patrick Mac Cawell, were taken prisoners; and Mac Cawell (i.e. Edmond) was slain by the sons of Redmond Mac Mahon, i.e. Glasny and Brian. Many others besides these were slain and taken prisoners on that occasion. Donnell, however, made his escape from the castle of Muineachan a week after his capture.

M1492.23

O'Clery, i.e. Teige Cam, Ollav to O'Donnell in literature, poetry, and history, a man who had kept a house of general hospitality for the mighty and the needy, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1492.24

An unusual plague raged in Meath, i.e. a plague of twenty-four hours duration; and any one who survived it beyond that period recovered. It did not attack infants or little children.


p.1197

M1492.25

The son of the Earl of Ormond came to Ireland, after having been a long time in England. An army was led by him, by O'Brien, with his kinsmen, and Mac William of Clanrickard, into the country of the Butlers, where they compelled the Butlers to give the Earl's son pledges of their submissiom The Irish chieftains of Leinster were taken prisoners, and Meath was ravaged, by this army. The Street of the Sheep in Dublin was burned by the Lord Justice. A peace was afterwards concluded between them recte Sir James Ormond and the Lord Justice, on these conditions, that each of them should have his own father's place, and that the deputyship in Ireland, i.e. the possession of the sword of state, and every thing connected with it, should be transferred to the Archbishop of Dublin, until the king should settle their disputes, and set them to rights. The reason for which the Earl of Kildare resigned his office of Lord Justice, and withdrew himself from the English of Meath, was, that they had not assisted him against the son of the Earl of Ormond.


p.1199

The English suffered many injuries in consequence of this, for, as soon as the Earl abandoned them, they were universally plundered and burned from every quarter by the Irish.

M1492.26

Hubert, son of Mulrony Mac Rannall, heir to the chieftainship of Conmaicne-Rein-na-bh-Fomorach, and sixteen men along with him, were slain and burned in the church of Cill-Trenain, on the banks of the Shannon, by the descendants of Cathal Oge Mac Rannall, and by the Muintir-Carolan.

M1492.27

A depredation was committed by Owen O'Rourke in the territory of Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, and he slew the son of O'Beirne (Cathal, the son of Murtough, who was son of Teige, son of Cormac).

M1492.28

Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, laid siege to the Rock of Lough Frey; but he was compelled by O'Donnell to desist, and make peace.

M1492.29

The castle of Baile-na-Huamha was re-erected by the descendants of Hugh Mac Dermot.

M1492.30

Conor Oge, son of Conor, who was son of Cathal Oge Mac Rannall, was slain by the descendants of Melaghlin Mac Rannall.

M1492.31

An army was led by O'Donnell, O'Rourke, and Owen O'Rourke, into Muin-tir-Eolais, in order to compel the sons of Melaghlin to submit to the authority of O'Rourke as their chief lord, which was refused; and the country was destroyed, both its corn and buildings And they styled William, son of Ir, the Mac Rannall, in opposition to Melaghlin, the son of William, who had been for a long time the sole chieftain.

M1492.32

Murtough, the son of Mahon O'Brien, died in Thomond of the wounds which he had received on the hosting aforesaid, i.e. the hosting of the son of the Earl of Ormond.

M1492.33

Hanlon, the son of Mahon O'Brien, was slain by the descendants of Donough O'Brien.

M1492.34

Hugh Mac Clancy, Chief Brehon and Professor of Law in Thomond, died.

M1492.35

Teige, the son of John, son of Teige Mac Donough, and Cormac, the son


p.1201

of Conor, son of Donnell Cam, fell by each other on Gaebhach; and others of them the Mac Donough family who survived, maimed each other.

M1492.36

Brian, the son of Niall Gallda O'Neill, and Ever, his son, were treacherously taken prisoners by the English of Carrickfergus, and delivered up to the sons of Con, the son of Hugh Boy.

M1492.37

The son of Rury Mac Quillin, and a great number of foot soldiers along with him, were slain by O'Kane.

M1493.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1493. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-three.

M1493.1

The Official O'Luchairen (Owen), a learned ecclesiastic, died.

M1493.2

O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Henry, son of Owen, the bestower of jewels and riches, a brave and warlike man, was treacherously killed by his own brother, Henry Oge.

M1493.3

O'Donnell went to Tyrone, at the instance of O'Donnell Donnell, the son of Henry, son of Owen; and Donnell was nominated O'Neill; and he brought away the hostages of the country, except those of O'Kane and O'Mellan. Henry Oge was nominated another O'Neill by O'Kane and O'Mellan, in opposition to Donnell, which was not lawful, as Donnell was the senior.

M1493.4

Donnell, the son of Owen, son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill, was slain by a party of the people of Art, the son of Con, son of Henry O'Neill.

M1493.5

O'More, i.e. Connell, the son of David, was slain at the castle of Baile na-


p.1203

m-Bachlach, in Crioch-Bulbach, by a party of the people of the Earl of Kildare, i.e. Garrett, the son of Thomas O'More recte Fitzgerald; and Niall, son of Donnell, was made O'More.

M1493.6

O'Hanlon, i.e. Edmond Roe, the son of Murrough, was slain by the sons of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1493.7

Mac Artan, i.e. Patrick, the son of Hugh Roe, died.

M1493.8

Finola, the daughter of O'Conor Faly, i.e. Calvagh, the son of Murrough, and wife of O'Donnell, i.e. Niall Garv, son of Turlough-an-Fhiona, and who was afterwards the wife of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh (O'Neill), a woman who had preserved her widowhood for the period of forty-nine years after the death of these good men, had deported herself chastely, honourably, piously, and religiously, died on the 25th of July.

M1493.9

Catherine, the daughter of Hugh Roe Mac Mahon, and wife of O'Reilly, i e. Turlough, son of John, son of Owen, died

M1493.10

Niall, the son of John Boy O'Neill, died in captivity.

M1493.11

The two O'Neills, i.e. Donnell and Henry Oge, the two sons of Henry, son of Owen, fought a battle with each other at Glasdromainn, where Donnell and his people were routed. In this battle were slain Mac Donnell (i.e. Randal), constable of O'Neill's gallowglasses, with his three sons, Sorley, Rory, and Tuathal; Edmond, the son of Mac Donnell More, i.e. the son of Colla, son of Turlough, son of Gillespick; the son of Rory, son of Hugh Ballagh Mac Donnell; Dowell and Donough Oge, the two sons of Donough Mac Donnell; Edmond, the son of John Boy O'Neill; Hugh Breifneach, the son of John, son of Art; and O'Haedha (Ferdoragh, the son of Ballagh O'Haedha), with a great


p.1205

number of others. Niall, the son of John Boy O'Neill; Hugh, the son of Donnell, son of Henry O'Neill; Donough Mac Cawell, and many others, were taken prisoners in this battle.

M1493.12

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, and his sons, Con and Hugh, went with a great army to the chiefs of Lower Connaught; he was joined by O'Rourke, i.e. Felim, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge; by Owen, the son of Tiernan, son of Teige, at that time heir to the lordship of Breifny; and by Donnell, the son of Owen O'Conor, Lord of Lower Connaught. And after they had collected their forces to one place, O'Donnell proceeded directly eastward into the province, until he arrived in Trian-Chongail. From thence he proceeded into Lecale, thence into Iveagh, and thence into Orior; and he ravaged and plundered Lecale, and every territory through which he passed that was hostile to him. While he O'Donnell was on this expedition, O'Neill, i.e. Henry Oge, the son of Henry, son of Owen, assembled his forces, and was joined by Mac Mahon, i.e. Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Rury, and by Magennis, i.e. Hugh, the son of Art, son of Hugh, with all their forces, and a countless host of others besides them. This numerous army of O'Neill overtook O'Donnell at Beanna-Boirche, and encompassed him in the van and the rear; but O'Donnell sustained and withstood this overwhelnning force firmly and powerfully, until he led his army in safety through the difficulties of the pass. At length the chiefs of both armies, reaching a level plain, arranged and marshalled their forces for an engagement; and a fierce and obstinate conflict, and a furious and dreadful battle, was fought between them, in which they bore in mind all their own enmities and new hatreds to one another. O'Neill and his forces were finally routed. In this battle O'Donnell slew John Roe, the son of Donough Mac Mahon, and many others; and the darkness at the close of the day, and beginning of the night, prevented O'Donnell's forces from following


p.1207

up the pursuit as they wished. They, therefore, pitched their camp for that night at the place where they gained the battle, at Beanna-Boirche, and on the morrow proceeded to their homes, after having gained victory and sway in every territory through which they had passed.

M1493.13

O'Conor Faly (i. e Cahir, the son of Con, son of Calvach), was defeated by Mageoghegan (James, the son of Conla, son of Hugh Boy), and the son of Teige, the son of Cahir, son of Turlough Ballagh O'Conor, the son of Art O'Conor, and the two sons of O'Maenaigh, were taken prisoners in the conflict, and deprived of eighty horses.

M1493.14

Turlough, the son of Teige O'Conor, and Cathal, the son of Murtough, son of Felim O'Conor, were hanged by O'Conor Faly (Cahir, the son of Con, &c)

M1493.15

Cormac, the son of Dermot Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg, was slain by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot.

M1493.16

A depredation vvas committed hy the sons of Rory Mac Dermot upon the descendants of Teige O'Conor; and Con, the son of Felim Finn O'Conor, and Tomaltagh Oge, the son of Tomaltagh the Hospitable Mac Dermot, were slain by them.

M1493.17

Mac Namee, i.e. Teige, the son of Conor Roe, son of Eachmarcach, an eminent poet and a good scholar, was slain by a labourer, one of his own people. i.e. the son of O'Clumhain.

M1493.18

Conor, the son of O'Daly of Breifny, died.

M1493.19

The county of Kildare and Kildare itself were burned by the son of the Earl of Ormond.

M1493.20

James Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach-mic-Neill, died; and Laighneach, his brother, assumed his place.


p.1209

Annal M1494.

M1494.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1494. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-four.

M1494.1

Inneenduv, the daughter of O'Donnell (Hugh Roe), and wife of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, died.

M1494.2

Cu-Uladh, the son of Hugh, son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill; Owen, the son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire; Brian, the son of Dermot O'Dowda; and O'Farrell, i.e. Conmac, the son of John, son of Donnell, son of John, son of Donnell, the second chieftain who was in Annaly at that time, died.

M1494.3

Gilla-Patrick, the son of Mac Manus Maguire, died, and was interred at Donegal on the third day afterwards.

M1494.4

Donnell, the son of Owen O'Conor, Lord of Sligo, a prosperous and warlike man, who possessed that tract of country from the Curlieu Mountains to Bunduff, being at the summit of his affluence, was treacherously slain and burned, in an attack by night, in the bawn of the castle at Bunfinne, by the sons of Rory, son of Turlough Carragh, namely, John and Brian; and Rory, the son of Turlough Carragh, took his place.

M1494.5

Tuathal, the son of Turlough-na-Mart O'Neill, and thirteen of his people, together with Murrough O'Lorcain, were slain by the Clann-Cana, and the sons of Brian-na-Coille, the son of Owen O'Neill.

M1494.6

Turlough, the son of Donough, son of Thomas Magauran, was slain by a cast of a javelin by the sons of Owen, son of Thomas, and Farrell, the son of Thomas, son of Thomas Magauran.

M1494.7

Owen Bearnagh, the son of Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, and a party of his gallowglasses, were slain by Teige, the son of Con, son of Donnell, son of Owen O'Neill, and Hugh Roe, the son of Glasny, son of Redmond, who was son of Rury Mac Mahon; and they were interred at Armagh.


p.1211

M1494.8

The English were defeated by Mac Mahon (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe) and O'Reilly (John, the son of Cathal, son of Owen, son of John), in a battle in which sixty of the English gentlemen were slain, and many prisoners were taken.

M1494.9

James, the son of Mac Manus, was slain by a dart cast at him by one of the sons of Cormac Magauran. It was Edmond, the son of Cormac, son of Manus, who threw the dart.

M1494.10

The descendants of Owen, the son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, went into the castle of Sligo.

M1494.11

The Earl of Kildare was taken prisoner in Dublin by the English, and sent over to England

M1494.12

Donnell, the son of Melaghlin Mac Rannall, heir to the lordship of his own territory, was slain at Baile-na-Cara, with the cast of a dart, by one of the sons of Felim, son of Gilla na naev, son of Donnell, son of Murtough Midheach.

M1494.13

James (brother of the Earl of Kildare) ravaged Meath, while the Earl was in the King's palace.

M1494.14

The Earl of Kildare, i.e. Garrett, the son of Thomas, and the son of the Earl of Ormond, i.e. James, son of John, son of James Butler, came from the house of the King of England, a peace having been concluded between them; and Edward Poynuil, an English knight, came with them as Lord Justice.

M1494.15

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, went with his forces to the castle of Sligo, and remained a great part of this year encamped around it. On this occasion many of his people were slain, among whom was the son of Mac William Burke (William, the son of Rickard, son of Edmond, son of Thomas), William, the son of O'Gallagher (Edmond, son of Donough, son of Loughlin), Owen, the son of Cormac Carragh O'Gallagher, and Donnell Arranach of Arran, a Scottish captain, who was along with O'Donnell. Many others were also slain by the warders of the castle, i.e. by Brian Caech, the son of Teige, son of Owen; Calvagh Caech, son of Donnell, son of Owen; and by Muintir-Airt. These transactions occurred in the Summer.


p.1213

M1494.16

Alexander, the son of Gillespick Mac Donnell, the representative of Mac Donnell, was slain by John Cahanagh, son of John, son of Donnell Ballagh, on the day before the Ides i.e. the 14th of October.

M1494.17

John, son of Owen O'Donnell, was hanged by Con, the son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell.

Annal M1495.

M1495.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1495. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-five.

M1495.1

John Maguire, the son of Pierce, son of Maurice, Parson of Doire-Maelain Derryvullan, and Erenagh of Claoin-inis Cleenish, who kept a house of general hospitality, and the Parson O'Hay (Patrick), died.

M1495.2

Rory, the son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, Lord of Carbury of Drumcliff; died. A contest arose among the descendants of Donnell concerning the lordship of the country, namely, among Felim, the son of Manus, son of Brian, Rory Oge, the son of Rory Ballagh, and Murtough Caech, the son of Manus O'Conor. Rory Oge and Turlough, son of Rory, son of Brian, fell by each other in a combat at Drumcliff, in consequence of which the country was left to Felim.

M1495.3

Cormac (i.e. Mac Carthy), the son of Teige, son of Cormac, Lord of Muskerry, was slain by his own brother, Owen, and his sons. He was the exalter and reverer of the church, the first founder of the monastery of Cill Chreidhe, and a man who had ordered that the Sabbath should be strictly observed throughout his territory. Owen, the son of Teige, assumed his place.

M1495.4

Manus, the son of Owen Roe Mac Manus of Tir-Tuathail-Maoilgairbh, and Murtough, the son of Owny O'Hanly, Chief of the race of Dofa, the son of


p.1215

Aengus, died; and Donnell, the son of Rory Boy, assumed the chieftainship in his place.

M1495.5

Tomaltagh, the son of Cormac Ballagh Mac Donough, died.

M1495.6

O'Donnell went over to the King of Scotland, and they formed a compact and league to assist each other mutually in all their exigencies.

M1495.7

Con, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, and his forces, surrounded the town of Sligo, and continued to besiege it for some time. The descendants of Owen O'Conor mustered a very great force to relieve Sligo, namely, the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, the inhabitants of Tireragh of the Moy, the Clann-Donough, and the inhabitants of Coolavin; and they proceeded in a vast irresistible body towards the town. After Con had received intelligence that these forces were marching towards him, he rose up with his few troops, with Owen O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, and the descendants of Donnell Cam, the son of Mac Donough, and marched forth from their tents, vigorously and resolutely, to Bel an-Droichit, to meet and oppose them; and they came within bow-shot of each other; and it was their wish not to give each other time or pause, but to come to attack each other without delay or respite. And now, when they had their weapons of valour ready for action, O'Donnell came up with them, for he had arrived from Scotland, and having heard at his own fortress of Donegal of the danger his son was in, he had stopped there only one night, and was now come to relieve him. Upon O'Donnell's arrival in the centre of his people, both


p.1217

armies gave each other a fierce and vigorous battle, in which the Lower Connaught army was defeated by O'Donnell, as was often the case with him to see the backs of his enemies turned towards him. On this occasion were slain Teige, the son of Brian Mac Donough, Lord of Tirerrill; Owen Caech, the son of Rory O'Dowda, Lord of Tireragh; Brian Caech, the son of Teige, son of Owen; Teige, son of Donnell, son of Owen; and Kian, the son of Brian O'Gara. O'Gara himself; i.e. Dermot, the son of Owen, was taken prisoner. Besides these, many others of the nobles and plebeians of Connaught were slain, drowned, or taken prisoners in this defeat of Bel-an-Droichit. The son of O'Boyle, i.e. Teige, the son of Niall, son of Turlough, was slain in the heat of the battle. O'Donnell then plundered and preyed his enemies throughout the territory generally, until they became submissive to him.

M1495.8

Teige, the son of Donnell Cam, assumed the chieftaincy of Tirerrill.

M1495.9

Mac William of Clanrickard, i.e. Rickard Oge, came to Lower Connaught, and whatever O'Donnell had not destroyed was destroyed by him.

M1495.10

O'Neill (i.e. Donnell) committed a depredation upon the other O'Neill (Henry), and a number of persons were slain between them.

M1495.11

O'Neill (Henry), Magennis (Hugh, the son of Art, son of Hugh), O'Hanlon (Melaghlin, the son of Felim), and the son of Mac Mahon (Gillapatrick, the son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe), marched with an army into Fermanagh, and burned the entire of Baile-Mic-Ghilla-ruaidh. They went thence to Maguire, and threatened that, unless they should obtain peace from Maguire, they would spoil his whole territory as far as Baile-Ui-Fhlannagain. Things did not turn


p.1219

out, however, thus for them; on the contrary, they were obliged to remain for two nights to the east of the lake at Druim-ralach, and did not dare to advance further into Maguire's country; and some of them were slain. O'Neill (Henry) at last gave Maguire his own terms of peace on that expedition.

M1495.12

The two sons of O'Hanlon (Felim), namely, Murrough Roe and Gilla-Patrick, were slain by the sons of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, and the sons of Carbry, son of Hugh O'Neill.

M1495.13

Magauran (Felim, the son of Thomas, son of Brian Breaghach), Chief of Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw, was drowned in Loch-Crannoige of Caill-an-mhuillinn; and Donnell Bearnagh, his brother, took his place.

M1495.14

Mac Aghirr (Gilla-Patrick, the son of another Gilla-Patrick), died.

M1495.15

Manus Mael, the son of Redmond Reagh, son of Don, son of Cuconnacht Maguire, was slain by Philip, the son of Edmond Maguire, and Gilla Ballagh, the son of Cuconnaught Mac Caffrey.

M1495.16

O'Duigennan of Kilronan (Duffy, the son of Melaghlin, son of Matthew Glas), Ollav of Muintir-Maelruain, a learned historian, who kept a house of general hospitality, and the richest of the literati of Ireland in flocks and herds, died in his own house at Kilronan, at a venerable old age, after winning the goal from the world and the Devil.

M1495.17

Donnell O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray, died; and two O'Mulconrys were set up in his place, namely, John, son of Torna, and Donough, son of Athairne.

M1495.18

Mac Ward of Tirconnell, i.e. Hugh; O'Breslen, i.e. Owen, the son of Owen, son of Petrus, Chief Brehon to Maguire; Brian, the son of Sorley Mac Cabe; and Tiernan O'Delvin, died.

M1495.19

Con, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, with his great little army (Con's army being so called because he was never in the habit of assembling a numerous army, or more than twelve score axe men, for making a standing fight, and sixty horsemen, for following up the rout, and taking prisoners ), marched to Mac Eoin of the Glins, for it had been told to him Con that Mac Eoin had the finest


p.1221

wife, steed (Dubhacoite by name), and hound, in his neighbourhood. Con had before that time sent messengers for the steed, but was refused it, though it had been promised by Con to one of his people. Con made no delay, but surmounted the difficulties of every passage, until he arrived at night with his "great little" band at the house of Mac Eoin, without having given him any previous notice or intelligence of his designs, and immediately took Mac Eoin prisoner, and made himself master of his wife, his steed, and his hound, together with all his other wealth, for he found the famous steed, and sixteen others with it, in the house on that occasion. The Glins were all plundered on the following day by Con's people; but he afterwards made full restitution to Mac Eoin's wife of all such property as was her's; and as soon as he had crossed the Bann, on his return westwards, he set her husband at liberty for her, but he carried the steed, with vast preys and spoils, with him into Tirhugh, and ordered the cattle-spoils to be left upon its grassy fields. Immediately after this he went with his own faithful people, and with the number of forces he was able to muster among those under his father O'Donnell's jurisdiction, and never halted until he had crossed the Shannon, and afterwards advanced into Munster, where he totally plundered Magh O'gCoinchinn, in Mac Carthy's

p.1223

country; and he then returned with many plunders, spoils, and preys, crossed the Erne, and proceeded to Donegal; and at Ard-na-tineadh-aoil Lime-kiln Hill divided the spoils which he had taken from Mac Carthy's country in Munster, and the spoils which he had carried off from Mac Eoin of the Glins, in the east of Ulster. These achievements were performed by Con, the son of Hugh Roe, in the space of fifteen weeks.

Annal M1496.

M1496.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1496. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-six.

M1496.1

Glasny, the son of Redmond, son of Rury Mac Mahon, was killed in his own house at Monaghan, by Gilla-Patrick, the son of Mac Mahon, and his other brother, Rury. These were the sons of Mac Mahon, i.e. Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Rury. Only sixteen sgologes had gone with them by night to commit this slaughter. Ross, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Roe Mac Mahon, was taken prisoner in the same house. At the end of a week after the killing of Glasny, Brian, the son of Redmond Mac Mahon, and the sons of Glasny, son of Redmond Mac Mahon, went on a predatory excursion against Mac Mahon (i.e. Hugh Oge) and his sons, and carried off the prey; and several were slain on both sides. The town of Mac Mahon was afterwards burned by Brian, the son of Redmond, son of Rory.

M1496.2

Gilla-Patrick, the son of Mac Mahon (Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe, son of


p.1225

Rury), was treacherously slain by O'Hanlon (Melaghlin, the son of Felim) and his brother Ardgal. His brother Ever was taken prisoner on the same day. After this murder, Mac Mahon, with his creaghts and the sons of Manus Mac Mahon, went over to O'Reilly and the English. Brian, the son of Redmond, and the sons of Glasny, son of Redmond, went with their creaghts into Fearnmhagh, upon the lands of Mac Mahon and Gilla-Patrick.

M1496.3

O'Donnell (Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv) went into Oriel to assist Brian, the son of Redmond Mac Mahon, and from thence they both marched into Breifny-O'Reilly, in pursuit of Mac Mahon; and they burned that part of the country through which they passed as far as Cavan, and O'Reilly's part of Cavan itself. On this occasion great depredations, spoliations, and destructions, were committed, and great booties obtained, by O'Donnell, in the English settlements in Machaire-Oirghiall in the county of Louth, and on Mac Mahon's adherents on his return back.

M1496.4

Mac Mahon (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe) died, having been blind for some time before; and Brian, son of Redmond Mac Mahon, took his place.

M1496.5

O'Brien, Lord of Thomond (Conor, the son of Turlough), died; and his brother, Gilla-Duv, was inaugurated in his place.

M1496.6

O'Mahony of Fonn-iartharach (Fineen), general supporter of the humanity and hospitality of West Munster, a wise man, learned in the Latin and English languages, died.

M1496.7

O'Doherty (Brian, the son of Donnell) died; and O'Donnell (Hugh Roe) nominated John O'Doherty as Lord in his place.

M1496.8

Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine, i.e. Mulmurray, died, and was interred at Donegal.


p.1227

M1496.9

O'Dowda, i.e. William, the son of Donnell Ballagh, died; and Brian Oge, the son of Brian O'Dowda, was styled O'Dowda in his place.

M1496.10

O'Flanagan of Tuath-ratha, i.e. Gilbert, the son of Cormac, son of Gilla-Iosa, died.

M1496.11

Ever, the son of Brian, son of Niall Gallda O'Neill, was treacherously slain, and his brother Owen was maimed on the same day, by their own two brothers, Con Roe and Felim.

M1496.12

Tiernan, the son of Coffey, son of Art O'Rourke, was treacherously slain by Farrell, the son of Cathal Ballagh, and the sons of Owny, son of Cathal Ballagh O'Rourke.

M1496.13

The castle of Ballyshannon was taken from O'Donnell's warders by Hugh, the son of O'Donnell.

M1496.14

O'Donnell made peace among the people of Carbury; Felim, the son of Manus, son of Brian it was agreed should possess the lordship, but the castle of Sligo should belong to Calvagh Caech, the son of Donnell, who was son of Owen O'Conor.

M1496.15

Con, the son of O'Donnell, laid siege to the castle of Ballyshannon. Maguire, i.e. John, the son of Philip, son of Thomas, came at the instance of Hugh, the son of O'Donnell, to drive Con from the town, and forcibly drove him from it. Hugh and Maguire afterwards pursued him to Donegal; and they burned a part of the town in the early part of the day. Con, with the forces of Tirconnell, Inishowen, and Dartry-Mac Clancy, turned in pursuit of Hugh and Maguire, and followed them to Termon-Daveog. Magrath, i.e. Rory, the son of Dermot, son of Marcus, Coarb of that Termon, came to them, and warned Con and the Kinel-Connell not to violate his protection, or the protection of the Termon, by attacking Maguire; they regarded not that his warning, but pursued Maguire, who was engaged in endeavouring to erect his escape by strength of arm. Con and his army, however, gained the common pass on them, so that they were obliged to take to a bog and morass which lay before them, where an engagement taking place they left one hundred and ten horses behind; and Maguire's people were defeated, himself taken prisoner, and twelve of the


p.1229

chiefs of his people slain, with many others, about Brian Maguire (the son of Brian son of Philip).

M1496.16

O'Farrell (Rury, the son of Cathal), died.

M1496.17

Magauran, i.e. Donnell Bearnagh, Chief of Teallach-Eachdhach, was treacherously slain before the altar of the church of Teampall-an-phuirt, by Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Owen Magauran; and the marks of the blows aimed at him are still visible in the corners of the altar.

M1496.18

Maguire (John) was set at liberty by Con O'Donnell, all the termoners of the province having flocked to him, to request and demand his liberation.

M1496.19

O'Cuirnin (Rory) and Owen Oge, the son of Owen, son of Hugh O'Daly,died.

M1496.20

John, the son of Owen O'Donnell, was put to death by Con, the son of Hugh Roe.


p.1231

Annal M1497.

M1497.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1497. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-seven

M1497.1

The monastery of the Friars in Carrickfergus was obtained for the Friars Minor de Observantiâ, by rescript from Rome, at the instance of Niall, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill; and sixteen brothers of the family of Donegal took possession of it on the vigil of the first Festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in Autumn, having obtained authority for that purpose.

M1497.2

Conor, the son of Cormac, son of Tomaltagh, Lord of Moylurg, was treacherously slain by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot, Conor and Teige; and Teige, the son of Rory, took his place without opposition.

M1497.3

Egneghan, the son of Naghtan, who was son of Turlough-an-Fhiona O'Donnell, was slain in O'Donnell's (Hugh Roe) camp, by his own foster-son, Con, son of Hugh, Gerald, son of Donnell, son of Felim O'Doherty, and Brian Mac Clancy, &c. There were slain along with Egneghan Owen, the son of Turlough Gallda O'Donnell; the son of Hugh, son of Turlough Gallda; Owen, the son of Hugh, son of Donough-na-Coille O'Donnell; Felim, the son of Gilla-Duv; and Turlough, the son of Cathal, son of Gilla-Duv O'Gallagher; Donough Balv O'Firghil, and many others not enumerated.

M1497.4

The two O'Neills, namely, Donnell and Henry Oge, made peace with each other at the end of Spring; and the son of Donnell (Hugh) was set at liberty without a ransom; and great gifts in steeds and armour were given by Henry Oge to Donnell for resigning the title of Lord.

M1497.5

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, resigned his lordship on the seventh of the Calends of June, being Friday, at Templecarn, in the Termon, in consequence of the dissensions of his sons; and his son Con was nominated O'Donnell on the ensuing Tuesday.

M1497.6

Walter, the son of Rickard Burke, went with a fleet to assist the young O'Donnell, Con, the son of Hugh Roe, against his brother, Hugh Oge. After having landed, he was joined by Con; but both were defeated by Hugh, and deprived of the greater part of their arms, armour, and provisions. Hugh was


p.1233

himself in two days afterwards taken prisoner by O'Donnell (Con), and sent to Connaught with Walter, son of Rickard Burke, to be confined in Conmaicne-Cuile.

M1497.7

An army was led by O'Donnell (Con) against Mac Dermot of Moylurg, i.e. Teige, the son of Rory Mac Dermot. Only a few of the Connacians joined his army on that occasion, namely, Felim, the son of Manus O'Conor, Lord of Carbury, and Owen O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, with their forces. A numerous body of forces was mustered by Mac Dermot, to oppose them at Seaghais the Curlieus, for the two O'Conors came with their tribes and chieftains to join his force and muster. A great part of O'Donnell's army made their way by force to the Bealach-Buidhe of Coirshliabh, under the conduct of Manus O'Conor, Owen O'Rourke, and Niall Garv O'Donnell, on which occasion Cathal O'Rourke and many others were slain in the pass of Bealach-Buidhe. The numerous host of the Sil-Murray rose up in the middle of the army, and defeated O'Donnell. Felim O'Conor, Lord of Carbury, was taken prisoner there, as were also the two Mac Sweenys, namely, Mac Sweeny Fanad, i.e. Rory, and Mac Sweeny Connaughtagh, i.e. Mac Sweeny Baghaineach, Owen; Donough-na-nordog, the son of O'Donnell; the two sons of Tuathal O'Gallagher; John and Turlough, the two sons of Donnel Mac Sweeny Fanad; John and Donnell Oge, the two sons of Mac Sweeny Baghaineach; Niall and Owen Roe; Gerald, the son of Donnell, son of Felim O'Doherty; and O'Donnell's physician, the son of Owen Ultach. The Cathach of Columbkille was also taken from them; and Magroarty, the keeper of it, was slain. Many others also were slain and taken prisoners in this battle. Owen O'Rourke escaped being killed or taken in this defeat.


p.1235

M1497.8

Con, the son of Con, son of Niall O'Donnell, died.

M1497.9

O'Neill, i.e. Henry Oge, the son of Henry, son of Owen, marched with a great army into Tirconnell, and first committed great destruction in Fanad. The young O'Donnell (i.e. Con) met this army, on their leaving Fanad, at Bel-atha-daire, on the River Leanainn; but O'Donnell, i.e. Con, was defeated, and he himself was killed there, with one hundred and sixty of his forces, on the 19th of October. His two brothers, Niall Garv and Donnell, were taken prisoners, as was also the son of Mac Sweeny, with sixteen men besides. The following are the gentlemen who fell along with Con on this occasion: Donnell, the son of Manus Roe, son of Niall O'Donnell; Edmond, the son of Felim Reagh, son of Niall Garv; Brian, the son of Boyle, i.e. Turlough, son of Niall; Donnell, the son of Tuathal O'Gallagher; Edmond, the son of Donough, son of Tomaltagh O'Gallagher; Conor, the son of John, son of Conor O'Donnell; Niall, the son of Conor, son of Felim Reagh O'Donnell; Conor, the son of Hugh, son of Conor-na-Laimhe O'Boyle; Conor, the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny, one of the men of Fanad; and William, the son of Bishop O'Gallagher, &c. This defeat took place on Tuesday, the 14th of the Calends of November. O'Neill, on his return, took the Castle-Derg, and left it in possession of Niall O'Neill, after which he went home with victory and spoils. Hugh Roe O'Donnell took possession of his lordship again, by consent of God and man.

M1497.10

The son of O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh, son of Hugh Roe, was released from captivity on the 7th of the Ides of November; and Walter Burke accompanied him to Tirconnell. O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, proffered the lordship to his son, Hugh Oge i.e. Hugh Duv, who declined it; and after his refusing to accept of the lordship, both commenced governing their principality, and humbling


p.1237

their neighbours and borderers, who began to resist their authority, by reason of the contests of O'Donnell's sons with each other.

M1497.11

Felim, the son of Murtough Roe, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, was slain at Ros-Earcain, by Donnell, the son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh; and Donnell himself was treacherously slain by the descendants of Donnell Cael O'Neill.

M1497.12

Brian, the son of Cu-Uladh, son of Hugh, son of Owen, son of Niall Oge O'Neill, died.

M1497.13

Murtough, the son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Felim, the son of Murtough Roe, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill.

M1497.14

Niall, the son of O'Neill, i.e. Henry, the son of Owen, died.

M1497.15

Eleanora, the daughter of Thomas (i.e. Earl of Kildare), son of John Cam, and wife of O'Neill (Con, son of Henry, son of Owen), died.

M1497.16

O'Farrell, i.e. Kedagh, the son of Thomas, son of Cathal, son of Thomas, and his kinsmen, were defeated by John Roe, the son of Carbry, son of Laoighseach: and Kedagh himself, and his son, Laoighseach; Donnell, the son of John, son of Brian, Lord of the Clann-Auliffe; Gerald, the son of Hugh Oge, Lord of Magh-Treagha; and many others, were slain in the battle.

M1497.17

Glasny, the son of John O'Hanlon, was slain by the sons of O'Byrne.

M1497.18

Murrough, son of Cormac, son of John O'Farrell, was slain by Brian Boy, the son of Rury, son of John O'Farrell.

M1497.19

Hugh Boy, the son of O'Rourke (Felim, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge, was slain by the sons of Teige, son of Cathal, son of Tiernan O'Rourke.

M1497.20

Ever and Tuathal, the two sons of Mac Mahon (i.e. Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe), together with fourteen men of their people, were slain by the people of Orior. But Manus Reagh and Manus Oge O'Hanlon, and fifty of the people of Orior, fell by them.

M1497.21

Donnell, the son of Rossa, son of Thomas Oge, son of Thomas Maguire, died.


p.1239

M1497.22

Mac Donough of Corran, i.e. Brian, the son of Mulrony, son of Tomaltagh, died.

M1497.23

Donnell, the son of Melaghlin O'Beirne, fountain of the hospitality of Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, and Teige Roe, the son of Carbry O'Conor, died.

M1497.24

Teige, the son of Melaghlin Mac Rannall, was slain by the son of Murrough Mac Rannall, as he had deserved.

M1497.25

Gilla-Duv, the son of Felim Boy, was slain at Cluain-Plocain, by the descendants of Teige O'Conor.

M1497.26

Calvagh, the son of Carbry O'Conor, was killed in prison by one discharge of an arrow.

M1497.27

Teige O'Rodaghan, Coarb of St. Caillin, a man whose goodness could not be well described, by reason of its exaltedness, greatness, and vastness, died in his own house.

M1497.28

Great famine prevailed through all Ireland in this and the following year, so that people ate of food unbecoming to mention, and never before heard of as having been introduced on human dishes.


p.1241

Annal M1498.

M1498.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1498. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-eight.

M1498.1

Mac Manus of Seanadh, i.e. Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal, son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Matthew, &c., a man who had kept a house of general hospitality, a biatach at Seanadh-Mic-Manus, a canon chorister in Armagh, and in the


p.1243

bishopric of Clogher, Parson of Inis-Caoin, Deacon of Lough Erne, and Coadjutor of the Bishop of Clogher for fifteen years before his death, the repertory of the wisdom and science of his own country, fruitful branch of the canon, and a fountain of charity and mercy to the poor and the indigent of the Lord— he it was who had collected together many historical books, from which he had compiled the historical book of Baile-Mic-Manus for his own use,—died of galar breac the small-pox on the tenth of the Calends of April, which fell on a Friday, and in the sixtieth year of his age.

M1498.2

O'Neill, i.e. Henry Oge, the son of Henry, son of Owen, Lord of Kinel-Owen, was slain in the house of Art, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, in Tuath-Eachadha, by the two sons of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen, i.e. Turlough and Con Bacagh, the sons of the daughter of the Earl of Kildare, in revenge of their father, who had been slain by Henry some time before.

M1498.3

Donnell, the son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill (who had been called O'Neill some time before), assembled together his friends and connexions, i.e. the descendants of Redmond Mac Mahon; and they made an incursion into Dungannon, and remained for some time around the castle, and a night at Cros-Caibhdeanaigh. Felim, son of that O'Neill who had been slain, i.e. Henry Oge, the son of Henry, brought down Niall, son of Art O'Neill, with all his forces, upon them, on Tuesday morning, and, finding them asleep, gave them a hostile awaking, and defeated them; and a great number of the chiefs of the province were slain on that occasion, among whom were Henry, the son of the aforenamed Donnell; Mac Cawell, i.e. Gilla-Patrick; Felim, the son of Redmond Mac Mahon; the two sons of James, son of Eochy More Mac Mahon;


p.1245

Melaghlin, the son of Felim Roe, son of Con, son of Con Mac Mahon; together with a great number of the tribe and servants of trust of the descendants of Redmond Mac Mahon. Hugh, the son of Mac Mahon, i.e. Brian, the son of Redmond, was taken prisoner there; and they the Mac Mahons were deprived of the most part of their horses, and of all their armour. And Felim, who had drawn these forces down upon O'Neill, was wounded in the head by the cast of a dart, of which he died a short time after.

M1498.4

Con, the son of Murtough, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Brian Bacagh, son of Edmond Roe O'Hanlon.

M1498.5

Niall Garv, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, died in captivity.

M1498.6

Donnell, the son of Naghtan, son of Turlough, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, died of galar breac the small-pox.

M1498.7

An incursion was made by O'Donnell (i.e. Hugh Roe) against the sons of Art O'Neill. The sons of Art and he engaged with each other; but the sons of Art were defeated, and Melaghlin, the son of Niall, son of Art, was slain by O'Donnell. They were afterwards pursued to Caislen-Mael; that castle was taken, and seventeen suits of armour were carried away from it; and fifteen prisoners were taken there, together with Felim and Hugh, the two sons of Henry Bacagh, the son of Rory, son of Owen O'Neill; Naghtan, the son of Owen O'Donnell; and the son of Egneghan O'Donnell.

M1498.8

O'Kane, i.e. John, the son of Aibhne, died; and Thomas, his brother, took his place.

M1498.9

The castle of Dungannon was taken by the King of England's Deputy in Ireland, viz. the Earl of Kildare, Garrett, the son of Thomas, who had gone thither at the instance of O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe; of Turlough, the son of Con O'Neill; of Maguire, i.e. John, the son of Philip; and of Donnell O'Neill, with his sons and friends. The greater number of the Irish of the province were along with them around the town i.e. the castle, which they finally took by great guns; and they liberated many prisoners who were detained in it,


p.1247

among whom were Donnell, the son of O'Donnell, who had been confined there for the space of a year; and Art, the son of O'Neill More (i.e. Henry), with his two sons, and many prisoners besides. They carried immense spoils away from it, and slew Con, the son of Turlough Roe O'Neill, in the castle. After this they left the town in the possession of Donnell O'Neill.

M1498.10

Thomas Oge, the son of Thomas the Earl, son of Garrett the Earl, and Cormac Oge, the son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, followed Owen, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Mac Carthy, in pursuit of a prey. On this occasion Owen himself, and his two sons; O'Sullivan Beare, i.e. Philip, the son of Dermot, with his son, Teige-an-Chaennaigh; Brian Oge Mac Sweeny, with many others, were slain by them.

M1498.11

Donough, the son of O'Donnell, and the two sons of O'Gallagher, i.e. John and Turlough, came from Moylurg out of captivity.

M1498.12

Slaine, the daughter of Mac Namara (Sida Cam), and wife of Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Ulick), died.

M1498.13

Sabia, the daughter of Art O'Neill, who had been the wife of Redmond, the son of Philip Maguire, died.

M1498.14

Margaret, the daughter of Donnell Ballagh Maguire, and wife of O'Flanagan (i.e. Gilbert) of Tuath-ratha, died, after the victory of penance, and was interred at Donegal. It was by this couple that a chapel had been erected, in honour of God and the Blessed Virgin Mary, at Achadh-Mor-Baile-Ui-Flannagain.

M1498.15

Maine, the son of Melaghlin, son of Matthew Mac Manus, was slain in Botha-Muintire-Fialain, by the sons of Cathal O'Gallagher.

M1498.16

O'Cuirnin, i.e. Conor Carragh, died.

M1498.17

Mac Ward of Oriel died of the plague.


p.1249

Annal M1499.

M1499.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1499. The Age of Christ, one thousand four hundred ninety-nine.

M1499.1

Loughlin Mac Gilla-Calma, Vicar of Cuil-Maine, a wise and pious clergyman, died.

M1499.2

O'Brien Gilla-Duv, whose name was Turlough, the son of Turlough, Lord of Thomond, died; and Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, took his place.

M1499.3

Teige Mac Dermot, the son of Rory, Lord of Moylurg, a successful and warlike man, who had spread terror of his arms through every territory around him, died in the Rock of Lough Key, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world; and Cormac, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, took his place.

M1499.4

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, went to the English territory, to meet the King of England's Deputy.

M1499.5

Mac Donnell of Clann-Kelly, i.e. Cormac, the son of Art, a charitable and truly hospitable man, died, and was interred at Clones.

M1499.6

Brian, the son of Maguire (John, the son of Philip), was taken prisoner by the son of Brian Maguire.

M1499.7

Donough, the son of Conor, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain by the men of Lurg, i e. by the sons of Turlough O'Muldoon.

M1499.8

Manus, the son of Godfrey Oge, son of Godfrey Roe Maguire, was slain by the people of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw.

M1499.9

The castle of Bundrowes was taken by the son of O'Donnell (i.e. by Donough-na-nordog, the son of Hugh Roe), from O'Donnell's own warders; but


p.1251

O'Donnell himself and his son, Hugh Oge, surrounded the castle; and Maguire, and Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, came to join O'Donnell and his son there. Donough-na-nordog and Philip came to a personal rencounter, in which they pommelled each other; but Donough's horse being killed, and he himself thrown down, he was taken prisoner on the spot by Philip, who immediately delivered him up to O'Donnell. The castle was afterwards taken on the same day. O'Donnell gave Donough back to Maguire, who conveyed him to his house, to be detained in confinement. O'Donnell afterwards gave Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, sixty cows, as a remuneration for his conquest.

M1499.10

Melaghlin, the son of Murrough, son of Teige Mac Rannall, was taken prisoner by Con Carragh, the son of Teige, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, and John, the son of Tiernan O'Rourke, and conveyed by them to Inis-Ochta, an island on Lough-Mac-Nen. Rury, the son of Turlough Maguire, attacked them on the lake, and slew these two sons of O'Rourke, and brought Mac-an-Chaoich Mac Clancy and his son, and Melaghlin, the son of Murrough, to his house. O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, afterwards ransomed him; and the castle of Leitrim was given up to O'Donnell again by Melaghlin, son of Murrough Mac Rannall.

M1499.11

An army was led by the Earl of Kildare (i.e. Garrett, the son of Thomas, son of John Cam), Lord Justice of Ireland, into Connaught; and he took Ath liag-Maenagain from the sons of William O'Kelly, and gave it to the sons of Hugh, son of Brian; and the sons of William O'Kelly were banished westwards across the River Suck. On this expedition the castle of Tulsk was taken by him from the descendants of Felim Cleireach O'Conor, and their hostages were given up by him to Hugh O'Conor, the second lord who was over the Sil-Murray. The castles of Roscommon and Castlereagh were also taken by him on this expedition.

M1499.12

Hugh O'Conor was banished from his country by Mac Dermot, and driven westwards across the Shannon, by consent of the Sil-Murray.

M1499.13

Mac William Burke was drawn to their assistance by O'Conor and the sons of William O'Kelly. The castle of Athleague was taken by him, and given


p.1253

up to the sons of William O'Kelly; and Conor O'Kelly, the second lord that was over Hy-Many, was taken prisoner in it, and delivered, together with the hostages of the subchiefs of Hy-Many, up to Melaghlin, the son of Teige, son of Donough, who assumed the full lordship of Hy-Many on that occasion.

M1499.14

The castle of Tulsk was taken by Mac William and O'Conor; and the son of Carbry, son of Brian, was killed in it by a bullet-shot; and the hostages of the descendants of Felim, and their castles, were given to O'Conor. Mac William made peace between O'Conor and Mac Dermot; and each gave up hostages into the keeping of the other, namely, Owen, son of O'Conor, and Carbry, son of O'Conor.

M1499.15

O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe marched with an army against Mac Dermot, i.e. Cormac, the son of Rory, and never halted until he reached the Curlieu mountains. Mac Dermot, having received intelligence of this, assembled the forces of Moylurg, and of the Tuathas of Connaught, to defend the pass of the Curlieus against O'Donnell. O'Donnell, perceiving this, marched round into Muintir-Eolais, crossed the Shannon near the castle of Leitrim, and thus entered Moylurg. He seized upon many preys and spoils, and commenced ravaging the country. When Mac Dermot heard of this, he repaired to O'Donnell, and concluded a perpetual peace with him, and humbly paid him his tribute. He also returned to him the Cathach, and the prisoners who had remained in Moylurg from the time of the defeat of Bealach-Buidhe to that time.

M1499.16

Great depredations were committed by Brian, the son of Donnell (i.e. the O'Neill), son of Henry, on Mac Donnell of Clankelly, i.e. Gillapatrick.


p.1255

Annal M1500.

M1500.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1500 The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred.

M1500.1

Donnell O'Fallon, Bishop of Derry, a friar minor of the observance, who for the period of thirty years diligently taught and preached throughout Ireland, died of an inward disease, and was interred at Ath-Trim.

M1500.2

O'Rourke (Felim, the son of Donough, son of Tiernan), died; and Owen, the son of Tiernan, son of Teige, took his place.

M1500.3

Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, died.

M1500.4

Brian Caech, the son of Niall, son of John Boy, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by Donnell, son of John Boy O'Neill, and the people of Hugh, in the doorway of the castle of Ceann-ard.

M1500.5

Thomas, the son of Hugh, son of Brian, son of Philip-na-Tuaighe Maguire, was slain by Teige, son of Thomas, son of Thomas Oge, and Muintir-Mucaidhein.

M1500.6

An army was led by O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, into Tyrone, and burned the town of O'Neill of Dungannon, demolished the old castle, and burned the crannog of Loch-Laeghaire, and then returned home, not meeting any opposition on this occasion.

M1500.7

An army was led by the Lord Justice of Ireland (Garrett, the son of Thomas, Earl of Kildare) into Tyrone; and another army was led by O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, so that he joined the Lord Justice at the castle of the sons of John Boy O'Neill, i.e. the castle of Kinard, which they besieged until they took it. The town was afterwards given up to Turlough, the son of Con O'Neill; and these chiefs then returned home. O'Donnell, after his return from this expedition, proceeded vigorously and resolutely into Tirerrill, and plundered the descendants of Brian Mac Donough, who were then at enmity with him, after which he returned home.

M1500.8

The aforementioned Turlough (to whom the Lord Justice had given up the castle of Kinard) was, at the end of six weeks afterwards, taken by O'Neill (Donnell), in O'Neill's own castle; and his creaghts were taken from him, which gave rise to much war in Tyrone.


p.1257

M1500.9

O'Farrell, i.e. Rury, the son of Irial, was slain on the island of Inis-mor-Locha-Gamhna, by James, son of Rury, son of Cathal, son of William O'Farrell.

M1500.10

O'Byrne of Leinster (Cahir, the son of Dunlang) was slain by some of his own kinsmen.

M1500.11

Feradhach, the son of Don Oge, son of Don More Maguire, and Brian, the son of John, son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire, were slain by the sons of Con O'Neill, at Bel-atha-na-Marclach.

M1500.12

Gilchreest, son of John Fin Mac Cabe, was slain in his own house, in a nocturnal attack, by Hugh, the son of John Boy Mac Mahon, who carried off the spoil found in his residence.

M1500.13

The two sons of Donough Oge, the son of Donough More, son of Hugh Maguire (viz. James and Redmond), were slain by Owen, the son of Donough More, son of the same Hugh.

M1500.14

The descendants of Don, the son of Cuconnaught Maguire, made an attack upon Ballymacgilroy, and slew Gilla-Duv, the son of Conor, son of Thomas Maguire, and Donnell Caech Mac Gilroy, with his son, and Rory, the son of Donnell Gearr Mac Gilroy, and many others.

M1500.15

Owen, son of Feradhach Balv, who was son of Don, who was son of Cuconnaught Maguire, was slain by Godfrey Mac Gilroy, in revenge of the people aforementioned.

M1500.16

A castle was begun to be built on the Rock of Loch-an-Tairbh, by Philip, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire.

M1500.17

Gilla-Patrick, the son of Flaherty, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, was slain by Niall, the son of Art O'Neill, and his sons, who carried off great spoils from the sons of Flaherty.

M1500.18

Sorcha, the daughter of Philip, son of Thomas (i.e. Gilla-Duv) Maguire, and Godfrey Oge, the son of Godfrey Roe Maguire, died.

M1500.19

Barry More was slain by his own kinsman, David Barry, Archdeacon of Cloyne and Cork. David was slain by Thomas Barry and Muintir O'Callaghan.


p.1259

M1500.20

The Earl of Desmond disenterred the body of David in twenty days, and afterwards burned it.

M1500.21

The Sinnagh (Fox) of Muintir-Tadhgain (Carbry) was slain by Con, the son of Art, son of Con O'Melaghlin.