Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

Annals of the Four Masters

Author: [unknown]

File Description

Electronic edition compiled by Myriam Priour

Funded by University College, Cork and
Seoirse Ó Luasa, An Caifé Liteartha, An Daingean, who donated a copy of the Annals of the Four Masters to the CELT Project.

2. Second draft, revised and corrected.

Proof corrections by Karen O'Brien, Winifred Power, Myriam Priour

Extent of text: 78 170 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland

(2002)

Distributed by CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: T100005C

Availability [RESTRICTED]

Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Notes

[The precise relationship between MSS 1–4 (below) is a matter for scholarly debate. Two views have been put forward, that of Walsh and Mooney (for bibliographical details of their publications, see below). According to Walsh, MSS 1 and 4 are what remains of the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 3 are the copies forwarded to Louvain for possible printing. According to Mooney, MSS 1 and 3 are the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 4 are what remains of the set forwarded to Louvain. It is more likely that Walsh's view is correct. For an excellent and fully documented discussion of the problem, see Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters, Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95.]

Sources

    Manuscript sources
  1. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 1220 olim C iii 3; paper; s. xvii; five hands, including Míchél Ó Cléirigh and Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh; 522 folios. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1171. Used by Dubhaltach Mac Fir Bhisigh, who refers to it as belonging to Fearghal Ó Gadhra. For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone & Elizabeth FitzPatrick, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 26 (Dublin 1943) 3276-82; ; Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95: 88–92.
  2. Dublin, University College L, OFM, A 13; paper; s. xvii; an autograph copy but scribal signatures are absent in the body of the text. The hands resemble those of Míchél Ó Cléirigh, but there are other hands including marginal notes by John Colgan. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1169. For a description of the MS, see Myles Dillon, Canice Mooney, & Pádraig de Brún, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Franciscan Library, Killiney (Dublin 1969) 24–27; Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 94–95.
  3. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 687 and 688 olim 23 P 6 and 23 P 7; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Míchél Ó Cléirigh, Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, and Conaire Ó Cléirigh, and two others. Annals from 1170 to 1616. For a description of the MSS, see Lilian Duncan, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 17 (1936) 2112–2114; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95; annals from 1170 to 1616); Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=MSS 687-8]) Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95.
  4. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1301 olim H. 2. 11; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Conaire Ó Cléirigh; and two other Ó Cléirigh scribes. Annals from 1334 (beginning acephalous) to 1605 in 466 folios. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82–83; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 92–94.
  5. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1300 olim H. 2. 9 and H. 2. 10; paper; s. xviii (1734-5) scribe: Hugh O'Mulloy (Aodh Ó Maolmhuaidh); a transcript of MS (i) made for John O'Fergus. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82).
  6. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 988 and 989 olim 23 F 2 and 23 F 3; paper; s. xviii; scribe not named; the text was transcribed in the house of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, and apparently under his supervision. This is a transcript of MS (i). For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy, fasc. 22 (1940) 2829–30).
    Editions and Translations
  1. Charles O'Conor (ed.) Rerum Hibernicarum scriptores veteres iii: Quatuor Magistrorum Annales Hibernici usque ad annum M.CLXXII. ex ipso O'Clerii autographo in Biblioteca Stowense servato, nunc primum uersione donati ac notis illustrati (Buckingham, 1826) [O'Conor's edition, though based on MS (i) is seriously defective].
  2. John O'Donovan (ed. & trans.) Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes, 7 vols. (Dublin 1848-51; repr. Dublin, 1856; repr. Dublin, 1990.) [volumes i-ii: pp v-vi (dedicatory letter of the editor) + pp vii-liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv-lxi (epistle dedicatory of Míchél Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii-lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2-1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189-93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii-vi: pp 2-2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377-2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494-8 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii-vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The edition of volumes i-ii, AM 2242-AD 1171, is made from a corrected copy of Charles O'Conor's edition (Buckingham, 1826). This edition is based on MS (i) which was not available to O'Donovan. O'Donovan collated the text so derived with MS (v) and MS (vi) both eighteenth-century transcripts of MS (i). MS (ii) was not known to O'Conor or O'Donovan. The text of the remainder of the remainder of the Annals (volumes iii-vi) is edited from MS (iii) collated with MS (iv).]
  3. Owen Connellan, The Annals of Ireland, translated from the original Irish of the Four Masters (Dublin, 1846) [Annals from 1171 to 1616].
  4. Henri Lizeray, Le livre des quatre maîtres: Annales du royaume d'Irlande, depuis les origines jusqu'à l'arrivée de saint Patrice (Leroux, 1882).
    Literature
  1. George Petrie, 'Remarks on the history and authenticity of the Annals of the Four Masters', Trans Roy Ir Acad 16 (1831) 381-93 [repr. O'Donovan, op. cit. i, pp vii-xix].
  2. Sir John T. Gilbert, 'The Celtic records of Ireland', Ir Q Rev 1 (1852) 588-700 [notice of O'Donovan's edition].
  3. Eugene O'Curry, Lectures on the manuscript materials of ancient Irish history (Dublin, 1861; repr. Dublin, 1878) 141-61 [note O'Curry's translation of John Colgan's remarks about Míchél Ó Cléirigh (143-45) and his sardonic comments on the Stowe sale of Irish MSS and the attitude of Lords Macaulay and Ashburnham].
  4. P. Mac Suibhne, 'A great historical work: the Annals of the Four Masters', J Ivernian Soc 7 (1915) 66-93.
  5. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24.
  6. E. J. Gwynn, 'Miscellanea', Ériu 9 (1921-23) 27-30: 27-8 [verse fragments in Annals of the Four Masters].
  7. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters', in Paul Walsh, Gleanings from Irish manuscripts, 2nd ed. (Dublin, 1933) 69-85.
  8. Paul Walsh, 'The Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 22 (1934) 128-31.
  9. Paul Walsh, 'The convent of Donegal, 1632-36', Ir Book Lover 23 (1935) 109-15.
  10. Brendan Jennings, Michael O Cleirigh, chief of the Four Masters, and his associates (Dublin, 1936) [an inadequate account of the MSS, otherwise very valuable].
  11. Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MSS 687-8])', Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3 [repr. for the most part in a chapter of his The Four Masters and their work].
  12. Paul Walsh, 'Slips in O'Donovan's Four Masters, vol. V', Ir Book Lover 25 (1937) 100-02.
  13. M. A. O'Brien, 'Miscellanea Hibernica, 5: a wrong entry in AU and FM [A.D. 603], Études Celtiques 3 (1939) 365.
  14. Paul Walsh, 'The dating of Irish annals', Ir Hist Stud 2, (1941) 355-75.
  15. Canice Mooney, 'Irish Franciscan libraries of the past', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser., 60 (1942) 223-4.
  16. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'John O Donovan and the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 29 (1943-5) 4-8.
  17. Paul Walsh, The Four Masters and their work (Dublin, 1944).
  18. Michael Duignan [notice of Walsh's Four Masters and their work], Éigse 4 (1943-4) 312.
  19. Helena Concannon, 'John O'Donovan and the Annals of the Four Masters', Studies (Dublin) 37 (1948) 300-7.
  20. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'Annals of the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 31 (1949-51) 126-8.
  21. Alexander Boyle, 'Fergal Ó Gadhra and the Four Masters', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser, 100 (1963) 100-14.
  22. Cathaldus Giblin, 'The Annals of the Four Masters', in Liam de Paor (ed.) Great books of Ireland (Dublin, 1967) 90-103, repr. in Benignus Millett & Anthony Lynch (ed.) Dún Mhuire, Killiney, 1945-95 (Dublin, 1995) 135-43.
  23. David Greene & Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry (London, 1967; repr. Dingle, 1990) 107-9, 200-01 [edition of restored text and translation of four verse epigrams that occur s. aa. 606, 614, 1022, and 1088].
  24. Pádraig Ó Súilleabháin, 'Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála', Éigse 15 (1973) 20-22.
  25. Alan Mac an Bhaird, 'Dán díreach agus ranna as na hannála 867-1134', Éigse 17 (1977) 157C168.
  26. Breandán Ó Buachalla, 'Annála ríoghachta Éireann is Foras feasa ar Éirinn: an comhthéacs comhaimseartha', Studia Hibernica, 22-3 (1982-3) 59-105.
  27. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75-95.
  28. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Vikings II: Ross Cam', Peritia 10 (1996) 236.
  29. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The celebrated antiquary: Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh (c.1600-71): his lineage life and learning (Maynooth, 1996) 6-10, 100-101, 186-89.
  30. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'Cathal Ó Mac Maghnusa: his time, life and legacy', Clogher Rec 16/2 (1998) 45-64.
  31. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Ad Annals of the Four Masters, 823-24', Peritia 13 (1999) 141.
  32. William O'Sullivan, 'The Slane manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters'. Ríocht na Mídhe [Journal of the County Meath Historical Society] 10 (1999) 78-85.
  33. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, 'The chronology and sources of the early Irish annals', Early Medieval Europe 10:3 (2001) 323341.
  34. Pádraig A. Breatnach, 'Irish records of the Nine Years' War: a brief survey, with particular notice of the relationship between Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill and the Annals of the Four Masters'. In Ó Riain, Pádraig (ed.), Beatha Aodha Ruaidh: the life of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Historical and literary contexts (Irish Texts Society, subsidiary series 12) (London 2002) 124-147.
  35. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, on his website at http://www.cs.tcd.ie/misc/kronos/chronology/synchronisms/annals-chron.htm offers comprehensive information on two traditions of dating used in the Irish Annals, together with two ancillary articles, 'Chronological synchronisation of the Irish annals', and 'Collation of the Irish regnal canon'.
  36. Bernadette Cunningham, O'Donnell Histories: Donegal and the Annals of the Four Masters (Rathmullan, 2007).
  37. Edel Bhreatnach and Bernadette Cunningham (eds.), Writing Irish History: the Four Masters and their World (Dublin, 2007).
  38. Bernadette Cunningham, 'The Ó Duibhgeannáin family of historians and the Annals of the Four Masters', Breifne 44 (2008) 557-572.
  39. Bernadette Cunningham, 'John O'Donovan's edition of the Annals of the Four Masters: an Irish classic?' in Dirk van Hulle and Joep Leersen (eds.), Editing the Nation's Memory: Textual Scholarship and Nation-building in Nineteenth-century Europe (Amsterdam, 2008), 129-149.
  40. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish Annals: their genesis, evolution and history (Dublin 2008).
  41. Nicholas Evans, The present and the past in medieval Irish chronicles, Studies in Celtic History 27 (Woodbridge, 2010).
  42. Bernadette Cunningham, The Annals of the Four Masters (Dublin, 2010).
  43. Pádraig A.Breatnach, The Four Masters and their manuscripts: studies in palaeography and text (Dublin, 2013).
    The edition used in the digital edition
  1. Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes.. in Volume 3: TranslationJohn O'Donovan (ed), First edition [Seven volumes. Volumes i—ii: pp v—vi (dedicatory letter of the editor)+ pp vii—liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv—lxi (epistle dedicatory of Mícheál Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii—lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2—1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189—93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii—vi: pp 2—2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377—2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494—98 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii—vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The whole work extends to 4167 pp.] Hodges & Smith Dublin (1848-51)

Encoding

Project Description

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Sampling Declaration

The present text represents pages 3-657 of the translation of volume 3, being the years A. D. 1172 to A. D. 1372, in the chronology of the compilers. That chronology deviates from the historical chronology, but it has not been corrected in this edition. All editorial introduction, original text, notes and indexes have been omitted. Editorial corrigenda are integrated into the electronic edition. Missing text supplied by the editor is tagged sup.

Editorial Declaration

Correction

Text has been checked and proofread twice. All corrections and supplied text are tagged. The Annals of the Four Masters is an extremely large and complex work. Any corrections of errors in the original text, as edited by O'Donovan, corrections to O'Donovan's translation, or to this digital edition of his translation are welcome. They will be credited to the scholars who make them.

The editors of this digital edition reproduce O'Donovan's translation, with a few obvious corrections, in full knowledge of its limitations. Its limitations are particularly evident in the translations of the embedded verse in Old and Middle Irish, many of which (given the stage of development of Irish studies in the mid-nineteenth century) are approximations or mistaken. Their correction cannot be undertaken in this digital edition and must await a new scholarly edition of the Annals as a whole. O'Donovan omits diacritics in the English translation, but quantities are marked in the digital edition of the Irish text, and this should be consulted on this point.

Normalization

The electronic text represents the edited text. The editor's divisions of words have been retained.

Quotation

Quotation marks are rendered q.

Hyphenation

Soft hyphens are silently removed. When a hyphenated word (hard or soft) crosses a page-break, the page-break is marked after the completion of the hyphenated word.

Segmentation

div0=the whole work; div1=the individual annals (i.e. the annalistic matter gathered under one year); div2=the annalistic entry; paragraphs are marked; passages of verse occurring within paragraphs are treated as embedded texts and the stanzas are marked lg and metrical lines are marked l. Page-breaks are marked pb n=""; words in languages other than English are tagged.

Standard Values

Dates are encoded in the format yyyy-mm-dd.

Canonical References

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Refs: EVENT (<DIV2>)

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Profile Description

Created: Translation by John O'Donovan (for source text see CELT file G100005C) Date range: c.1846-1850.

Use of language

Language: [EN] The text is in English.
Language: [LA] Some words are in Latin.
Language: [GA] Some words are in Irish.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: T100005C

Annals of the Four Masters: Author: [unknown]

M1172.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1172. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-two.

M1172.1

BRIGIDIAN O'KANE, successor of Maidoc, died.

M1172.2

Giolla Aedha O'Muidhin (of the family of Errew of Lough Con), Bishop of Cork, died. He was a man full of the grace of God, the tower of the virginity and wisdom of his time.


p.5

M1172.3

Tiernagh O'Malone, successor of Kieran of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1172.4

Tiernan O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny and Conmaicne, a man of great power for a long time, was treacherously slain at Tlachtgha by Hugo de Lacy and Donnell, the son of Annadh O'Rourke, one of his own tribe, who was along with them. He was beheaded by them, and they conveyed his head and body ignominiously to Dublin. The head was placed over the gate of the fortress, as a spectacle of intense pity to the Irish, and the body was gibbeted, with the feet upwards, at the northern side of Dublin.


p.7

M1172.5

Donnell O'Farrell, chief of Conmaicne, was slain by the people of the King of England.

M1172.6

Mulmurry Mac Murrough, Lord of Muintir Birn, was slain by Mugh Magennis and the Clann-Aodha of Ui Eathach Uladh.

M1172.7

Dermot O'Kaelly died.

M1172.8

The Kinel Owen were defeated by Flaherty O'Muldorry and the Kinel Connell. They the Kinel Connell made prodigious havoc of them, through the holy miracles of God, of St. Patrick, and St. Columbkille, whose churches they the Kinel Owen had plundered.

M1172.9

The complete visitation of the province of Connaught was performed the fourth time by Giolla Mac Liag Gelasius, successor of St. Patrick and Primate of Ireland, to Armagh.

M1172.10

Mac Giolla Epscoip, chief of Clann-Aeilabhra, legislator of Cath Monaigh, was treacherously slain by Donslevy O'Haughy, king of Ulidia. The chiefs of Ulidia, who were as guarantees between them, put Donslevy to death for it i.e. for his crime .


p.9

M1172.11

The son of Annadh O'Rourke and the English treacherously plundered the inhabitants of Annaly and Muintir Magilligan, carrying off many cows and prisoners. They afterwards made another incursion into Ardagh of Bishop Mel, and ravaged the country generally, and slew Donnell O'Farrell, chief of Annaly, on that occasion.

M1172.12

A synod of the clergy and laity of Ireland was convened at Tuam, in the province of Connaught, by Roderic O'Conor and Kyley Catholicus O'Duffy, Archbishop of Tuam, and three churches were consecrated by them.

Annal M1173.

M1173.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1173. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-three.

M1173.1

Murray O'Coffey, Bishop of Derry and Raphoe, a son of chastity, a precious stone, a transparent gem, a brilliant star, a treasury of wisdom, and a fruitful branch of the canon, after having bestowed food and raiment upon the poor and the destitute, after having ordained priests and deacons, and men of every ecclesiastical rank, re-built many churches, consecrated many churches and burial-places, founded many monasteries and Regles's i.e. abbey churches, and fulfilled every ecclesiastical duty; and after having gained the palm for piety, pilgrimage, and repentance, resigned his spirit to heaven in the Duibhregles of Columbkille, in Derry, on the 10th day of February. A great miracle


p.11

was performed on the night of his death—namely, the dark night was illumined from midnight to day-break; and the people thought that the neighbouring parts of the world which were visible, were in one blaze of light; and the likeness of a large globe of fire arose over the town, and moved in a south-easterly direction ; and all persons arose from their beds, imagining that it was daylight; and it was also thus on the east side of the sea.

M1173.2

Conaing O'Hennessy, head of the canons of Roscrea, died.

M1173.3

Ettru O'Meehan, Bishop of Cluain Clonard, died at an advanced age, after having spent a good life.

M1173.4

Kenny O'Ronan, Bishop of Glendalough, died.

M1173.5

Maelisa Mac Ward, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan, died.

M1173.6

Maelmochta O'Melaghlin, Abbot of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1173.7

A great plunder was made by Hugh Magennis and the Clann-Aedha. They plundered the large third of Armagh; but this man was killed in three months after this plundering of Armagh.


p.13

M1173.8

Donnell Breaghach the Bregian O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, was slain by the son of his own father step-brother, Art O'Melaghlin, and by Muintir Laeghachain, at Durrow of Columbkille.

M1173.9

Gilla Mac Liag Gelasius, the son of Rory, the successor of St. Patrick, and Primate of Armagh, and of all Ireland, a son of chastity, filled with purity of heart towards God and man, died in righteousness, at a venerable old age, on the 27th of March, being the Wednesday after Easter, and in the eighty-seventh year of his age. He had been sixteen years in the abbacy of St. Columbkille, at Derry, before he became successor of St. Patrick.

Annal M1174.

M1174.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1174. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-four.

M1174.1

Maelisa O'Connaghtan, Bishop of Sil-Murray Elphin, died.

M1174.2

Maelpatrick O'Banan, Bishop of Connor and Dalaradia, a venerable man, full of sanctity, meekness, and purity of heart, died in righteousness, in Hy-Columbkille, at a venerable old age.

M1174.3

Gilla Mochaibeo, Abbot of the monastery of SS Peter and Paul at Armagh, a diligent and faithful servant of the Lord, died on the 31st day of March, in the seventieth year of his age.

M1174.4

Flann i.e. Florentius O'Gorman, chief Lecturer of Armagh, and of all Ireland, a learned sage, and versed in sacred and profane philosophy, after


p.15

having spent twenty-one years of study in France and England, and twenty other years in directing and governing the schools of Ireland, died happily on the Wednesday before Easter, in the seventieth year of his age.

M1174.5

Maurice O'Duffy, Abbot of the monastery of Ath da laarg, on the River Boyle, died.

M1174.6

Rory O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, was slain in the middle of the island of Inish-cloghran.

M1174.7

Congalagh O'Coinfiacla, Lord of Teffia, died.

M1174.8

Mulrony O'Keary, Lord of Carbury, was treacherously slain by the Galls Ostmen of Dublin, i.e. by Mac Turnin, assisted by the son of Hugh O'Farrell, and Kellagh O'Finnallan, Lord of Delvin-More.

M1174.9

The diocese of Westmeath was annexed to the city of Clonmacnoise, by consent of the clergy of Ireland.

M1174.10

The Earl led an army to plunder Munster; King Roderic marched with another army to defend it against them. When the English had heard of Roderic's arrival in Munster, for the purpose of giving them battle, they


p.17

solicited to their assistance the Galls Ostmen of Dublin; and these made no delay till they came to Thurles. Thither came Donnell O'Brien and the Dalcassians, the battalion of West Connaught, the great battalion of the Sil-Murray, besides numerous other good troops left there by the King, Roderic. A brave battle was fought between the English and Irish at this place, in which the English were finally defeated by dint of fighting. Seventeen hundred of the

p.19

English were slain in this battle, and only a few of them survived with the Earl, who proceeded in sorrow to his house at Waterford. O'Brien returned home in triumph.

M1174.11

Melaghlin O'Donnagan, Lord of Ara, was slain by O'Conaing.

Annal M1175.

M1175.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1175. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-five.

M1175.1

O'Brien, Bishop of Kildare, died.

M1175.2

Maelisa Mac an Chlerigh Cuirr, Bishop of Ulidia (Down), died.

M1175.3

Giolla Donnell Mac Cormac, Bishop of Ulidia, died.

M1175.4

Flaherty O'Brollaghan, successor of St. Columbkille, a tower of wisdom and hospitality, a man to whom, on account of his goodness and wisdom, the clergy of Ireland had presented a bishop's chair, and to whom the presidency of Hy Iona had been offered, died in righteousness, after exemplary sickness, in the Duibhregles of Columbkille; and Gilla Mac Liag O'Branan was appointed in his place in the abbacy.

M1175.5

The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane, and Niall O'Gormly.

M1175.6

Manus O' Melaghlin, Lord of East Meath, was hanged by the English, after they had acted treacherously towards him at Trim.


p.21

M1175.7

Donnell Kavanagh, the son of Dermot, King of Leinster, was treacherously slain by O'Foirtchern and O'Nolan.

M1175.8

The son of Donnell, son of Donough, Lord of Ossory, was treacherously slain by Donnell O'Brien.

M1175.9

Teige, the son of Farrell O'Rourke, was killed.

M1175.10

Dermot, the son of Teige O'Brien, and Mahon, the son of Turlough O'Brien, were deprived of sight in their own house at Castleconning, by Donnell O'Brien; and Dermot died soon after; and Mac an Leithdheirg O'Conor, (i.e. the son of O'Conor Corcomroe), was also slain by Donnell on the same day.


p.23

M1175.11

Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, marched with an army into Munster; he expelled Donnell O'Brien from Thomond, and much wasted the country on that expedition.

M1175.12

Conor Mac Concoille, Abbot of the church of SS. Peter and Paul, and afterwards successor of St. Patrick, died at Rome, having gone thither to confer with the successor of St. Peter.

M1175.13

Gillacolum O'Molloy, Lord of Fircall, was treacherously slain by Rory, the son of Conor Mac Coghlan.

Annal M1176.

M1176.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1176. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-six.

M1176.1

Fore and Kells were laid waste by the English, and by the Hy-Briuin.

M1176.2

Louth was laid waste by the Saxons.

M1176.3

Niall, the son of Mac Loughlin, was slain by Muintir Branan, i.e. the Dal-m-Buinne.


p.25

M1176.4

The daughter of Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, and wife of Flaherty O'Muldory, was killed by the sons of O'Carellan.

M1176.5

Benmee, the daughter of Donough O'Carroll, and wife of Cooey O'Flynn, lady of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee, died.

M1176.6

Cooey O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre, Firlee, and Dalaradia, was slain by Cumee, his own brother, and the Firlee.

M1176.7

The English were driven from Limerick by Donnell O'Brien, by laying siege to them.

M1176.8

An English castle was in progress of erection at Kells.

M1176.9

The English Earl (i.e. Richard) died in Dublin, of an ulcer which had broken out in his foot through the miracles of SS. Bridget and Columbkille, and of all the other saints whose churches had been destroyed by him. He saw, as he thought, St. Bridget in the act of killing him.


p.27

M1176.10

The castle of Slane, in which was Richard Fleming with his forces, and from which he used to ravage Oriel, Hy-Briuin, and Meath, was plundered by Melaghlin, the son of Mac Loughlin, Lord of the Kinel-Owen, by the Kinel-Owen themselves and the men of Oriel. They killed five hundred or more of the English, besides women, children, and horses; and not one individual escaped with his life from the castle. Three castles were left desolate in Meath on the following day, through fear of the Kinel-Owen, viz. the castle of Kells, the castle of Galtrim, and the castle of Derrypatrick. Richard Fleming himself was slain on this occasion.

M1176.11

A ballybetagh was granted in perpetuity by Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, viz. the townland of Toomaghy to God and St. Berach. The following were the sureties of that perpetual gift: Keyly Catholicus O'Duffy, Archbishop of Tuam; Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv; Flann O'Finnaghty; Hugh O'Flynn; Rourke O'Mulrenin; Ignatius O'Monahan; Gilla-an-choimhdhe Mac-an-leastair; O'Hanly; and Conor Mac Dermot; who were to guarantee that this townland was to remain for ever the property of God and St. Berach, from O'Conor and his representative.

M1176.12

Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Conor, Lord of the north of Connaught, the glory, the moderator, and the good adviser of the Irish people, died, and was interred at Mayo of the Saxons.

M1176.13

Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Brien, the heir apparent to the kingdom of Munster, died.


p.29

M1176.14

Donnell O'Malley, Lord of Umallia the Owles, in the county of Mayo, died. Dermot,the son of Cormac Mac Carthy, King of Desmond, was taken prisoner by his own son, Cormac Liathanach; but Cormac was treacherously slain by his own people, and Dermot then re-assumed his lordship.

M1176.15

Donnell Mac Gillapatrick now Fitzpatrick, Lord of Ossory, died.

M1176.16

Hugh, the son of Gilla-Broidi O'Rourke, died.

M1176.17

Donnell, son of Gillapatrick O'Keary, Lord of Carbury O'Keary, was treacherously slain by O'Melaghlin (i.e. Art), upon which Art was deposed by the men of Meath, and his kingdom (or lordship) was given to Donough O'Melaghlin; and his son Flann was slain by the inhabitants of Carbury O'Keary.

Annal M1177.

M1177.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1177. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy and seven.

M1177.1

Cardinal Vivianus arrived in Ireland. A synod of the clergy of Ireland, both bishops and abbots, was convened by this cardinal on the first Sunday in Lent, and they enacted many ordinances not now observed.

M1177.2

Hugh O'Neill, popularly called an Macaemh Toinleasc, who had been for some time Lord of the Kinel-Owen, and heir presumptive to the throne of Ireland, was slain by Melaghlin O'Loughlin and Ardgal O'Loughlin; but Ardgal himself fell on the spot by O'Neill.

M1177.3

An army was led by John De Courcy and the knights into Dalaradia and


p.31

to Dun da leathghlas; they slew Donnell, the grandson of Cathasach, Lord of Dalaradia. Dun da leathghlas was plundered and destroyed by John and the

p.33

knights who came in his army. A castle was erected by them there, out of which they defeated the Ulidians twice, and the Kinel-Owen and Oriels once, slew Conor O'Carellan, chief of Clandermot, and Gilla-Macliag O'Donnelly, chief of Feardroma; and Donnell O'Flaherty now Laverty was so wounded by arrows on this occasion, that he died of his wounds in the church of St. Paul at Armagh, after having received the body and blood of Christ, and after extreme unction and penance. Many other chieftains were also slain by them besides these. During the same expedition, John De Courcy proceeded with his forces to Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee; before his arrival, however, Cumee O'Flynn had set Armoy on fire; but they burned Coleraine and many other churches on this incursion.

M1177.4

Niall O'Gormly, Lord of the men of Magh-Ithe and Kinel-Enda, was


p.35

slain by Donough O'Carellan and the Clandermot in the middle of Derry Columbkille. The house in which he was was first set on fire, and afterwards, as he was endeavouring to effect his escape out of it, he was killed in the doorway of the house. Donough O'Carellan then made his perfect peace with God, St. Columbkille, and the family i.e. clergy of Derry, for himself and his descendants, and confirmed his own mainchine (gifts) and those of his sons, grandsons, and descendants, for ever, to St. Columbkille and the family of Derry. He also granted to them a ballybetagh near Donaghmore, and, moreover, delivered up to them the most valuable goblet at that time in Ireland, which goblet was called Mac Riabhach i.e. the tan-coloured son, as a pledge for sixty cows. There was also a house erected for the cleric, in lieu of that burned over the head of O'Gormly, and reparation was made by him for all damage caused by the burning. All the Clandermot gave likewise full satisfaction on their own behalf.

M1177.5

Murrough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, brought Milo de Cogan and his knights with him to Roscommon, to ravage Connaught, to annoy Roderic his father. The Connacians immediately burned Tuam and other churches, to prevent the English from quartering in them. They afterwards defeated the English, and forcibly drove them out of the country of Connaught; and Roderic put out the eyes of his son, in revenge for this expedition.


p.37

M1177.6

O'Muldory and the Kinel-Connell were defeated by Conor O'Carellan in a battle, in which O'Sherry and many other distinguished men of the Kinel-Enda were slain.

M1177.7

Donnell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny in the now county of Sligo, died.

Annal M1178.

M1178.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1178. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-eight.

M1178.1

The crozier of Columb Mac Luighdheach openly conversed with its cleric.

M1178.2

Donnell O'Fogarty, bishop of Ossory, died.

M1178.3

Gilchreest O'Hoey, bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, died.

M1178.4

Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony, assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen; and Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, was banished from Moy Ithe into Inishowen, to Donough O'Duibhdhiorma. In three months afterwards, the Kinel-Moen deposed Conor, the son of Conallagh, and gave back the chieftainship to Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly. The people of Donnell O'Gormly, namely, Gilla Caech O'Ederla, and the O'Flanagans, treacherously slew O'Loony in Donnell's own house, even while he was under the protection of the Erenagh of Urney, who was with him at the time. Upon this the Kinel-Moen drove Donnell O'Gormly from the chieftainship, and set


p.39

up Rory O'Flaherty as their chieftain: but the three sons of this O'Flaherty acted a treacherous part towards the Kinel-Moen;they slew Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, Tiernan, the son of Randal Mac Donnell, and eight other gentlemen of the Kinel-Moen. Randal, the son of Eachmarcach O'Kane, had been slain by the Kinel-Moen in the beginning of this summer, and in revenge of this were slain Galagh O'Loony and Murtough O'Petan; and it was in revenge of this, moreover, the aforesaid act of treachery was committed against the Kinel-Moen.

M1178.5

A violent wind-storm occurred in this year; it caused a great destruction of trees. It prostrated oaks. It prostrated one hundred and twenty trees in Derry-Columbkille.

M1178.6

John De Courcy with his foreigners repaired to Machaire Conaille, and committed depredations there. They encamped for a night in Glenree, where


p.41

Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, and Cooley Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, made a hostile attack upon them, and drowned and otherwise killed four hundred and fifty of them. One hundred of the Irish, together with O'Hanvy, Lord of Hy-Meith-Macha, fell in the heat of the battle.

M1178.7

John De Courcy soon after proceeded to plunder Dalaradia and Hy-Tuirtre; and Cumee O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee, gave battle to him and


p.43

his foreigners, and defeated them with great slaughter, through the miracles of Patrick, Columbkille, and Brendan; and John himself escaped with difficulty, being severely wounded, and fled to Dublin.

M1178.8

The Constable of the King of England in Dublin and East Meath (namely, Hugo) marched with his forces to Clonmacnoise, and plundered all the town, except the churches and the bishop's houses. God and Kieran wrought a manifest miracle against them, for they were unable to rest or sleep, until they had secretly absconded from Cuirr Cluana on the next day.

M1178.9

The River Galliv (Galway) was dried up for a period of a natural day; all the articles that had been lost in it from remotest times, as well as its fish, were collected by the inhabitants of the fortress, and by the people of the country in general.


p.45

M1178.10

A victory was gained by Art O'Melaghlin, the people of Offaly, and the English, over the people of Delvin Eathra and Melaglhlin Beg, and a party of the men of Teffia; in the battle, Murray, the son of the Sinnagh the Fox, was slain.

M1178.11

Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died at Annadown.

M1178.12

Awley Mac Awley was killed by the Sil-Anmchadha.

M1178.13

Melaghlin Beg O'Melaghlin took the house of Art O'Melaghlin, who made his escape out of it; but Flann, the son of Mac Awley, chief of Calry, was killed by Melaghlin.


p.47

Annal M1179.

M1179.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1179. The age of Christ, one thousand one hundred seventy-nine.

M1179.1

Tuathal O'Connaghty, bishop of Tir-Briuin; Colman O'Scanlan, Erenagh of Cloyne; Gilladowny O'Forannan, Erenagh of Ardstraw; and Mulmurry Mac Gillacolum, seachnab prior of Ardstraw, died.


p.49

M1179.2

Armagh was burned, as well churches as regleses, excepting only Regles Brighde and Teampull na bh-Fearta.

M1179.3

The churches of Tyrone, from the mountain southwards, were left desolate, in consequence of war and intestine commotion, famine, and distress.

M1179.4

O'Rogan, Lord of Iveagh, died of three nights sickness, shortly after he had been expelled for violating the Canoin-Phatruig.

M1179.5

A peace was concluded by Donough O'Carellan and all the Clandermot with the Kinel-Moen and O'Gormly i.e. Auliffe, the son of Menman, brother-in-law of the aforesaid Donough. This peace was concluded between them in the church of Ardstraw, upon the relics of that church and those of Donaghmore and Urney. On the following day, O'Gormly (Auliffe) repaired to the house of Donough O'Carellan to demand further guarantees, but was killed in the middle of the meeting, in the doorway of the house, in the presence of his own sister, the wife of Donough. Three of his people were also killed along with him; namely, Kenny, son of Art O'Bracan; the son of Gilchreest, son of Cormac Mac Reodan, the foster-brother of Donough O'Carellan.

M1179.6

Ardstraw, Donaghmore, Urney, [...] were desolated by the men of Magh Ithe.


p.51

M1179.7

One hundred and five houses were burned in Clonmacnoise, during a predatory incursion.

M1179.8

Clonfert-Brendan, with its churches, were burned.

M1179.9

Lorha, Ardfert-Brendan, Cashel, Tuam, Disert-Kelly, Kilmaine, and Balla, were all burned.

M1179.10

Melaghlin O'Mulvey, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, died.

M1179.11

Ivor O'Casey, Lord of the Saithne, died.

M1179.12

Melaghlin Reagh O'Shaughnessy, Lord of half the territory of Kinelea, was killed by the son of Donough O'Cahill.

Annal M1180.

M1180.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1180. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty.

M1180.1

Lorcan O'Toole, i.e. Lawrence, Archbishop of Leinster and Legate of Ireland, suffered martyrdom in England.


p.53

M1180.2

Macraith O'Deery, Erenagh of Derry died.

M1180.3

Randal O'Carellan was killed by the Kinel-Moen, in defence of St. Columbkille, in the middle of Derry-Columbkille.


p.55

M1180.4

Donough O'Carellan was killed by the Kinel-Connell, in revenge of his treacherous conduct towards O'Gormly, and by the miracles of the saints whose guarantee he had violated.

M1180.5

Aindileas O'Doherty died at Derry-Columbkille.

M1180.6

A battle, called the battle of the Conors, was fought between Connor Moinmoy, the son of Roderic O'Conor, and Connor O'Kelly, Lord of Ely-Many, in which were slain Conor O'Kelly, his son Teige, his brother Dermot, Melaghlin, the son of Dermot O'Kelly, and Teige, the son of Teige O'Conor

M1180.7

Maurice O'Heyne, Lord of Hy-Fiacrach-Aidhne, was killed by the men of Munster.

M1180.8

Carroon O'Gilla-Ultain, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, was killed by Hugh Mac Carroon, on Inis Endaimh, in Mor-loch.

M1180.9

Donnell, the son of Teige O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, died.


p.57

M1180.10

Mulmurry Mac Con-na-mbocht, chief senior of Ireland, died.

M1180.11

Hugh O'Caithniadh, Lord of Erris, was treacherously slain by O'Callaghan at Kilcommon.

M1180.12

Auliffe O'Toghda, Chief of Bredagh, was killed by O'Gaughan, Chief of Moy-heleag.

M1180.13

Murrough O'Laghtna, Chief of Da Bhac, was drowned in Lough Conn.

Annal M1181.

M1181.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1181. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-one.

M1181.1

Dungal O'Kaelly, Bishop of Leighlin, died.

M1181.2

Mulmurry O'Dunan, Abbot of Cnoc-na-Seangan Louth, died.

M1181.3

Mulkieran O'Fiavra, successor of Kieran, died.

M1181.4

Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Tirconnell, defeated the sons of the King of Connaught on the Saturday before Whitsuntide. Sixteen of the sons of the lords and chieftains of Connaught were slain by the Kinel Connell, as well as many others, both of the nobles and the plebeians. They held the Connacians under subjection for a long time after this battle, which was known by the name of Cath Criche Coirpre i.e. the Battle of the Territory of Carbury.


p.59

M1181.5

According to another book, the sons of kings who were slain by Flaherty in the last mentioned battle were the following, viz. Brian and Manus, two sons of Turlough More; and Mulrony; and [...] two sons of Hugh O'Connor. In that battle also fell Hugh, the son of Conor O'Kelly, and Gilchreest, the son of Mageraghty O'Rodiv; Eachmarcach O'Murray; Donough, the son of Brian Luighneach O'Conor; Cucuallachta, the son of Murtough O'Conor; three of the O'Mulrenins; the two Mac Gillaboys; and Hugh, son of Hugh, who was son of Roderic, together with many others of the nobility.

M1181.6

Donnell, the son of Hugh Mac Loughlin, and the Kinel-Owen of Tullaghoge, made an incursion into Ulidia, and defeated the Ulidians, the Hy-Tuirtre, and the Firlee, together with Rory Mac Donslevy, and Cumee O'Flynn.

M1181.7

The men of Moy-Ithe, together with O'Kane Eachmarcach, and the Kinel-Binny of the Valley, mustered an army, and crossed Toome. They plundered all the territories of Firlee and Hy-Tuirtre, and carried off many thousands of cows.

M1181.8

Tomaltagh O'Conor was consecrated successor of St. Patrick. He performed the visitation of the Kinel-Owen, received his dues from them, and left them his blessing.


p.61

M1182.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1182. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty two.

M1182.1

Hugh O'Kaelly, Bishop of Oriel, and head of the Canons of Ireland, died.

M1182.2

Donnell O'Huallaghan, Archbishop of Munster, died.

M1182.3

Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, marched with an army to Dunbo, in Dal Riada, and there gave battle to the English. The Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Randal O'Breslen, Gilchreest O'Kane, and many others, were killed. On this occasion they carried off with them the Gospel of St. Martin.

M1182.4

Brian, the son of Turlough O'Brien, was treacherously slain by Randal Macnamara Beg.

M1182.5

Hugh Mac Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, was killed by Gilla-Ultain Mac Carroon.

M1182.6

Murrough, the son of Taichleach O'Dowda, was killed by Melaghlin O'Mulrony.

M1182.7

Auliffe O'Farrell assumed the lordship of Annaly, and Hugh was expelled.

Annal M1183.

M1183.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1183. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-three.

M1183.1

Joseph O'Hea, Bishop of Hy-Kinsellagh (died).

M1183.2

Bec O'Hara, Lord of Leyny in Connaught, was treacherously slain by Conor, the grandson of Dermot, who was son of Roderic, in his own house, on Lough Mac Farry.


p.63

M1183.3

A battle was fought between O'Flaherty (Gillarevagh) and the son of O'Gormly, in which O'Flaherty and a great number of the Kinel-Moen were slain.

M1183.4

Farrell, son of Auliffe O'Rourke, was slain by Loughlin, son of Donnell O'Rourke.

M1183.5

Gilla Ultain Mac Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, and five others were slain by the sons of the Sinnach (the Fox) O'Caharny.

Annal M1184.

M1184.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1184. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-four.

M1184.1

Gilla Isa O'Moylin, a bishop, died.

M1184.2

Brian Breifneach, son of Turlough O'Conor, died.

M1184.3

Maelisa O'Carroll was consecrated successor of St. Patrick, after Tomaltach O'Conor had resigned that dignity.

M1184.4

Art O'Melaghlin, Lord of Westmeath, was treacherously slain by Dermot O'Brien (i.e. the son of Turlough), at the instigation of the English, and Melaghlin Beg assumed his place, and in three days afterwards defeated the same Dermot in a conflict, in which many persons were slain, among whom was the son of Mahon O'Brien.

M1184.5

A castle was erected by the English at Killare.

M1184.6

Another castle was plundered by Melaghlin and Conor Moinmoy O'Conor, in which many of the English were slain.

M1184.7

Thirty of the best houses in Armagh were plundered by the English of Meath.

M1184.8

The monastery of Assaroe was granted to God and St. Bernard by Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Kinel-Connell, for the good of his soul.


p.65

M1184.9

Kenfaela O'Grady, successor of Cronan of Tomgraney, died.

M1184.10

Niall, son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny, died.

M1184.11

Auliffe, the son of Farrell O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was treacherously slain by Mac Rannall.

M1184.12

Donnell O'Flanagan, Lord of Clann-Cahill, died at Conga-Feichin Cong.

M1184.13

Farrell O'Reilly was treacherously slain by Melaghlin O'Rourke.

Annal M1185.

M1185.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1185. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-five.

M1185.1

Maelisa O'Murray, Lector of Derry-Columbkille, died at a venerable old age.

M1185.2

Philip Unserra (of Worcester) remained at Armagh with his Englishmen during six days and nights in the middle of Lent.

M1185.3

Gilchreest Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry and of the Clans, viz. Clann-Aengus,


p.67

Clann-Duibhinreacht, Clann-Fogarty, Hy-Kennoda, and Clann-Colla in Fermanagh, and who was the chief adviser of all the north of Ireland, was slain by O'Hegny and Muintir-Keevan, who carried away his head, which, however, was recovered from them in a month afterwards.

M1185.4

Melaghlin, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, was slain by the English.

M1185.5

Maelisa O'Daly, ollave (chief poet) of Ireland and Scotland, Lord of Corcaree and Corca-Adain, a man illustrious for his poetry, hospitality, and nobility, died while on a pilgrimage at Clonard.

M1185.6

The son of the King of England, that is, John, the son of Henry II., came to Ireland with a fleet of sixty ships, to assume the government of the kingdom. He took possession of Dublin and Leinster, and erected castles at Tipraid Fachtna and Ardfinan, out of which he plundered Munster; but his people were defeated with great slaughter by Donnell O'Brien. The son of


p.69

the King of England then returned to England, to complain to his father of Hugo de Lacy, who was the King of England's Deputy in Ireland on his (John's) arrival, and who had prevented the Irish kings from sending him (John) either tribute or hostages.

M1185.7

A general war broke out in Connaught among the Roydamnas princes. viz. Roderic O'Conor, and Conor Moinmoy, the son of Roderic; Conor O'Diarmada; Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy; and Cathal Crovderg, the son of Turlough. In the contests between them many were slain. Roderic and his son afterwards made peace with the other chiefs.

M1185.8

The West of Connaught was burned, as well churches as houses, by Donnell O'Brien and the English.

M1185.9

Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, who was the son of Roderic, burned Killaloe, as well churches as houses, and carried off all the jewels and riches of the inhabitants. Thomond was also destroyed and pillaged by Conor Moinmoy, the son of Roderic, and by the English. The English came as far as Roscommon with the son of Roderic, who gave them three thousand cows as wages.

M1185.10

Auliffe O'Murray, Bishop of Armagh and Kinel-Farry, a brilliant lamp that had enlightened clergy and laity, died; and Fogartagh O'Carellan was consecrated in his place.

M1185.11

Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, was slain by the English of Cork.

M1185.12

Donnell Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory, died.

Annal M1186.

M1186.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1186. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-six.

M1186.1

Maelcallann, son of Adam Mac Clerken, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan, died.

M1186.2

Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, died; and Rory O'Flaherty O Laverty was elected by some of the Kinel-Owen of Tullaghoge.


p.71

M1186.3

Con O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, the lamp of the hospitality and valour of the north of Ireland, was slain by the son of Mac Loughlin and a party of the Kinel-Owen; in consequence of which Inishowen was unjustly ravaged.

M1186.3

Gillapatrick Mac Gillacorr, Chief of the Hy-Branain, was slain at the instigation of the Hy-Branain themselves.

M1186.4

Roderic O'Conor was banished into Munster by his own son, Conor Moinmoy. By the contests between both the Connacians were destroyed. Roderic. however, by the advice of the Sil-Murray, was again recalled, and a triocha-ched of land was given to him.

M1186.5

Hugo de Lacy, the profaner and destroyer of many churches; Lord of the English of Meath, Breifny, and Oriel; he to whom the tribute of Connaught was paid; he who had conquered the greater part of Ireland for the English, and of whose English castles all Meath, from the Shannon to the sea, was full; after having finished the castle of Durrow, set out, accompanied by


p.73

three Englishmen, to view it. One of the men of Teffia, a youth named Gilla-gan-inathar O'Meyey, approached him, and drawing out an axe, which he had

p.75

kept concealed, he, with one blow of it, severed his head from his body; and both head and trunk fell into the ditch of the castle. This was in revenge of Columbkille. Gilla-gan-inathar fled, and, by his fleetness of foot, made his

p.77

escape from the English and Irish to the wood of Kilclare. He afterwards went to the Sinnagh (the Fox) and O'Breen, at whose instigation he had killed the Earl.

M1186.6

Murrough, the son of Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was slain by Conor Moinmoy O'Conor.

M1186.7

O'Breslen, Chief of Fanat in Tirconnell, was slain by the son of Mac Loughlin.

Annal M1187.

M1187.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1187. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-seven.

M1187.1

Murtough O'Maeluire, Bishop of Clonfert and Clonmacnoise, died.

M1187.2

Maelisa O'Carroll, Bishop of Oriel (Clogher), died.

M1187.3

Rory O'Flaherty O'Laverty, Lord of Kinel-Owen, was slain, while on a predatory excursion into Tirconnell, by O'Muldory (Flaherty).

M1187.4

The rock of Lough Key was burned by lightning. Duvesa, daughter of O'Heyn, and wife of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, with seven hundred (or seven score) others, or more, both men and women, were drowned or burned in it in the course of one hour.

M1187.5

Gilla-Isa Gelasius, the son of Oilioll O'Breen, Sech-Abb Prior of Hy Many, a historian, scribe, and poet, died.


p.79

M1187.6

The castle of Killare, which was in possession of the English, was burned and demolished by Conor Moinmoy O'Conor and Melaghlin Beg: and not one of the English escaped, but were all suffocated, or otherwise killed; They carried away their accoutrements, arms, shields, coats of mail, and horses, and slew two knights.

M1187.7

Donough O'Rourke was treacherously slain by the Muintir-Eolais.

M1187.8

Drumcliff was plundered by the son of Melaghlin O'Rourke, Lord of Hy-Briuin and Conmaicne, and by the son of Cathal O'Rourke, accompanied by the English of Meath. But God and St. Columbkille wrought a remarkable miracle in this instance; for the son of Melaghlin O'Rourke was killed in Conmaicne a fortnight afterwards, and the eyes of the son of Cathal O'Rourke were put out by O'Muldory (Flaherty) in revenge of Columbkille. One hundred and twenty of the son of Melaghlin's retainers were also killed throughout Conmaicne and Carbury of Drumcliff, through the miracles of God and St. Columbkille.

M1187.9

Mac Dermot (Maurice, son of Teige), Lord of Moylurg, died in his own mansion on Claenlough, in Clann-Chuain.

M1187.10

Randal Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin, died.

M1187.11

Hugh, the son of Melaghlin O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by the sons of Con Mag Rannal.

M1187.12

Aireaghtagh Mac Awley, Chief of Calry, died.


p.81

Annal M1188.

M1188.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1188. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-eight.

M1188.1

Martin O'Broly, chief Sage of the Irish, and Lector at Armagh, died.

M1188.2

Hugh O'Beaghan, Bishop of Inis-Cathy, died

1188.3

Auliffe O'Deery performed a pilgrimage to Hy Iona, where he died after sincere penitence.

M1188.4

Rory O'Canannan, sometime Lord of Tirconnell, and heir presumptive to the crown of Ireland, was treacherously slain by Flaherty O'Muldory on the bridge of Sligo, the latter having first artfully prevailed on him to come forth from the middle of Drumcliff. The brother and some of the people of O'Canannan were also killed by him. Manus O'Garve, Chief of Fir-Droma (who had laid violent hands on O'Canannan), was afterwards slain by the people of Eachmarcach O'Doherty, in revenge of O'Canannan's death.

M1188.5

Donnell O'Canannan wounded his foot with his own axe at Derry, as he was cutting a piece of wood, and cried of the wound, in consequence of the curse of the family clergy of Columbkille.

M1188.6

The English of the castle of Moy-Cova, and a party from Iveagh, in Ulidia, set out upon a predatory excursion into Tyrone, and arrived at Leim-mhic-Neill, where they seized on some cows; Donnell O'Loughlin pursued them


p.83

with his retainers, and overtook them at Cavan na g-crann ard, where an engagement took place between them; and the English were defeated with great slaughter. But Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, Lord of Aileach, and presumptive heir to the throne of Ireland, on account of his personal symmetry, intelligence, and wisdom, alone received a thrust from an English spear, and fell in the heat of the conflict. His body was carried to Armagh on the same day, and there interred with great honour and solemnity.

M1188.7

Edwina, daughter of O'Quin, and Queen of Munster, died on her pilgrimage at Derry, victorious over the world and the devil.

M1188.8

John de Courcy and the English of Ireland made an incursion into Connaught, accompanied by Conor O'Dermot; upon which Conor Moinmoy, King of Connaught, assembled all the chieftains of Connaught, who were joined by Donnell O'Brien, at the head of some of the men of Munster. The English set fire to some of the churches of the country as they passed along, but made no delay until they reached Eas-dara (Ballysadare), with the intention of passing into Tirconnell, because the Connacians would not suffer them to tarry any longer in their country.

M1188.9

As soon as O'Muldory (Flaherty) had received intelligence of this, he assembled the Kinel-Conell, and marched to Drumcliff to oppose them. When the English heard of this movement, they burned the entire of Bally-sadare, and returned back, passing by the Curlieu mountains, where they were attacked by the Connacians and Momonians. Many of the English were slain, and those who survived retreated with difficulty from the country, without effecting much destruction on this incursion.


p.85

M

The English of Ulidia took a prey from the Kinel-Owen; but they were overtaken and slaughtered by Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, Lord of the Kinel-Owen; but Donnell himself fell fighting in the heat of the battle.

Annal M1189.

M1189.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1189. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred eighty-nine.

M1189.1

Mulkenny O'Fearcomais, Lector of Derry, was drowned between Aird (Ardmagilligan) and Inishowen.

M1189.2

Armagh was plundered by John De Courcy and the English of Ireland.

M1189.3

Armagh was burned from St. Bridget's Crosses to St. Bridget's Church, including the Rath, the Trian, and the churches.

M1189.4

Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, died a sincere penitent in the Great Monastery.

M1189.5

Donnell, the son of Murtough Mac Loughlin, was slain by the English of Dalaradia while he was staying amongst them.

M1189.6

Eghmily, the son of Mac Cann, the happiness and prosperity of all Tyrone, died.

M1189.7

Mac-na-h-Oidhche son of the night O'Mulrony, Lord of Fermanagh, was driven from his lordship, and fled to O'Carroll. Shortly afterwards an English army arrived in that country, to whom O'Carroll and O'Mulrony gave battle; but O'Carroll was defeated, and O'Mulrony killed.

M1189.8

Conor Moinmoy (the son of Roderic), king of all Connaught, both English and Irish, was killed by a party of his own people and tribes; i.e. by Manus,


p.87

M1189.9

the son of Flann O'Finaghty (usually called an Crossach Donn); Hugh, son of Brian Breifneach, the son of Turlough O'Conor; Murtough, son of Cathal, son of Dermot, the son of Teige; and Gilla-na-naev, the son of Gilla-Coman, who was the son of Murray Bane the Fair O'Mulvihil of the Tuathas.

M1189.10

Alas for the party who plotted this conspiracy against the life of the heir presumptive to the throne of Ireland! To him the greater part of Leth-Mhogha had submitted as king. Donnell O'Brien had gone to his house at Dunlo, where he was entertained for a week; and O'Conor gave him sixty cows out of every cantred in Connaught, and ten articles ornamented with gold; but O'Brien did not accept of any of these, save one goblet, which had once been the property of Dermot O'Brien, his own grandfather. Rory Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, had gone to his house. Mac Carthy, King of Desmond, was in his house, and O'Conor gave him a great stipend, namely, five horses out of every cantred in Connaught. Melaghlin Beg, king of Tara, was in his house and took away a large stipend; and O'Rourke had gone to his house, and also carried with him a great stipend.

M1189.11

After Conor Moinmoy had been slain, the Sil-Murray sent messengers to Roderic O'Conor, the former King of Ireland, to tell him of the death of his son, and to give offer him the kingdom: and as soon as Roderic came to Moy Naei, he took the hostages of the Sil-Murray, and of all Connaught; for


p.89

the hostages that had been delivered up to Conor Moinmoy were on Inishcloghran, an island in Lough Ree, at that time.

M1189.12

Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Tirconnell, encamped with his forces in Corran; and all the Connacians, both English and Irish, were against him on the other side.

M1189.13

Conor, grandson of Dermot, was slain by Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, in revenge of the death of his father.

M1189.14

Richard I. was crowned King of England on the 6th of July.

M1189.15

O'Muldory (Flaherty) marched with his forces against the Connacians, and pitched his camp in Corran. All the Connacians, both English and Irish, came to oppose him; however, they were not able to injure him, and both departed without coming to an engagement on that occasion.

Annal M1190.

M1190.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1190. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety.

M1190.1

Dermot O'Rafferty, Abbot of Durrow, died.

M1190.2

Melaghlin O'Naghtan and Gilla-Barry O'Slowey were slain by Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor.

M1190.3

More, daughter of Turlough O'Conor, and Duvesa, daughter of Dermot Mac Teige, died.

M1190.4

A meeting was held at Clonfert-Brendan, to conclude a peace between Cathal Crovderg and Cathal Carragh. All the Sil-Murray repaired to this meeting, together with the successor of St. Patrick, Conor Mac Dermot, and Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv; but they could not be reconciled to each other on this occasion.


p.91

M1190.5

O'Conor and the Sil-Murray went to Clonmacnoise on that night, and early next morning embarked in their fleet, and sailed up the Shannon until they came to Lough Ree. A violent storm arose on the lake, by which their vessels were separated from each other; and the storm so agitated the vessel in which O'Conor was, that it could not be piloted. Such was the fury of the storm, it foundered, and all the crew perished, except O'Conor himself and six others. In this vessel with O'Conor (Cathal Crovderg) were Areaghtagh O'Rodiv and Conor, son of Cathal, who were both drowned, as were also Conor and Auliffe, the two sons of Hugh Mageraghty; O'Mulrenin, and the son of O'Monahan, and many others.

Annal M1191.

M1191.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1191. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-one.

M1191.1

Roderic O'Conor set out from Connaught, and went to Flaherty O'Muldory in Tirconnell, and afterwards passed into Tyrone, to request forces from the north of Ireland, to enable him to recover his kingdom of Connaught; but the Ultonians not consenting to aid in procuring lands for him from the Connacians, he repaired to the English of Meath, and these having also refused to go with him, he passed into Munster, whither the Sil-Murray sent for him, and gave him lands, viz. Tir Fiachrach and Kinelea of Echtge.

M1191.2

Ailleann, daughter of Regan O'Mulrony, and wife of Aireachtagh O'Rodiv, died.


p.93

M1192.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1192. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-two.

M1192.1

The doorway of the refectory of Duv-regles-Columbkille was made by O'Kane, of Creeve, and the daughter of O'Henery.

M1192.2

Taichleach O'Dowda, Lord of Hy-Awley and Hy-Fiachrach of the Moy, was slain by his own two grandsons.

M1192.3

Hugh O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, died.

M1192.4

The English were defeated at the weir of Aughera, by Muintir Maoil-t-Sinna.

M1192.5

The castle of Ath-an-Urchair and the castle of Kilbixy were erected in this year.


p.95

M1192.6

The English of Leinster committed great depredations against Donnell O'Brien. They passed over the plain of Killaloe, and directed their course westwards, until they had reached Magh-Ua-Toirdhealbhaigh, where they were opposed by the Dalcassians, who slew great numbers of them. On this expedition the English erected the castles of Kilfeakle and Knockgraffon.

M1192.7

Donnell O'Brien defeated the English of Ossory, and made a great slaughter of them.

Annal M1193.

M1193.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1193. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-three.

M1193.1

Eochy O'Boyle was slain by the Hy-Fiachrach of Ardstraw.

M1193.2

Mulpatrick O'Coffey died.

M1193.3

Cathal Mac Gaithen died.


p.97

M1193.4

Dervorgilla (i.e. the wife of Tiernan O'Rourke), daughter of Murrough O'Melaghlin, died in the monastery of Drogheda Mellifont, in the eighty-fifth year of her age.

M1193.5

Dermot, son of Cubroghda O'Dempsey, Chief of Clanmnalier, and for a long time Lord of Offaly, died.

M1193.6

Cathal Odhar, the son of Mac Carthy, was slain by Donnell Mac Carthy.

M1193.7

Murtough, the son of Murrough Mac Murrough, Lord of Hy-Kinsellagh, died.

M1193.8

Hugh O'Mulrenin, Chief of Clann-Conor, was slain by the English of Dublin.


p.99

M1193.9

O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, was taken by the English, who first put out his eyes, and afterwards hanged him.

M1193.10

Inishcloghbran was plundered by the sons of Osdealv, and the sons of Conor Moinmoy.

Annal M1194.

M1194.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1194. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-four.

M1194.1

Constantine O'Brain O'Brien?, Bishop of Killaloe, died.

M1194.2

Donnell, son of Turlough O'Brien, King of Munster, a beaming lamp in peace and war, and the brilliant star of the hospitality and valour of the Momonians, and of all Leth-Mogha, died; and Murtough, his son, assumed his place.

M1194.3

The English landed upon the island of Inis-Ua-bh-Fionntain, but were forcibly driven from it.

M1194.4

Cumee O'Flynn was slain by the English.

M1194.5

Gilbert Mac Costello marched, with an army, to Assaroe, but was compelled to return without being able to gain any advantage by his expedition.


p.101

M1194.6

Melaghlin, the son of Donnell, who was the grandson of Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory, died.

M1194.7

Conor, son of Manus, who was son of Donslevy O'Haughey, was treacherously slain by O'Hanlon.

M1194.8

Hugh Dall (the Blind), the son of Turlough O'Conor, died.

M1194.9

Sitric, the son of Flann O'Finnaghty, Chief of Clann-Murrough, died.

M1194.10

Donough, son of Murtough, who was son of Turlough, was slain by Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien.

M1194.11

Murrough, the son of Auliffe O'Kennedy, was slain in fingail by Loughlin. the son of Magrath O'Kennedy.

Annal M1195.

M1195.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1195. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-five.

M1195.1

Donnell O'Conaing Gunning, Bishop of Killaloe, died.

M1195.2

Florence, the son of Regan O'Mulrony, Bishop of Elphin, died.

M1195.3

Donnell O'Finn, Coarb of Clonfert-Brendan, died.

M1195.4

Eachmarcach O'Kane died in St. Paul's church.

M1195.5

Conor Mag Fachtna died in the abbey church of Derry.

M1195.6

Sitric O'Gormly was slain by Mac Donslevy.

M1195.7

John De Courcy and the son of Hugo De Lacy marched with an army to conquer the English of Leinster and Munster.

M1195.8

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor and Mac Costelloe, with some of the English and Irish of Meath, marched into Munster, and arrived at Imleach Iubhair (Emly) and Cashel. They burned four large castles and some small ones.

M1195.9

Cathal Mac Dermot marched from Munster into Connaught, and passed victoriously through the province. On arriving at Lough Mask and Inishrobe, he seized upon all the vessels i.e. boats of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and


p.103

brought them away to Caislen na-Caillighe the Hag's Castle, where he proceeded to commit great ravages in all directions, until Cathal Crovderg, accompanied by a party of the English and of the Sil-Maelruana, arrived and made peace with him (Mac Dermot), although he (Cathal) had thitherto committed great injuries.

Annal M1196.

M1196.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1196. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-six.

M1196.1

The Abbey ofSS. Peter and Paul at Armagh, with its churches, and a great part of the Rath, were burned.

M1196.2

Murtough, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, Lord of Kinel-Owen, presumptive heir to the throne of Ireland, tower of the valour and achievements of Leth-Chuinn, destroyer of the cities and castles of the English, and founder of churches and fair nemeds (sanctuaries), was killed by Donough, the son of Blosky O'Kane, at the instigation of the Kinel-Owen, who had pledged their loyalty to him before the Three Shrines and the Canoin-Phatruig i.e. the Book of Armagh. His body was carried to Derry, and there interred with honour and respect.

M1196.3

Rory Mac Donslevy, with the English, and the sons of the chieftains of Connaught, marched an army against the Kinel-Owen and Oriors. The Kinel-Owen of Tulloghoge and the men of Orior proceeded to the plain of Armagh to oppose them, and there gave them battle. Mac Donslevy was


p.105

defeated with dreadful slaughter; and twelve of the sons of the lords and chieftains of Connaught, with many of an inferior grade, were slain. Among the chieftains slain were Brian Boy O'Flaherty; the son of Maelisa O'Conor, of Connaught; the son of O'Conor Faly; and the son of O'Faelain (Phelan), of the Desies.

M1196.4

The son of Blosky O'Currin plundered Termon-Daveog; but in a month afterwards he himself was slain, and his people were dreadfully slaughtered, through the miracles of God and St. Daveog.

M1196.5

Donnell, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, defeated the English of Limerick and Munster in a battle, with dreadful slaughter, and drove them from Limerick. He also defeated them in two other battles in this year.

M1196.6

Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, embraced Orders in the monastery of Boyle; and Tomaltagh assumed the lordship in his stead.

M1196.7

Hugh O'Farrell, Lord of Muintir-Annaly, was treacherously slain by the sons of Sitric O'Quin.

M1196.8

The chiefs of Muintir-Eolais were treacherously slain by the son of Cathal O'Rourke.

M1196.9

Murray Mac Rannall, surnamed the Gillaroe, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by the son of Manus O'Conor, at the instigation of the son of Cathal O'Rourke, who had procured the deaths of the above-mentioned chiefs.

M1196.10

Mahon, the son of Conor Moinmoy, Roydamna of Connaught, was slain by O'More (Donnell) and the men of Leix, who attempted to prevent him


p.107

from bearing off the spoil which he had taken from the English; but O'More was killed by Cathal Carrach O'Conor, in revenge of him Mahon.

M1196.11

Congalach, the son of Farrell O'Rourke, was slain by the men of Leyny, on Slieve-da-én

M1196.12

Iodnaidhe O'Monahan, Lord of Hy-Briuin na-Sinna.

M1196.13

Cathal, the son of Hugh O'Flaherty, was slain by the son of Murtough Midheach Midensis.

Annal M1197.

M1197.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1197. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-seven.

M1197.1

John De Courcy and the English of Ulidia marched, with an army, to Eas-Creeva, and erected the castle of Kilsanctan, and wasted and desolated the territory of Kienaghta. He left Rotsel Pitun, together with a large body of


p.109

forces, in the castle, out of which they proceeded to plunder and ravage the territories and the churches. Rotsel Piton afterwards came on a predatory excursion to the harbour of Derry, and plundered the churches of Cluain-I, Enagh, and Dergbruagh. But Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Kinel-Owen and Kinel-Conell, with a small party of the northern Hy-Niall, overtook him; and a battle was fought between them on the strand of Faughanvale, in which the English and the son of Ardgal Mac Loughlin were slaughtered, through the miracles of SS. Columbkille, Canice, and Brecan, whose churches they had plundered.


p.111

M1197.2

Mac Etigh, one of the Kienaghts, robbed the altar of the great church of Derry, and carried off the four best goblets in Ireland, viz. Mac Riabhach, Mac Solas, the goblet of O'Muldory, and the goblet of O'Doherty, called Cam-Corainn. These he broke, and took off their jewels and brilliant gems. On the third day after this robbery, these jewels and the thief were discovered. He was hanged by Flaherty O'Muldory at Cros-na-riagh (i.e. the Cross of Executions), in revenge of Columbkille, whose altar he had profaned.

M1197.3

Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Kinel-Connell, Kinel-Owen, and Oriel, defender of Tara, heir presumptive to the sovereignty of all Ireland, a Connell in heroism, a Cuchullin in valour, a Guaire in hospitality, and a Mac Lughach in feats of arms, died on Inis Saimer, on the second day of February, after long and patient suffering, in the thirtieth year of his reign, and fifty-ninth of his age, and was interred at Drumhome with due honour.

M1197.4

Eachmarcach O'Doherty (i.e. Gilla Sron-mael) immediately after assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Connell. A fortnight afterwards John De Courcy, with a numerous army, crossed Toome into Tyrone, thence proceeded to Ardstraw, and afterwards marched round to Derry-Columbkille, where he and his troops remained five nights. They then set out for the hill of Cnoc-Nascain, to be conveyed across it; but the Kinel-Connell, under the conduct of Eachmarcach O'Doherty, came to oppose them, and a battle was fought between them, in which many fell on both sides. The Kinel-Conell were much


p.113

slaughtered, for two hundred of them were slain, besides Eachmarcach himself and Donough O'Tairchirt, Chief of Clann-Snedhgile Clann-Snelly, the prop of the hospitality, valour, wisdom, and counsel of all the Kinel-Conell; and also Gilla-Brighde O'Doherty, Mag-Duane, Mag-Fergail, the sons of O'Boyle, and many other nobles. The English then plundered Inishowen, and carried off a great number of cows from thence, and then returned.

M1197.5

Conor O'Kane died.

M1197.6

Conor, the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg and Moynai, tower of the grandeur, splendour, hospitality, and protection of all Connaught, died after exemplary penance in the monastery of Ath-da-laarg (Boyle).

M1197.7

Magrath O Laverty, Tanist of Tyrone, and Mulrony O'Carellan, Chief of Clann-Dermot, were slain.

M1197.8

Donnell, son of Randal Mac Ranall, was treacherously slain by the sons of Mac Duvdara.

M1197.9

Rory O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, was taken prisoner by Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught.

Annal M1198.

M1198.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1198. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-eight.

M1198.1

Gillamacliag O'Branan resigned his abbacy; and Gilchreest O'Kearney was elected coarb of St. Columbkille by the universal suffrages of the clergy and laity of the north of Ireland.

M1198.2

Roderic O'Conor, King of Connaught and of all Ireland, both the Irish and


p.115

the English, died among the canons at Cong, after exemplary penance, victorious over the world and the devil. His body was conveyed to Clonmacnoise, and interred at the north side of the altar of the great church.

M1198.3

The son of Brian Breifneagh, who was the son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain by Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy.

M1198.4

Cathalan O'Mulfavil, Lord of Carrick-Braghy, was slain by O'Dearan, who was himself slain immediately afterwards in revenge of him.

M1198.5

An army was led by John De Courcy into Tyrone, among the churches; and Ardstraw and Raphoe were plundered and destroyed by him. He afterwards went to Derry, where he remained a week and two days, destroying Inishowen and the country generally. And he would not have withdrawn all his forces from thence had not Hugh O'Neill sailed with five ships to Killi [...] in Latharna, burned a part of the town, and killed eighteen of the English. The English of Moylinny and Dalaradia mustered three hundred men, and marched against Hugh, who had no intimation of their approach until they


p.117

poured round him, while he was burning the town. A battle was then fought between them, in which the English were defeated. The English were routed five successive times before they retreated to their ships; and there were only five of Hugh's people slain. As soon as John De Courcy had heard of this, he left the place where he was etermined upon making conquests, that is, Derry-Columbkille.

M1198.6

A war broke out between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen. The Kinel-Connell joined O'Hegny against the Kinel-Owen; and they had a meeting at Termon Daveog, for the purpose of forming a league of amity with him. Hugh O'Neill, however, repaired thither to prevent the meeting, and attacked and defeated O'Hegny, who delivered him hostages.

M1198.7

On the same day Hugh and the Kinel-Owen went to the plain of Magh Ithe, and plundered the Kinel-Connell. From this place they drove off a vast number of cows, after killing O'Duvdirma in a skirmish between the cavalry.

M1198.8

Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen made a second incursion into the plain of Moy Itha, to give battle to the Kinel-Connell; but the Kinel-Connell left their camp to them, upon which terms of peace and friendship were agreed on between the parties.

M1198.9

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor made peace with Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, brought him into his territory, and gave him lands.

Annal M1199.

M1199.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1199. The Age of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-nine.

M1199.1

Maelisa, son of Gilla-Ernain, Erenagh of Kilmore-Oneilland, and intended successor of St. Patrick, died.

M1199.2

Sanctus Mauritius O'Baedain died in Hy-Columbkille.

M1199.3

The English of Ulidia made three great incursions into Tyrone, and on the third incursion they pitched their camp at Donaghmore-Moy-Imclare, and sent


p.119

forth a large body of their troops to destroy and plunder the country. Hugh O'Neill set out to oppose this host; and they came to an engagement, in which the English were slaughtered, and such as escaped from him fled secretly by night, tarrying nowhere until they had passed Toome.

M1199.4

Rory O'Donslevy, and some of the English of Meath, mustered a body of troops, and plundered the Monastery of SS. Peter and Paul (at Armagh), and left only one cow there.

M1199.5

Donnell O'Doherty, Lord of Kinel-Enda and Ard-Mire, died.

M1199.6

Donough Uaithneach, the son of Roderick O'Conor, was slain by the English of Limerick.

M1199.7

Roduv Mac Roedig, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa, was slain by the English, on a predatory incursion, in Hy-Earca-Cein.

M1199.8

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor was banished from the kingdom of Connaught; and Cathal Carrach assumed his place.

M1199.9

Hugh O'Neill, with the men of Moy-Itha and the men of Oriel, marched to Tibohine-Artagh, to relieve Cathal Crovderg O'Conor. They returned again,


p.121

however, and on coming, to Easdara (Ballysadare), were overtaken by Cathal Carragh, with the chiefs of Connaught and William Burke, with the English of Limerick: a battle was fought between them, in which the forces of the north of Ireland were defeated; and O'Hegny, Lord of Oriel, and many others beside him, were slain.

M1199.10

John de Courcy, with the English of Ulidia, and the son of Hugo De Lacy, with the English of Meath, marched to Kilmacduagh to assist Cathal Crovderg O'Conor. Cathal Carragh, accompanied by the Connacians, came, and gave them battle: and the English of Ulidia and Meath were defeated with such slaughter that, of their five battalions, only two survived; and these were pursued from the field of battle to Rindown on Lough Ree, in which place John was completely hemmed in. Many of his English were killed, and others were drowned; for they found no passage by which to escape, except by crossing the lake in boats.

M1199.11

Rourke O'Mulrenin, Chief of Clann-Conor, died.

M1199.12

John was crowned King of England on the sixth of April.

M1199.13

Murrough Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin Eathra, died.


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Annal M1200.

M1200.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1200. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred.

M1200.1

Kyley Catholicus O'Duffy, Archbishop of Tuam, died at an advanced age.

M1200.2

Uaireirghe, son of Mulmora, the son of Uaireirghe O'Naghtan, one of the noble sages of Clonmacnoise, a man full of the love of God, and of every virtue, and head of the Culdees of Clonmacnoise, died on the tenth of March.

M1200.3

Malone O'Carmacan, Successor of St. Coman, died.

M1200.4

Hugh O'Neill was deposed by the Kinel-Owen, and Conor O'Loughlin was elected in his stead. The latter plundered Tir-Enda, killed many persons, and drove off many cows.

M1200.5

Egneghan O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, sailed with the fleet of Tirconnell thirteen vessels by sea, and despatched his army by land, and pitched his camp at Gaeth-an-Chairrgin. The Clandermot repaired to Port-Rois on the


p.125

other side, to attack the fleet: when the crews of the thirteen vessels perceived their intentions, they attacked and defeated the Clann-Dermot. Mac Loughlin (Conor Beg, son of Murtough) came to their assistance; but his horse was wounded under him, and he himself was dismounted. He was afterwards slain by the Kinel-Connell, in revenge of Columbkille, his coarb and shrine, that he had violated some time before. And it was for the same violation that Murrough O'Creaghan, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach, was killed. Egneghan's troops followed up the route, and slaughtered the Kinel-Owen and the Clann-Dermot.

M1200.6

Meyler, and the English of Leinster, marched to Clonmacnoise against Cathal Carragh (O'Conor), where they remained two nights: they plundered the town of its cattle and provisions, and attacked its churches.

M1200.7

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor went into Munster, to the son of Mac Carthy and William Burke to solicit their aid.

M1200.8

Gerrmaide O'Boylan was slain by O'Donnell (Egneghan).

M1200.9

A battle was fought between O'Donnell on the one side, and O'Rourke (Ualgarg) and Conor na-Glaisfene O'Rourke on the other. The Hy-Briuin (O'Rourkes) were defeated, and their men dreadfully cut off, both by drowning and killing. Conor himself was drowned on this occasion. This battle was fought at Leckymuldory.


p.127

M1200.10

Donough Uaithneach, the son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by the English of Limerick.

M1200.11

Mahon, the son of Gilla Patrick-O'Keary, was slain by the English of Clonard.

M1200.12

Clonard was burned by O'Keary, to injure the English who were in it.

M1200.13

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor made a predatory incursion into Munster, and plundered Castleconning Castleconnel, the market of Limerick, and Castle-Wilkin; and led Wilkin and his wife away captives, after having killed thirteen knights, and many other persons besides them.

M1200.14

Fiachra O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Mailruana, died.

M1200.15

Cathal Carragh assumed the government of Connaught, and Cathal Crovderg was banished by him into Ulster. He arrived at the house of O'Hegny, Lord of Fermanagh, and went from thence to John de Courcy, with whom he formed a league of amity.

Annal M1201.

M1201.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1201. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred one.

M1201.1

Tomaltagh O'Conor, successor of St. Patrick, and Primate of Ireland, died.

M1201.2

Conn O'Melly, Bishop of Annaghdown, a transparently bright gem of the Church, died.

M1201.3

Johannes de Monte Celion, the Pope's Legate, came to Ireland, and convoked a great synod of the bishops, abbots, and every other order in the Church,


p.129

at Dublin, at which also many of the nobles of Ireland were present. By this synod many proper ordinances, for the regulation of the Church and the State, were enacted.

M1201.4

A fortnight afterwards the same Legate called a meeting of the clergy and laity of Connaught at Athlone, at which meeting many excellent ordinances were established.

M1201.5

Niall O'Flynn O'Lynn was treacherously slain by the English of Ulidia.

M1201.6

Manus, the son of Dermot O'Loughlin, was slain by Murtough O'Neill; and Murtough was killed in revenge of him.

M1201.7

Conor, the son of Maurice O'Heyne, died.

M1201.8

Teige O'Breen, Lord of Lune, in Meath, died.

M1201.9

Murray, son of Niall, who was son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny, died.

M1201.10

Murrough O'Madden, Chief of half Sil-Anmchadh, was wounded in the head by an arrow, and died of the wound.

M1201.11

Cathal Crovderg and William Burke, at the head of their English and Irish forces, marched from Limerick, through Connaught, to Tuarn, and proceeded


p.131

from thence successively to Oran, to Elphin, to the Rock of Lough Key, and to the monastery of Ath-da-Loarg (Boyle); and the houses of the monastery served them as military quarters.

M1201.12

At this time Cathal Mac Dermot went on a predatory excursion into Hy-Diarmada: Teige, the son of Conor Moinmoy, overtook him, and a battle was fought between them, in which Cathal Mac Dermot was slain.

M1201.13

As to Cathal Carragh, King of Connaught, he assembled his forces, and marched against this army, and arrived at Guirtin Cuil luachra, in the vicinity of the monastery. They remained confronting each other for a week, during which daily skirmishes took place between them. At the end of this time Cathal Carragh went forth to view a contest; but a body of his people being violently driven towards him, he became involved in the crowd, and was killed. This happened through the miracles of God and St. Kieran. Ancolly, the son of Dermot O'Mulrony, and many others, were also killed in this battle. After this Cathal Crovderg and William Burke passed with their forces through Moylurg and Moy-Nai, and thence through West Connaught, and arrived at Cong, where they spent the Easter. William Burke and the sons of Rory O'Flaherty, however, conspired to deal treacherously by Cathal Crovderg, but God protected him on this occasion from their designs, through the guarantee of the ecclesiastical witnesses to their league of mutual fidelity.


p.133

M1201.13

The people of William Burke afterwards went to demand their wages from the Connacians; but the Connacians rushed upon them, and killed seven hundred of them. William then returned to Limerick, and Cathal Crovderg assumed the regal sway of Connaught.

M1201.14

Ualgarg O'Rourke mustered an army, and marched into Tirconnell. On their arrival in the country, they seized upon a number of cows and other property. O'Donnell (Egneghan) overtook them at Leck-I-Muldory, where a battle was fought between them, in which the Hy-Briuin (O'Rourkes) and their army were defeated and cut off with terrible havoc, both by killing and drowning. It was on this occasion that Conor na-Glais-fene (O'Rourke) was drowned.

M1201.15

On the same day the Kinel-Owen made another predatory incursion into Tirconnell; and a conflict took place between them and O'Donnell, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Gearrmaidi O'Boylan and many others of the Kinel-Owen were slain alone with him.

M1201.16

Tiernan, the son of Donnell, who was the son of Cathal O'Rourke, was slain by Mag-Fiachrach and the Clann-Cahill; but Mag-Fiachrach, surnamed Eoganach i.e. the Tyronian was killed on the same spot.

M1202.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1202. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred two.

M1202.1

Murtough O'Carmacan, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan, died.

M1202.2

Maelcolum O'Bronan, Erenagh of Tory (island), died.

M1202.3

Donnell O'Brollaghan, a prior, a noble senior, a sage illustrious for his intelligence, personal form, and comeliness, and for his mildness, magnanimity, piety, and wisdom, after having spent a good life, died on the twenty-seventh of April.


p.135

M1202.4

Maelfinen Mac Colman, a venerable senior, and Conn Craibhdheach (the Pious) O'Flanagan, died.

M1202.5

Donnell Carragh O'Doherty, Royal Chieftain of Ardmire, was slain by the O'Boyles, after he had plundered many churches and territories.

M1202.6

Conor Roe, the son of Donnell O'Brien, was slain by his own brother, i.e. Murtough, son of Donnell, who was son of Turlough O'Brien.

M1202.7

Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, escaped from confinement; and Cathal Crovderg made peace with him, and gave him land. He afterwards expelled him, but, at the intercession of the English, made peace with him at once.

M1202.8

Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Melaghlin, died.

M1202.9

Dermot, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, was slain by the son of Loughlin O'Conor.

Annal M1203.

M1203.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1203. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred three.

M1203.1

The son of Gillakelly O'Ruaidhin, Bishop of Kilmacduagh, died.

M1203.2

Derry-Columbkille was burned, from the cemetery of St. Martin to the well of St. Adamnan.

M1203.3

A monastery was erected by Kellagh without any legal right, and in despite of the family of Iona, in the middle of Iona, and did considerable damage to the town. The clergy of the north of Ireland assembled together to pass over into Iona, namely, Florence O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone i.e. of Derry; Maelisa O'Deery, Bishop of Tirconnell Raphoe, and Abbot of the church of SS. Peter end Paul at Armagh; Awley O'Fergahail, Abbot of the regles of Derry Ainmire O'Coffey; with many of the family clergy of Derry, besides numbers of the clergy of the north of Ireland. They passed over into Iona; and, in accordance with the law of the Church, they pulled down the aforesaid monastery;


p.137

and the aforesaid Awley was elected Abbot of Iona by the suffrages of the Galls and Gaels.

M1203.4

Dermot, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, went on a predatory excursion into Tyrone, and plundered the Screen-Columbkille. He was encountered, however, by a party of the Kinel-Owen, who defeated Dermot and his English; and Dermot himself was killed through the miracles of the Shrine.

M1203.5

An army was led by the son of Hugo de Lacy and a party of the English of Meath into Ulidia; and they banished John de Courcy from thence, after they had defeated him in a battle fought at Dundaleathglas (Downpatrick), in which many had been slain.

M1203.6

Murtough the Teffian, son of Conor Moinmoy, who was the son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Dermot, the son of Roderic, and Hugh, the son of Roderic, namely, by his own two paternal uncles, on the green of Kilmacduagh.

M1203.7

A victory was gained by Donnell, the son of Mac Carthy, and the people of Desmond, over the English; in the conflict one hundred and sixty persons, or more, were slain.

M1203.8

Faelan Mac Faelan, Lord of Hy-Faelain, died in the monastery of Connell.


p.139

M1203.9

Kells, Trim, and Droichead Nua (Newbridge) were burned.

M1203.10

Sitric (the Teffian) O'Kelly, of Hy-Maine, died.

Annal M1204.

M1204.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1204. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred four.

M1204.1

Sitric O'Sruithen, Erenagh of Conwal, i.e. head of the Hy-Murtele, and chief man of all the Clann-Snedhgile for his worth, died, after exemplary penance, and was interred in the church which he had himself founded.

M1204.2

John de Courcy, the plunderer of churches and territories, was driven by


p.141

the son of Hugo de Lacy into Tyrone, to seek the protection of the Kinel-Owen. He arrived at Carrickfergus, and the English of Ulidia slew great numbers of his people.


p.143

M1204.3

William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories; but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that; for he died of a singular disease, too shameful to be described.

M1204.4

Murtough O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died.


p.145

Annal M1205.

M1205.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1205. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred five.

M1205.1

The Archbishop O'Heney retired into a monastery, where he died soon after.

M1205.2

Donat O'Beacdha, Bishop of Tyrawley, died.


p.147

M1205.3

Saerbrehagh Justin O'Deery, Erenagh of Donaghmore, and Patrick O'Muron, died.

M1205.4

Manus O'Kane, son of the Lord of Kianaghta and Firnacreeva, tower of the valour and vigour of the North, was wounded by an arrow, and died of the wound.

M1205.5

The son of Guill-bhealach O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, was slain by the English.

M1205.6

Conor O'Breen, of Brawney, died on his pilgrimage to Clonmacnoise.

M1205.7

Randal Mac Dermot, Lord of Clandermot, died.

M1205.8

Donnell Mac Concogry, Chief of Muintir Searcachan, died.

M1205.9

Donnell O'Faelain (Phelan), Lord of the Desies of Munster died.

M1205.10

Teige, the son of Cathal Crovderg, died of one night's sickness at Clonmacnoise.

M1205.11

Meyler, the son of Meyler, took possession of Limerick by force; on account


p.149

of which a great war broke out between the English of Meath and the English of Meyler, during which Cooley, the son of Cumee O'Laeghaghan, was slain by the race of Fiacha, the son of Niall i.e. the Mageoghegans, &.

Annal M1206.

M1206.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1206. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred six.

M1206.1

Donnell O'Hurray, Chief Lector at Derry, died.

M1206.2

Mulpeter O'Calman, Coarb of St. Canice, and tower of the piety and wisdom of the north of Ireland, died.

M1206.3

Flaherty O'Flaherty, Prior of Dungiven, and Gillapatrick O'Falaghty, Erenagh of Dun-crun, died.

M1206.4

Egneghan O'Donnell took a prey, and killed some persons in Tyrone.

M1206.5

The successor of St. Patrick went to the King of England on behalf of the churches of Ireland, and to complain of the English of Ireland.


p.151

M1206.6

Tomaltagh, the son of Conor, son of Dermot, who was the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg, Airtech, and Aicidheacht, and chief hero of the Clann-Mulrony, died.

M1206.7

Egneghan O'Donnell plundered Hy-Farannan and Clann-Dermot; he took many cows, and killed persons. He was overtaken by the Hy-Dermot, the O'Farannans, and the O'Gormleys; and a struggle ensued, in which many were killed and drowned on both sides; but the Kinel-Connell ultimately bore ofF the prey, after much labour.

M1206.8

Rory O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha, died.

M1206.9

Hugh, the son of Murrough O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, and Caithniadh O'Caithniadh, Lord of Erris, died.

M1206.10

Hugh O'Goirmghialla, Lord of Partry in Carra, was slain by the men of Carra.

M1206.11

Rory O'Toghda, Chief of Bredagh in Hy-Awley Tirawley, died.

M1206.12

Gilbert O'Flanagan and Ivor Mac Murrough slew each other at Roscommon.


p.153

M1206.13

Murtough Mac Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, died.

M1206.14

An army was led by the son of Hugo de Lacy, and the English of Meath and Leinster, into Tullaghoge (in Tyrone), and burned churches and corn, but obtained neither hostages nor pledges of submission from Hugh O'Neill on this occasion.

M1206.15

The same people led another army into Kienaghta, and burned all the churches of that territory, besides driving off a countless number of cows.

Annal M1207.

M1207.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1207. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seven.

M1207.1

Egneghan O'Donnell set out upon a predatory excursion into Fermanagh, and seized upon cows; but a considerable muster of the men of Fermanagh pursued him, and slew O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, tower of the warlike prowess and hospitality of the province in his time; and some others of his nobility were slain along with him. The following were the nobles who fell on this occasion: Gillareagh, the son of Kellagh O'Boyle; Donough Conallagh, the son of Conor Moinmoy; and Mahon, the son of Donnell Midheach (i.e. the Meathian) O'Conor. Many other heroes fell besides these.

M1207.2

Donnell, the son of Farrell O'Rourke, Lord of the greater part of Breifny, died.

M1207.3

Murray, the son of Roderic O'Conor, and Auliffe O'Farrell, Chief of Annaly, died.

M1207.4

Dermot O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

M1207.5

The remains of Roderic O'Conor, King of Connaught, were disinterred, and deposited in a stone shrine.


p.155

M1207.6

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, expelled Hugh O'Flaherty, and gave his territory to his own son, Hugh O'Conor.

M1207.7

A great war broke out among the English of Leinster; i.e. between Meyler, Geoffrey, Mares, and William Mareschal. Leinster and Munster suffered severely from them.

M1207.8

Another great war broke out between Hugo de Lacy and Meyler; and the result was, that nearly all Meyler's people were ruined.

M1207.9

Cathal Carragh, son of Dermot, who was son of Teige O'Mulrony, took a great prey from Cormac, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, and O'Flynn of the Cataract, but was overtaken by some of the Connacians, namely, Dermot, son of Manus, who was son of Murtough O'Conor; Cormac, son of Tomaltagh; Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny; and Donough O'Dowda, Lord of Tirawley and Tireragh; and a battle ensued, in which Cathal Carragh was defeated. He was taken prisoner, and blinded; and his son, Maurice, with the son of Cugranna O'Flanagan, and many others, were killed (in the battle).

M1207.10

Meyler Oge, Murtough O'Brien, and Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor,


p.157

made a predatory incursion into Tir-Fachrach Aidhne, and plundered fifteen ballys (townlands).

M1207.11

Cathal, son of Rory, who was son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny, Lord of Teffia, died.

M1207.12

The sons of Hugo de Lacy and the English of Meath marched to the castle of Athnurcher now Ardnurcher, and continued to besiege it for five weeks, when it was surrendered to them, as was also the territory of Fircal; and Meyler was banished from the country.

Annal M1208.

M1208.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1208. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eight.

M1208.1

David Breathnach (Walsh), Bishop of Waterford, was slain by O'Faelan of the Desies.


p.159

M1208.2

A prey was taken by Hugh O'Neill in Inishowen. O'Donnell (Donnell More) overtook him with his forces; and a battle was fought between them, in which countless numbers were slaughtered on both sides. In this battle fell Donnell Mac Murrough, and a great number of the Kinel-Owen with him. In the heat of this conflict fell also Caffar O'Donnell, Farrell O'Boyle, Cormac O'Donnell, David O'Doherty, and other chiefs of the Kinel-Connell. The Kinel-Connell were at length routed by dint of fighting.

M1208.3

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) against Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen; and he seized upon the spoils and hostages of the country. A peace, however, was afterwards concluded between O'Neill and O'Donnell, who entered into an alliance to assist each other against such of the English or Irish as should oppose them.

M1208.4

Duvinnsi Magennis, Lord of Clann-Aodha, in Iveagh, was slain by the son of Donslevy O'Haughy.

M1208.5

Fineen, son of Dermot, son of Cormac Mac Carthy, was slain by his own brothers.

M1208.6

Ualgarg O'Rourke was deprived of the lordship of Breifny; and Art, son of Donnell, who was son of Farrell, assumed his place through the influence of the English.

M1208.7

John, Bishop of Norwich, was sent by the King of England into Ireland as Lord Justice; and the English were excommunicated by the successor of St. Peter for sending the Bishop to carry on war in Ireland; so that the English were without mass, baptism, extreme unction, or lawful interment, for a period of three years.


p.161

M1208.8

Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was taken prisoner by the English of Limerick, in violation of the guarantee of three bishops, and by order of his own brother, Donough Cairbreach.

M1208.9

Dermot O'Keevan, Lord of that tract of country extending from Toomore to Gleoir, died.

M1208.10

Auliffe O'Rothlain, Chief of Calry of Coolcarney, was slain by O'Moran.

Annal M1209.

M1209.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1209. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred nine.

M1209.1

Kele O'Duffy, Bishop of Mayo of the Saxons; Gilchreest O'Kearney, Coarb (Bishop) of Connor; and Flaherty O'Flynn, Coarb of Dachonna of Eas-mic n-Eirc Assylyn, died.


p.163

M1209.2

Art, son of Donnell, who was son of Farrell O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, and Cormac, the son of Art O'Rourke; and Ualgarg O'Rourke assumed the lordship as his successor.

M1209.3

Donough O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died.

M1209.4

The King of England came to Ireland with seven hundred ships, and landed at Dublin, where he remained until he had recruited himself after the fatigues


p.165

of his voyage, and then set out for Tioprait Ulltain in Meath, where Cathal Crovderg O'Conor came into his house i.e. made his submission to him. He banished Walter de Lacy to England, and then proceeded, with his nobles, to Carrickfergus, whence he also banished Hugo de Lacy to England. Hugh O'Neill repaired hither at the King's summons, but returned home without giving him hostages. The King besieged Carrick until it surrendered, and he placed his own people in it. O'Conor then returned home.

M1209.5

The King of England then went to Rathguaire, whither O'Conor repaired again to meet him; and the King requested O'Conor to deliver him up his son, to be kept as a hostage. O'Conor did not give him his son, but delivered up four of his people instead, namely, Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny; Dermot, son of Conor O'Mulrony, Lord of Moylurg; Finn O'Carmacan; and Torvenn, son of the King of the Gall-Gaels, one of O'Conor's servants of trust. The King then returned to England, bringing these hostages with him.


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Annal 1210.

M1210.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1210. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ten.

M1210.1

The English came to Cael-uisge. Hugh O'Neill and Donnell O'Donnell, assembling their forces, marched thither, and slew the English, together with Henry Beg, and distributed their goods and property among their troops.

M1210.2

Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, took a prey in Moylurg, and carried it with him to Seghais the Curlieus, to his brother Dermot. Hugh, the son of Cathal, pursued him; but Turlough fled before him to the North.

M1210.3

The hostages of Connaught arrived in Ireland, viz. Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny; Dermot, son of Conor O'Mulrony; Finn O'Cormacan; and Aireachtach Mac Donough.

M1210.4

Murtough Muimhneach, son of Turlough More O'Conor, died.

M1210.5

A great war broke out between the King of England and the King of Wales: and ambassadors came from the King of England into Ireland for the English bishop; and the chiefs of the English of Ireland repaired, with the English bishop, to attend the summons of the King of England: and Richard Tuite was left in Ireland as Lord Chief Justice.


p.169

M1210.6

The Justice went to Athlone, with the intention of sending his brothers to Limerick, Waterford, and Wexford, that he himself might reside in Dublin and Athlone (alternately); but it happened, through the miracles of God, St. Peter, and St. Kieran, that some of the stones of the castle of Athlone fell upon his head, and killed on the spot Richard Tuite, with his priest and some of his people, along with him.

M1210.7

The sons of Roderic O'Conor and Teige, the son of Conor Moinmoy, accompanied by some of the people of Annaly, came across the Shannon, from the east side, into the Tuathas, and carried a prey with them into the wilderness of Kinel-Dofa. Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, pursued them; and a battle


p.171

was fought between them, in which the sons of Roderic were defeated, and again driven eastwards across the Shannon, leaving some of their men and horses behind.

Annal M1211.

M1211.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1211. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eleven.

M1211.1

Sitric O'Laighenain, Coarb of St. Comgall of Bangor, died.

M1211.2

The castle of Clones was erected by the English and the English bishop, and they made a predatory incursion into Tyrone; but Hugh O'Neill overtook them, and routed and slaughtered them, and slew, among others, Meyler, the son of Robert.

M1211.3

Thomas Mac Uchtry and the sons of Randal Mac Sorley came to Derry with a fleet of seventy-six ships, and plundered and destroyed the town. They passed thence into Inishowen, and ravaged the entire island recte peninsula.


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M1211.4

An army was led by the Connacians, at the summons of the English bishop and Gilbert Mac Costello, to Assaroe; and they erected a castle at Cael-uisge.

M1211.5

Roderic, the son of Roderic, who was son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain by the inhabitants of Leyny, in Connaught.

M1211.6

Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, wrested Delvin from the English; and Melaghlin, the son of Art, defeated the English, who were maintaining possession of that territory, and killed their constable, Robert of Duncomar.

M1211.7

Cugaela O'Heyne died.

M1211.8

Raghnailt and Caillech De, two daughters of Roderic O'Conor, died.

M1212.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1212. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twelve.

M1212.1

Drumquin, with its churches, was burned by the Kinel-Owen, without the consent of O'Neill.

M1212.2

Farrell O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by the English.

M1212.3

Gilbert Mac Costello was slain in the castle of Cael-uisge; and the castle itself was burned by O'Hegny.

M1212.4

The castle of Clones was burned by Hugh O'Neill and the men of the north of Ireland.

M1212.5

Donough O'Heyne was deprived of sight by the son of Cathal Crovderg, without the consent of the O'Conor.

M1212.6

The victory of Caill-na-gerann was gained by Cormac, the son of Art


p.175

O'Melaghlin, and Hugh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, over the English, in which the latter, together with Pierce Mason and the sons of Sleviny, were slaughtered.

M1212.7

Donough Mac Cann, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa, died.

M1212.8

Donnell O'Devine was slain by the sons of Mac Loughlin in the doorway of the abbey-church of Derry.

M1212.9

A prey was taken by Gillafiaclagh O'Boyle, accompanied by a party of the Kinel-Connell, from some of the Kinel-Owen, who were under the protection of O'Taircheirt (Gillareagh), Chief of Clann-Sneidhghile and Clann-Fineen. O'Taircheirt overtook them (the plunderers), and gave them battle, but was killed while defending his guarantee.

M1212.10

Dermot, the son of Roderic O'Conor, forcibly took the house of Hugh, the son of Manus O'Conor, at Kilcolman-Finn, in Corran. Thirty-five men were burned in the house on this occasion.

M1212.11

Donnell, the son of Donnell Braghagh the Bregian O'Melaghlin, defeated Cormac O'Melaghlin in a battle, in which Gilchreest Mac Colgan and many others were slain.

M1212.12

Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Melaghlin, was slain, while on a predatory excursion, by the people of Meyler.

M1212.13

An army was led by the English of Munster to Roscrea, where they erected


p.177

a castle. From thence they proceeded to Killeigh, where they were overtaken by Murtough, the son of Brian O'Conor, and his army, who gave them battle; in which Melaghlin, the son of Cathal Carragh O'Conor received wounds of which he died.

Annal M1213.

M1213.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1213. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirteen.

M1213.1

Gilla-na-naev O'Rowan, Bishop of Leyny, and Muirigen O'Muirigen, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1213.2

Ainmire O'Coffey, Abbot of the Church of Derry-Columbkille, a noble ecclesiastic, distinguished for his piety, meekness, charity, wisdom, and every other good quality died.

M1213.3

Thomas Mac Uchtry and Rory Mac Randal plundered Derry-Columbkille, and carried off, from the middle of the church of Derry, all the precious articles of the people of Derry, and of the north of Ireland, which they brought to Coleraine.


p.179

M1213.4

O'Kane and the sept of Firnacreeva, came to Derry to take the house of the son of Mac Loughlin. The great prior, of the abbey church of Derry, who interposed to make peace between them, was killed. God and St. Columbkille wrought a miracle on this occasion; for Mahon Magaithne, the person who had gathered and mustered the army, was killed in the doorway of the church of Duvregles, in revenge of Columbkille.

M1213.5

The castle of Coleraine was erected by Thomas Mac Uchtry, and the English of Ulidia; and all the cemeteries and buildings of the town were thrown down excepting only the church to supply materials for erecting this castle.

M1213.6

Hugh O'Neill defeated and dreadfully slaughtered the English, and, on the same day, burned Carlongphort (Carlingford) both people and cattle.

M1213.7

Donn O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, was treacherously killed by his own people.

M1213.8

Finn O'Brollaghan, steward of O'Donnell (Donnell More) went to Connaught to collect O'Donnell's tribute. He first went to Carbury of Drumcliff; where, with his attendants, he visited the house of the poet Murray O'Daly of Lissadill; and, being a plebeian representative of a hero, he began to wrangle with the poet very much (although his lord had given him no instructions to do so). The poet, being enraged at his conduct, seized a very sharp axe, and dealt him a blow which killed him on the spot, and then, to avoid O'Donnell, he fled into Clanrickard. When O'Donnell received intelligence of this, he collected a large body of his forces, and pursued him to Derrydonnell in


p.181

Clanrickard,—a place which was named from him, because he encamped there for a night;—and he proceeded to plunder and burn the country, until at last MacWilliam submitted to him, having previously sent Murray to seek for refuge in Thomond. O'Donnell pursued him, and proceeded to plunder and ravage that country also, until Donough Cairbreach O'Brien sent Murray away to the people of Limerick. O'Donnell followed him to the gate of Limerick, and, pitching his camp at Monydonnell (which is named from him), laid siege to that town; upon which the people of Limerick, at O'Donnell's command, expelled Murray, who found no asylum anywhere, but was sent from hand to hand, until he arrived in Dublin.

M1213.9

O'Donnell returned home on this occasion, having first traversed and completed the visitation of all Connaught. He mustered another army without much delay in the same year, and, marching to Dublin, compelled the people of Dublin to banish Murray into Scotland; and here he remained until he composed three poems in praise of O'Donnell, imploring peace and forgiveness from him. The third of these poems is the one beginning, ‘Oh! Donnell, kind hand for granting peace,’ &c. He obtained peace for his panegyrics, and O'Donnell afterwards received him into his friendship, and gave him lands and possessions, as was pleasing to him.

M1213.10

Cormac O'Melaghlin plundered the castle of Kinclare, burned the bawn,


p.183

and defeated the English, and carried away from them many horses and accoutrements.

M1213.11

The English of Ireland led a great army against Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin. They met him at the bridge of Tine, where a battle was fought between them, in which the son of Art was defeated, and Rory O'Keary was killed. The son of Art was then banished from Delvin, and his people were plundered. The English then went to Athlone, where they erected a castle. They also erected the castle of Kinnity, the castle of Birr, and the castle of Durrow.

M1213.12

Cormac, the son of Art, went on a predatory excursion into Delvin, and plundered Melaghlin Beg, whom he banished from that country: he also slew William of the Mill, and assumed the lordship of Delvin himself.


p.185

Annal M1214.

M1214.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1214. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fourteen.

M1214.1

O'Kelly, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach, died.

M1214.2

Ardgar O'Conor, Bishop of Sil-Murray Elphin, died.

M1214.3

Benmee, daughter of O' Hegny, and wife of Hugh O'Neill, Queen of Aileach, died, after having spent a virtuous life.

M1214.4

A depredation was committed by Hugh, the son of Melaghlin O'Loughlin, on the coarb of Columbkille; but Hugh himself was killed before the expiration of a year afterwards, through the miracles of God and Columbkille.

M1214.5

Cathal Mac Dermot, the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg, and tower of the glory of Connaught, died.

M1214.6

Brian, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, the son of the Lord of West Connaught, died.

M1214.7

The territory of Carbury Co. Sligo, the possession of Philip Mac Costello, was preyed by Ualgarg O'Rourke, who carried off a number of cows.

Annal M1215.

M1215.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1215. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifteen.

M1215.1

Dionysius O'Lonargan, Archbishop of Cashel, died at Rome.

M1215.2

Conar (Cornelius) O'Heney, Bishop of Killaloe, died on his return from the fourth General Council of Lateran.


p.187

M1215.3

Annudh O'Murray, Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, and Maelpoil O'Murray, Prior of Dungiven, died.

M1215.4

Trad O'Mulfavill, Chief of Kinel-Fergusa, with his brothers, and a great number of people who were with them, were slain by Murray, the son of the Great Steward of Lennox.

M1215.5

Donough O'Duvdirma, Chief of Bredagh, died in the Duvregles of Derry.

M1215.6

Aengus O'Carellan, Chief of the Clann-Dermot, was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1215.7

Murrough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, died.

M1215.8

Mac Cann, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa, was slain by his kinsmen.

M1215.9

Rory O'Flynn O'Lynn, Lord of Derlas, died. Gillacutry Mac Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-sionna, died.

M1215.10

Gillakevin O'Kelly of Bregia, was taken prisoner in the monastery of St. Peter at Athlone, by the English, and afterwards hanged by them at Trim.

M1215.11

Teige Mac Etigen, Chief of Clann-Dermot, died.


p.187

Annal M1216.

M1216.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1216. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixteen.

M1216.1

Mahon O'Laverty, Chief of the Clann-Donnell, died.

M1216.2

Giolla Arnain O'Martan, Chief Ollave (professor) of law in Ireland, died.

M1216.3

Tomaltagh, the son of Hugh, who was the son of Oireaghtagh O'Rodiv, was slain by Donnell, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot.

M1216.4

Eachdonn Mac Gilluire, Coarb of St. Patrick and Primate of Ireland, died at Rome, after a well-spent life.

M1216.5

Melaghlin, the son of Dermot, was slain by the men of Fircall and the people of Meyler.

M1216.6

Murrough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, died.


p.191

M1216.7

The castle of Killaloe was erected by Geoffrey Mares. The English Bishop also built a house there by force.

M1216.8

Henry III. was crowned in England on the 19th of October.

Annal M1217.

M1217.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1217. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventeen.

M1217.1

Gillatierny Mac Gillaronan, Bishop of Oriel (Clogher), and head of the canons of Ireland, died, after penance and repentance.

M1217.2

Dermot, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, died.

M1217.3

More, daughter of O'Brien (Donnell), and wife of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, died.

M1217.4

Donnell O'Gara died.

M1217.5

Niall, the grandson of Loughlin O'Conor, died.

M1217.6

Donough O'Mulrenin, Chief of the Clann-Conor, died.

M1217.7

Teige O'Farrell was slain by Murrough Carragh O'Farrell.

M1217.8

Gillapatrick Mac Acadhain, Chief of Clann-Fearmaighe, died.


p.193

M1217.9

Donnell, the son of Murrough Mac Coghlan, Lord of the greater part of Delvin, was treacherously slain by the sons of Melaghlin Mac Coghlan, at Liathdruim.

M1217.10

Cathal Finn O'Laghtna, Chief of the Two Bacs, was treacherously slain in his own house by O'Flynn of Moy-h-Eleog.

M1217.11

Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, was inaugurated.

Annal M1218.

M1218.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1218. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighteen.

M1218.1

Clemens, Bishop of Leyny Achonry, died.

M1218.2

Gilla-na-naev O'Gormally, priest of Rathloury, died on his pilgrimage.


p.195

M1218.3

Maelisa O'Deery, Erenagh of Derry, died on the 18th of December; having been Erenagh of Derry for forty years, and having done all the good in his power, both in Church and State.

M1218.4

The church of the monastery of Boyle was consecrated.

M1218.5

Murtough O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre, was slain by the English; and Congalagh O'Quin, Chief of Magh Lugad, and of all Sil-Cathasaigh, and tower of the valour, hospitality, and renown of the north of Ireland, was also slain by the English on the same day.

M1218.6

Rory and Melaghlin, two sons of Mac Coghlan, died in the monastery of Kilbeggan.

M1218.7

Loughlin O'Conor died in the monastery of Knockmoy.


p.197

M1218.8

A depredation was committed by the English of Meath, and by Murtough Carragh O'Farrell on the Hy-Briuin of the Shannon. Dermot, the son of Turlough, who was the son of Melaghlin, and some of the Connacians, overtook them, and defeated the English, of whom upwards of one hundred persons were either slain or drowned. The son of O'Conor and some of his people fell fighting, in the heat of the conflict.

Annal M1219.

M1219.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1219. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred nineteen.

M1219.1

Hugh O'Malone, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, was drowned.

M1219.2

Fonaghtan O'Bronan, Coarb of St. Columbkille, died; and Flann O'Brollaghan was appointed in his place.

M1219.3

Melaghlin, the son of Conor Moinmoy, was slain by Manus, the son of Turlough O'Conor, who had taken his house (by force) at Cloontuskert.

M1219.4

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) into the Rough Third of


p.199

Connaught, and obtained hostages and submission from O'Rourke and O'Reilly, and from all the race of Aedh Finn. He afterwards passed through Fermanagh, and destroyed every place through which he passed, both lay and ecclesiastical property, wherein there was any opposition to him.

M1219.5

Walter de Lacy and the son of William Burke returned from England.

M1219.6

Duvdara, the son of Murray O'Malley, was put to death for his crimes by Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, while in fetters in O'Conor's fortress.

M1219.7

Enda, the son of Danar O'Mulkieran, died.

Annal M1220.

M1220.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1220. The age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty.

M1220.1

Jacobus came to Ireland as the Pope's Legate, to regulate and constitute the ecclesiastical discipline of Ireland, and then returned home.

M1220.2

Dermot, the son of Roderic (who was son of Turlough More O'Conor), was slain by Thomas Mac Uchtry, as he was coming from the Insi Gall (Hebrides), after having there collected a fleet, for the purpose of acquiring the kingdom of Connaught. Mulrony O'Dowda was drowned on the same expedition.

M1220.3

Melaghlin, the son of Melaghlin Beg O'Melaghlin, was drowned in Lough Ree.

M1220.4

Dermot, the son of Brian Dall, was treacherously slain by the son of Mahon O'Brien.

M1220.5

An army was led by Walter de Lacy and the English of Meath to


p.201

Athliag, where they erected the greater part of a castle. Another army was led by Cathal Crovderg, eastwards across the Shannon, into the territory of Caladh, and the English, being stricken with fear, made peace with him; and the Connacians destroyed the castle.

M1220.6

The Cairneach Riabhach Mac Clancy, and Farrell Magauran, were killed by Hugh, the son of Donnell, who was son of Farrell O'Rourke, and by the Clann-Fermaigh.

Annal M1221.

M1221.0

THE AGE OF CHRlST, 1221. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-one.

M1221.1

St. Dominic died.

M1221.2

Cormac, Abbot of Comar, was killed.

M1221.3

The son of Hugo de Lacy came to Ireland, without the consent of the King of England, and joined Hugh O'Neill. Both set out to oppose the English of


p.203

Ireland, and first went to Coleraine, where they demolished the castle. They afterwards went into Meath and Leinster, and destroyed a great number of persons on that occasion. The English of Ireland mustered twenty-four battalions at Dundalk, whither Hugh O'Neill, and the son of Hugo de Lacy, came to oppose them with four great battalions. The English upon this occasion gave his own demands to O'Neill.

M1222.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1222. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-two.

M1222.1

Mag-Gelain, Bishop of Kildare, died.

M1222.2

Albin O'Mulloy, Bishop of Ferns, died.

M1222.3

Maelisa O'Flynn, Prior of Eas-mac-neirc, died.

M1222.4

Teige O'Boyle, the Prosperity and Support of the North of Ireland, and bestower of jewels and riches upon men of every profession, died.

M1222.5

Niall O'Neill violated Derry with the daughter of O'Kane, but God and St. Columbkille were avenged for that deed, for he did not live long after it.


p.205

M1222.6

Gilla Mochoinni O'Cahill, Lord of Kinelea East and West, was slain by Shaughnessy, the son of Gilla-na-naev O'Shaughnessy, after having been betrayed by his own people.

M1222.7

More, daughter of O'Boyle, and wife of Auliffe O'Beollain Boland, died.

Annal M1223.

M1223.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1223. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-three.

M1223.1

Maelisa, the son of Turlough O'Conor, Prior of Inishmaine, died.

M1223.2

Duffagh O'Duffy, Abbot of Cong, died.

M1223.3

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) to Croghan, in Connaught,


p.207

thence into the Tuathas of Connaught, and westwards across the Suck, and plundered and burned every territory which he entered, until he had received their hostages and submissions.

M1223.4

Shaughnessy, the son of Gilla-na-naev O'Shaughnessy, was slain by the Clann-Cuilen, a deed by which the Bachal mor of St. Colman, of Kilmacduagh was profaned.

M1223.5

Murrough Carragh O'Farrell was slain at Granard, An. Ult. by an arrow, in a battle against Hugh, the son of Auliffe O'Farrell.

Annal M1224.

M1224.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1224. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-four.

M1224.1

The Monastery of St. Francis at Athlone, was commenced by Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, in the diocese of Clonmacnoise, on the eastern bank of the Shannon.


p.209

M1224.2

Mulmurry O'Conmaic, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach and Kinelea Kilmacduagh died.

M1224.3

The Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, i.e. the English bishop, died.

M1224.4

Maurice, the Canon, son of Roderic O'Conor, the most illustrious of the Irish for learning, psalm-singing, and poetical compositions, died, and was interred at Cong.

M1224.5

Mulkevin O'Scingin, Erenagh of Ardcarne, died.

M1224.6

Maelisa, son of the Bishop O'Mulfover, parson of Hy-Fiachrach and Hy-Awley, and materies of a bishop for his wisdom, was killed by the son of Donough O'Dowda, a deed strange in him, for none of the O'Dowdas had ever before killed an ecclesiastic.

M1224.7

A heavy and awful shower fell on a part of Connaught, namely, on Hy-Many, Sodan, in Hy-Diarmada, and other districts, from which arose a murrain


p.211

rain and dreadful distemper among the cattle of the aforesaid territories, after they had eaten of the grass moistened by this shower, and the milk of these cattle produced a variety of inward maladies in the people who used it. It was no wonder that these ominous signs should appear this year in Connaught, for great was the evil and affliction which they suffered in this year, viz., the death of Cathal Crovderg, son of Turlough More O'Conor, King of Connaught, a man

p.213

who, of all others, had destroyed most of the rebels and enemies of Ireland, he who had most relieved the wants of the clergy, the poor, and the destitute, he who, of all the Irish nobility that existed in or near his time, had received from God most goodness, and greatest virtues, for he kept himself content with one married wife, and did not defile his chastity after her death until his own death, in whose time most tithes were lawfully received in Ireland; this just and up-right king, this discreet, pious, and justly judging hero, died on the 28th day of the summer (on Monday), in the habit of a Grey Friar, in the monastery of Knockmoy, (which monastery, together with its site and lands, he himself had

p.215

granted to God and the monks), and was interred therein nobly and honourably. Cathal Crovderg was born at the Harbour of Lough Mask, and fostered in Hy-Diarmada by Teige O'Concannon. The government of Connaught was assumed without delay by Hugh O'Conor, his son, for the hostages of Connaught were in his (Hugh's) hands at the time of his father's death. Hugh, upon his accession to the government, commanded the son of O'Monahan should be deprived of sight as a punishment for his having violated a female, and ordered the hands and feet of another person to be cut off for having committed a robbery. This was done to maintain the authority of a prince.

M1224.8

Hugh, the son of Conor Moinmoy O'Conor, died on his return from Jerusalem and the River Jordan.

M1224.9

Donncahy, the son of Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv, Chief of Clann-Tomalty, died on his pilgrimage, at Toberpatrick.

M1224.10

Melaghlin, the son of Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died.

M1224.11

Gilla na-naev Crom the Stooped O'Shaughnessy, Lord of the Western half of Kinelea of Echtge, died

M1224.12

Donnell O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died.

M1224.13

Cucannon O'Concannon died.

M1224.14

Mahon, the son of Kehernagh O'Kerrin, Lord of Kerry of Lough-na-narney, died.


p.217

M1224.15

The corn remained unreaped until the Festival of St. Bridget 1st February, when the ploughing was going on, in consequence of the war and inclement weather.

M1224.16

A monastery was erected by Maurice Fitzgerald, from whom the Fitzgeralds of Kildare and Desmond are descended, at Youghal, in the diocese of Cloyne, in Munster, for Franciscan friary.


p.219

Annal M1225.

M1225.0

The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-five.

M1225.1

Auliffe O'Beollan (Boland) Erenagh of Drumcliff, a wise and learned man and a general Biatagh, died.

M1225.2

O'Mulrenin, abbot of the monastery of Boyle, died in consequence of having been blooded.

M1225.3

Maelbrighde O'Maigin, Abbot of Toberpatrick, a son of chastity and wisdom, died. By him the church of Toberpatrick, together with its sanctuary and crosses, had been, with great exertions, begun and finished, in honour of St. Patrick, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. John, and the Apostles.

M1225.4

Gilla-an-Choimhdhe Mac Gillacarry, a noble priest, and parson of Teach Baoithin, died.

M1225.5

Dionysius O'Mulkieran, Erenagh of Ardcarne, died.

M1225.6

Gilla-Coirpthe O'Muron, died, and was buried at Conga-Fechin (Cong).

M1225.7

O'Neill mustered a great force at the request of Donn Oge Mageraghty, royal Chieftain of Sil-Murray, who wanted to be revenged of O'Conor (i.e. Hugh), for having deprived him (Mageraghty) of his lands, and marched into Connaught to assist the sons of Roderic, viz., Turlough and Hugh. But


p.221

when Mageraghty turned against Hugh, the Sil-Murray also, and the inhabitants of West Connaught, with Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, as well as all the Irish of the province, with the exception of Mac Dermot (Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh), conjointly rose out against him. As to O'Neill he made no delay until he arrived in the very centre of Sil-Murray, whence he marched to the Faes of Athlone; and he remained two nights at Muilleann Guanach, and totally plundered Lough Nen, from whence he carried off O'Conor's jewels. Thence he proceeded to Carnfree, where Turlough, the son of Roderic, was inaugurated; and then O'Neill, with his people, returned home; for all their own people were faithful to the sons of Roderic,

p.223

excepting only the supporters of Hugh, namely, Mac Dermot, David O'Flynn, &.

M1225.8

The resolution then adopted by the son of Cathal Crovderg, was to repair to the English to the Court of Athlone; for it happened, fortunately for him, that the chiefs of the English of Ireland were at that very time assembled there, and the greater part of them were friendly to him, on his father's account as well as on his own, for both had paid them wages for military services, and had been bountiful towards them. The English received him with joy, and kept him among them with much affection for some time afterwards. He then engaged in his cause the Lord Justice, and as many of the chiefs of the English of Ireland as he considered necessary, together with Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, and O'Melaghlin, with their forces.

M1225.9

When the inhabitants of Moynai and of the Tuathas of Connaught had heard of this muster, they fled into the territory of Leyny and Tirawley, with their cows and other cattle, and left the sons of Roderic attended by only a few troops. The sons of Roderic O'Conor afterwards proceeded to Kilkelly with all the troops they had, and placed themselves in defence of their cows and flocks. As for Hugh O'Conor, and the English who accompanied him, they despatched light marauding parties to plunder the retainers of the sons of Roderic, but detained the main body of their army about them for the purpose of making an attack upon the sons of Roderic themselves. Hugh, the son of Roderic, Donnell O'Flaherty, Tiernan, the son of Cathal Miccarain, and the son of Turlough, son of Roderic, went to protect some of their Aes graidh.


p.225

The English, with Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, then set out to surround Turlough; but the latter, on perceiving this, ordered his recruits in the van, and Donn Oge Mageraghty, with his Calones, Flaherty O'Flanagan, and a few Tyronian soldiers, who were with him in the rear, to cover the retreat, by which means they escaped from the enemy without the loss of a man. On the same day some of Hugh O'Conor's marauding parties encountered Eachmarcach Mac Branan, who had gone to protect his cows against them; and Eachmarcach fell by the overwhelming force of the warriors who fought against him. Hugh O'Conor, and the English, pursued the sons of Roderic that night to Meelick, and for three nights afterwards continued plundering Leyny in all directions. This was unfortunate to O'Hara, who had to make peace with them, in consideration of the inconsiderable number of its cattle then left in Leyny.

M1225.10

The sons of Roderic were at this time stationed near Lough Macfarry, in Gleann-na-Mochart. Hugh then proposed to the English that they should pursue and plunder the inhabitants of the Tuathas, the Sil-Murray, and Clann-Tomalty, as they had fled before him with their cattle; and this being agreed upon, they set out, taking a road which the English alone would never have thought of taking, viz. they passed through Fiodh Gatlaigh, and marched until they reached Attymas; and they plundered Coolcarney, after


p.227

having nearly destroyed its people. Some of them fled to Duvconga, but the greater part of these were drowned; and the baskets of the fishing weirs were found full of drowned children. Such of them as on this occasion escaped from the English, and the drowning aforesaid, passed into Tirawley, where they were attacked by O'Dowda, who left them not a single cow.

M1225.11

As to the sons of Roderic, the resolution they adopted, at Lough Mac-farry, was to separate from each other, until the English should leave Hugh; to send Donn Mageraghty, and others of their chieftains, to O'Flaherty, their sworn friend and partisan; and the sons of Murtough O'Conor, and Tiernan, the son of Cathal, to take charge of their people and cows, and to obtain peace on their behalf, until the English should leave (Hugh) the son of Cathal Crovderg. Hugh was at this time at Mayo, and the sons of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor went to him under protection and guarantee.

M1225.12

As to the inhabitants of the southern side of Connaught, they were not in a state of tranquillity at this period, for the English of Leinster and Munster, with Murtough O'Brien, the English of Desmond, and the sheriff of Cork, had made an irruption upon them, and slew all the people that they caught, and burned their dwellings and villages. Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was displeased at their coming on this expedition; for it was not he that sent for them, but were themselves excited by envy and rapacity, as soon as they had heard what good things the Lord Justice and his English followers had obtained in Connaught at that time. During this incursion the four sons of Mac Murrough were slain on the same spot.

M1225.13

Woeful was the misfortune, which God permitted to fall upon the best province in Ireland at that time! for the young warriors did not spare each other, but preyed and plundered each other to the utmost of their power. Women and children, the feeble, and the lowly poor, perished by cold and famine in this war!


p.229

M1225.14

The sons of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor having come before Hugh O'Conor, as we have stated, he went on the next day to Kilmaine, were the three English armies met; and nearly the whole of the triocha ched (cantred) was filled with people, both English and Irish. Hugh O'Flaherty, under the protection and guarantee of the chiefs of the English, and of his gossip Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, came to Hugh O'Conor and the Lord Justice, and made peace with O'Conor, on behalf of his people and cows, on condition that he should expel the sons of Roderic. After this, Hugh and his English went to Tuam, where he dismissed the English of Leinster and Desmond; after which he returned back to (watch) O'Flaherty, for he did not confide in him, as O'Flaherty had, some time before, the sons of Roderic at the west side of the lake, together with Donn Oge Mageraghty.

M1225.15

The son of Manus then parted from the sons of Roderic, and set out for Tirawley, in quest of his cows and people, and fortunately found them there, without having been plundered or molested. He then took them with him, under the protection of O'Rourke, after having first plundered Philip Mac Costello.

M1225.16

Donough Cairbreach O'Brien sent a detachment of his people before him, with immense spoils; but Hugh, the son of Roderic, and Owen O'Heyne, having heard of this movement, went before them with a few select men, defeated the Momonians, deprived them of their spoils, and detained some of their nobles as hostages. When Donough Cairbreach heard of this, he came to Hugh, the son of Roderic, and made a solemn peace with him, and bound himself never


p.231

again to oppose him, on condition that Hugh would restore him his Aes graidh. But he did not adhere to this his covenant with the son of Roderic; for, after obtaining his people from him, he came in the first army that Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, marched against him.

M1225.17

After this, Hugh the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and the Lord Justice with his English, set out for the port of Inis Creamha; and O'Flaherty was compelled to surrender the island of Inis Creamha, and Oilen na Circe, and all the vessels boats on the lake, into the hands of Hugh. The Lord Justice then returned home, and was escorted a great part of the way by Hugh O'Conor, with whom he left a few of the chiefs of his people, together with many soldiers and warriors; for the Connacians were not faithful to him, except very few. After this Hugh gave up to the English the chiefs of his people, as hostages for the payment of their wages, as Flaherty, O'Flanagan, Farrell O'Teige, and others of the chiefs of Connaught, who were subsequently obliged to ransom themselves.

M1225.18

After the departure of the main army of the English from Hugh, the sons of Cathal Crovderg, O'Flaherty, the son of Murtough, and all the other nobles, revolted against him, and joined the sons of Roderic. Hugh O'Conor the despatched messengers and letters to the Lord Justice, to inform him of the circumstance, and request additional forces. His request was by no means


p.233

an ineffectual one, for the English responded to his call cheerfully and expeditiously; and well was their promptness rewarded, for their spoil was great, and their struggle trifling. The English of Leinster, under the conduct of William Grace and the sons of Griffin, were sent to aid him. On the arrival of these forces, Hugh proceeded westwards, across the Togher the Causeway, against the sons of Roderic, and advanced to Hy-Diarmada, where he had heard they were stationed, without any considerable forces, for their allies had not as yet joined them; and he sent his brother Felim, and others of the chiefs of his people, and a great number of the English recruits into Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne, to plunder Owen O'Heyne. These encamped for one night at Ardrahen, with a view to plunder the country early in the morning following.

M1225.19

O'Flaherty and the sons of Murtough O'Conor, who were then on their way to join the sons of Roderic, having received intelligence that the English had gone to plunder their sworn partisan, Owen O'Heyne, and were stationed at Ardrahen, did not abandon their friend, but, with one mind and accord, followed the English until they came very close to them. They then held a council, and came to the resolution of sending Tuathal, the son of Murtough


p.235

O'Conor, and Taichleach O'Dowda, with numerous forces, into the town, while O'Flaherty and the other son of Murtough were to remain with their forces outside Tuathal and Taichleach, with a strong body of their soldiers, marched spiritedly and boldly into the town, and made a powerful attack upon the English there, who were routed east and west. They pursued those who fled eastwards. Tuathal wounded the constable of the English with his first shot; and Taichleach, by another shot, gave him so deep a wound, that he was left lifeless. As to the English who were routed westwards from the town, they were met by O'Flaherty and the other son of Murtough; but it happened, through their evil destiny, that the English routed them immediately. On this occasion Mahon, the son of Hugh, who was son of Conor Moinmoy; Gilchreest Mac Dermot; Niall, the son of Farrell O'Teige, and others, were slain; but the man who slew Niall O'Teige, i.e. the brother of Colen O'Dempsey, was slain himself also.

M1225.20

As to the sons of Roderic, they joined O'Flaherty and their other allies the next morning, and proceeded southwards to Druim-Ceanannain; but Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, with his English, set out after them. The tribes who supported the sons of Roderic now held a consultation, and came to the resolution that each of them should return to his own residence which all accordingly did, excepting Donn Oge Mageraghty; and the princes, i.e. the sons of Roderic, being thus left with only a small force, went to Hugh O'Neill, accompanied by Donn Mageraghty.

M1225.21

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, then attacked O'Flaherty, and took hostages and pledges from him. He then proceeded to Kilmaine and Mayo, in pursuit of the sons of Murtough and Tiernan, the son of Cathal Migaran O'Conor who came before him under the guarantee of Donough Cairbreach,


p.237

and the chiefs of the English, and on condition that he should spare their people and cattle. This was a necessary tranquillity, for there was not a church or territory in Connaught at that time that had not been plundered and desolated.

M1225.22

An oppressive malady raged in the province of Connaught at this time: it was a heavy burning sickness, which left the large towns desolate, without a single survivor.

M1225.23

Flann, the son of Auliffe O'Fallon, Chief of Clann-Uadagh, was slain by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, in this war; and Teige O'Finaghty, one of the officers Aes graidh of Hugh, the son of Roderic, was slain by the people of Mac Egan during the same war.

M1225.24

Auliffe, the son of Fearcair O'Fallon, chieftain of his own tribe, and the best of them, died.

M1225.25

Murray O'Finaghty, Chief of Clann-Murrough, died in a vessel on Lough Oirbsen (Lough Corrib), which he had gone into in good health.

M1225.26

A house was attacked upon the son of Teige O'Kelly (Lord of Hy-Many), and upon Ardgal his brother, by the sons of Teige O'Kelly, and both were burned within it.

M1225.27

Duarcan O'Hara, Teige O'Hara, and Edwina, daughter of Dermot, the son of Donnell O'Hara, died.


p.239

M1225.28

The Momonians and English attacked Tearmann Caelainne, but the English were slaughtered on this occasion, through the miracles of God and St. Caelainn.

M1225.29

The corn remained unreaped until after the festival of St. Bridget the 1st of February.

Annal M1226.

M1226.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1226. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-six.

M1226.1

Donum Dei, Bishop of Meath, died.

M1226.2

Connmagh O'Tary (Torpy), Bishorp of Leyny, died.

M1226.3

Hugh, the son of Donn O'Sochlaghan, Erenagh of Cong, a learned singer, a scribe, and a man expert in many trades, died.

M1226.4

Matthew O'Mulmoghery died.

M1226.5

Tiernan, the son of Cathal Miccaruinn, who was son of Turlough More, a Roydamna prince, the most hospitable man and most expert at arms, and whose exploits had been more various and successful than those of any of his tribe for a long time, was slain by Donough O'Dowda and his sons.

M1226.6

Nuala, daughter of Roderic O'Conor, and Queen of Ulidia, died at Conga Fechin Cong, and was honourably interred in the church of the Canons at Cong.

M1226.7

Donnell, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, was slain by the sons of Murtough O'Flaherty, after they and Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, had attacked and taken the house in which he was.

M1226.8

Farrell O'Teige, surnamed an Teaghlaigh, Chief of the household of Cathal Crovderg, and Hugh, the son of Cathal, were slain by Donslevy O'Gara.

M1226.9

Hugh, the son of Donnell O'Rourke, was slain on Lough Allen by Cathal O'Reilly and Conor, the son of Cormac O'Mulrony.

M1226.10

Maurice Mac Dermot was slain.


p.243

M1226.11

The Castle of Kimlore was demolished by Cathal O'Reilly.

M1226.12

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, took Hugh O'Flaherty prisoner, and delivered him up into the hands of the English.

Annal M1227.

M1227.1

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1227. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-seven.

M1227.2

Conor, the son of Niall O'Caharny Fox, was slain by the Leinster soldiers who were along with the King of Connaught.

M1227.3

Henry O'Meaghlin and Murtough O'Melaghlin were slain by the English.

M1227.4

Melaghlin O'Conor Faly was slain by Cuilen O'Dempsy.

M1227.5

Gilla-Colum O'Molloy was slain by O'More.

M1227.6

The English of Ireland assembled at Dublin and invited thither Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught. As soon as he arrived they began to deal treacherously by him; but William Mareschal, his friend, coming in with his forces, rescued him, in despite of the English, from the middle of the Court, and escorted him to Connaught.

M1227.7

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, appointed a conference at Lathach Caichtubil with William Mares (de Marisco), the son of Geoffry Lord Justice


p.245

of Ireland. A few only of his chiefs went with him across the Lathach slough, namely, Cormac the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, Dermot, the son of Manus, the son of Murtough O'Conor, Teige, the son of Mahon O'Kerrin, and Rory O'Mulrenin. William Mares set out to meet them, accompanied by eight horsermen. But when O'Conor recollected the treachery already mentioned, he rose up against the English and excited his people to attack them; and he himself attacked William Mares, and at once took him prisoner. His people responded O'Conor's incitement, rushed upon the English, and defeated them; they killed the constable of Athlone, and took Master Slevin and Hugo Arddin prisoners. Hugh sent these Englishmen across the Lathach to be imprisoned; and then, advancing with his troops, he plundered the market of Athlone and burned the whole town. This achivement was of great service to the Connacians, for he O'Conor obtained his son and daughter, and all the other hostages of Connaught, who had been in the hands of the English, in exchange for the aforesaid prisoners; and obtained moreover a peace for the men of Connaught.

M1227.8

Donslevy O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha, was slain by Gillaroe, his own brother's son, after the latter had, on the same night, forcibly taken a house from him and Gillaroe himself was afterwards put to death for this crime by the devise of Hugh O'Conor.

M1227.9

Hugh, son of Roderic O'Conor, and the son of William Burke, marched with a great army into the North of Connaught, and they burned Inishmaine, plundered the country into which they came, and took hostages.

M1227.10

An army was led by Geoffrey Mares de Marisco and Turlough, the son


p.247

of Roderic O'Conor, into Moynai, erected a castle at Rindown and took the hostages of the Sil-Murray.

M1227.11

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, went to Tirconnell to O'Donnell, and returned again southwards, taking his wife with him; but he was met by the sons of Turlough very near Seaghais Curlew Mountains, who took his wife and his horses from him, and his wife was given up into the hands of the English.

M1227.12

Another army was led by Turlough, and the English of Meath, into the West of Connaught, and they committed a great depredation on Hugh, the son of Rory O'Flaherty. They proceeded thence into the country of Carra; they took hostages from the sons of Murtough, and Turlough obtained from them a number of fat beeves out of every cantred in their possession.

M1227.13

Cumara O'Donnellan was slain, while in fetters, by Rory Mac Donslevy in revenge of his father.

M1227.13

Brian, the son of Conor O'Diarmada, was slain.

M1227.14

The castle of Athleague was erected by Geoffrey Mares De Marisco

Annal M1228.

M1228.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST,1228. The age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty eight.

M1228.1

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, king of Connaught, was treacherously killed by the English in the court mansion of Geoffrey Mares at the instigation of the English, after he had been expelled by the Connacians.


p.249

M1228.2

A great war broke out in Connaught between the two sons of Roderic O'Conor, Hugh and Turlough, after the death of the Hugh above-mentioned, for the younger son did not yield submission to the elder; and they destroyed Connaught between them, and desolated the region extending from Easdara Ballysadare, southwards, to the river of Hy-Fiachrach, excepting only a small portion of Sliabh Lugha, and the territory of the people of Airtech.

M1228.3

Niall, the son of Congalagh O'Rourke, Lord of Dartry and Clann Fearmaighe, was slain by the two sons of Art, the son of Donnell O'Rourke, namely, Art and Auliffe; and Auliffe Gearr, the son of Niall, who was son of Congalagh, was slain, while bathing, by Auliffe, the son of the same Art.

M1228.4

Farrell, the son of Sitric O'Rourke, was slain by the sons of Niall, the son of Congalagh O'Rourke.

M1228.5

Murtough, the son of Flaherty O'Flanagan, was slain by the sons of Teige O'Gara.

M1228.6

Hugh, the son of Donough O'Farrell, was slain by Hugh, the son of Auliffe O'Farrell.

M1228.7

David O'Flynn, Chief of Sil Maelruain, and Rory O'Mulrenin, died.

M1228.8

Richard, the son of William Burke, came to Ireland, from the King of England, as Justiciary.

M1228.9

Hugh, the son of Roderic O'Conor, assumed the kingdom of Connaught, by the election of the Justiciary and the chiefs of Connaught, in preference to Turlough, his elder brother.


p.251

M1228.10

Melaghlin, the son of Turlough, who was the son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Hugh, King of Connaught.

M1228.11

An intolerable dearth prevailed in Connaught, in consequence of the war of the sons of Roderic. They plundered churches and territories; they banished its clergy and ollaves into foreign and remote countries, and others of them perished of cold and famine.

M1228.12

David O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, died.

M1228.13

Hugh, son of Donough O'Farrell, was slain by Hugh, son of Auliffe O'Farrell.

Annal M1229.

M1229.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1229. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-nine.

M1229.1

The monastery of St. Francis, at Cork, was founded by Mac Carthy More (Dermot).

M1229.2

Murray O'Gormally, Prior of Inis-macnerin, and the most renowned in Connaught for piety and wisdom, died.

M1229.3

Dermot O'Fiach, Abbot of the church of Gilla-Molaisse O'Gillarain, of Tuaim, died, and was interred at Ardcarne.


p.253

M1229.4

Dermot Mac Gillacarry, Erenagh of Tibohine, and a noble priest, died.

M1229.5

He was buried in the monastery of the Holy Trinity, his body having been by right obtained by the canons, from the monks of the monastery of Boyle, after it had remained three nights unburied, because the monks had attempted to retain it in their own monastery.

M1229.6

Gerard O'Kane, the wisest of the order of canons, died.

M1229.7

Duvesa, daughter of Roderic O'Conor, and wife of Cathal Mac Dermot, died a nun.

M1229.8

Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died.

M1229.9

Dionysius O'More, Bishop of Sil-Murray Elphin, resigned his bishopric for the sake of God.

M1229.10

Loughlin O'Monahan was killed by his father's brother.

Annal M1230.

M1230.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1230. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty.

M1230.1

Florence O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone, a noble and select senior, died in the eighty-sixth year of his age.

M1230.2

Gilla-Isa O'Clery, Bishop of Leyny Achonry; Joseph Mac Techedan, Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh; Magrath Mac Sherry, Bishop of Conmaicne; Rool Petit (Rodolphus Petit), Bishop of Meath, a select ruler and soldier of Christ; Gilla-Coimdeadh O'Duileannain, Coarb of St. Feichin, and Abbot of the church of the Canons at Easdara Ballysadare; Murray O'Gormally, Prior of Inis-mac-nerin; Mulmurry O'Malone, Coarb of St. Kieran, of Clonmacnoise; Gilla-Carthy O'Helgiusain, a canon and anchorite; and Donslevy O'Hinmainen, a holy monk and the chief master of the carpenters of the monastery of Boyle, died.


p.251

M1230.3

Melaghlin Mac Firedinn, a noble priest and a professor of literature, died in his monastic noviciate in the monastery of Boyle.

M1230.4

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) into Connaught, against Hugh, the son of Roderic O'Conor, who was opposed to him, and destroyed Moynai and a great part of the country province. The sons of Roderic, however, did not give him hostages on this occasion.

M1230.5

An army was led by the son of William Burke into Connaught, and desolated a large portion of that country, and Donn Oge Mageraghty and Eghtighern,


p.257

the son of the Brehon O'Minaghan, and many others not enumerated, were slain. Hugh, the son of Roderic, King of Connaught, was expelled by the son of William Burke and the English (by overwhelming numbers), on this occasion, to Hugh O'Neill, because he had risen up against the English; and Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was proclaimed king of Connaught by the son of William Burke.

M1230.6

Hugh O'Neill, Lord of Tyrone and Roydamna heir presumptive to the throne of all Ireland,the defender of Leth-Chuinn against the English of Ireland and the people of Leth-Mhogha Nuadhat; who had never rendered hostages, pledges, or tribute, to English or Irish; who had gained victories over the English, and cut them off with great and frequent slaughter; the plunderer of the English and Irish; a man who had attempted the subjugation of all Ireland, —died a natural death, although it was never supposed that he would die in any other way than to fall by the hands of the English.

M1230.7

Art, the son of Art O'Rourke, was treacherously slain by Randal O'Finn.

M1230.8

Melaghlin O'Monahan was slain by his relatives.


p.259

Annal M1231.

M1231.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1231. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-one

M1231.1

Dionysius O'More, Bishop of Elphin, closed his days on the Island of the Blessed Trinity on Lough Key, on the 15th of December, and Donough O'Conor was appointed in his place.

M1231.2

Flann O'Connaghty, Bishop of Hy-Briuin Breifney Kilmore, died.

M1231.3

Stephen O'Breen, Erenagh of Mayo died.

M1231.4

Keleher O'Devlin, Erenagh of Camma, a charitable, pious, wise, and prayerful man died.

M1231.5

Fethfoilge, daughter of Conor Mac Dermot, and wife of Murtough Muimhneach, the son of Turlough More died. She was the mother of Manus, Conor Roe, Tuathal, and Turlough the Priest, Prior of the Church of SS. Peter and Paul.

M1231.6

Duvcovlagh, daughter of Conor Mac Dermot, died in the monastery of Boyle.

M1231.7

Flaherty O'Flanagan, Chief of the race of Cathal, the son of Muireadhach Muilleathan, died on his pilgrimage in the monastery of Boyle. Duvtawragh, daughter of O'Quin, and wife of this Flaherty, died.

M1231.8

Ualgarg O'Rourke, Lord of Breifney, died on his way to the River Jordan.

M1231.9

Gilla-Isa Magauran, Lord of Tealach Eachdhach, and Duinnin O'Mulconry, Ollave chief poet of the race of Muireadhach Muilleathan the Sil-Murray, died.


p.261

M1231.10

Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died.

M1231.11

An army was led by Donnell O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, and Aengus Mac Gilla-Finnen, with the forces of Fermanagh, against O'Reilly (Cathal): they brought boats with them upon Lough Oughter, and plundered Eo-inis, and, after obtaining their own award, they carried away with them all the jewels, treasures, and wealth of the whole town.

M1231.12

Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg (O'Conor), was taken prisoner by the son of William Burke, at Meelick, in violation of the guarantee given by all the English chieftains in Ireland.

M1232.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1232. THe Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-two.

M1232.1

Faghtna O'Hallgaith, Coarb of Drumacoo, and official of Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne, who had kept an open house for strangers, the sick, and the indigent, and also for the instruction of the people, died.

M1232.2

The church of Kilmore, in Hy-Briuin na-Sinna, was consecrated by


p.261

Donough O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin; and canons were appointed in the same town by Conn O'Flanagan, who was Prior there.

M1232.3

Tipraide O'Breen, Coarb of St. Coman, who was learned in theology, history, and law, died on the island of Inis-Clothran, on his pilgrimage.

M1232.4

Hugh, the son of Auliffe, who was son of Donnell O'Farrell, Chief of Annaly, was burned on the island of Inis Locha Cuile by the sons of Hugh Ciabach, the son of Morogh O'Ferrall, having been nine years Chief of Annaly, from the death of his predecessor, Morrogh Carrach O'Ferrall.

M1232.5

Manus, son of Auliffe, the son of Teige Mac Mulrony, lamp of hospitality, feats of arms, and piety, died.

M1232.6

Donough, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, eminent for his hospitality and feats of arms, died in Aicideacht, —a great loss to Connaught.

M1232.7

Conor, son of Hugh, the son of Roderic, made his escape from the English, and the sons of the chiefs of Connaught assembled around him, and they made an incursion into the Tuathas; but Conor, with Gilla-Kelly O'Heyne, and Gilchreest, the son of Donough Mac Dermot, and many others along with them, were slain by the people of the Tuathas. This was the day on which the people of the Tuathas whitened all the handles of their battle-axes, because it was rumoured that it was by a man who carried a white handled battle-axe that the son of Hugh had been slain.

M1232.8

The kingdom of Connaught was again given to Hugh, the son of Roderic, by the son of William Burke, who made peace with him after he had taken Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg, prisoner.


p.265

M1232.9

The castle of Bungalvy was erected by Rickard de Burgo, and the erection of the castle of Dunamon was commenced by Adam Staunton.

M1232.10

Gilla-na-naev O'Daly, a learned poet, who had kept a house of hospitality for the indigent and the mighty, died.

M1232.11

Malone Bodhar the Deaf O'Mulconry took Cluain Bolcain.

M1232.12

Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was set at liberty by the English.

M1232.13

Conor, the son of Niall O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died.

M1232.14

Donnell O'Loughlin, Lord of Tyrone, at the head of an army composed of the English and Irish, made an incursion into Tirconnell, and did much injury in Fanat, and carried away the hostages of Donnell O Boyle and O'Tairchirt.

M1232.15

An army was led by O'Donnell into Tyrone, and arrived at Tullaghoge, on which occasion he killed many cows, burned the corn crops, and did much injury, and then returned home in triumph.

M1232.16

Mevagh and Aughnish were plundered by the Kinel-Owen, for their ships


p.267

touched at these places; but a party of the Kinel-Connell, with the son of Niall O'Donnell, came upon them, and slaughtered the crews, but the son of Niall himself was slain in the heat of the conflict.

M1232.17

Gilla-na-naev O'Daly, an adept in poetry, died.

Annal M1233.

M1233.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1233. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-three.

M1233.1

Geoffry O'Deery, Erenagh of Derry-Columbkille died.

M1233.2

Maelisa O'Maeny, a noble priest, who was wont to sing his psalter every day, excepting Sunday only died.

M1233.3

Donncahy, Erenagh of Aghagower, settler of every dispute and covenant, a man of esteem and honour, died on the 15th of December.

M1233.4

An army was led by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, into Connaught, and Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh (Lord of Moylurg), went to meet him and brought him with him into Moylurg. A camp was formed by them at Druim Gregraighe, and Cormac, his son Conor, the people of the Three Tuathas, the two sons of Murtough Mac Dermot, namely, Donough and Murtough, joined him there. The resolution they adopted was to go in pursuit of Hugh, King of Connaught, and the other sons of Roderic. On overtaking them they attacked and defeated Hugh, the son of Roderic, slew himself and his brother,


p.269

Hugh Muimhneach, his son, Donough More, the son of Dermot, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, and many others besides them. There were also slain on this occasion Raghallagh O'Flanagan, Thomas Biris, Constable of Ireland, John, his relative, John Guer, and many other Englishmen; after they had been cursed and excommunicated by the clergy of Connaught, by the ringing of bells with croziers, and the extinguishing of candles; for Hugh Muimhneach had violated and plundered Tibohine, and many other churches, so that he and his party fell in revenge of the saints whose churches they had violated. The kingdom and government of Connaught was on that day taken from the sons of Roderic, the son of Turlough. After this Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, assumed the government of Connaught, and demolished the castles which had been erected by the power of the sons of Roderic O'Conor, and the son of William Burke, namely, the castle of Bungalvy, Castle-Kirk, and Castle-na-Cally, and the castle of Dunamon.

M1233.5

An army was led by William, the son of Hugo de Lacy (whose mother was the daughter of Roderic O'Conor), accompanied by the English of Meath, into Breifny against Cathal O'Reilly, and committed great depredations; but a party of O'Reilly's people overtook William de Lacy, and the chiefs of his army, who were behind the preys, and they gave battle to each other, in which William Britt, and a number of the chiefs of the English along with him, were slain. William de Lacy, with many others, was wounded. They returned from the territory without hostage or pledge. And William de Lacy, Charles, the son of Cathal Gall O'Conor, Feorus Finn, the son of the English Queen, and Dermot Bearnagh O'Melaghlin, died of the wounds they received in that battle of Moin-crann-chaoin. Niall Sinnagh O'Catharny, Lord of Teffia, was


p.271

also wounded in this battle, and died at his own house, after making his will and being anointed.

Annal M1234.

M1234.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1234. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-four.

M1234.1

Aengus O'Mulfover, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach Killala; Gilla-na-naev, the son of Art O'Breen, Erenagh of Roscommon; Maelisa, the son of Daniel O'Gormally, Prior of Inismacnerin; Mulpeter O'Carmacan, Master at Roscommon; and Gilla-Isa (Gelasius) O'Gibellan, a monk and anchorite on Trinity Island died.

M1234.2

Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Neill, Lord of the Kinel-Owen, and heir presumptive to the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Mac Loughlin (Donnell), and the Kinel-Owen themselves, and Donnell i.e. Mac Loughlin; assumed the lordship.

M1234.3

Aengus Mac Gillafinnen, Lord of Lough Erne, turned against O'Donnell, and went into Tirconnell upon a predatory incursion; but O'Donnell (Donnell More), overtook him, and killed him in revenge of the death of Egneghan.

M1234.4

Hugh O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, was killed by Donough, the son of Duarcan O'Hara (after he had burned the house over him, and after Hugh had escaped out of it), in revenge of his brother, and the five sons of his father's brother, whom he Hugh had slain, and of another brother who had been plundered by him.

M1234.5

Dermot O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan, was slain.

M1234.6

Richard, the son of William Mareschal, having rebelled against the King


p.273

of England, in England, he came over to Ireland, and landed in Leinster. The English of Leinster assembled to oppose him, on behalf of the King: Mac Maurice, Lord Justice of Ireland; Hugo de Lacy, Earl of Ulster; and Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath. They came to Cuirreach-Life, in Leinster, where they engaged with Mareschal, and killed him; and they made a prisoner of Geoffry Mareschal, who had stood alone fighting on the field of battle, after all his people had fled from him.

Annal M1235.

M1235.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1235. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-five.

M1235.1

Isaac O'Mulfover, Erenagh of Killala, died.

M1235.2

Matheus, Prior of Trinity Island died.

M1235.3

Madden O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

M1235.4

Loughlin, the son of Echtighern O'Kelly, was slain by the sons of Gilla-Reagh O'Boyle.


p.275

M1235.5

Taichleach, the son of Hugh O'Dowda, Lord of Tirawley and Tireragh, was killed by one shot of an arrow during his interference to quell a quarrel in the camp of Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg.

M1235.6

An expedition was made by the English of Ireland this year, being assembled by Richard, the son of William Burke. The most illustrious of those who were with him on this expedition were Mac Maurice, Lord Justice of Ireland; Hugo de Lacy, Earl of Ulster; Walter Rittabard, the chief Baron of Leinster, who commanded the English of Leinster; and John Goggan, with the English of Munster, together with all the routes of soldiers in Ireland. Crossing the bridge at Athlone, they proceeded to Roscommon, and burned the town; thence, going to Elphin, they burned the great church there, and proceeded from thence to the monastery of the Ath Dalaarg, on the river Boyle, on the night of Trinity Sunday precisely. Parties of their soldiers assailed the monastery, broke into the sacristy, and carried away chalices, vestments, and other valuable things. The English chiefs, however, were highly disgusted at this, and sent back every thing they could find, and paid for what they could not find. Next day they sent marauding parties to Creit, to Cairthe-muilchenn,


p.277

to Tor-Glinne-fearna, and they carried off great spoils from those places to the Lord Justice at Ardcarne. Here the English held a private consultation, at the request of Owen O'Heyne, who wished to be revenged on the Momonians, and on Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, and they determined on going back the same way through Hy-Many and Moinmoy, and thence to Thomond, without giving the Momonians any notice or forewarning of their intentions. This they accordingly did, and committed great depredations.

M1235.7

Now when Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, saw that the English had departed, the resolution he came to was to proceed with his forces, to succour the Momonians. This he did, and, on their joining them, spirited skirmishes took place every day. At last the Connacians and Momonians came to a pitched battle with the English, and fought manfully. But the English cavalry and infantry, who were clad in armour, finally overcame them. Many were slain on both sides, but the Momonians suffered most loss, through the imprudence of Donough Cairbreach. The Connacians then returned home, and on the next day O'Brien made peace with the English, and gave them hostages. The English returned into Connaught, and went first to Hugh O'Flaherty, who made peace with them in behalf of his people and cattle. As to Felim the son of Cathal Crovderg, the resolution which he adopted was to take with him to O'Donnell, i.e. Donnell More, all the cows belonging to such of the inhabitants of Conmaicne-mara and Conmaicne-Cuile who should take his advice, together with the son of Manus, and Conor Roe, the son of Murtough Muimhneach, and leaving the whole country desolate for the English. The English soon afterwards came to Dun-Mughdord, and sent messengers to Manus, the son of Murtough Muimhneach, to demand hostages from him; but Manus would not give them either peace or hostages. The English then sent from Dun-Mughdord a numerous force against the sons of Roderic, who plundered


p.279

Achill, and carried off great spoils to Druimni. Hugh O'Flaherty and Owen O'Heyne also came round with a great army, having vessels with them, which they carried by land as far as Linan Cinn-mara. These vessels, with their forces, being met by the Lord Justice at Druimni, were brought to the Callow of Inis-Aenaigh.

M1235.8

Manus at this time was with his ships on the Sound near the island, and he made frequent attacks upon the English, and they upon him in return. The English, however, desisted for a time; they removed their camp, and drew their vessels into the angle of a large strand at that place. When Manus observed this, he landed on Inis-raithni, and sent a party of his people on the Island of Inis-Aonaigh. As soon, however, as the English perceived that Manus and his people had landed on these islands, they drew their boats along the strand, and having them on the sea, they quickly filled them with a numerous army and troops of well-armed and mail-clad soldiers; and these landed on the islands on which the people of Manus were (except Inis-Raithin, where Manus himself was), and killed all the people they found on them. Upon this Manus, and those who were with him on Inis-Raithin, took to their ships, and fled from the island. Had Manus, however, been on friendly terms with the O'Malleys, they would have sent their ships against the English fleet.


p.281

M1235.9

There was not a single cow upon any of the Insi Modh islands which the English did not carry off to the shore in one day; and those to whom these cows had belonged would have been obliged to come off their islands, in consequence of thirst and hunger, if they had not been killed or taken prisoners.

M1235.10

Many of the inferior sort were slain that night by the English. On the next day, which was Friday, the English went upon the islands north of Umallia; and the chiefs of the army ordered that no people should be slain on that day, in honour of the crucifixion of Christ.

M1235.11

After the English had plundered and devastated Umallia, both by sea and land, they marched on with their cows and spoils to Luffertane; thence they proceeded, by regular marches, to Easdara Ballysadare, where they took a prey from O'Donnell, because he had granted an asylum to Felim after his expulsion; and from thence to the Curlieu Mountains, and to Caladh-Puirt na Cairrge, on Lough Key, to take it from a party of the people of Felim O'Conor and Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, who were guarding it. On this occasion the English of Ireland and the Lord Justice spared and protected Clarus, the son of Mailin, Archdeacon of Elphin, and the Canons of Trinity Island, in honour of the Blessed Trinity; and the Lord Justice himself, and the chiefs of the English, went to see that place, and to kneel and pray there.

M1235.12

The English afterwards, with great art and ingenuity, constructed wonderful engines, by means of which they took the fortress of the Rock of Lough Key from the people of Felim and Cormac; and the Lord Justice, after taking it, left warders in it, with as much provisions and beer as they deemed sufficient. By this expedition the English left the Connacians without food, raiment,


p.283

or cattle, and the country without peace or tranquillity, the Gaels Irish themselves plundering and destroying one another. The English, however, did not obtain hostages or pledges of submission on this expedition.

M1235.13

Felim made peace with the Lord Justice; and they the English gave him the King's five cantreds, free of tribute or rent.

M1235.14

The Rock of Lough Key was taken, twenty nights afterwards, by Cormac Mac Dermot. As the constable and a great number of his people had gone out, O'Hostin, one of his own people, closed the gate of the fortress, and afterwards gave it up to Cormac. The English were Conveyed recte fled to Trinity Island, and afterwards conducted out of the country in security. The fortress of the Rock was afterwards razed and demolished by Cormac, in order that the English might not take it again.

M1235.15

Donnell and Murtough, two sons of Murray O'Malley, were slain by Donnell, son of Manus, who was son of Murtough O'Conor; and by Niall Roe, son of Cathal, son of Conor recte O'Conor, in Cliara, and were interred there.

M1235.16

Tuathal, the son of Murtough O'Conor, was slain by Conor Boy, the son of Turlough O'Conor, and by Conor, the son of Hugh Muimhneach O'Conor.

M1235.17

The Castle of Meelick was demolished by Felim O'Conor.


p.285

Annal M1236.

M1236.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1236. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-six.

M1236.1

Magrath Mac Mailin, Priest of Kilmactranny, died.

M1236.2

Hugh O'Gibellan, Priest of Kilrodan, and finally canon of Trinity Island, died on the Christmas night.

M1236.3

The Lord Justice of Ireland, Mac Maurice, summoned the English of Ireland to meet him at Ath-feorainne, at which meeting Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, was present. They all yearned to act treacherously towards Felim, although he was the gossip of the Lord Justice; and this was the reason that the meeting had been called. Felim having received intelligence and forewarning of their design, departed from the assembly; and, attended by a few horsemen, proceeded to Roscommon. He was pursued thither and as far as the bridge of Sligo; he fled to O'Donnell for protection. As they did not overtake him they committed great acts of plunder upon Teige O'Conor, and carried away many respectable women into captivity and bondage; they then proceeded to Druim Gregruighe in Moylurg, where the Lord Justice awaited their return. The meeting above mentioned was called immediately after the departure of Richard, the son of William Burke, for England.

M1236.4

After this the Lord Justice and the English returned home, leaving the government of the country to Brian, the son of Turlough O'Conor.

M1236.5

Great depredations were committed by this Brian and the soldiers of the Lord Justice on the sons of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, and others of the people of Felim. The sons of Hugh committed other depredations among the English and their own Irish enemies; so that the country was destroyed between both parties.

M1236.6

Conor, the son of Hugh Muimhneach, was slain by Manus, the son of Murtough O'Conor.

M1236.7

Mulmurry O'Laghtnan was appointed to the bishopric of Tuam, and went


p.287

to England, where he was consecrated, after having received the Pope's letters, by consent of the King of England.

M1236.8

Mac William returned from England, but whether with peace or with war was unknown.

M1236.9

Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, returned to Connaught, having been invited thither by some of the Connacians, namely, by O'Kelly, O'Flynn, the son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and the son of Art O'Melaghlin; all forming four equally strong battalions. They marched to Rindown, where Brian, the son of Turlough, Owen O'Heyne, Conor Boy, son of Turlough, and Mac Costello, had all the cows of the country. Felim's people passed over the ramparts and ditches of the island recte peninsula, and every chief of a band and head of a troop among them drove off a proportionate number of the cows, as they found them on the way before them; after which they dispersed, carrying off their booty, in different directions, and of the four battalions, leaving only four horsemen with Felim.

M1236.10

When Brian, the son of Turlough, Owen O'Heyne, and their forces, observed that Felim's people were dispersed with their spoils, they set off actively and quickly with a small party of horse and many foot-soldiers to attack Felim and his few men. Conor Boy, son of Turlough, did not perceive his situation until he came up with Rory, son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, and, mistaking him for one of his own people, he fell by him.

M1236.11

Felim (the King) strained his voice calling after his army, and commanding them to abandon the spoils and rally to fight their enemies. Many of the enemy's forces were killed in this rencounter by Felim and his people, upon the island and outside the island; all excommunicated persons and doers of


p.289

evil, excepting only Teige, son of Cormac, who was son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot. As soon as Mac William learned how O'Conor had defeated all who had turned against him, he joined him to reduce them. Dermot, the son of Manus, upon hearing this, went over to Manus, the son of Murtough O'Conor.

M1236.12

After this Mac William proceeded to Tuam da ghualann, without notice or forewarning, and thence to Mayo of the Saxons, and left neither rick nor basket of corn in the large churchyard of Mayo, or in the yard of the church of St. Michael the Archangel, and carried away eighty baskets out of the churches themselves. They afterwards went to Turlagh, on which they inflicted a similar calamity. They then sent a body of men to plunder the people of Dermot, the son of Manus, and these falling in with the people of Conor Roe, and the inhabitants of Turlagh, they plundered them all indiscriminately; and Manus was compelled to expel and banish Dermot's people from him. On the following day Conor Roe went into Mac William's house, made peace with him, and received a restoration of the prey of cows which had been taken from him; and such part of their cattle as the people of the church of Turlagh were able to recognize as their own was restored to them. Dermot, the son of Manus, also went into the house of i.e. submitted to the English, that they might spare such of his people and cattle as were then remaining with him. Mac William proceeded to Balla, where he stopped for one night, and went thence to Tuam da ghualann. He left the province of Connaught without peace or tranquillity, and without food in any church or territory within it.

M1236.13

Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died.

M1236.14

Dermot, the Son of Niall O'Rourke, was deprived of sight by Cuconnaught O'Reilly.

M1236.15

Cathal Reagh, son of Gilla-Brude O'Rourke, Lord of Hy-Briuin, died.


p.291

M1236.16

Heavy rains, harsh weather, and much war prevailed in this year.

M1236.17

The victory of Cluain Catha was gained by Felim O'Conor, over the sons of Roderic, and Conor, the son of Cormac Mac Dermot.

M1236.18

Gillapatrick Mac Gillaroid, Lord of Kinel-Aengusa, died.

M1236.19

Tearmonn Caollainne was burned by the Lord Justice.

M1236.20

O'Donnell(Donnell More) marched with an army to Iubhar Chinn Choiche in Ulidia, and destroyed every territory through which he passed: he also obtained hostages and submission from most of the Ulidians.

Annal M1237.

M1237.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1237. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-seven

M1237.1

Thomas O'Rowan, Bishop of Leyny, died.

M1237.2

Gilla-Isa Mac-an-Skealy O'Tormy, Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, died.

M1237.3

Gilla-na-necc O'Monahan died in the monastery of Boyle.

M1237.4

An army was led by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and his brothers, into Connaught, being joined by Cuconnaught O'Reilly, with all the Hy-Briuin, and by Cathal Mac Randal, with the Conmaicni, against the descendants of Roderic, namely, Brian, son of Turlough, Murtough, and Donnell, sons of Dermot, who was son of Roderic, and Conor, son of Cormac, who was son of Dermot. They went northwards across Coirrshliabh-na-Seaghsa, until they arrived at Drumraitte, in pursuit of the race of Roderic. The descendants of Roderic sent the soldiers of the Lord Justice, who were


p.293

along with them, to give battle to Felim and his forces. Felim, however, ordered his troops not to shoot at them at all, but to come to a close fight without delay. This was done according, to his order; and the soldiers did not long sustain the charge, when they were routed towards their people. A great number of them were slain, and, among the rest, Mac Mibric.

M1237.5

When the descendants of Roderic saw the flight and confusion into which their forces were thrown, they retreated from their position without the loss of a man. After this defeat, however, they were dispersed in such a manner that they had no residence in the territory of Sil-Murray. All their people were plundered by Felim, and many preys were taken from Conor, son of Cormac, in Tirerrill. They Felim's party afterwards brought their fleet on Lough Key, and drove from thence Cormac Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, and plundered all Moylurg; and the lordship of the territory and lake they gave to Donough, the son of Murtough Luath-Shuileach.

M1237.6

The Lord Justice made peace with Felim; and the five cantreds of the King were given him Felim, free of cattle-tribute, or rent.— (Vide supra, 1230.)

M1237.7

Manus, son of Dermot, who was son of Manus, was slain by Donnell, son of Dermott, who was son of Roderic O'Conor.

M1237.8

Murtough, son of Dermott, who was son of Roderic, was slain by the son of Manus, son of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor.

M1237.9

A prey was taken by Conor, son of Cormac, from Rory O'Gara, and Rory's brother was slain.

M1237.10

The hostages of Conor, the son of Cormac, were put to death by Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg.

M1237.11

A monastery for canons was commenced by Clarus Mac Mailin, on Trinity Island in Lough Oughter, under the patronage of Cathal O'Reilly.


p.295

M1237.12

The barons of Ireland went to Connaught, and commenced erecting castles there.

Annal M1238.

M1238.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1238. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-eight.

M1238.1

Felix O'Rooney, Archbishop of Tuam, after having some time before resigned his bishopric for the sake of God, and after having assumed the monastic habit in Kilmurry Mary's Abbey, in Dublin, died.

M1238.2

Donough Uaithneach, son of Hugh, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Teige, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg.

M1238.3

Donough, son of Duarcan O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, was taken prisoner by Teige, the son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg; and, while on his way to the place of confinement, he was killed in Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, by his own kinsmen, namely, the sons of Hugh O'Hara.

M1238.4

Flaherty Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, and Clann-Congail, and of Hy-Kennoda in Fermanagh, the most illustrious in Tyrone for feats of arms and hospitality, was treacherously slain by Donough Mac Cawell, his own kinsman.

M1238.5

Donough, son of Murtough Mac Dermot, went into Breifny to O'Reilly, and brought a great force with him into Connaught, and plundered the people of Cluain-Coirpthi; and many of the chiefs of Muintir-Eolais were slain in pursuit of the prey which had been taken in the country, as were also a great number of inhabitants of the Tuathas.

M1238.6

Mulrony, the son of Donough O'Dowda, was slain by Melaghlin, the son of


p.297

Conor Roe, who was son of Murtough Muimhneach, and by the son of Tiernan, who was son of Cathal Miccarain O'Conor.

M1238.7

Castles were erected in Muintir-Murchadha, in Conmaicne-Cuile, and in Carra, by the barons aforesaid.

M1238.8

An army was led by Mac Maurice, Lord Justice of Ireland, and Hugo de Lacy, Earl of Ulster, into Tyrone and Tirconnell. They deposed Mac Loughlin (Donnell), and gave the government of Tyrone to the son of O'Neill, and they themselves obtained the hostages of the north.

M1238.9

The Cloictheach of Annadown was erected.

M1238.10

Cathal Mac Reevy, Lord of Feara-Scedne, died.

Annal M1239.

M1239.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1239. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred thirty-nine.

M1239.1

Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, died.

M1239.2

The battle of Carnteel was fought by Donnell Mac Loughlin, where Donnell Tamnaighe O'Neill, Mac Mahon, Sorley O'Gormly, and Caech-Bearnais


p.299

Bearnais O'Gormly, and the chiefs of Kinel Moen, with many others, were slain. Mac Loughlin reassumed the lordship after this battle, but was deprived of it without delay.

M1239.3

Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor (King of Connaught), died.

M1239.4

Farrell, the son of Cuconnaught O'Reilly, Lord of Dartry and Clann-Fermaighe, and, according to another book, Lord of Breifny, from the mountain eastwards, was slain by Mulrony, son of Farrell, and Conor, son of Cormac Mac Dermot, after he had gone on a predatory excursion to the son of Niall, the son of Congallagh O'Rourke, on which occasion he plundered them and took their house. Murtough, son of Niall, came out on parole, but was seized and killed, immediately after the son of O'Reilly had been slain.

M1239.5

A prey was taken by the English of Ireland from O'Donnell, and they plundered Carbury; and the Lord Justice himself was awaiting them at Ballysadare, and his scouts went as far as Drumcliff.

M1239.6

Lasarina, daughter of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and the wife of O'Donnell, gave a half townland of her marriage dowry, viz., Rosbirn, to Clarus Mac Mailin, and the Canons of Trinity Island, in Lough Key, in honour of the Trinity and the Virgin Mary.

M1239.7

Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, died.

Annal M1240.

M1240.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1240. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty.

M1240.1

A monastery was founded at Waterford for Franciscan Friars by Sir Hugo Purcell.

M1240.2

Gilla-na-naev O'Dreain, Erenagh of Ardcarne, died.


p.301

M1240.3

A great army was led by Cuconnaught O'Reilly against Cormac Mac Dermot, and plundered the entire country as far as Ardcarne, and slew many people, in revenge of his son. Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh, was deposed, and Donough, the son of Murtough Mac Dermot, assumed the lordship of Moylurg.

M1240.4

Felim O'Conor went before the King of England to complain to him of the English and Irish, on which occasion he received great honour from the King; he then returned safe home.

M1240.5

Hugh, the son of Gilla-na-naev Crom O'Shaughnessy, was slain by Conor, son of Hugh, who was the son of Cathal Crovderg, and by Fiachra O'Flynn.

M1240.6

Sabia, daughter of O'Kennedy, and wife of Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, died.

M1240.7

The Monastery of Timoleague, in Carbery, in Munster, in the diocese of Ross, was founded for Franciscan Friars, by Mac Carthy Reagh, Lord of Carbery, and his own tomb was erected in the choir of the Friars. In this monastery also Barry More, O'Mahony of Carbery, and the Baron Courcy, are interred.


p.303

Annal M1241.

M1241.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1241. The age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-one.

M1241.1

Bishop O'Flaherty (i.e. Murtough), i.e. the Bishop of Annadown, died.

M1241.2

The church of the Friars Minor in Athlone was consecrated by the successor of St. Patrick.

M1241.3

Donnell More, the son of Egnaghan O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Fermanagh, and Lower Connaught, as far as the Curlieu Mountains, and of Oriel, from the plain northwards, died in the monastic habit, victorious over the world and the devil, and was interred with honour and respect in the monastery of Assaroe, in the harvest time.

M1241.4

Melaghlin O'Donnell was installed in the lordship of Tirconnell, in the place of his father. O'Neill (i.e. Brian), after having been expelled by Mac Loughlin, came to O'Donnell, and O'Donnell, with his forces, went with Brian O'Neill into Tyrone, and they gave battle to Mac Loughlin, i.e. the battle of Caimeirge, in which they slew Donnell O'Loughlin, Lord of the Kinel-Owen, and ten of his family, together with all the chieftains of the Kinel-Owen. And Brian O'Neill was then installed in the lordship of the Kinel-Owen.

M1241.5

Dermot, the son of Manus, son of Turlough More O'Conor, celebrated for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1241.6

Sitric Mageraghty, Chief of Clann-Tomalty, died.

M1241.7

Walter de Lacy, Lord of the English of Meath, and head of the council of the English of Ireland, died in England.

M1241.8

Teige, the son of Rory O'Gara, died.

M1241.9

Teige O'Conor plundered Dartry and Clann-Fearmaighe in the county of Leitrim.


p.305

M1241.10

The Lord Justice, namely, Maurice Fitzgerald, mustered a great army with which he marched into Moynai in the county of Roscommon, and plundered Fiachra O'Flynn and Donough Mac Dermot; a small party of O'Conor's people overtook them, and slew Nar Mac Gillakelly, and many others.

M1241.11

Donnell Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry, died.

M1242.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1242. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-two.

M1242.1

Donnell Mac Airten died a Canon at Kilmore.

M1242.2

A great chapter was held by the Primate of Armagh, and the abbots of the Canons Regular of Ireland, at Louth, on which occasion many of the relics which Mochta had collected, and brought from Rome, were taken up.

M1242.3

Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, Lord of the Dalcassians, tower of the splendour and greatness of the south of Ireland, and his son Turlough, died.

M1242.4

Connor O'Brien assumed the lordship of Thomond.

M1242.5

Hugh O'Conor (i.e. the Aithchleireach), son of Hugh, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Turlough, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg.

M1242.6

Brian, son of Donough O'Dowda, Lord of Tireragh, Tirawley, and Erris, was killed on the way as he was going on a pilgrimage to the Abbey of Boyle.

M1242.7

A great army was led by the Lord Justice and all the English of Ireland, with Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, into Tirconnell, in pursuit of Teige O'Conor, who had fled to Kinel-Connell. The army encamped at Drumhome, and they destroyed much on this expedition, but Teige was not abandoned to them. Teige O'Conor was afterwards taken by Cuconnaught O'Reilly, at the request of Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg.


p.307

Annal M1243.

M1243.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1243. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-three.

M1243.1

Petrus Magrath, after having retired to spend his life among the canons of Trinity Island, on Lough Key, died, and was interred on St. Martin's festival day.

M1243.2

Finaghty O'Lughadha, Coarb of St. Benen, died.

M1243.3

Malone O'Creghan Crean, Archdeacon of Tuam, after having returned across the sea as a professor, died in Dublin.

M1243.4

Cahasagh O'Snedhuisa, Deacon of Muintir-Mulrony i. e. the Mac Dermots of Moylurg, died at Ardcarne on the 10th of August.

M1243.5

Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, was set at liberty by O'Reilly, and he came with his forces to the Abbey of Boyle, and afterwards to the house of Mac Dermot (Cormac, son of Tomaltagh), whom he took prisoner, together with his wife, the daughter of Mac Carthy (viz., Edwina, daughter of Fineen), who was Teige's own mother, and gave her as wife to Cuconnaught O'Reilly, for his own ransom.

M1243.6

Teige went again on the festival of St. Martin following, with a small party, to a meeting appointed by O'Reilly. Teige was taken by treachery, and his people were slain, and he himself was kept in confinement until the festival of St. Bearach ensuing.

M1243.7

A great army was mustered by the King of England, to oppose the King of France, and he sent ambassadors to summon the English of Ireland to his aid. Among the rest went Richard, the son of William Burke, and died on that expedition.

M1243.8

Cathal, son of Hugh O'Conor, the fosterson of the O'Reillys, turned against them, and committed depredations on Murtough Mac Gilhooly in Moy-Nissi, and made a prisoner of Murtough himself, whom he afterwards put to death


p.309

at Kill-Sessin. Immediately after this he committed another predatory outrage in the territories of Clann-Fearmaighe and Dartry in the county of Leitrim.

M1243.9

In the same year Moy-Rein was plundered by Cathal, and a war broke out between O'Conor and O'Reilly.

Annal M1244.

M1244.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1244. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-four.

M1244.1

Donough (son of Fineen, the son of Melaghlin, son of Hugh, who was son of Turlough) O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin, died on the 23rd of April on Inishcloghran, and was interred in the abbey of Boyle.

M1244.2

The Archdeacon of Tuam was drowned in the Glaislinn of Cluain.

M1244.3

Donogh More O'Daly, a poet who never was and never will be surpassed, died, and was interred in the abbey of Boyle.

M1244.4

Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, was blinded and hanged by Cuconnaught O'Reilly, on the festival of St. Bearach, on Inis-na-Canaire an island, in Lough Allen, having been kept in confinement by him from the feast of St. Martin to that time. Rory, the son of Hugh, his brother, was


p.311

drowned in Cuirreen Connaughtagh, at Ath-liag-na-Sinna, on the 9th day of March, and was interred in the monastery of Cluain-tuaiscirt, with great veneration and honour.

M1244.5

Conor, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, died at the end of the first month of Spring.

M1244.6

An army was led by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, eastwards, into Breifny, against O'Reilly, to take revenge of him for his Felim's fosterson and kinsman, Teige O'Conor. They encamped for a night at Fenagh-Moy-Rein. The Coarb was not home on that night, and there was no roof on the church of Fenagh, and as there was not, a party of the troops, without the permission of their chiefs, burned some tents and huts which were within the church, and the Coarb's ward was there suffocated. The Coarb himself, on coming home next day, was greatly angered and incensed at the death of his ward, and he demanded his eric from O'Conor, who answered that he would give him his own award. ‘My award is,’ said the Coarb, ‘that you deliver up to me the very best man among you as eric, for your having burned my ward.’ ‘That is Manus, the son of Murtough Muimhneach,’ said O'Conor. ‘I am not at all,’ said Manus; ‘it is he who is head of the army.’ ‘I will not depart from you,’ said the Coarb, ‘until I obtain eric for my ward.’ The army then marched out of the town, and the Coarb followed them. They proceeded to Ath-na-Cuirre, on the River Geirctheach, but the flood had then overflowed


p.313

its banks, and they were not able to cross the ford; so they pulled down the chapel-house of St. John the Baptist, which was on the margin of the ford, that they might place its materials across the river, that the army might pass over it. Manus, the son of Murtough Muimhneach, and Conor, son of Cormac Mac Dermot, went into the house; and Manus called to the man who was on the top of the house throwing it down. ‘There,’ said he, pointing up his word, ‘is the nail which prevents the stick from falling ;’ and while he was thus speaking, the rafter of the house fell down on his own head and fractured it, so that he died immediately on the spot. He was buried outside the door of the church of Fenagh; and three times the full of Clog-na-Riogh, together with thirty horses, were given as an offering for his soul; and thus it was that the Coarb of St. Caillin obtained eric for the death of his ward. A monument of hewn stone and a beautiful cross were raised over his head, but they were broken down not long afterwards by the O'Rourkes.

M1244.7

Cormac, son of Tomaltagh, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of all the Clann-Mulrony, died in Autumn, in the habit of a Grey Friar, in the abbey of Boyle, victorious over the world and the Devil, after having been in the lordship twenty-six years.

M1244.8

Farrell Mac Tagadain was treacherously slain by Conor Mac Tiernan on Inishfree, an island in Lough Gill.

Annal M1245.

M1245.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1245. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-five.

M1245.1

Donnell O'Flanagan, Abbot of Cong, died.

M1245.2

Conor Roe, the son of Murtough Muimhneach, who was son of Turlough O'Conor, was wounded with a knife by O'Timmaith, his own steward, in consequence of an angry conversation that occurred between them at Port-na-leicce.


p.315

The steward was killed by Ivor O'Beirne; and Conor Roe was conveyed to the abbey of Boyle, where he died of the wound, after Extreme Unction and Penance, and he was interred in that monastery.

M1245.3

The castle of Sligo was erected by Maurice Fitzgerald, Lord Justice of Ireland, and by the Sil-Murray; for Felim O'Conor was ordered to erect it at his own expense, and to convey the stones, lime, and houses of Trinity Hospital thither, after the Lord Justice had granted that place to Clarus Mac Mailin, in honour of the Holy Trinity.

M1245.4

A great army was led by the King of England into Wales, he pitched his camp at the castle of Gannoc; and he invited to his aid the Lord Justice, the English of Ireland, and Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and his forces, to come to him. As soon as they had come they desolated all Wales, but obtained neither hostages nor pledges on this occasion. The King treated Felim O'Conor with great honour on this expedition.

M1245.5

The castle of Ath-an-chip on the River Shannon, on the borders of Moy-Nissi in the county of Leitrim, was erected by Myles Costello.

M1245.6

Fiachra, the son of David O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, died.

M1245.7

Carroll Boy, son of Teige, the son of Aengus Finnabhrach O'Daly, died.

M1245.8

The Castle of Suicin was erected.


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M1245.9

Randal O'Mulvey was slain by the Connacians.

M1245.10

Murtough, son of Maurice, who was son of Cathal Mac Dermot, was slain by the men of Breifny.

M1245.11

An army was led by O'Donnell (Melaghlin) against the English and Irish of Lower Connaught, and he carried away many cows and other property on that expedition.

Annal M1246.

M1246.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1246. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-six.

M1246.1

John O'Hughroin, son of the Coarb of Mochua, Bishop of Elphin, died in Rath-Aedha-mic-Bric.

M1246.2

John Fitz-Geoffry came to Ireland as Lord Justice, and Maurice Fitzgerald was deprived.

M1246.3

Drumlahan was burned in this year.

M1246.4

Melaghlin, son of Conor Roe, the son of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor, was slain by O'Dowda (Murtough), who was banished over sea after the commission of that deed.

M1246.5

Maurice Fitzgerald marched with an army into Tirconnell: he gave the


p.319

half of Tirconnell to Cormac, son of Dermot, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, and obtained hostages from O'Donnell for the other half. These hostages he left in the castle of Sligo.

M1246.6

O'Donnell (Melaghlin), and the chiefs of the Kinel-Connell, came on All-Saints' day to Sligo, and burned the bawn, but were not able to make their way into the castle; upon which the people of the castle hanged the hostages in their presence, having suspended them from the top of the castle, i.e. O'Mianain, the tutor of O'Donnell, and another who was his foster-brother.

M1246.7

Murrough O'Hanlon, Lord of the Oriors, was put to death by command of Brian O'Neill.

M1246.8

Hugh, son of Hugh O'Conor, was taken prisoner and plundered.

M1246.9

Turlough, the son of Hugh O'Conor, made his escape from the Crannog wooden house of Lough Leisi in Autumn, having drowned his keepers, namely, Cormac O'Murray, and the two O'Ainmireachs. He was again taken while under the protection of the Bishop of Cluain Clonfert, and, being given up into the hands of the English, was confined in the castle of Athlone.

M1246.10

Albert, the German, Archbishop of Armagh, was translated to Hungary.

Annal M1247.

M1247.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1247. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-seven.

M1247.1

Conor O'Murray, Bishop of Hy-Fiachraclh Aidhne Kilmacduaggh, died at Bristol.

M1247.2

Hugh Mac Conchaille, Abbot of Clones, died.

M1247.3

Melaghlin O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Kinel-Moen, Inishowen, and Fermanagh, was slain by Maurice Fitzgerald. He was enabled to accomplish this in the following manner: A great army was led by Maurice Fitzgerald,


p.321

and the other English chiefs, first to Sligo, and thence to the Cataract of Aedh Roe, the son of Badharn. Cormac, the son of Dermot, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, joined his muster. This was on the Wednesday after the festival of SS. Peter and Paul. O'Donnell assembled the Kinel-Connell and Kinel-Owen against them, so that they did not allow a single man, either English or Irish, to cross the ford of Ath-Seanaigh for a whole week. The English then bethought them of sending Cormac O'Conor with a large body of cavalry westwards along the plain, who was to turn southwards through the plain, and then eastwards along the borders of the bog, unperceived by any one, until he should arrive at Bel-atha-Culuain a ford on the Erne. This was accordingly done, and the Kinel-Connell knew nothing of the movement until they saw the body of cavalry advancing on their rear, on their side of the river; they then turned round to them. When the English saw that the attention of the Kinel-Connell was directed towards the cavalry who had advanced on their rear, they rushed across the ford against them, being confident that they the

p.323

Kinel-Connell
would not be able to attend to the attacks of both. The Kinel-Connell were now in the very centre of their enemies, who had surrounded them on every side. O'Donnell was slain on the spot, as well as the Cammhuinealach Wry-necked O'Boyle, the head Chieftain of the Three Tuathas, Mac Sorley, Lord of Argyle, and other chiefs of the Kinel-Connell. A great number of Fitzgerald's forces were slain and drowned here; others of them were drowned northwards in the River Finn, and many others at Termon Daveog, in pursuit of preys that fled before them; and among the rest William Britt, sheriff of Connaught, and his brother, a young knight. The country was then plundered and desolated by them the English, and they left the chieftainship of the Kinel-Connell to Rory O'Canannan on this occasion.

M1247.4

Eachmarcach O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by Manus O'Kane, after having gone on a predatory excursion into his country as far as Armoy in Dal-Riada.

M1247.5

Turlough, the son of Hugh O'Conor, made his escape from Athlone.

M1247.6

Miles Mac Costello took possession of Feadha Conmaicne, and expelled Cathal Mac Rannall from thence: the Crannóg of Claenlough was also taken for him, and he left those who had taken it to guard it for him. Hereupon Cathal and Turlough, two sons of Hugh O'Conor, rose up to assist Mac Rannall in expelling Mac Costello from Feadha-Conmaicne. They retook the Crannog and the Lake, and demolished the castle of Leckderg on the Saturday before Whit-Sunday; and Turlough went to Trinity Island, to Clarus Mac Mailin, the Erenagh, for the English were not willing to come out of the castle, except on the condition that the Erenagh would protect and escort them westwards across the Shannon to Tuaim-mna. Soon afterwards they went away with Clarus, and the Clann-Costello were all expelled from that country.


p.325

M1247.7

A great war was kindled by Turlough, the son of Hugh O'Conor, and Donough, the son of Anmchadh O'Gillapatrick of Ossory, against the English of Connaught. Turlough assembled the sons of the lords of Connaught, with whom he proceeded to Fiodh-Ua-n-Diarmada and Muintir-Fahy, where they slew many persons. From thence they marched to the castle of Bungalvy Galway, and burned the town and the castle. Many persons were destroyed by them, with Mac Elget, Seneschal of Connaught, who was killed by the aforesaid Donough, the son of Anmchadh. The English afterwards pursued them, and gave them battle, in which a number of the English were slain; and the Irish retreated in despite of them into Carra, where Jordan de Exeter, the Clann-Adam, and the English of Carra, assembled against Turlough. Turlough left the country to them, as he had not forces equal to their's.

M1247.8

Buirges Chinntrachta was burned by Teige, son of Connor Roe, and Teige, son of Tuathal, who was son of Murtough Muimhneach. The English of Connaught had not for a long time before experienced such a war as was waged with them by the Roydamnas the royal heirs presumptive on this occasion; for there was not a district or cantred of the possessions of the English in Connaught which they did not plunder and devastate.

M1247.9

Roscommon and Ardcarne were burned by the English.

M1247.10

Finola, daughter of Roderic O'Conor, died at Conga-Fechin Cong.

M1247.11

O'Dowda and O'Boyle brought a fleet to plunder Carbury; and the crew of one ship, under the command of Manus O'Boyle, were drowned at Inis-Tuathrass.


p.327

M1247.12

Teige, the son of Conor Roe, burned Inishmore in Claenlough, on which occasion twenty-eight of the English were also burned.

M1247.13

A monastery was founded in Galway, in the archdiocese of Tuam, by William Burke, Lord of Clanrickard, for Franciscan friars. Many tombs were erected in this monastery by the chief families of the town.

M1247.14

The monastery of Ennis, in Thomond, in the diocese of Killaloe, was founded by O'Brien, and in this monastery is the burial-place of the race of Brian.

M1247.15

A great army was led by the son of Maurice Fitzgerald and the English to Assaroe at Ballyshannon, at the desire of Godfrey O'Donnell. Rory O'Canannan, with the Kinel-Connell, came against them, and the English were unable to do him any injury, or to proceed furthur on that occasion.

Annal M1248.

M1248.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1248. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-eight.

M1248.1

Dermot O'Cuana, the great priest of Elphin, died, and was buried at Kilmore.

M1248.2

Master Gilbert O'Carroll died.

M1248.3

Opichin Guer was slain by Gilla-Mochoinne O'Cahill.

M1248.4

The son of Manus and the son of Conor Roe rose up together against the English. The castle of Mac Henry, i.e. of Piers Poer, was burned by them, and its constable was taken prisoner. They carried the spoils of the north of Umallia along with them to the islands called Inse Modha. Jordan de Exeter, John Butler, Robin Lawless, and many others, assembled, and marched to Ballytoberpatrick, and from thence to Aghagower; and, on the next day,


p.329

they plundered Umallia north and south. Henry came with a numerous army into Umallia (his own country), for his residence was there. Pierce Poer, the son of Henry, made peace with Donnell, son of Manus, and Donnell promised that he would give him men and vessels to attack his kinsmen.

M1248.5

As to the sons of O'Conor, who were on the islands of Inse Modh, they received information that a body of men had gone from the son of Henry Poer to Donnell, for the purpose of bringing his ships; and O'Conor's sons, on learning this, went forth and killed O'Huain, son of the Englishwoman, and John, the son of the English priest. In the affray, Sinnott Guer, and a number of his people, were also slain by Dermot, the son of Manus; but this was a victory without triumph, for Dermot himself, the son of Manus, that valiant hero and stay in battle, was killed on the spot.

M1248.6

Teige, son of Conor Roe, was killed by the English. This Teige had been the dread and terror of such of the English and Irish as were opposed to him up to his death.

M1248.7

An army was led by Maurice Fitzgerald into Tirconnell, where he engaged in conflicts and committed great depredations and plunders. He banished Rory O'Canannan into Tyrone, and left the lordship of Kinel-Connell to Godfrey, the son of Donnell O'Donnell.

M1248.8

The Kinel-Owen and O'Canannan mustered a body of forces and marched into Tirconnell, and gave battle to Godfrey and the Kinel-Connell, on which expedition Rory O'Canannan and many others were slain.

M1248.9

Another army was led by the Lord Justice of Ireland into Tyrone, against O'Neill. The Kinel-Owen held a council, in which they agreed that, as the English of Ireland had, at this time, the ascendancy over the Irish, it would be advisable to give them hostages, and to make peace with them for the sake of their country. It was on this expedition that the English erected the bridge of the Bann, and the castle of Druim Tairsigh.


p.331

M1248.10

Brien O'Neill, Lord of Tyrone, brought vessels small boats, from Lough Foyle into Magh-Ithe, and across Termon Daveog, until he reached Lough Erne, where he committed great depredations, and demolished a castle.

M1248.11

The entire of Conmaicne-mara Conamara was plundered by the English. The English went upon an expedition against O'Flaherty, who defeated them, and killed numbers of them.

M1248.12

Murtough O'Dowda, that is, the Aithchleireach, Lord of the tract of country extending from Kildarvilla to the Strand, was killed by the son of Felim O'Conor.

M1248.13

William Burke died in England. His body was brought over to Ireland, and buried at Athassel.

M1248.14

The King of France went to Jerusalem in defence of Christianity.

M1248.15

John Tyrrell was slain by Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell.

M1248.16

Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg, gave, by order of Teige O'Monahan, Rathna-Romhanach to the canons of Kilmore, in the honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Augustine.

M1248.17

Auliffe, son of Cathal Reagh O'Rourke, was treacherously slain by Cathal Carrach Mac Donough.

M1248.18

Faghartach O'Devlin, Lord of Corran in the county of Sligo, died.

M1248.19

Raighned, Archbishop of Armagh, came from Rome, bringing with him a pallium, in which he said Mass at Armagh on the festival of SS. Peter and Paul.


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Annal M1249.

M1249.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1249. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred forty-nine.

M1249.1

Mulmurry O'Laghtnan, Archbishop of Tuam, a proficient in the canon law, died in winter, a short time before Christmas.

M1249.2

Andreas Mac Gillager, Coarb of Fechin, died.

M1249.3

Mulkieran O'Lenaghan, a noble priest of Tuam-mna, who kept a house of hospitality for the clergy and the laity, died on the way as he was going to Ardcarne, to hear a sermon, on the Friday before Lammas, and was interred with pomp and honour on Trinity Island, in Lough Key.

M1249.4

Conn O'Flanagan, Prior of Kilmore of the Shannon, died.

M1249.5

More, daughter of Donough O'Dowda, and wife of Gilla-Muinelach O'Boyle, died.

M1249.6

Teige O'Monahan, Lord of Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, died on the 6th day of June, and was buried at Kilmore-na-Sinna.

M1249.7

Fineen Mac Carthy made a great war on the English of Desmond, and inflicted many evils upon them.

M1249.8

Pierce Poer, the son of Henry, David Trew, and a number of young men, went, along with Mac Feorais, into Connaught, to the castle of Sligo. The son of Felim O'Conor marched to meet them, and a fierce battle was fought, in which Pierce Poer, David Trew, and many of the youths aforesaid, were slain; and their bodies were carried to Ballysadare for interment.

M1249.9

As to the son of Felim, he proceeded after this to Tireragh, and through Mac Feorais's country, which he entirely plundered from the Moy to Traigh Eothuile-an-tsaoir.


p.335

Gereoitin Mac Feorais pursued them i.e. the son of Felim and his forces, overtook Donough, the son of Manus, and wounded him; he was also taken, after being wounded, and led captive to Dun Contreathain. The son of Felim afterwards followed them, killed Gereoitin, and rescued and carried with him the son of Manus, who afterwards died of his wounds. He was a great loss.

M1249.10

Mac Maurice Fitzgerald mustered an army, and, proceeding into Connaught, took from the son of Felim as much of the preys as he could overtake. When Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, heard that an English muster was in his neighbourhood, and reflected on the great injuries which his son had done to the English, he adopted the resolution of sending his moveable property eastwards across the Shannon into Breifny, and into the north of Ireland. The Lord Justice then assembled the English of Meath and Leinster, who marched a great army across the bridge of Athlone, and thence into Sil-Murray; and Mac Maurice Fitzgerald, on the other side, had with him the English of Connaught and Munster. Both these armies, having first plundered


p.337

Sil-Murray on their route, proceeded to Elphin, and, having sent for Torlough, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, they elected him King in the place of Felim, the son of Cathal. They afterwards plundered Breifny, and committed many injuries there in every direction, and carried away from thence innumerable spoils. They were twenty nights and days in Sil-Murray ravaging it, so that they plundered Lough Key, with its islands, and also the Rock. The Lord Justice then went to Meath, and the son of Maurice to Sligo, leaving Torlough in charge of Sil-Murray.

M1249.11

An army was led by the Roydamnas heirs presumptive of Connaught, namely, Turlough and Hugh, two sons of Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, to Athenry, on Lady Day in mid-autumn, to burn and plunder it. The sheriff of Connaught was in the town before them, with a great number of the English. The English demanded a truce for that day from the sons of the King of Connaught, in honour of the Blessed virgin Mary, it being her festival day; but this they did not obtain from them; and although Turlough forbade his troops to assault the town, the chiefs of the army would not consent, but determined to make the attack, in spite of him. When Jordan and the English saw this, they marched out of the town, armed and clad in mail, against the Irish army. The youths of the latter army, on seeing them drawn up in battle array, were seized with fear and dismay, so that they were routed; and this was through the miracles of the Blessed Virgin Mary, on whose festival they had refused to grant the truce demanded from them. Of their chiefs were here killed Hugh, son of Hugh O'Conor; Dermot Roe, son of Cormac O'Melaghlin, the two sons of O'Kelly; Brian an Doire, the son of Manus; Carragh Inshiubhail, son of Niall O'Conor; Boethius Mac Egan; the two sons of Loughlin O'Conor; Donnell, son of Cormac Mac Dermot; Finnanach Mac Branan; Cumumhan Mac Cassarly, and others besides.

M1249.12

Donough O'Gillapatrick, i.e. the son of Anmchadh, son of Donough, one of the Ossorians, was killed by the English. This was a retaliation due to the English; for, up to that time, he had killed, burned, and destroyed many


p.339

of them. This Donough was, of the Irish, the third greatest plunderer of the English: the three plunderers were Conor O'Melaghlin, Conor Mac Coghlan, surnamed of the Castles, and the son of Anmchadh, viz., this Donough Fitzpatrick. He was in the habit of going about to reconnoitre their market towns, in the guise of a pauper, or a carpenter, or a turner, or poet, or of one carrying on the trade of a merchant, as was said in the following quatrain.
    1. He is a carpenter, he is a turner,
      My nursling is a bookman,
      He is selling wine and hides,
      Where he sees a gathering.

M1249.13

Dunmore was burned by the sons of the King of Connaught.

M1249.14

An army was led by O'Donnell (Godfrey), into Lower Connaught, and he destroyed and ravaged that tract of country reaching from the Curlieu Mountains to the Moy, and returned safe and in triumph, carrying with him great spoils and many hostages.

Annal M1250.

M1250.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1250. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty.

M1250.1

Thomas O'Meallaigh, Bishop of Annadown, died.

M1250.2

The Bishop of Imleach Iubhair Emly died.

M1250.3

Congalagh Mac Kidnel, Bishop of Breifny Kilmore, died.

M1250.4

Turlough, son of Mortough Muimhneach O'Conor, Prior of the church of SS. Peter and Paul, died.

M1250.5

Felim O'Conor came from the north, with a numerous force, out of Tyrone; he marched into Breifny, and thence into the Tuathas, accompanied by Conor, son of Tiernan O'Conor; thence into Hy-Many, and they expelled Turlough out of Connaught, who again went over to the English. He Felim then collected all the moveable property of Connaught, and proceeded with it down across Sliabh Seaghsa the Curlieu Mountains, but the English sent messengers


p.341

after him, and, a peace being concluded between them, his kingdom was again restored to him.

M1250.6

The hostages of Connaught were blinded by the English at Athlone.

M1250.7

A great depredation was committed by Felim on Cathal O'Conor, and the latter was driven out of Connaught.

M1250.8

Carbry O'Melaghlin was treacherously slain by David Roche.

M1250.9

Dermot O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died in prison, where he had been confined by Fitzgerald.

M1250.10

A great army was led by Maurice Fitzgerald, Cathal O'Reilly, Cuconnaught O'Reilly, and all the other chiefs of Hy-Briuin, into Tyrone, and remained three nights at Tullaghoge, where they sustained much injury and hardship, but obtained no pledges or hostages from the O'Neills on this expedition. On their return into Tirconnell Maurice Fitzgerald took O'Canannan, Lord of the Kinel-Connell, prisoner, under protection of Bishop O'Carolan. He was afterwards killed as he was trying to make his escape from them.

M1250.11

Fineen Florence Mac Carthy was slain by the English of Desmond.

Annal M1251.

M1251.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1251. The Age of Christ, one thousand two bundred fiftty-one.

M1251.1

Raighned, Archbishop of Armagh, went on a pilgrimage to Rome.

M1251.2

Florentius Mac Flynn was, on Christmas Day, consecrated Archbishop of Tuam, for his wisdom and learning.

M1251.3

A monastery was founded at Kilnamullagh, in the diocese of Cork, by Barry, who chose a burial place for his family in it.

M1251.4

Gilla Mochoinne, son of Gilla Mochoinne O'Cahill, was slain by Conor, son of Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg.


p.343

M1251.5

Teige, son of Tuathal, who was son of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor was slain by the English.

M1251.6

The two sons of Rory O'Neill were slain in Kilmore-O'Neilland.

M1251.7

Ardgal O'Laverty, the lamp of the valour and hospitality of the north of Ireland, died.

M1251.8

Gilchreest O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, and his brother, were slain by Kellagh Balbh the Stammering O'Boyle.

M1251.9

Donough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by the men of Oriel.

M1251.10

Ivor Mac Madden, Chief of Clann-Ruadhrach, was slain.

M1251.11

Conor, son of Cormac, who was son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, illustrious for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1251.12

Flaherty O'Carroll, Chief of Calry, was slain by Art, son of Art O'Rourke.

M1251.13

Murray O'Teige died.

M1251.14

On the festival of SS. Peter and Paul, a great shower of rain fell in Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, so that a large boat might have sailed round the town of Kilmore-na-Sinna; and a mill might grind on the stream which ran from the hill down to the ford of Ath-na-faithche, at Fenagh, during the time that vespers were being chaunted.

M1251.15

Flann O'Laghtnan, Chief of the Two Bacs, died.


p.345

M1252.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1252. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-two.

M1252.1

Maelmaedhóg O'Beollain, Coarb of Columbkille, at Drumcliff, a man of great esteem and wealth, the most illustrious for hospitality, and the most honoured and venerated by the English and Irish in his time, died.

M1252.2

The castle of Caol-Uisce was erected by Maurice Fitzgerald, as was also the castle of Moy-Cova.

M1252.3

Conor O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire in the county of Donegal, tower of the hospitality and feats of arms of the north, died.

M1252.4

Conor Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry in Tyrone, and many other territories, and peace-maker of Tirconnell, Tyrone, and Oriel, was slain by the people of Brian O'Neill, while defending his protegees against them, he himself being under the protection of O'Gormly and O'Kane.

M1252.5

Cuconnaught Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, died.

M1252.6

Gilla-Isa O'Carroll, Chief of Calry of Drumcliffe, died.

M1252.7

Manus Mac Gilduff, Chief of Tullygarvey, died.

M1252.8

The Lord Justice of Ireland came to Armagh with a very numerous army, and proceeded thence to Iveagh, from which he marched back to Cluain-Fiachna. Brian O'Neill and his brother made submission to him, and Rory


p.347

O'Neill was given up to him as a hostage. It was on this expedition a riot took place between the men of Meath and the men of Munster, in the English camp at Dundalk, and many of the men of Munster were killed.

M1252.9

Great heat and drought prevailed in this Summer, so that people crossed the beds of the principal rivers of Ireland with dry feet. The reaping of the corn crops of Ireland was going on twenty days before Lammas the 1st of August, and the trees were scorched by the heat of the sun.

M1252.10

New money was ordered by the King of England to be made coined in Ireland, and the money previously in use was discontinued.

M1252.11

Murrough O'Fallon, High Constable of Connaught, was slain in Moy-Rein by the men of Breifny.

M1252.12

Godfrey O'Donnell made a predatory incursion into Tyrone, and took many cows and prisoners, but was overtaken as he was leaving the country by Brian O'Neill, and a fierce battle was fought between them, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and left behind many heads, with a great number of their chieftains i.e. as prisoners.

Annal M1253.

M1253.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1253. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-three.

M1253.1

Alinn O'Sullivan, Bishop of Lismore, died.

M1253.2

David, the son of Kellagh O'Gillapatrick, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, died and Thomas O'Quin, a friar minor, was consecrated at Rome as his successor.

M1253.3

Gilla-Kelly O'Ruaidhin, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach Killala, died, and John O'Laidig, a friar of the order of St. Dominic, was elected to succeed him at Killala in Hy-Fiachrach, and the degree of Bishop conferred on him at Tuam, on the second Sunday in Lent.

M1253.4

A monastery for Dominican Friars was founded at Sligo.


p.349

M1253.5

Another monastery for the same order of friars was founded at Ath-Leathan in Leyny.

M1253.6

A palace was erected by Tomaltagh O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin, at Killtesin.

M1253.7

Owen O'Heyne, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne, died.

M1253.8

The daughter of the Earl of Ulster, wife of Miles Mac Costello, died, and was interred in the Abbey of Boyle.

M1253.9

A great hosting by the English of Ireland, under the command of Mac Maurice (Fitzgerald), and they marched into Tyrone against O'Neill; but, far from obtaining either hostages or pledges from him, they were cut off with very great slaughter on that occasion.

M1253.10

A great war was waged with the English by Brian O'Neill, Chief of Kinel-Owen. He marched to Moy-Cova, the castle of which, with a great number of other castles, he demolished. He also burned Sradbhaile, and desolated Machaire-Uladh.

M1253.11

An incursion was made by Donnell O'Reilly and the Caech Monoculus O'Reilly, Cathal O'Conor, and Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, into Muintir-Eolais, against Cathal Mac Rannall, and they plundered the entire country. They remained two nights encamped at Tulach-alainn, and stopped the third night at Annaghduff, where Gilla-na-naev separated from the others. The O'Reillys and Cathal O'Conor then marched to Cluain-Conmaicne where they remained


p.351

encamped for a night. When Hugh, the son of Felim, heard this, he quickly assembled his forces, and followed them to Cluain. They gave each a fierce battle, in which the Muintir-Reilly were defeated, and Donough, son of Gilla-Isa, the son of Donough O'Reilly, the son of Gilla-Toedog O'Biobhsaigh, and many others, were slain.

M1253.12

The Franciscan monastery of Ardfert was founded by Fitzmaurice of Kerry.

Annal M1254.

M1254.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1254. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-four.

M1254.1

Maelfinnen O'Beollain, Coarb of Drumcliff, died.

M1254.2

Murrough O'Melaghlin was slain by the son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny.

M1254.3

Aindiles O'Henery, tower of the valour of the north of Ireland, died.

M1254.4

Pierce Pramister, Lord of Conmaicne, of Dunmore, died.

M1254.5

The Dominican monastery of Ath-leathan Ballylahan, in the county of Mayo was totally destroyed by fire.

M1254.6

Pierce Ristubart, Lord of Sil-Mailruain, and a baron, was slain on Lough Ree, by Murrough O'Melaghlin.

M1254.7

Sitric Mac Shanly was taken prisoner by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, who also caused Sean-Shuileach Mac Shanly to be blinded, for he had been told that they were forming treacherous plots against him.

M1254.8

Donough, son of Donough, who was son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, and Auliffe O'Biobhsaigh, were slain by the Connacians, at Cluain-Conmaicne.

M1254.9

Manus O'Gara was unjustly slain by the people of the son of Felim O'Conor.


p.353

M1254.10

The King of France returned from Jerusalem, after having concluded a three years' peace between the Christians and the Saracens.

M1254.11

The Green Monastery at Kildare was founded by the Earl of Kildare; and they his family have a superb tomb in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary in this monastery.

Annal M1255.

M1255.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1255. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-five.

M1255.1

Donslevy O'Flynn, Abbot of the Church of SS. Peter and Paul at Armagh, died, and Patrick O'Murray, Prior of the same house, was elected to the abbacy.

M1255.2

Thomas Mac Dermot, Erenagh of Elphin, died; he was parson of Moylurg, Airteach, and Clann-Cuain.

M1255.3

O'Laidig, Erenagh of Annadown, died.

M1255.4

Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, went to Tyrone, and made peace between his own father and the people of the North of Ireland; and he brought with him from the north all the Connacians who were there in a state of disturbance; he brought them, with their moveables, through the midst of his bitterest enemies, viz. the sons of Roderic O'Conor and the English, who did not dare to molest them.

M1255.5

Mac Carroll assumed the archbishopric of Cashel, in Munster.

M1255.6

Florence Mac Flynn, Archbishop of Tuam, crossed the sea to converse with


p.355

the King of England; and all that he requested was obtained by him from the king's honour; and he returned home again.

M1255.7

Mahon O'Monahan was slain at Buimlinn.

M1255.8

Dermot O'Quin, Auliffe, his son, together with the chiefs of Muintir Gillagan, were slain at Faradhan Moighe Treagha, by Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, who afterwards pillaged their territory.

M1255.9

A great meeting took place at Tochar Mona Coinneadha between O'Conor Felim and Mac William Burke. A peace was concluded between them, and all his conditions were conceded to Felim.

M1255.10

Juliana, daughter of the Coarb of St. Caillin, and Gilla-na-naev, his brother died.

M1255.11

Ranailt, daughter of O'Farrell, died in a bath.

Annal M1256.

M1256.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1256.

M1256.1

The age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-six.

M1256.2

Flann Mac Flynn died in Bristol.

M1256.3

The Archbishop of Dublin died.

M1256.4

Gilla-an-Choimhdheadh O'Kinnfaela, Abbot of Annadown, died.

M1256.5

O'Gillaran, Abbot of Trinity Church at Tuam, died.

M1256.6

A party of the O'Reilly family were slain by Hugh, the son of Felim O'Conor, namely, Cathal O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir-Maelmora, and of all the race of Hugh Finn; his two sons, namely, Donnell Roe and Niall; his brother, Cuconnaught; the three sons of Cathal Duff O'Reilly, namely, Godfrey, Farrell, and Donnell; Annadh, son of Donnell O'Reilly, who was slain by Conor Mac


p.357

Tiernan; Niall, i.e. the Caech Monoculus O'Reilly; Tiernan Mac Brady; Gilla-Michael Mac Taichligh; Donough O'Biobhsaigh; Manus, son of Mac Gilduff; and upwards of sixty others of the chiefs of their people were slain along with them. This engagement is called the Battle of Moy Slecht, and was fought on the margin of Athderg, at Alt-na-heillte, over Bealach-na-beithe.

M1256.7

The O'Reillys, however, slew a number of the chiefs of the opposite forces, namely, Dermot O'Flanagan, Flann Mageraghty, Murrough Finn, O'Farrell, and many others besides: their glaslaiths recruits even forced the van of the adverse army to give way three times, but they were at length overpowered by the main body. It was at Sailtean-na-nGasan that the van of that army first came up with the O'Reillys, from which place they pursued them to Ait-Tighe-Mec-Cuirrin, and from thence to the field of the great battle.

M1256.8

A Justiciary arrived in Ireland from the King of England. He and Hugh O'Conor held a conference at Rinn Duin, where a peace was ratified between them, on condition that so long as he should be Justiciary, the territory or lands of O'Conor in Connaught should not be circumscribed.

M1256.9

Rory O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha in the County Mayo, was slain by David, son of Richard Cuisin. Hugh, the son of Felim O'Conor, plundered the territory of the son of Richard Cuisin, in revenge of O'Gara; he demolished his castle, and killed all the people that were in it, and seized on all the islands of Lough Techet.


p.359

M1256.10

Randal Mac Brannan, Lord of Corcachlann, died.

M1256.11

Mac William Burke set out on a predatory expedition against Rory O'Flaherty. He plundered Gno-More and Gno-Beg, and took possession of all Lough Oirbsion Lough Corrib.

M1256.12

Donncahy Mac Shanly died in the Abbey of Boyle.

M1256.13

A great war broke out between Hugh O'Conor and Con O'Rourke i.e. the son of Tiernan, though they had been till then upon amicable terms with each other. O'Rourke afterwards went to the English, and formed a league of peace with them for himself and his people, without the permission so to do by Felim or his son. Hugh O'Conor the son of Felim afterwards, to wit, on the Wednesday before Christmas Day, plundered O'Rourke. They afterwards made peace with each other.

M1256.14

Athlone and Dun-doighre were burned on the one day.

M1256.15

O'Donnell, i.e. Godfrey, marched with an army into Fermanagh, by which he obtained property and hostages. From thence he proceeded to Breifny-O'Rourke, where they gave him his own demand.

Annal 1257M.

M1257.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1257. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-seven.

M1257.1

Mac Robias, Abbot of Clones, died.

M1257.2

Murray, son of Maelbrighde O'Faircheallaigh, Coarb of Maidoc, died.

M1257.3

Maelpatrick Mac Kele, Erenagh of Killala, was slain.


p.361

M1257.4

Thomas O'Mulkieran, the most eminent man in Ireland for wisdom, died.

M1257.5

The monastery of the Virgin Mary, at Roscommon, was consecrated by Bishop Tomaltagh O'Conor, for Dominican friars.

M1257.6

Con, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, went into the house of O'Conor and his son, and ratified a treaty of peace with them, and gave them as much of the land of Breifny as they desired to have, together with the fortress of Cloch-inse-na-dtorc, in Lough Finvoy, in which Hugh, son of Felim, placed guards.

M1257.7

Cathal Cairceach, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, and Hugh, son of Conor, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, were blinded by Hugh, son of Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg; and this was done through envy and rancour, and in violation of the guarantees of the laity, clergy, and relics of Connaught.

M1257.8

Con, son of Cathal O'Reilly, Chief of Muintir-Maelmora, died.

M1257.9

Cloch-inse-na-dtorc, in Lough Finvoy, was burned by O'Rourke, those who guarded it being first permitted to come out of it.

M1257.10

Sitric, son of Ualgarg O'Rourke, was elected chief of his tribe, by Hugh O'Conor, in preference to Conor, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, in consequence of which Donnell, son of Conor, killed Sitric.

M1257.11

A conference was held by Felim O'Conor at Athlone, with the Lord Justice of Ireland, with Mac William Burke and the other English chiefs, and they made peace with one another.

M1257.12

A great depredation was committed by Hugh O'Conor on O'Rourke about Easter.

M1257.13

A brave battle was fought by Godfrey O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, in defence of his country, with the Lord Justice of Ireland, Maurice Fitzgerald, and the other English nobles of Connaught, at Creadran-Cille in Ros-cede, in the territory of Carbury, to the north of Sligo. A desperate and furious battle was fought between them: bodies were mangled, heroes were disabled, and the senses were stunned on both sides. The field was vigorously maintained


p.363

by the Kinel-Connell, who made such obstinate and vigorous onsets upon the English that, in the end, they routed them with great slaughter. Godfrey himself, however, was severely wounded; for he met Maurice Fitzgerald face to face in single combat, in which they wounded each other severely. In consequence of the success of this battle, the English and the Geraldines were driven out of Lower Connaught.

M1257.14

On the same day Mac Griffin, an illustrious knight, was taken prisoner by O'Donnell's people; and Sligo was afterwards burned and totally plundered by them. Donough, the son of Cormac O'Donnell, was killed in the heat of this battle of Creadran. They (O'Donnell's people) then returned home in consequence of O'Donnell's wounds; but, were it not that his wounds had oppressed him, he would have routed his enemies to the River Moy. Godfrey, on his return, prostrated and demolished the castle which had been erected by the English a short time before, at Cael-uisce, to carry on the war against the Kinel-Connell.

M1257.15

Maurice Fitzgerald, for some time Lord Justice of Ireland, and the destroyer of the Irish, died.

M1257.16

The King of England granted Felim O'Conor a charter to hold the five cantreds of the King.

M1257.17

A great war between Conor O'Brien and the English of Munster; and the English were slaughtered by him. Teige O'Brien also committed great depredations upon them.

M1257.18

Conor, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, was treacherously slain at Ath-na-failme by Gillabarry O'Lamhduibh, one of his own people, and by the people of Matthew O'Reilly.

M1257.19

Cathal O'Monahan died on the 6th of December.


p.365

Annal M1258.

M1258.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1258. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred, fifty-eight.

M1258.1

Abraham O'Conallan, Archbishop of Armagh, received a Pallium from the Court of Rome, in which he said Mass, at Armagh, on the 2nd day of the month of June.

M1258.2

Walter de Salerna, Archbishop of Tuam, and Great Dean of London, died in England, having been elected to those dignities in the preceding year by the King of England.

M1258.3

Tomaltagh O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin, was elected Archbishop of Tuam.

M1258.4

Gilchreest O'Carmacan, Deacon of Elphin, died.

M1258.5

The monk O'Curnin, a pious sage, died.

M1258.6

Matthew, son of Gillaroe O'Rodiv, i.e. the Master Professor, died.

M1258.7

The Bishop's palace at Elphin, and the palace of Kilsesin, were demolished by Hugh O'Conor.

M1258.8

O'Donnell (Godfrey) had now, for the space of a year, after having fought the battle of Creadran, been lying on his death-bed in an island in Loch-Beathach. When O'Neill i.e. Brian obtained intelligence of this, he collected his forces together for the purpose of marching into Tirconnell, and sent messengers to O'Donnell to demand hostages, pledges, and submission, from the Kinel-Connell, as they had no capable chieftain since the disabling of Godfrey. When the messengers delivered their message to O'Donnell, they returned back with all the speed they could exert.

M1258.9

O'Donnell ordered the Kinel-Connell to assemble from all quarters and come to him; and after they had assembled at the summons of their lord, he ordered them, as he was not able to march with them, to make for him the bier wherein his body would finally be borne, and to place him in it, and carry him in the midst of his people. He told them to exert their bravery, as he himself was among them, and not to suffer the might of their enemies to prevail


p.367

over them. They then, by order of their lord, proceeded on their march against O'Neill's army; and the two armies met face to face, at the river called Suileach. They attacked each other, without regard to friendship or kindred, until the Tyronian army was discomfited and driven back, leaving behind them many men, horses, and a great quantity of valuable property. On the return of the Tirconnelian army from this victory, the bier on which O'Donnell was carried was laid down in the street of Congbhail, and here his soul departed, from the venom of the scars and wounds which he had received in the battle of Creadran. This was not death in cowardice, but the death of a hero, who had at all times triumphed over his enemies.

M1258.10

When O'Neill heard of the death of O'Donnell, he again sent messengers to the Kinel-Connell, to demand hostages and submission from them. Hereupon the Kinel-Connell held a council, to deliberate on what they should do, and as to which of their own (petty) chiefs they would yield submission and obedience, as they had no certain lord since Godfrey died. Whilst they were engaged in such speeches, they saw approaching Donnell Oge, the son of Donnell More O'Donnell, a valiant youth, then eighteen years of age, who had arrived from Scotland, and the Kinel-Conell immediately conferred the chieftainship upon him. This they lawfully did, as he was their own legitimate and worthy lord. When the Kinel-Connell told him of the message which the emissaries of O'Neill had brought them, he deemed it extravagant and exorbitant. It was on this occasion he repeated the celebrated proverb, in the Albanian Gaelic, in which he conferred with the emissaries, namely, ‘That every man should have his own world.’ Similar to the coming of Tuathal Teachtmhar over the sea from Scotland, after the extirpation of the royal race of Ireland by the Attacots, was this coming of Donnell Oge, to consolidate the


p.369

monarchy, to cement territories, and to defend his own country against foreigners, from the day on which he was installed in the lordship until the day of his death.

M1258.11

The monastery of Claena, in Leinster, in the diocese of Kildare, was founded for Franciscan Friars.

M1258.12

A great host was led by Hugh, son of Felim, and Teige O'Brien, to meet Brian O'Neill, at Cael-Uisce. The aforesaid chieftains, with one accord, conferred the sovereignty over the Irish on Brian O'Neill, after having made peace with each other; for the observance of which agreement the hostages of Hugh O'Conor were delivered up to him, and the hostages of Muintir-Reilly, and of all the Hy-Briuin, from Kells to Drumcliff.

M1258.13

Mac Sorley sailed with a fleet from the Insi Gall Hebrides around


p.371

Connaught, and at length put in at Conmaicne-mara, where he took a merchant ship, and plundered it of its wine, cloth, copper, and iron. Jordan de Exeter, Sheriff of Connaught, pursued Mac Sorley to the island on which he was stopping, with his ships at anchor near it. An engagement took place between them, in which Jordan was at once killed, as was also Pierce Agabard, a knight of his people. Mac Sorley and his people returned exultingly and enriched, and reached their own country in safety.

M1258.14

Donnell, son of Conor, the son of Tiernan O'Rourke, who was until now detained in prison for his father, by Felim O'Conor and his son Hugh, was set at liberty by them; and the lordship of Breifny was given to him, in the place of his father.

M1258.15

Magrath Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach-Dunchadha, was slain by Donnell, son of Conor O'Rourke. The Connacians, and the men of Breifny in general, upon this took the lordship from Donnell, and the inhabitants of Tealach-Dunchadha slew his brother, Cathal, son of Conor. After this the lordship of Hy-Briuin, from the mountain eastwards, was conferred upon Art, son of Cathal Reagh O'Rourke.

M1258.16

O'Brian Magauran, Chief of Tealach Eachdhach, was slain by the Connacians.

M1258.17

Auliffe, son of Art O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, from the mountain westwards, died.

M1258.18

Thomas O'Beirne died.

M1258.19

Ardgal O'Conor, son of the Coarb of Coman, died.

M1258.20

A great war broke out between the English and Conor O'Brien, during which were burned Ardrahen, Kilcolgan, and many street-towns, and much corn.

M1258.21

A conference took place between the English of Ireland and the Irish, in the absence of Felim O'Conor, and a peace was concluded between them.


p.373

Annal M1259.

M1259.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1259. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred fifty-nine.

M1259.1

Cormac O'Luimlin, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan, and the most illustrious man in Ireland for wisdom, died, a holy senior, of great age.

M1259.2

Tomaltagh, son of Turlough, who was son of Melaghlin O'Conor, returned from Rome, after having been consecrated Archbishop of Tuam at the Pope's court, bringing with him a pallium and great benefits for the Church.

M1259.3

Gillacam Mac Gillakieran, a man eminent in literature and poetry, died.

M1259.4

Hugh O'Conor gave the place seat of Auliffe, son of Art, to Art Beg, son of Art O'Rourke, and made a prisoner of Art, son of Cathal Reagh, after he had removed Auliffe from his residence.

M1259.5

Hugh O'Conor went to Derry-Columbkille, to espouse the daughter of Dugald Mac Sorley Mac Donnell.

M1259.6

Cathal Mac Consnamha, Chief of Muintir-Kenny in the county of Leitrim, was blinded by Hugh O'Conor; the hostages of Donnell O'Rourke, namely, Niall, son of Donough, and Brian, son of Niall O'Rourke, and all the other hostages of the Hy-Briuin, were also blinded by him.

M1259.7

Hugh O'Conor and Brian O'Neill held a conference at Devenish, in Lough Erne.

M1259.8

Hugh O'Conor made peace with Donnell O'Rourke, and afterwards gave him the lordship of Breifny.

M1259.9

Taichleach Mac Dermot died.

M1259.10

Miles Mac Costello died.

M1259.11

Hugh O'Conor made a prisoner of Gilbert Mac Costello, and ravaged all Sliabh-Lugha. Gilbert delivered up his own three sons prisoners in the place of himself, upon which Hugh O'Conor liberated him.

M1259.12

Teige O'Brien, Roydamna heir presumptive of Munster, died.

M1259.13

Siry O'Boyle was slain by his own tribe.


p.375

M1259.14

O'Donnell (Donnell Oge) assembled a very numerous army, and marched into Tyrone. Hugh Boy O'Neill came with another army to meet him, and all the country was burned by them. They went from thence into Oriel, and hostages were given up to them in every place through which they passed, until their return.

M1259.15

Felim O'Tuathail, Lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh Omurethi, died.

Annal M1260.

M1260.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1260. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty.

M1260.1

Kenny O'Beirne, Prior of Kilmore, died.

M1260.2

Mael-Finnen O'Meehin died.

M1260.3

The dignity of bishop was conferred, by the Coarb of St. Patrick, upon Melaghlin O'Conor, at Dundalk.

M1260.4

The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas Downpatrick was fought by Brien O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the Irish chieftains were slain, viz. Brian


p.377

O'Neill, the Chief of Ireland; Donnell O'Cairre; Dermot Mac Loughlin; Manus O'Kane; Kian O'Henery; Donslevy Mac Cann; Conor O'Duvdirma, and his son Hugh; Hugh O'Kane; Murtough O'Kane; Auliffe O'Gormly; Cu-Uladh O'Hanlon; and Niall O'Hanlon. In a word, fifteen of the chiefs of the family of O'Kane were slain on the field. Some of the chiefs of Connaught also fell there, namely, Gilchreest, son of Conor, son of Cormac, son of Tomaltagh Mae Dermot, Lord of Moylurg; Cathal, son of Tiernan O'Conor; Mulrony Mac Donough; Cathal, son of Donough, the son of Murtough; Hugh son of Murtough Finn; Teige, son of Cathal, son of Brian O'Mulrony; Dermot, son of Teige, son of Murray, son of Tomaltagh O'Mulrony; Conor Mac Gilla-Arraith; Teige, son of Kian O'Gara; Gillabarry O'Quin; Carolus, son of the Bishop O'Murray; and many others, both of the Irish nobility and the plebeians.

M1260.5

An army was led by Mac William Burke against Felim O'Conor, and he plundered the country before him, until he reached Roscommon. He dared not, however, pass down beyond this, because Felim and his son Hugh na nGall were near him in the Tuathas, and the cows of Connaught were behind them in the wilderness; so that they came to a resolution, on both sides, to make peace with each other. Accordingly they did so, and then Mac William returned home.


p.379

M1260.6

An army was led by Mac Maurice into Thomond, to attack Conor O'Brien. O'Brien, attended by the chiefs of his people, met him at Coill-Bearain; and the English were defeated at once, with the loss of David Prendergast, a most puissant knight; the Failgeach; the parson of Ardrahin, Thomas Barrott; and others not mentioned.

M1260.7

Manus, the son of Hugh Mageraghty, was slain by Donnell O'Flahiff.

M1260.8

Loughlin, son of Auliffe, the son of Art O'Rourke, and Tiernan his brother, were slain by Hugh O'Conor, after they had been delivered up to him by Donnell, son of Niall, the son of Congalagh O'Rourke.

M1260.9

Donnell, son of Conor, son of Tiernan O'Rourke, was treacherously slain by the inhabitants of Tealach-Dunchadha Tullyhunco; and Murtough, his brother, was afterwards slain by Hugh O'Conor. Art Beg, son of Art O'Rourke, was also slain by Hugh O'Conor.

M1260.10

Teige Duff, son of Niall, the son of Congalagh, was slain by Melaghlin, son of Auliffe, who was son of Art O'Rourke.

M1260.11

A great depredation was committed by Hugh O'Conor in Tuath-ratha; on which occasion Conor Mac Branan, Chief of Corc-Achlann, Murtough O'Maeny, the son of Brian O'Fallon, and many others, were slain.

M1260.12

A depredation was committed by Mac Maurice on O'Donnell. A party of O'Donnell's men overtook them (i.e. the plunderers) at Beannan Breacmhoighe, and burned and killed some of them.

M1260.13

A great depredation was committed on Fitzmaurice by O'Donnell, who plundered the whole of Carbury.

M1260.14

The garrison of Conor O'Kelly was burned by the people of Hugh O'Conor.


p.381

M1260.15

Sitric Mac Shanly was slain at Athlone by Donncahy Mageraghty and Tomaltagh Mageraghty.

M1260.16

A predatory incursion was made by O'Donnell, against the kinel-Owen, after the battle of Down; and the greater part of Kinel-Owen was plundered and burned by him on that occasion.

M1260.17

Abraham O'Conallan, Coarb of St. Patrick (Archbishop of Armagh), died.

Annal M1261.

M1261.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1261. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-one.

M1261.1

Maelpatrick O'Scannal, Bishop of Raphoe, was elected to the Archbishopric of Armagh.

M1261.2

Sixteen of the most distinguished of the clergy of Kinel-Connell were killed at Derry by Conor O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen, together with Conor O'Firgil. Conor O'Neill was slain immediately afterwards by Donn O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, through the miracles of God and St. Columbkille.

M1261.3

Hugh, son of Melaghlin O'Conor, was slain by Mulfaville O'Heyne.

M1261.4

Cathal O'Hara was slain by the English, by the procurement of Mac Feorais Bermingham; and five of the people of Leyny were also killed in the Great Church of Easdara Ballysadare.

M1261.5

A great war was waged, and many injuries were inflicted, by Fineen Mac Carthy, son of Donnell Mac Carthy, and his brothers, on the English.

M1261.6

A great army was marched by the Clann-Gerald Geraldines into Desmond, to attack Mac Carthy, i.e. Fineen. Mac Carthy attacked and defeated them; and in this contest were slain eight barons and five knights, besides others of


p.383

the English nobles, as also John Fitz Thomas and Barry More. Countless numbers of the English common soldiers were also killed in the aforesaid battle.

M1261.7

Fineen Mac Carthy was afterwards killed by the English, and the lordship of Desmond was assumed by his brother, the Aithcleireach Mac Carthy.

M1261.8

Art, son of Cathal Reagh O'Rourke, made his escape from the custody of Hugh O'Conor; and the nobles of Breifny and Conmaicne gave him the lordship of Breifny.

M1261.9

Donnell O'Hara committed a depredation upon the Clann-Feorais Berminghams, in revenge for their having slain Cathal O'Hara, and desecrated the church of St. Feichinn: he also killed Sefin Mac Feorais, who while being killed had upon his head the bell which he had taken from the church of Ballysadare.

M1261.10

Brian Roe O'Brien burned and demolished Caislein ui Chonaing Castle Connell, and killed all that were in it.

M1261.11

The Fortress of Hugh O'Conor (at Snamh-in-redaigh) was burned by the men of Breifny.


p.385

M1261.12

Cluain Suilionn, i.e. the Fortress of Felim O'Conor, was burned.

M1261.13

Turlough Oge, son of Hugh O'Conor, was given in fosterage to Art O'Rourke.

M1261.14

A great depredation was committed by Hugh O'Conor in Breifny; and he advanced to Drumlahan, where a part of his army was defeated, and many of the less distinguished of them were slain.

M1261.15

Hugh Boy O'Neill was banished, and Niall Culanagh was elected in his place.

M1261.16

Niall O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died.

M1261.17

A great victory was gained by O'Donnell over Niall Culanagh O'Neill in a battle, in which many of the chiefs of Kinel-Owen, under the conduct of Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, and many other chiefs not mentioned here, were killed or taken prisoners.

M1262.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1262. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-two.

M1262.1

Maelpatrick O'Scannail, Archbishop of Armagh, said Mass in a pallium (in the Octave of John the Baptist), at Armagh.

M1262.2

Melaghlin, son of Teige O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin, died.

M1262.3

A very great army was led by the English of Ireland against Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and his son Hugh na ngall; upon which O'Conor sent off the greater number of the cows of Connaught into Tirconnell, away from the English, and remained himself on Inis Saimer to protect his cows and people. Mac William Burke marched across Tochar Mona Coinneadha from the west, with a great army, as far as Elphin; and the


p.387

Lord Justice of Ireland and John de Verdun came across the bridge of Athlone to Roscommon. They sent out marauding parties into Kinel-Dofa-mic-Aengusa, who plundered all that remained after O'Conor in Connaught; and they marked out a place for a castle at Roscommon. As to Hugh O'Conor, he assembled his troops, and marched into the West of Connaught, and plundered the country from Mayo of the Saxons, and from Balla, westwards; and he also burned their towns and corn as far as Sliabh Lugha, and slew many persons between them these places. He sent his chiefs and young nobles into Upper i.e. South Connaught, who burned and plundered the country from Tuam da ghualann to Athlone, and killed all they met who were fit to bear arms. The English afterwards dispatched messengers to O'Conor and his son, to offer them peace; and Hugh came to a conference with them at the ford of Doire-Chuirc, where they made peace with each other, without giving hostages or pledges on either side. After they had concluded this peace, Hugh O'Conor and Mac William Burke slept together in the one bed, cheerfully and happily; and the English left the country on the next day, after bidding farewell to O'Conor.

M1262.4

Hugh Boy O'Neill was again elected, and Niall Culanagh deposed.

M1262.5

A great depredation was committed by the English of Meath on Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly; and his own tribe forsook him, and went over to the English. He was deposed by them, and his lordship was bestowed on the son of Murrough Carragh O'Farrell. After this many evils, depredations, aggressions, spoliations, and slaughters, were committed by Gilla-na-naev on the English; and he asserted, by main force, the lordship of Annaly, and banished the son of Murrough Carragh from the country.

M1262.6

Donslevy Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Hugh Boy O'Neill.

M1262.7

An army was led by Mac William Burke and the English of Ireland into


p.389

Desmond, against Mac Carthy, and arrived at Mangartagh, of Lough Leane. Here Gerald Roche, who was said to be the third best knight of his time in Ireland, was slain by Mac Carthy. This was a triumph without joy to Desmond, for Cormac, son of Donnell God the Stammering Mac Carthy, was slain in this battle. Indeed, both the English and the Irish suffered great losses about the Mangartagh mountain on that day.

M1262.8

Donnell O'Monahan was slain by the sons of Rory and of Teige O'Conor.

M1262.9

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell Oge), first into Fermanagh, and thence into the Rough Third of Connaught, and to Granard in Teffia; and every territory through which he passed granted him his demands and gave him hostages; and he returned home in triumph.

Annal M1263.

M1263.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1263. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-three.

M1263.1

Thomas O'Kelly, Bishop of Clonfert, and Mulkierian O'Malone, Abbot of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1263.2

David O'Finn, Abbot of the Monastery of Boyle, and Gillapatrick, son of Gilla-na-nguisen, Prior of Doirean, a man eminent for piety and hospitality, died.

M1263.3

Donn O'Breslen was slain by Donnell O'Donnell, in the bishop's court palace at Raphoe.

M1263.4

An army was led by Mac William Burke against Felim O'Conor and his son. He reached Roscommon, and the Sil-Murray fled before him into the north of Connaught; and the English had no preys to seize upon on that occasion.


p.391

Donough O'Flynn and Teige, his son, attacked their army, and killed one hundred of them, noble and plebeian, with Aitin Russell and his son, the five sons of Cuconnaught O'Conor, and others. The army then returned to their homes in sorrow.

M1263.5

Mulfavill O'Heyne was slain by the English.

M1263.6

Dermot Cleireach, son of Cormac Mac Dermott, died.

M1263.7

Aindiles Mag-Fhionnbharr Maginver, Chief of Muintir-Gearadhain, died.

M1263.8

A castle was erected by Mac William Burke at Ath-angail, in Corran.

M1263.9

Machair O'Ruadhain Rowan was slain by the English in the doorway of the church of Kilsescnen.

M1263.10

Edwina, daughter of O'Flanagan, died.

M1263.11

An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell Oge) into Connaught, and joined Hugh O'Conor at the Curlieu mountains. They proceeded from thence to Croghan, thence across the River Suck, and thence into Clanrickard; and they totally ravaged the country as far as Echtge and Galway. O'Conor then separated from O'Donnell; and O'Donnell proceeded across the Rivers Sruthair and Rodhba, through Tirawley, and afterwards across the Moy, and obtained his full demands from all.

M1263.12

A great depredation was committed by Hugh, son of Felim, on the English


p.393

of Sliabh Lugha, and in Ciarraighe: great numbers of the English were killed by him, and he carried off many cows from them.

Annal M1264.

M1264.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1264. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-four.

M1264.1

Aengus O'Cluman, Bishop of Leyny, died in the Abbey of Boyle, having resigned his bishopric long before.

M1264.2

A war broke out between Art O'Melaghlin and the English of Meath; and he destroyed great numbers of them near the River Brosna, both by killing and drowning.

M1264.3

Murtough, son of Donnell O'Hart, was killed; and his people were burned by Donn Maguire.

M1264.4

A great depredation was committed by the inhabitants of Delvin Eathra on the Sil-Anmchadha; and the five sons of O'Madden were slain on the occasion.

M1264.5

A conference was held this year at Athlone between the Lord Justice of Ireland (attended by the English, the Earl of Ulster, and Maurice Fitzgerald,


p.395

with their respective forces), on the one side, and Felim O'Conor and his son on the other. The English were seized with fear and perplexity of mind when they saw the King of Connaught and his son approaching them with a numerous and complete muster of their forces, and came to the resolution of suing for peace. Felim and the chiefs of his people consented to make the peace, and they afterwards separated on amicable terms.

M1264.6

A war broke out between Mac William Burke (Earl of Ulster) and Maurice Fitzgerald, so that the greater part of Ireland was destroyed between them. The Earl took all the castles that Fitzgerald possessed in Connaught, burned his manors, and plundered his people.

M1264.7

Art O'Melaghlin burned all the castles and street-towns in Delvin, Calry, and Brawney, and drove the English out of all of them; he then took hostages from their chieftains.

M1264.8

The Lord Justice of Ireland, John Goggan, and Theobald Butler, were taken prisoners by Maurice Fitzgerald in a consecrated church.

M1264.9

The castle of Lough Mask and the castle of Ardrahin were taken by Mac William Burke.

M1264.10

The Archbishop of Armagh, Maelpatrick O'Scannal, brought the Friars Minor to Armagh; and (according to tradition), it was Mac Donnell Galloglagh that commenced the erection of the monastery.


p.397

Annal M1265.

M1265.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1265. The Age of Cbrist, one thousand two hundred sixty-five.

M1265.1

Thomas, the son of Farrell Mac Dermot, Bishop of Elphin; Thomas O'Maicin, Bishop of Leyny; and Maelbrighde O'Grugan, Erenagh of Elphin, died.

M1265.2

Maurice, the son of Niall O'Conor, was elected to the bishopric of Elphin.

M1265.3

The castle of Sligo was demolished by Hugh O'Conor and O'Donnell. The castle of Beannada and the castle of Rath-ard-Creeva were also burned and destroyed by them.

M1265.4

The monastery of Toberpatrick was burned.

M1265.5

Teige Mag-Finnvar was slain by Conor Mac Rannal and the son of Donnel O'Farrell.

M1265.6

Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, the defender and supporter of his own province, and of his friends on every side; the expeller and plunderer of his foes, —a man full of hospitality, prowess, and renown; the exalter of the clerical orders and men of science; a worthy materies of a King of Ireland for his nobility, personal shape, heroism, wisdom, clemency, and truth, died, after the victory of Extreme Unction and penance, in the monastery of the Dominican Friars, at Roscommon, which he himself had granted to God and that order. Hugh O'Conor, his own son, was inaugurated king over the Connacians, as his successor. Hugh committed his regal depredation in Offaly, and on his


p.399

return to Athlone put out the eyes of Cathal, son of Teige O'Conor, who died in consequence.

M1265.7

Murtough, son of Cathal, the son of Dermot, son of Teige O'Mulrony, Lord of Moylurg, died.

M1265.8

Gilla-na-naev O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan, Cathal Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, and Murray O'Carroll, Chief of Calry, died.

M1265.9

A conference was held by Tomaltagh O'Conor (Archbishop of Tuam) with David Prendergast and the Mac Murroughs; and many of the Archbishop's people were slain on that day by them at Kilmaine.

M1265.10

Dervorgilla, daughter of O'Dowda (the mother of the Archbishop Tomaltagh O'Conor), died, after the victory, &.

Annal M1266.

M1266.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1266. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-six.

M1266.1

The dignity of bishop was conferred at Armagh on a friar of the order of St. Dominic (i.e. O'Scopa), and he was appointed to Raphoe.

M1266.2

Thomas O'Mulconry, Archdeacon of Tuam, and Maelisa O'Hanainn, Prior of Roscommon and Athleague, died.

M1266.3

Thomas O'Meehan became Bishop of Leyny.

M1266.4

A bishop-elect came from Rome to Clonfert-Brendan, and the dignity of bishop was conferred on him, and on Thomas O'Meehan, at Athenry, on the Sunday before Christmas.

M1266.5

Donnell O'Hara was killed by the English while he was in the act of burning Ardnarea.


p.401

M1266.6

Mahon, son of Kehernagh O'Kerrin, Lord of Ciarraighe in the County of Mayo, was slain by the English.

M1266.7

Mahon O'Cuilein, Lord of Claenghlaisi, was killed by his own wife with one stab of a knife, given through jealousy.

M1266.8

The castle of Tigh-da-Choinne was demolished, and all Conmaicne was laid waste.

M1266.9

Turlough, son of Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, died in the monastery of Knockmoy in the county of Galway.

M1266.10

Dermot Roe, son of Conor, the son of Cormac Mac Dermot, and Donncahy, son of Donn Oge Mageraghty, were blinded by Hugh O'Conor.

M1266.11

The borough of Bel-an-tachair was burned by Flann Roe O'Flynn, and many of the English of the town were slain by him.

M1266.12

Hugh O'Conor, King of Connaught, went into Breifny to depose Art, son of Cathal Reagh; and he gave the lordship of Breifny to Conor Boy, son of Auliffe, the son of Art O'Rourke, and took hostages from all the chiefs of Breifny.

M1266.13

An army was led by William Burke against O'Melaghlin; but many of his troops were drowned in Ath-Crochda, and he returned without conquest or hostages.

M1266.14

A party of O'Conor's people, namely, Loughlin, son of Dermot, who was son of Murtough O'Conor, Mac Keherny, and the son of Donnell Duv O'Hara, made a great slaughter of the Welshmen and the people of Leyny in West Connaught; and thirty-one of their heads were brought to O'Conor.

M1266.15

Cormac, son of Gilchreest Mac Dermot, received a wound, of which he died.

M1266.16

Sabia, daughter of Cathal Crovderg, and Malone Bodhar the Deaf O'Mulconry, Ollav of Sil-Murray in history, died.

M1266.17

Maelpatrick O'Scannal, Primate of Armagh, brought the Friars Minor to Armagh, and afterwards cut a broad and deep trench around their church.


p.403

Annal M1267.

M1267.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST 1267. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-seven.

M1267.1

The Bishop of Clonfert, who was a Roman, went over to the Pope.

M1267.2

Murrough Mac Sweeny was taken prisoner in Umallia by Donnell, son of Manus O'Conor, who delivered him up to the Earl, in whose prison he died.

M1267.3

Brian, son of Turlough, who was son of Roderic O'Conor, died in the monastery of Knockmoy.

M1267.4

A depredation was committed by Mac William on O'Conor; and he plundered Tir-Many and Clann-Uadagh.

M1267.5

A depredation was committed by the English of West Connaught in Carbury of Drumcliff, and they plundered Easdara Ballysadare.

M1267.6

Donough, son of Rory, the son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by the English.

M1267.7

A dangerous disease attacked the King of Connaught; and the report of it spread all over Ireland.

M1267.8

Alice, daughter of Mac Carroon, died.

M1267.9

Hugh O'Murray, Chief of Lagan, was slain at Killala by O'Mulfover, coarb of the church, on a Sunday, after hearing mass.

Annal M1268.

M1268.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1268. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-eight.

M1268.1

Hugh, son of Conor O'Flaherty, Official of Annadown, died.

M1268.2

The Great Church of Armagh was begun by the Primate, Gillapatrick O'Scannal.

M1268.3

Conor Roe O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, Seoinin, his son, his daughter, his


p.405

daughter's son, i.e. the son of Rory O'Grady, Duvloughlin O'Loughlin, Thomas O'Beollan, and a number of others, were slain by Dermot, the son of Murtough O'Brien, for which he himself was afterwards killed; and Brian, the son of Conor O'Brien, then assumed the lordship of Thomond.

M1268.4

Turlough Oge, the son of Hugh, son of Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg, the foster-son of the Hy-Briuin, died.

M1268.5

Auliffe O'Farrell, Tower of Protection to the Conmaicni, was treacherously slain by the English.

M1268.6

Conor O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many; Aengus O'Daly, a man eminent for poetry, and keeper of a house of hospitality; Manus Mageraghty, Chief of Clann-Tomalty; Donnell O'Grady, Chief of Kinel-Dongaly; and Dugald Mac Rory, Lord of Insi-Gall, and of Airer-Gaedheal Argyle, died.

M1268.7

Maurice Roe Fitzgerald was drowned in the sea, together with a ship's crew, while on his return from England.

M1268.8

Hugh O'Conor set out for Athlone against the English, who came to the Faes to oppose him; and a battle was fought between them, in which the English were defeated, with the loss of many.

M1268.9

Donn, son of Teige O'Monahan, was slain, together with ten of his people, by Teige O'Flanagan and Gilchreest O'Beirne.

M1268.10

Farrell O'Molloy, Chief of Fircall, and Melaghlin Mac Coghlan, were slain by the English.

M1268.11

Aengus O'Mulfover was slain by the O'Murrays, in revenge of their Kennfine.


p.407

Annal M1269.

M1269.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1269. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred sixty-nine.

M1269.1

David O'Bragan, Bishop of Clogher, died, and was interred in the monastery of Mellifont, for he had been one of its monks.

M1269.2

Teige, son of Niall, the son of Murray O'Conor, was slain at Elphin, by a youth of his own brother's people; and the person by whom the deed was perpetrated was killed for it.

M1269.3

Ivor O'Beirne, chief servant and confidant of Hugh O'Conor, withdrew from the world, from the midst of his children and affluence, and entered the monastery of Roscommon, where he passed the rest of his life among the Dominican friars.

M1269.4

Brian, son of Donnell Duv O'Hara, was slain by the English of Sligo.

M1269.5

Benmee, daughter of Turlough (son of Roderic O'Conor), and wife of Mulmurry Mac Sweeny; Jeffrey, son of Donnell Clannagh Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Slieve Bloom; and Hugh O'Finaghty, a learned minstrel, died.

M1269.6

Eghmily Mac Artan was slain by O'Hanlon.

M1269.7

Donnell O'Farrell and Hugh, his son, two truly hospitable and munificent men, were slain by Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell and the English.

M1269.8

Christina, daughter of O'Naghtan, and wife of Dermot Midheach Mac Dermot, the most hospitable and chaste woman of her tribe, and the most bountiful to the order of Grey Friars, died, after the victory of penance.

M1269.9

The castle of Sligo was rebuilt by the son of Maurice Fitzgerald, after it had been demolished by Hugh O'Conor and O'Donnell.


p.409

M1269.10

The castle of Roscommon was erected by Robert de Ufford, Lord Justice of Ireland. He was induced to erect it because Hugh O'Conor, King of Connaught, was ill, and was therefore unable to give the English battle or opposition, or prevent the erection of the castle. The Connacians, until his recovery, were plundered and trodden under foot by the English.

M1269.11

Flaherty O'Maelfina, Chief of half the territory of Calry of Moy-heleog, was slain by Gaughan, Chief of the other half.

Annal M1270.

M1270.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1270. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy.

M1270.1

Maelpatrick O'Scannal, Archbishop of Armagh, went over to the King of England: the King received him honourably; and he returned home with great privileges.

M1270.2

A great war broke out between O'Conor and the Earl of Ulster, Walter Burke. The Earl assembled the chiefs of the English of Ireland, together


p.411

with the Lord Justice and all his Irish faction, and marched into Connaught; the first night they arrived at Roscommon, and the second at Elphin; from thence they proceeded to Port-lecce, where they rested and encamped for that night; and on the next morning they marched, by common consent, eastwards, across the ford of Ath-Caradh-Conaill, on the Shannon.

M1270.3

The King of Connaught, attended by a small number of the chiefs of his people, was at this time in Moy-Nise, ready to meet the English; and the Lord Justice and a small part of the English army remained on the west side of the Shannon, awaiting the Connacians. After the Earl had crossed the ford of Ath-Caradh Conaill, a small party of O'Conor's people attacked the English at Coillte Conmaicne, and slew some of them. After this they went to Moy-Nise, where they encamped for that night; and they consulted together, and agreed to make peace with the King of Connaught, and to deliver up to his people the Earl's brother (William Oge, son of Richard, the son of William the Conqueror), while he himself (i.e. O'Conor) should be in the Earl's house concluding the peace. This was accordingly done; but O'Conor's people took the Earl's brother prisoner at once, and slew John Dolifin and his son. When the Earl heard of this, he became enraged, and passed the night in sadness and sorrow; and he rose next morning at daybreak, with his English and Irish arranged and arrayed about him, and marched against O'Conor to Ath-an-chip, where they met face to face Turlough O'Brien, who had come to assist O'Conor. The Earl himself faced Turlough, mindful of the old enmity between them, and slew him at once; but the Connacians came up with the Earl's troops at the ford, where they poured down upon them, horse and foot, broke through their van, and forcibly dislodged their rear. In this onslaught at the ford, nine of the chief English knights were slain around the ford, together with Richard


p.413

na Coille and John Butler, exclusive of others, both noble and plebeian. Immense spoils were also taken from them, consisting of arms, armour, horses, &. The Earl's brother (William Oge) was put to death after this battle by O'Conor, as an eric for the son of O'Brien, who had been slain by the Earl.

M1270.4

The castle of Ath-Angaile, the castle of Sliabh Lugha, and the castle of Cill Calman, were demolished by O'Conor. Rindown and Uillin Uanagh were also burned by him.

M1270.5

Brian Roe O'Brien turned against the English, and committed great depredations upon them; and the castle of Clar-Atha-da-charadh was taken by him.

M1270.6

Great depredations were committed by the Earl and the English of Connaught in Tirerrill on the people of Hugh O'Conor; and David Cuisin Cushen was killed on that occasion.

M1270.7

The son of Murrough Carragh O'Farrell, a bear in liveliness, and a leopard in prowess, was slain by the English.

M1270.8

Tany More, son of Duinnin, son of Nedhe, son of Conaing Boy O'Mulconry, was elected to the chief ollavship of Connaught; and the ollavships of Dubhshuileach O'Mulconry and Dunlang O'Mulconry were abolished.

M1270.9

Sligo was burned by O'Donnell and the Kinel-Connell; and the son of Breallagh-an-Chairn O'Mulrenin was killed on that occasion.

M1270.10

Christina, daughter of O'Naghtan, and wife of Dermot Midheach Mac


p.415

Dermot, died. She was a good, charitable, and hospitable woman, and had given much alms to the order of Grey Friars.

Annal M1271.

M1271.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1271. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-one.

M1271.1

Simon Magrath, Deacon of Ardcarne, died.

M1271.2

Walter Burke, Earl of Ulster, and Lord of the English of Connaught, died of a short sickness in the castle of Galway, after the victory of penance.

M1271.3

Thomas Mac Maurice died at Ballyloughmask.

M1271.4

Ivor O'Beirne, the head and confidential servant of Hugh O'Conor, died at Roscommon, after penance, and was buried there.

M1271.5

Hugh O'Conor, son of the coarb of St. Coman, was killed at Muine-inghine-Chrechain, by Thomas Butler.

M1271.6

Donnell O'Flynn was slain on the same day, by the son of Robin Lawless, at the upper end of Sruthair.

M1271.7

Mahon O'Conor was slain by the English of Dunmore.

M1271.8

Nicholas, the son of John Verdun, Lord of Oriel, was slain by Geoffry 0'Farrell.

M1271.9

Conor, son of Tiernan O'Conor, was slain by Melaghlin, son of Art O'Rourke, and by the Clann-Fearmaighe in the County Leitrim.

M1271.10

The castle of Teagh Templa, the castle of Sligo, and the castle of Athliag Ballyleague, were demolished by Hugh O'Conor.

M1271.11

Hugh, son of Niall O'Dowda, died.


p.417

M1272.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1272. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-two.

M1272.1

Henry Butler, Lord of Umallia, and Hosty Merrick, were slain by Cathal, son of Conor Roe, and by the Clann-Murtough O'Conor.

M1272.2

The castle of Roscommon was demolished by Hugh O'Conor, King of Connaught.

M1272.3

Teige Dall (the Blind), son of Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, died. He had been the best materies of a king of all his tribe, until he was blinded by the O'Reillys.

M1272.4

James Dodaly, Lord Justice of Ireland, was slain by O'Broin and the Connacians.

M1272.5

Maurice, son of Donough, son of Tomaltagh O'Mulrony, the most hospitable and valiant of his tribe, died in O'Donnell's garrison at Murvagh, and was conveyed to the abbey of Boyle, to be interred there.

M1272.6

Donough, son of Gilla-na-naev Magauran, was slain by his brother Thomas.

M1272.7

Richard Tuite, the noblest of the English barons, died.

M1272.8

Meath was burned, as far as Granard, by Hugh O'Conor. Athlone was also burned by him, and its bridge was broken down.

M1272.9

O'Donnell (Donnell Oge) collected the vessels and boats upon Lough Erne, and proceeded thence to Lough Oughter. The goods and valuables of the surrounding country (which were upon the islands of that lake) were seized


p.419

on and carried off by him; and he acquired control and sway in every place in the neighbourhood on this expedition.

M1272.10

The first Edward was made king over the English on the 16th of November.

Annal M1273.

M1273.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1273. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-three.

M1273.1

Flann O'Tierney, Lord of Carra, was slain by the O'Murrays in a dispute concerning the lordship of Carra, and through the power of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor.

M1273.2

Conor Boy, son of Auliffe, son of Art O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by the sons of Conor, son of Tiernan O'Conor; and he killed the best of them, namely, Tiernan.

M1273.3

Eochy Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, and many others along with him, were slain by O'Hanlon and the Kinel-Owen.

M1273.4

A depredation was committed by Jordan d'Exeter in Corran. A few of the young princes of Connaught overtook him; but these having adopted an imprudent plan, suggested by some of the common people, it fell out that Donnell, son of Donough, Manus, son of Art O'Conor, Aireaghtagh Mac Egan, Hugh O'Beirne, and many others, were slain.

M1273.5

A great army was led by Mac Maurice Fitzgerald into Thomond, where he took hostages, and obtained sway over O'Brien.

M1273.6

Cormac, son of Dermot, son of Roderic O'Conor, died.


p.421

M1273.7

Donnell Irrais of Erris, son of Manus, son of Murtough Muimhneach, was banished from Umallia and Erris.

M1273.8

Roderic O'Flaherty was banished from West Connaught.

M1273.9

O'Donnell (Donnell Oge) assembled a considerable army, composed of the nobles of Tirconnell and Connaught, with whom he marched into Tyrone, and ravaged the country.

M1273.10

Donnell O'Quin, Semi-Chief of Aicideacht, was slain by O'Duffy.

Annal M1274.

M1274.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1274. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-four.

M1274.1

Hugh, son of Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught, a king who had desolated and devastated that part of Connaught possessed by his English or Irish enemies; a king who had given the English frequent overthrows, prostrated their manor-houses and castles, and cut off their heroes and warriors; a king who had obtained the hostages of the Hy-Briuin, and all the race of Aedh Finn; a king the most successful and triumphant, the most hospitable and renowned; the destroyer and improver of Ireland, died, after gaining the victory of penance, on Thursday, the third day of the Summer. Hugh, son of Rory, son of Hugh, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, was made king in his place; but he was only one quarter of a year in the government, when he was slain, in the church of the Friars at Roscommon, by his kinsman, namely, Rory, son of Turlough, the son of Hugh O'Conor; upon which, Hugh, son of Cathal


p.423

Dall, the son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, was made king by the Connacians; and his reign was not longer, for he had been but one fortnight in the government, when he was slain by Mageraghty (Tomaltagh) and O'Beirne; and Teige, son of Turlough, son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, was elected king over the Connacians.

M1274.2

Tiernan, son of Hugh O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, and Donnell, son of Manus, who was son of Murtough Muimhneach, most illustrious throughout all Ireland for hospitality and prowess, died.

M1274.3

Gilla-na-naev, son of Hugh, the son of Auliffe O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, supporter of the hospitality and prowess of the Clanna-Rury, a man full of nobleness and intellect, dangerous to his foes, and kind to his friends, died, after the victory of penance.

M1274.4

Melaghlin, son of Auliffe, the son of Art O'Rourke, Lord of Dartry and Clann-Fearmaighe, was slain by Conor, son of Donnell, the son of Niall O'Rourke.

M1274.5

Teige, son of Carroll Boy O'Daly, chief poet of Hugh O'Conor, died.

M1274.6

Donnell Oge, son of Donnell, son of Art O'Rourke, and Cathal Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry, died.

M1274.7

Fergal O'Caithniadh, Lord of Erris, died in Hy-Mac-Caechain.

Annal M1275.

M1275.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1275. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-five.

M1275.1

O'Laidigh, Bishop of Killala, and Carbry O'Scuapa, Bishop of Raphoe, in Tirconnell, died.

M1275.2

Rory, son of Turlough O'Conor, was taken prisoner by the O'Conor (Teige, son of Turlough, his brother). Rory afterwards made his escape, and Conor O'Hanley took him with him; but they were pursued, and overtaken, and Conor O'Hanley was killed.

M1275.3

Teige, son of Cathal Mac Dermot, was plundered by O'Conor.

M1275.4

Conor, son of Farrell, son of Donough, son of Murtough O'Conor, was slain by his own kinsmen.


p.425

M1275.5

Art, son of Cathal Reagh O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by Mac Finnvar and the English at Granard, and his people were slaughtered.

M1275.6

A great victory was gained over the English in Ulidia, so that there were counted two hundred horses and two hundred heads, besides all who fell of their plebeians.

M1275.7

Thomas Magauran was slain by the Kinel-Luachain.

M1275.8

The Kinel-Owen came into Tirconnell, and desolated a great part of the country. O'Donnell (Donnell Oge) assembled his people to oppose them, and pursued them to the breast of Slieve Truim, where they were defeated; and they left slaughtered men, many horses, accoutrements, arms, and armours behind them to the Kinel-Connell on this expeditions.

Annal M1276.

M1276.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1276. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-six.

M1276.1

Gilla-an-Choimhdhe O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone (Derry), died.

M1276.2

Hugh Muimhneach, son of Felim, who was son of Cathal Crovderg, came from Munster into Connaught, and went thence to O'Donnell. O'Donnell and all his forces went with him to Echenach, and there parted from him, Hugh remaining in Connaught.

M1276.3

A depredation was committed by the sons of Turlough on the son of Felim and the sons of Mac Dermot; and Gilchreest O'Mulrenin was slain by them.


p.427

M1276.4

A depredation was committed by the son of Felim on the Clann-Murtough; and Gilla-na-n-Aingel O'Conroy was slain by Clann-Murtough, while pursuing the prey.

M1276.5

A depredation was committed by Rory, son of Turlough, on the O'Naghtans, but they defeated him, and deprived him of the booty. Donnell, son of Niall, son of Congalagh O'Rourke (i.e. Gilla-an-ime), and many others of the O'Rourkes, were slain by them. Gilchreest O'Naghtan and William O'Naghtan were afterwards slain by Rory, son of Turlough.

M1276.6

Dermot Mac Gillamurry, Lord of Lecale, died.

Annal M1277.

M1277.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1277. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-seven.

M1277.1

Braen O'Mulmoghery, Abbot of Kells, died.

M1277.2

Brian Roe O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was treacherously taken by the son of the Earl of Clare, and afterwards drawn between horses, and this after both had entered into gossipred with each other, and taken vows by bells and relics to retain mutual friendship.

M1277.3

Gilchreest O'Beirne, servant of trust to Hugh O'Conor, was slain by Gillaroe, son of Loughlin O'Conor.

M1277.4

Gilla-na-naev O'Beirne died, after penance.

M1277.5

The castle of Roscommon was pulled down by Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor i.e. Hugh Muimhneach, aided by the Connacians and Donnell O'Donnell.


p.429

M1277.6

A great depredation was committed by the people of Eachdhach upon the Kinel-Luachain, in Gleann-da-duile, during which they slew Conor Mac Dorcy, and a host of others.

Annal M1278.

M1278.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1278. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-eight.

M1278.1

Thomas O'Quin, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1278.2

Flaherty O'Davine, Lord of Fermanagh, died.

M1278.3

Teige, son of Turlough, son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught, was slain by the sons of Cathal Mac Dermot.

M1278.4

Rory, son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain by Gilchreest Mac Clancy and the inhabitants of Dartry, on the borders of Drumcliff; and the Swarthy Parson, son of Tiernan O'Conor, and many others not numbered here.

M1278.5

Donough, Farrell, and Gilchreest, the three sons of Murrough, son of Donough, son of Tomaltagh, were slain by Teige, son of Donnell O'Conor, of Erris.

M1278.6

The victory of Cuinche was gained by Donough, son of Brian Roe, and the other sons of O'Brien, over the Earl of Clare; they burned the church of Cuinche over the heads of his people, and caused an indescribable destruction of them, both by burning and killing.

M1278.7

Tomaltagh Mageraghty, Royal Chieftain of Sil-Murray, was slain by the people of the Tuathas.


p.431

M1278.8

Hugh Muimhneach, son of Felim, assumed the sovereignty of Connaught.

M1278.9

Brian O'Dowda and Art na g-Capall of the Horses O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, gave battle to the Clann-Feorais Birminghams, in which the Clann-Feorais were defeated, and the two sons of Meyler More, Conor Roe Mac Feorais, and others besides, were slain.

Annal M1279.

M1279.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1279. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred seventy-nine.

M1279.1

Tomaltagh, son of Turlough, son of Melaghlin O'Conor, Archbishop of Tuam, the most illustrious man in all Ireland for wisdom, knowledge, and charity, died, after the victory of penance.

M1279.2

Gilla-an-Choimhdheadh O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone (Derry), died.

M1279.3

Conor, son of Dermot, son of Manus O'Conor, was killed.

M1279.4

Murrough O'Naghtan was slain by Donnell O'Naghtan; upon which a challenge was given to Donnell by Robert O'Naghtan, brother of Murrough; and Robert also fell by (the hand of) Donnell.

M1279.5

Donnell, son of Gilchreest O'Naghtan, was slain by Hugh O'Connor.

M1279.6

Melaghlin, son of Turlough O'Conor was slain.

M1279.7

Gillo-Isa More Mac Firbis, Ollav of Tireragh in history, died.


p.433

Annal M1280.

M1280.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1280. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty.

M1280.1

John O'Laidhigh, Bishop of Killala, and Matthew, son of Manus O'Conor, Abbot of Boyle, died.

M1280.2

A contention arose between Hugh Muimhneach, son of Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught, and the descendants of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor. Hugh Muimhneach was slain by these at the wood of Dangan; and Melaghlin, son of Manus, was taken prisoner on the same day by them; but he was ransomed by O'Donnell, and they received four hundred cows and twenty horses for him.

M1280.3

Cathal, son of Conor Roe, son of Murtough Muimhneach, son of Turlough More O'Conor, was inaugurated king by the Connacians after this.

M1280.4

Melaghlin O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, and Conor O'Gormly, fell by the tribe of Teallach-Modharain.

Annal M1281.

M1281.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1281. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-one.

M1281.1

Teige, son of Cathal Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, illustrious for hospitality, prowess, and nobility, died.

M1281.2

The battle of Disert-da-chrioch was fought by the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen, that is, beween Hugh Boy, son of Donnell Oge, son of Hugh Meth, son of Hugh, who was usually called an Macaemh Toinleasc, assisted by the English of Ulster, on the one side; and Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Fermanagh, Oriel, and the greater part of the Irish of Ulster, of


p.435

Connaught, excepting a small portion, and of the entire of Breifny, on the other. In this battle the Kinel-Connell were defeated; and Donnell Oge O'Donnell, the most illustrious man of the Irish of his time for hospitality, prowess, splendour, and nobility, and the greatest commander in the west of Europe, was slain; and he was interred in the monastery of Derry, having obtained the palm in every goodness up to that time. The most distinguished of those who fell along with him were the following, namely, Mulrony O'Boyle, Chief of the Three Tuathas; Owen, son of Melaghlin, son of Donnell More O'Donnell; Kellagh, son of Giolla-Brighde O'Boyle, one of the most illustrious chieftains of his time for prowess, and for munificence to learned men and ollavs; Andiles O'Boyle, and Dowell, his son; Gilchreest Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry; Donnell Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir-Feodachain; Enna O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen; Cormac, son of the Ferleighin Lector O'Donnell, Chief of Fanad; Gilla-an-Choimhdheadh O'Muldoon, Chief of Lurg; Cormac, son of Cormac O'Donnell; Gilla-na-nóg Mac Dail-re-docair; Melaghlin, son of Niall O'Boyle; Andiles, son of Murtough O'Donnell; Manus Mac Quin; Gilla-na-naev O'Heoghagan; Murtough O'Flaherty; Murtough Macan-Ulty; Flaherty Mac Buidheachain; and many others of the sons of lords and chieftains not enumerated here.

M1281.3

Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, was inaugurated in the place of his father.

M1281.4

A battle was fought between the Barretts and the Cusack, in which the Barretts were defeated, and William Barrett, Adam Fleming, and many others, were slain. There were assisting the Cusack in this battle two of the Irish, namely, Taichleach O'Boyle and Taichleach O'Dowda, who surpossed all that were there in bravery and valour, and in agility and dexterity at shooting.

M1281.5

Hugh Muimhneach, son of Turlough O'Brien, died.


p.437

M1282.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1282. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-two.

M1282.1

Murtough Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, and Art, his brother, were slain by the English.

M1282.2

Taichleach, son of Mulrony O'Dowda, Lord of Tireragh, the most hospitable and warlike of his tribe in his time, was slain by Adam Cusack on the strand of Traigh Eothaile.

M1282.3

Lasarina, daughter of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, the wife of Donell More O'Donnell, and the mother of Donnell Oge, head of the women of Leth-Chuinn, died.

M1282.4

Mathew O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir Maelmora, and Gilla-Isa Mac Tiernan usually called Gilla-Isa More, Chief of Teallach-Dunchadha, died.

M1282.5

Cathal, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died on Inis-Cuan


p.439

an island in the river of Cluain-lis-Becc-mic-Conla; and Geoffrey, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, assumed the lordship of Annaly after him.

Annal M1283.

M1283.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1283. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-three.

M1283.1

Hugh Boy O'Neill, Lord of Kinel-Owen; head of the liberality and valour of the Irish; the most distinguished in the North for bestowing jewels and riches, the most formidable and victorious of his tribe in his time, and the worthy heir to the throne of Ireland; was slain by Mac Mahon (Brian) and the Oriels, and Gilla-Isa Roe, son of Donnell O'Reilly.

M1283.2

Teige, son of Donnell of Erris O'Conor, was wounded by the people of Leyny, and delivered up to Cathal O'Conor, and soon after this died of the effect of his wound.

M1283.3

Dublin and Christ's church were burned.

Annal M1284.

M1284.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1284. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty four.

M1284.1

Maurice O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin, died, and Auliffe O'Tomalty was consecrated his successor; but he died soon after. Gilla-Isa, son of Liathanagh O'Conor, Abbot of Trinity Island in Lough Ree (of the Premonstratentian Order), was then elected to the bishopric of Elphin.


p.441

M1284.2

Donough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was slain by Turlough O'Brien.

M1284.3

Dowell, son of Manus O'Boyle, Chief of Cloch Chinnfaeladh, was slain by the people of O'Mulgeeha.

M1284.4

Mac-na-h-Oidhche Mac Dorcy, Chief of Kinel-Luachain, died.

M1284.5

Simon de Exeter was slain by Brien O'Flynn and the two sons of O'Flanagan, Dermot and Melaghlin; in consequence of which war and dissensions arose in Connaught. After this the English committed great depredations; but they restored the whole of the spoils to the family of Trinity Island and the monks of the abbey of Boyle.

M1284.6

The castle of Kilcolman was thrown down by Cathal, son of Conor Roe, King of Connaught.

M1284.7

Dunmore was burned by Fiachra O'Flynn.

Annal M1285.

M1285.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1285. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-five.

M1285.1

Simon O'Rourke, Bishop of Breifny, died.

M1285.2

Rory O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh-Lugha, was slain by Mac Feorais Bermingham on Lough O'Gara.

M1285.3

Maurice Mael the Bald Fitzgerald died.


p.443

M1285.4

Henry Mac Gillafinnen died.

M1285.5

Manus O'Conor defeated Adam Cusack and the English of West Connaught at Easdara Ballysadare, where many persons were killed, and Colin Cusack, the brother of Adam, was taken prisoner.

M1285.6

Philip Mac Costello defeated the people of Manus O'Conor on Slieve Gamh, where many of Manus's people were slain.

Annal M1286.

M1286.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1286. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-six.

M1286.1

A great army was led by the Earl of Ulster into Connaught; and many monasteries and churches throughout the province were destroyed by him. He obtained sway in every place through which he passed, and took the hostages


p.445

M1286.2

of all Connaught. He then brought the Connacians with him, and took the hostages of the Kinel-Connell and Kinel-Owen. He deposed Donnell, the son of Brian O'Neill, and gave the lordship to Niall Culanagh.

M1286.3

Philip Mac Costello died.

Annal M1287.

M1287.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1287. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-seven.

M1287.1

Florence O'Gibellan, Archdeacon of Elphin, a distinguished philosopher, died.

M1287.2

Gilla-na-nóg O'Monahan, Lord of the Three Tuathas in the county of Roscommon, died.

M1287.3

Dermot Midheach i.e. the Meathian, son of Dermot, who was son of Maurice Mac Dermot, Lord of Sil-Mailruain, the best, oldest, and noblest man of his tribe, died.

M1287.4

Melaghlin, son of Tomaltagh Mageraghty, was slain by Turlough, the son of Owen O'Conor, to avenge the desertion of his Turlough's father by the aforementioned Tomaltagh.

M1287.5

Adam Cusack, Benmumhan, daughter of O'Kane, and Donnell O'Hanly, Chief of Kenel-Dofa in the county of Roscommon, died.

Annal M1288.

M1288.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1288. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-eight.

M1288.1

Stephen, Archbishop of Tuam, died.

M1288.2

Michael Mac-an-t-Sair, Bishop of Clogher, died.

M1288.3

Manus, the son of Conor Roe O'Conor, with as many as he was able to muster of the Connacians and of the Hy-Briuin and Conmaicne, proceeded to


p.447

Ath-Slisean, where his brother Cathal, the King of Connaught, was stationed with his troops. A battle was fought between them, in which Cathal was taken prisoner, and his people were defeated. Manus then took forcible possession of the sovereignty of Connaught, and deposed his brother. A house was forcibly taken from the same Manus by Turlough, the son of Owen O'Conor, at Rossmore, where Manus and Niall Gealbhuidhe O'Conor were wounded. Ranall Mac Ranall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain on this occasion by one shot of an arrow. An army was led by Manus O'Conor, after his wounds were healed, against the Sil-Murray; and he obtained sway over them and took their hostages.

M1288.4

An army was led by the Red Earl, Richard, son of Walter Earl of Ulster, son of Richard, son of William the Conqueror, against Connaught; and he arrived at Roscommon, where Manus, the son of Conor Roe, King of Connaught, Fitzgerald, and the people of the king, then were, all of whom assembled together, and openly defied the Earl to pass beyond that place; so that the Earl adopted the resolution of quitting that country, and he then dispersed his forces.

Annal M1289.

M1289.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1289. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred eighty-nine.

M1289.1

Miles, Bishop of Conmaicne, that is, the English bishop, and Simon O'Finnaghty, Erenagh of Elphin, died.


p.449

M1289.2

Matthew O'Sgingin, chief historian of Ireland, died.

M1289.3

Teige O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Chathail, died.

M1289.4

An army was led by Richard Tuite, the English of Meath, and Manus O'Conor, King of Connaught, against O'Melaghlin, who assembled his people to oppose them, and marched to Crois-Shliabh, in their vicinity. A battle was fought between them, in which Richard Tuite, i.e. the Great Baron, with his kinsmen, and Siecus Jacques O'Kelly were slain.

M1289.5

Fiachra O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, the most hospitable and expert at arms of all the chiefs of Connaught, went to form an alliance with the English by marriage, but was treacherously slain by the son of Richard Finn the Fair Burke, Mac William, and Mac Feorais Bermingham.

M1289.6

An army was led by Mac Feorais Bermingham and the English, into Leinster, against Calvagh O'Conor; and a battle was fought between them, in which the English were defeated, and Meyler de Exeter and many others of the English were slain; they were also deprived of many horses and other spoils.


p.451

Annal M1290.

M1290.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1290. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety.

M1290.1

O'Sedaghan, Bishop of Kilmacduagh, died.

M1290.2

Carbry O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, the most noble-deeded youth in Ireland in his time, was slain by Mac Coghlan.

M1290.3

An army was led by Donnell, the son of Brian O'Neill, into Kinel-Owen, whence he expelled Niall Culanagh O'Neill, and he himself then assumed the lordship of Kinel-Owen by force of arms.

M1290.4

Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, was deposed by his own brother, Turlough O'Donnell, aided by his mother's tribe, i.e. the Clann-Donnell Mac Donnells of Scotland, and many other gallowglasses; and he himself assumed the lordship by force.

Annal M1291.

M1291.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1291. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-one.

M1291.1

Edru Magrath, Abbot of the monastery of the Blessed Trinity in Lough Key, died.

M1291.2

Turlough, the son of Owen O'Conor, the most hospitable, most expert at arms, and most victorious man of his time in Ireland, was slain by Niall Gealbhuidhe O'Conor.


p.453

M1291.3

Conor O'Dowda (i.e. Conor Conallagh), Lord of Hy-Fiachrach, was drowned in the Shannon.

M1291.4

Congalagh Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

M1291.5

An army was led by Richard Burke, Earl of Ulster, usually called the Red Earl, into Kinel-Owen, where he deposed Donnell, son of Brian O'Neill, and installed Niall Culanagh O'Neill in his place; but after the Earl had left the country, Niall Culanagh was slain. This deed, however, was not a fortunate one for Donnell; for Brian, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, was inaugurated, by the influence of the said Earl, by Mac Martin and Mac Eoin, and the other Donnell was banished from Tyrone.

M1291.6

An army was led by the Earl into Tirconnell against Turlough, son of Donnell Oge, and plundered the country, as well ecclesiastical as lay property. He then proceeded to Elphin in Connaught, and the Connacians rendered him their hostages.

M1291.7

An insurrection was raised by Cathal O'Conor, Niall Gealbhuidhe O'Conor, and their English and Irish adherents, to dethrone Manus O'Conor. They gave battle to each other at Cuil-Maile, where Cathal was wounded, and Murrough, son of Teige O'Conor, and many others not enumerated here, were killed. Manus was defeated, and secretly effected his escape, after having been deprived of many of his horses. After Cathal had been wounded, his people, and those of Niall Gealbhuidhe, committed great depredations in Carbury. As to Manus O'Conor, being aided by the Sil-Murray, his own servants of trust, and the English of Roscommon, who came to his assistance on the day after his defeat, he went in pursuit of the preys, and came up with them at Srath-an-fherain, and at Aenach, where he deprived them of the prey; but Niall made his escape by dint of valour and prowess. Thomas Mac Costello was slain, and his brother, David Mac Costello, taken prisoner, and afterwards killed while in captivity. Many others of the army, both English and Irish, were slain or disabled. Niall afterwards returned to the country on terms of peace, and his own lands were restored to him; but great complaints and dissensions occurring between them, Niall thought fit to leave the country.

M1291.8

Brian O'Flynn O'Lyn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre died.


p.455

M1291.9

A great depredation was committed by Manus O'Conor upon Niall Gealbhuidhe.

M1291.10

Hugh O'Fallon was killed (or died).

M1292.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1292. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-two.

M1292.1

Aindiles O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, a man of universal hospitality, and Donough, son of Owen O'Conor, died.

M1292.2

Sorley O'Gormly was slain by O'Neill.

M1292.3

Niall Gealbhuidhe O'Conor was slain by Teige, son of Andreas O'Conor, and Tuathal, son of Murtough.

M1292.4

Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin More, was slain, by order of the Earl, by Sifin Mac Feorais Birmingham.

M1292.5

Congalagh O'Kelly, Lord of Bregia, died.


p.457

M1292.6

An army was led by the Red Earl against Manus O'Conor; and he arrived at Roscommon, but departed without obtaining hostages or acquiring any power by this expedition. Manus, however, followed the Earl to Meelick, and gave him his full demands.

Annal M1293.

M1293.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1293. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-three.

M1293.1

Florence O'Carolan, Bishop of Derry, died.

M1293.2

It was revealed to Nicholas Mac Maelisa (Coarb of St. Patrick) that the relics


p.459

of Patrick, Columbkille, and Bridget were at Sabhall; they were taken up by him, and great virtues and miracles were afterwards wrought by means of them, and, after having been honourably covered, they were deposited in a shrine.

M1293.3

Murrough O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, died.

M1293.4

Manus O'Conor, King of Connaught, a warlike and valiant man, the most victorious, puissant, and hospitable of the Irish of his time, died, having been ill a quarter of a year; and Hugh, son of Owen, was inaugurated his successor, through the influence of the Lord Justice but on the tenth day after his election he was taken prisoner by Fitzgerald, and some of his people were slain, and others plundered.

M1293.5

Cathal O'Conor was slain by Rory, son of Donough Reagh.

M1293.6

Cathal Roe O'Conor, having made a prisoner of Hugh, son of Owen, assumed the kingdom of Connaught, but was killed a quarter of a year afterwards by Rory, son of Donough Reagh O'Conor. Hugh, son of Owen, afterwards received his liberty, and, aided by the power of the Lord Justice and the people of the king of England took possession of the kingdom of Connaught; but on the tenth day after his election, he was taken prisoner by Fitzgerald, when great spoils were taken from him, and fifty of his people slain.

M1293.7

Farrell O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir-Maelmora, died.

M1293.8

More, daughter of Felim O'Conor, died.


p.461

M1293.9

Murtough O'Flanagan, Lord, or Chieftain of Clann-Cathail, died.

M1293.10

Tuathal, son of Murtough O'Conor, was slain by the O'Haras.

M1293.11

The castle of Sligo was given to John Fitz-Thomas, and John himself went to England.

Annal M1294.

M1294.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1294. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-four.

M1294.1

Great depredations were committed by Hugh, son of Owen (O'Conor), upon the Clann-Murtough.

M1294.2

Murtough, the son of Manus O'Conor, the best materies of a provincial king of all his tribe, was slain by Teige (i.e. Teige O'Conor) and Donnell, the son of Teige.

M1294.3

Melaghlin O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Cathail, was slain by Cathal, son of Teige Mac Dermot, in the street of Sligo. Cathal, son of Teige Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, died shortly afterwards; and Mulrony, the son of Gilchreest Mac Dermot, assumed his place.

M1294.4

Donogh Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny; Duarcan Mac-Tiernan, Lord, or Chieftain, of Teallach Dunchadha; and Dervilia, daughter of Teige, the son of Cathal Mac Dermot, died.

M1294.5

The castle of Sligo was razed by Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor.

M1294.6

Richard Burke, i.e. the Red Earl, was taken prisoner by Fitzgerald, in consequence of which all Ireland was thrown into a state of disturbance.


p.463

M1294.7

A great depredation was treacherously committed upon the Connacians by Fitzgerald and Mac Feorais Birmingham. Hugh, son of Owen, was attempted to be deposed by them. The country was desolated ; yet, though they thus disturbed the province, they acquired no power over it.

M1294.8

David Mac Giolla-Arraith was slain by the sons of Donnell Duv O'Hara.

M1294.9

Donnell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died.

M1294.10

The Earl was taken prisoner by Fitzgerald, in consequence of which capture Ireland was thrown into a state of disturbance.

M1294.11

Dermot O'Caomhain died.

Annal M1295.

M1295.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1295. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-five.

M1295.1

The Red Earl was let out of prison by Fitzgerald, through the power of the King of England; and good hostages of his own tribe were received in his stead.

M1295.2

Brian, the son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, Lord of Kinel-Owen, was slain by Donnell, the son of Brian O'Neill, and a great slaughter made of the English and Irish who were along with him.

M1295.3

Hostilities broke out in Tirconnell between Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, and Turlough, his brother, concerning the lordship, so that a great part of the country was destroyed between them, both lay and ecclesiastical property. Turlough was afterwards deposed, and banished from Tirconnell to the Kinel-Owen and the Clann-Donnell.

M1295.4

Donnell O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, one of the most judicious men in counsel of his time, died in the habit of a monk, and was interred in the monastery of Knockmoy.

M1295.5

Mac Branan (i.e. Con), Chief of Corcachlann, died; and Tomaltagh Mac Branan, who was elected his successor, was slain by the Muintir-Conallan, in revenge of their father, who had been killed by him some time before.


p.465

M1295.6

The castle of Baile-nui and the castle of Magh-Breacruighe were razed to the ground by Jeffrey O'Ferrall; and the castle of Magh-Dumha was also demolished by him.

Annal M1296.

M1296.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1296. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-six

M1296.1

Gilla-Isa Mac-an-Liathanaigh, Bishop of Elphin, and Maelpeter O'Duigennan, Archdeacon of Breifny, from Drumcliff to Kells, died.

M1296.2

Hugh, the son of Owen O'Conor, was deposed by his own tribe, and the Clann-Murtough were brought in his place. The chieftainship was conferred by them on Conor Roe, the son of Cathal, and their hostages were given up to him. In consequence of this dethronement, all the country, as well ecclesiastical as lay property, was spoiled. A great force was mustered to aid Hugh O'Conor, consisting of the English and Irish, among whom were William Burke and Theobald Burke; these he brought into the country, and for four days and four nights they continued destroying it and plundering it of its corn and cattle. The chieftains of the country then came to him Hugh O Conor, and he led them to the Earl, in order to conclude a peace with them. As to the Clann-Murtough, they burned and destroyed the whole territory of Carbury, and attacked its churches; but God, the Virgin Mary, and Columbkille, whose churches they had profaned, took revenge of them for this shortly afterwards.

M1296.3

As for the aforementioned chieftains, after they had promised submission to Hugh, they returned to their respective homes; but they did not remain long


p.467

at peace with him, for they soon afterwards again sided with the Clann-Murtough. Hugh, the son of Owen, then came into the Tuathas, bringing O'Farrell and Mac Rannall, with their troops, along with him, and sent messengers to Mac Dermot and O'Flanagan, upon which these turned out against the Clann-Murtough, in opposition to the other tribes, and sided with Hugh. When Conor Roe had heard of this, he made an attack upon Mac Dermot, and, in conjunction with his kinsmen, committed a depredation upon him. Mac Dermot went in pursuit of the prey; and a battle was fought between them, in which Conor Roe was slain, and Loughlin, his son, and Manus, son of Tomaltagh, were taken prisoners, after the loss of many on both sides. Mac Dermot brought the prisoners to Hugh. On the same day Hugh (i.e. the O'Conor), O'Farrell, Mac Dermot, Mac Rannall, and the abovementioned tribes, committed a retaliatory depredation on the people followers of the Clann-Murtough. Loughlin, the son of Conor, was afterwards blinded, in consequence of which he died.

M1296.4

An army was led by the king of England into Scotland, and he acquired great power in that country. The chiefs of the English of Ireland, i.e. Richard Burke, Earl of Ulster, Gerald Fitzgerald, and John Fitzthomas, were on this expedition. They commenced ravaging Scotland, both territories and churches. A monastery of friars in that country was plundered by them, and they prostrated it to the ground, so that they left not one stone of it above another on its site, and this after they had killed many of its ecclesiastics, besides women and persons not able to bear arms.

Annal M1297.

M1297.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1297. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-seven.

M1297.1

Melaghlin Mac Brian, Abbot of Boyle, was elected to the bishopric of Elphin; and Marian O'Donnaver, a friar of the order of St. Dominic, who had been elected to the same see before Melaghlin, repaired both to Rome, where Melaghlin died.


p.469

M1297.2

Henry Mageraghty, Bishop of Conor, died, and was interred in the monastery of Drogheda. He was a monk.

M1297.3

William O'Duffy, Bishop of Clonfert, fell from his horse, and died in consequence.

M1297.4

Conor, the son of Taichleach Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg and Airteach, the best man of his time for combat and contest, valour and prowess, incursion and wealth, protection and refuge, veracity and governing authority, died, and was interred in the monastery of Boyle.

M1297.5

Manus O'Hanly, Chief of Kinel-Dofa, died.

M1297.6

Cu-Uladh O'Hanlon, Lord of Orior, Aengus Mac Mahon, and many others of the chiefs of his people, were slain by the English of Dundalk, on their return home from the Earl of Ulster.


p.471

Annal M1298.

M1298.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1298. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-eight.

M1298.1

Thomas O'Heraghty, Abbot of Assaroe, died.

M1298.2

Sabia, daughter of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and wife of Teige, son of Andreas O'Conor, died.

M1298.3

Brian Breaghach the Bregian Magauran, Chief of Teallach-Eachdhacih Tullyhaw, was slain by Hugh Breitneach O'Conor, and the Clann-Murtough.

M1298.4

Donough, the son of Donnell O'Hara, a chieftain's son, of best hospitality and hand in defence of his country, was slain by his own kinsman, Brian Carragh O'Hara.

M1298.4

Thomas Fitzmaurice, a Baron of the Geraldines, usually called the Crooked Heir, died.

Annal M1299.

M1299.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1299. The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred ninety-nine.

M1299.1

Nicholas Mac Maelisa, Archbishop of Armagh, the most godly and devout ecclesiastic of his time in Ireland, died.

M1299.2

Farrell O'Firghil, Bishop of Raphoe, died. He was the most celebrated man of his time for charity, humanity, piety, and benevolent actions.

M1299.3

Alexander Mac Donnell, the best man of his tribe in Ireland and Scotland for hospitality and prowess, was slain by Alexander Mac Dowell, together with a countless number of his people who were slaughtered.


p.473

Annal M1300.

M1300.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1300. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred.

M1300.1

Congalagh O'Loughlin, Bishop of Corcomroe, a man of learning, hospitality, and piety, died.

M1300.2

Felim Mac Carthy, heir-apparent to the lordship of Desmond, died.

M1300.3

The castle of Ath-Cliath-an-Chorainn (i.e.of Ballymote) was commenced by the Earl.

M1300.4

John Prendergast was slain by the son of Fiachra O'Flynn.

M1300.5

Theobald Butler, an illustrious baron, died.

M1300.6

Adam Staunton, another great baron, died.

M1300.7

Seoinin Oge Mac Maurice was slain by Conor O'Flynn, with many others along with him.

Annal M1301.

M1301.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1301. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred one.

M1301.1

Finola, daughter of Felim O'Conor, Abbess of Cill-Craebhnatt, died.

M1301.2

Carbry, son of Cormac O'Melaghlin, was slain at the instigation of the son of Art O'Melaghlin, his kinsman.


p.475

M1301.3

William Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry, was slain by Ualgarg the son of Donnell, son of Art O'Rourke.

M1301.4

A great depredation was committed by Hugh, the son of Cathal O'Conor, and the Clann Murtough, upon Teige, the son of Andreas, in Magh g-Cedne.

M1301.5

An army was led by the King of England into Scotland. Fitzgerald, Mac Feorais Bermingham, and all the other noble barons of Ireland, except the Earl of Ulster, accompanied him on this expedition. They remained in Scotland from a fortnight before Lammas until Allhallowtide, but were not able to effect the total conquest of the country.

M1302.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1302. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred two.

M1302.1

Stephen O'Bragan, Archbishop of Cashel died.

M1302.2

Miles, Bishop of Limerick, grandson of the Leinster Earl, and the Bishop of Cork, died. The latter had been a monk before he was consecrated Bishop.


p.477

M1302.3

Donnell Roe Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond; Donn Carragh Maguire, the first lord of the Sil-Uidhir in Fermanagh; and Rory, the son of Donnell O'Hara, heir-presumptive to the lordship of Leyny, died.

M1302.4

A great depredation was committed by Hugh, son of Cathal, in Magh g-Ceidne, upon Teige, son of Brian, and Sitric, son of Cairneach Mac Clancy.

Annal M1303.

M1303.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1303. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred three.

M1303.1

Melaghlin Mac Brian, Bishop of Elphin, died; and Donough O'Flanagan took the bishopric after him.

M1303.2

Turlough, the son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, usually called Turlough of Cnoc-an-Madhma, Lord of Tirconnell, a warlike tower of protection in battle, and the Cuchullin of the Clann-Daly in valour, was slain by his brother, Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, after a long war, during which much of their country was spoiled between them in every direction; and great numbers of the Kinel-Owen, of the chiefs of the English of the North, and of the Kinel-Connell themselves, were slaughtered along with him. Among these were Murtough Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry; Donn O'Kane, Lord of Firnacreeva and Kienaghta; Donough Mac Menman, and Hugh Mac Menman; two grandsons of the Ferleighin Lector O'Donnell; Niall, son of Niall O'Boyle, heir presumptive to the Three Tuathas; Mac Hugossa, his son, and brother; Adam Sandal; and many others, as well English as Irish. After this, Hugh, son of Donnell Oge, enjoyed the lordship of Tirconnell in happiness and prosperity as long as he lived.


p.479

M1303.3

Donnell Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died.

M1303.4

Dermot O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuathratha, his two sons, and many others along with them, were slain at Bun Duibhe, by some of the household of Donnell, son of Teige O'Conor, who had pursued them, to deprive them of a prey which they were carrying off from Magh-g-Cedne.

M1303.5

Manus Magauran, Chief of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, in the county of Cavan, and Niall Mac Gillafinnen, cried.

M1303.6

Garrett Fitzgerald died.

M1303.7

A great depreciation was committed by the Clann-Murtough O'Conor in Muintir-Kenny, on which occasion Murtough. Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, was slain.

M1303.8

A great army was led by the King of England into Scotland; and the Red Earl and many of the Irish and English went with a large fleet from Ireland to his assistance. On this occasion they took many cities, and gained sway over Scotland. Theobald Burke, the Earl's brother, died after his return from this expedition, on Christmas night, at Carrickfergus.


p.481

Annal M1304.

M1304.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1304. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred-four.

M1304.1

Conor, son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain by Hubert O'Flaherty, after he had acted treacherously towards Donough O'Flaherty. Hubert was killed in retaliation immediately after this.

M1304.2

The Countess, wife of Richard Burke, Earl of Ulster, i.e. the Red Earl, and Walter de Burgo, heir of the same Earl, died.

Annal M1305.

M1305.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1305. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred-five.

M1305.1

O'Conor Faly (Murtough), Maelmora, his kinsman, and Calvagh O'Conor, with twenty-nine of the chiefs of his people, were slain by Sir Pierce Mac Feorais Bermingham in Mac Feorais's own castle, by means of treachery and deceit.

M1305.2

The new castle of Inishowen was erected by the Red Earl.

M1305.3

A victory was gained by Hugh, son of Cathal O'Conor, and the Clann-Murtough, over the O'Reillys, in a contest in which Philip O'Reilly, the heir of Clann-Sweeny, and Mac Buirche, head of the Gallowglasses, together with one hundred and forty others, were slain.


p.483

M1305.4

Matthew Oge O'Reilly was slain by the inhabitants of Teallach-Dunchadha.

M1305.5

Turlough, son of Niall Roe O'Brien, died.

M1305.6

Hugh Oge O'Farrell died.

Annal M1306.

M1306.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1306. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred six.

M1306.1

Donough O'Flaherty, Bishop of Killala, the most eminent of the Irish for piety, died at Dunbuinne, on his way to Dublin, and was interred with honour at Mullingar, in the house of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

M1306.2

Petrus O'Tuathalain, Vicar of Killaspugbrone, and Professor Thomas O'Naan, Archdeacon of Raphoe, and bishop-elect of the same church, died.

M1306.3

Turlough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, a man the most illustrious, most pious, most humanely charitable, most prosperous, and most expert at arms, that was in Ireland in his time, died; and his son Donough was elected in his place.

M1306.4

Donnell Tuirtreach O'Neill was slain through mistake by the household of O'Neill.

M1306.5

Farrell Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais in the county of Leitrim , was slain by his brothers and a party of his own people.

M1306.6

A great war broke out between Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor, King of Connaught, assisted by the chiefs of the Sil-Murray and Hugh, son of Cathal O'Conor, joined by some of the sons of the chieftains of Connaught, and the chieftains and tribes of Breifny. They the two armies were for the space of four months encamped at both sides of the Shannon. Some of Hugh's people encamped in the Tuathas, where they committed great depredations. Flann,


p.485

son of Fiachra O'Flynn, heir presumptive of Sil-Maelruain, and Brian, son of Donough Reagh O'Conor, together with many others, were slain by the O'Hanlys, who were in pursuit of them for their prey. The most distinguished of those who made this incursion were Rory, son of Cathal O'Conor; Donough, son of Conor of the Cup, the son of Farrell Mac Dermot, heir presumptive to the lordship of Moylurg, by reason of his prosperity and hospitality up to that day. Howbeit, these chieftains marched on with their spoil, and as many of their people as had survived, until they arrived at O'Conor's fortress. They then burned the palace of the King of Connaught. Hugh, the son of Owen, overtook them after they had burned the royal residence, and immediately deprived them of the prey, killed Donough, son of Conor of the Cup, and some of his people around him.

M1306.7

A great depredation was committed by the Clann-Murtough O'Conor in the territory of Carbury. David O'Caomhain, Chief of that tract of country extending from Tuaim-da-Bhodar to Gleóir, a rich and affluent brughaidh farmer, Donough Mac Buidheachain, and many others, were slain on this predatory incursion.

M1306.8

O'Flanagan was slain by Brian Carragh O'Hara.

Annal M1307.

M1307.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1307. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seven.

M1307.1

Laurence O'Laghtnan (i.e. a Grey Friar), Bishop of Kilmacduagh, and Donough O'Flanagan, Bishop of Elphin, died.


p.487

M1307.2

Donnell, son of Teige, son of Brian, son of Andreas, son of Brian Luighneach, who was son of Turlough More O'Conor, Tanist of Connaught, a man of great prowess and hospitality, who was universally esteemed, was slain by Hugh Breifneach, the son of Cathal Roe O'Conor.

M1307.3

Teige, the son of Melaghlin, son of Donough, son of Donnell, son of Manus, son of Turlough O'Conor, a man distinguished for his hospitality, was slain by Cathal, the son of Donnell, son of Teige O'Conor.

M1307.4

The greater number of the English of Roscommon were slain by Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, at Ath-easgrach-Cuan, where Philip Muinder, John Muinder, and Main Drew, with many others whose names are not mentioned, were killed. Dermot Gall Mac Dermot, Cormac Mac Kaherny, and the sheriff of Roscommon, were taken prisoners; but they were afterwards set at liberty, and they made peace recte restitution for the burning of the town by Edmund Butler. Donough O'Kelly, after he had performed these exploits, died; and his was not the death of one who had lived a life of cowardice, but the death of a man who had displayed prowess and bravery, and bestowed jewels and riches.

M1307.5

Alvy, daughter of Teige O'Conor, died.

M1307.6

Melaghlin O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, and Manus Mageraghty, died.


p.489

M1307.7

Conor, son of Fiachra O'Flynn, the most hospitable and valiant youth of his tribe, died.

M1307.8

Edward II. was made king of England on the 7th of July.

Annal M1308.

M1308.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1308. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eight.

M1308.1

Lightning fell upon the monastery of the friars of Roscommon, and destroyed it.

M1308.2

A great depredation was committed by Mulrony Mac Dermot upon the sons of Donnell O'Conor, in the territory of Carbury; and another depredation was committed upon them by the Clann-Murtough, who had concluded a peace with them, and given them hostages, but afterwards acted treacherously towards them. The sons of Donnell O'Conor after this proceeded to Slieve-da-én, taking nothing with them but their steeds, horses, and accoutrements. As soon as the English of Tireragh and Leyny had heard of this, they assembled, and pursued them to the summit of Slieve-da-én. Here the sons of Donnell turned on them, and a battle ensued, in which the English were routed and pursued as far as Leac-Easa-dara. Thomas Mac Walter, Constable of Bunfinne, his brother, and many others, were slain.


p.491

M1308.3

A retaliatory depredation was committed by Hugh, the son of Cathal O'Conor, upon his brother Rory, son of Cathal, on which occasion Manus Mac Manus O'Conor, and others, were killed.

Annal M1309.

M1309.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1309. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred nine.

M1309.1

Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Rory, son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught, and worthy heir to the monarchy of Ireland, the most hospitable and expert at arms of all the Irish born in his time, was slain by Hugh Breifneach, the son of Cathal O'Conor, at Coill-an-clochain, together with many of the chiefs of his people about him. Among these were Conor Mac Dermot; Dermot Roe, son of Teige O'Conor; Dermot, son of Cathal Carragh


p.493

Mac Dermot; Hugh, son of Murtough, son of Teige, son of Mulrony; and Dermot O'Healy, a princely brughaidh, the best of his time. On the other side fell Gilla-na-naev Mac Egan, Chief Brehon of Connaught, and the most illustrious of the Brehons of his time; Faghartach O'Devlin, and others not mentioned. The Sil-Murray then conferred the lordship upon Rory,the son of Cathal O'Conor. Rory O'Conor and O'Flynn afterwards led a troop of cavalry to the Plain, and slew Mac Feorais Bermingham.

M1309.2

A conference was held by William Burke (i.e. as many of them as were on his side) with Rory, son of Cathal, at Ath-Slisean. They violated, however, the rules of a conference, and a battle was fought between them, in which Rory was defeated, and some of his people were slain. William Burke went to the abbey of Boyle, and the Clann-Murtough went to Tirerrill, where they destroyed much corn, and made many conflagrations. Mac William then proceeded northwards, across the Curlieu Mountains, and drove Rory, the son of Cathal, from his fortress. On this occasion Donough O'Finnaghty and many others were slain by the van of Mac William's army.

M1309.3

A depredation was committed by Mac William in Clan-Fearmaighe, and another at Binn-Gulban.

M1309.4

Conor, the son of Brian Roe O'Brien, was slain.


p.495

Annal M1310.

M1310.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1310. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred ten.

M1310.1

Conor O'Brien, the best roydamna of his time, was treacherously slain by the black English.

M1310.2

Great retaliatory depredations were committed by Hugh Breifneach and the Clann-Murtough upon Mulrony Mac Dermot. Donough Mac Donough was plundered by them, and many of the chiefs of his people were taken prisoners; others were killed and burned by them, and his Mac Donough's wife, the daughter of O'Flanagan, was killed.

M1310.3

Farrell Mac Dorcy died.

M1310.4

Finola, daughter of Manus O'Conor, and Una, daughter of Hugh, the son of Felim, died.

M1310.5

An army was led by Geoffrey O'Farrell to Dun-Uabhair, where Donnell, son of Hugh Oge O'Farrell, Hugh, son of Maelisa, and Godfrey, son of Murtough, were slain.

M1310.6

The castle of Bunfinne, including both its houses and corn stacks, was burned and plundered by Rory, son of Cathal, Hugh, son of Manus, and the people of Hugh Breifneach.

M1310.7

Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, the worthy heir to the kingdom of Connaught,


p.497

was, by treachery and deceit, slain by Mac Quillin (i.e. Johnock), who was on bonaght with him. It was for a bribe that Mac Quillin did this.

M1310.8

Twenty tuns of wine were washed ashore in Magh-Cedne.

M1310.9

The castle of Sligo was erected by the Red Earl.

M1310.10

Felim, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor, assumed the place of his father.

M1310.11

Cormac O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuathratha, was slain by Henry Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir Feódacháin.

M1310.12

Magrath Maguire, Tanist of Fermanagh, and Donn Mac Gilla-Michil, Chief of Clann-Conghaile, were burned by Roolv Mac Mahon.


p.499

Annal M1311.

M1311.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1311. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eleven.

M1311.1

Donnell O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, died.

M1311.2

A great depredation was committed in Connaught by the Clann-Murtough O'Conor, on which occasion Gilchreest, son of Maurice, who was son of Donough Mac Dermot; Hugh, son of Cormac, son of Donough, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot; William Mac Giolla-Arraith; and many others besides, were slain by them.

M1311.3

A great army was led by William Burke into Munster, against Clarus De Clare, and a battle was fought, in which Clarus was defeated. William Burke pursued the routed enemy with great bravery, until the people of Clarus closed around him, and took him prisoner. He was, however, victorious in the battle.

M1311.4

Teige O'Hanly was slain by Jordan de Exeter.

M1311.5

A great war broke out in Thomond. Donough Mac Namara and his adherents (i.e. the inhabitants of the cantred of Hy-Caisin) gave battle to O'Brien and the men of Munster; but Mac Namara was defeated, and he himself and Donnell O'Grady, Lord of Kinel-Dungaile, were slain on the battle field; and both armies suffered immense slaughter.

M1311.6

Donough O'Brien, King of Munster, and a materies for a monarch of Ireland for his hospitality and achievements, was treacherously slain by Murrough, son of Mahon O'Brien; and Murtough was elected in his place.

M1311.7

Loughlin Reagh O'Dea was slain by Mahon, the son of Donnell Connaghtagh O'Brien.


p.501

M1311.8

Johnock Mac Quillin slew Gruidelach at Ballytoberbride, where he himself was immediately after killed, in revenge of it; and it was with the same short axe with which he had killed Hugh Breifneach O'Conor that he was killed himself.

M1311.9

A depredation was committed by Felim O'Conor, King of Connaught, upon the Clann Murtough, on the border of Magh Cedne, where Melaghlin, son of Conor, popularly called Ceann an Medhil, and many others, were slain.

M1311.10

Dermot Cleireach O'Brien died.

M1311.11

Donnell O'Beirne, Chief of Tir Briuin, and Gilla Isa O'Daly, an ollav in poetry, died.

M1312.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1312. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twelve.

M1312.1

William Mac Feorais Bermingham, Archbishop of Tuam, and Benedict O'Bragan, Bishop of Leyny Achonry, died.

M1312.2

Melaghlin Mac Aedha, Bishop of Elphin, was afterwards elected to the bishopric of Tuam.


p.503

Annal M1313.

M1313.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1313. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirteen.

M1313.1

Teige, son of Andreas, son of Brian Luighneach O'Conor, and Cathal, son of Murrough Carragh O'Farrell, died.

M1313.2

Gilla-Isa Mac Dorcy was slain by Cathal Carragh Mac Dermot.

Annal M1314.

M1314.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1314. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fourteen.

M1314.1

Mathew Maguibne, Bishop of Breifny Kilmore, died.

M1314.2

Niall i.e. Niall Beg, the son of Melaghlin, son of Turlough of Cnoc-an-madhma O'Donnell, was slain by Hugh, the son of Hugh O'Donnell.

M1314.3

Matthew Mac Tiernan was slain by Cathal O'Rourke.

M1314.4

Roolbh Rodolph Mac Mahon was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1314.5

The O'Reillys were defeated at Drumlahan by Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor.

M1314.6

Niall, son of Brian O'Neill, heir presumptive of Kinel-Owen, a prosperous and very wealthy man, died.

M1314.7

Manus, son of Donnell O'Hara, was slain by Manus, son of William O'Hara.

Annal M1315.

M1315.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1315. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifteen.

M1315.1

A great fleet arrived in Ireland from Scotland, commanded by Edward, the King of Scotland's brother, and landed in Ulster. They committed great depredations on the Earl's people and the English of Meath. The Earl mustered a great army to oppose the Scots, and was joined by Felim, son of Hugh


p.505

O'Conor, and a great number of the Connacians. Rory, son of Cathal, mustered another great army in Connaught, and many castles were burned and broken down by him after Felim had left the country province.

M1315.2

Hugh (i.e. Hugh Ballagh), the son of Manus O'Conor, was slain by Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor.

M1315.3

Manus, the son of Manus O'Conor, the most famous and illustrious of the princes of Connaught at this time, and Donnell, his brother, were on the next day also slain by the same Cathal.

M1315.4

The Red Earl and Edward Bruce, with their armies, came to a battle with each other, in which the Earl was defeated, and William Burke and the two sons of Mac Anveely were taken prisoners.

M1315.5

Mahon Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, O'Mulvey, Chief of Muintir-Cearbhallain, and many of their people, were slain by Mulrony Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg. Conor Roe, son of Hugh Breifneach, who fought on Mac Dermot's side on that day, was also slain.

M1315.6

O'Donnell (Hugh, son of Donnell Oge) came with a great army to the castle of Sligo, took the town, and destroyed much around it.

M1315.7

Rory, son of Donnell O'Conor, was slain by a band of gallowglasses, at the instigation of Dervorgilla, daughter of Manus O'Conor, who gave them a reward for the deed.

M1315.8

Auliffe O'Farrell died.

M1315.9

Teige O'Higgin, a learned poet, died.


p.507

Annal M1316.

M1316.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1316. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixteen.

M1316.1

A great army was mustered by Felim O'Conor, by Mac Feorais Birmingham, and the English of West Connaught. They marched to Tochar-mona-Coinneadha.


p.509

Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor, king of Connaught, came against them with all his forces; and a battle was fought between them, in

p.511

which Rory was defeated, and he himself slain, together with Dermot Gall Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, Cormac Mac Keherny, Chief of Ciarraighe, and many others of the chiefs of his gallowlasses, and of his own particular friends.

M1316.2

Felim again assumed the government of Connaught; he mustered another army, and marched against Ath-leathan; he burned the town, and slew Slevin de Exeter, Lord of the town, and also Goganagh De Cogan, the noblest baron in his time in Ireland, and many others of the English, and acquired much booty.

M1316.3

A very great army was mustered by Felim O'Conor and the chiefs of the province of Connaught. Among these chiefs were the following, viz.

  1. Donough O'Brien, with the chiefs of Munster;
  2. O'Melaghlin, King of Meath;
  3. Malgary O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny;
  4. O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly;
  5. Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many;
  6. Manus, son of Donnell O'Conor, Tanist of Connaught;
  7. Art 0'Hara, Lord of Leyny;
  8. and Brian O'Dowda, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach.
They all marched to Athenry. The English of West Connaught mustered their forces, to oppose

p.513

them, namely, William Burke; the Baron Mac Feorais Bermingham, Lord of Athenry; and the greater part of the English of Leath Chuinn. A fierce and spirited engagement took place between them, in which the Irish were at last defeated. Felim O'Conor, from whom the Irish had expected more than from any other Gael then living, was slain. There were also slain
  1. Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, and
  2. twenty-eight gentlemen of the O'Kellys;
  3. Manus, son of Donnell O'Conor, Tanist of Connaught;
  4. Art O'Hara, Lord of Leyny;
  5. Melaghlin Carragh O'Dowda;
  6. Conor Oge O'Dowda;
  7. Murtough, son of Conor O'Dowda;
  8. Dermot Mac Dermot, heir apparent to Moylurg;
  9. Murtough, son of Taichleach Mac Dermot;
  10. Murtough, son of Dermot O'Farrell;
  11. Melaghlin Oge Mac Manus;
  12. John, son of Murrough O'Madden;
  13. Donnell, son of Hugh O'Concannon, Lord of Hy-Diarmada, and his brother Murtough;
  14. Murrough O'Madden;
  15. Donnell O'Boyle;
  16. Donough O'Molloy, and his people along with him;
  17. Murrough, the son of Murrough Mac Mahon, and one hundred of his people;
  18. Niall Sinnagh the Fox, Lord of the men of Teffia, and his people;
  19. Farrell, son of John Gallda O'Farrell;
  20. William, son of Hugh Oge O'Farrell;
  21. Thomas, son of Auliffe O'Farrell; and
  22. five of the Clann-Donough,
namely,
  1. Tomaltagh, son of Gilchreest;
  2. Murrough, son of Donough;
  3. Conor, son of Teige;
  4. Murtough, son of Donough; and
  5. Melaghlin, son of Donough.
In this battle were also slain
  1. John Mac Egan, O'Conor's Brehon;
  2. Gilla-na-naev, son of Dailredocair O'Devlin,

    p.515

    O'Conor's standard-bearer; and
  3. Thomas O'Conallan.
In short, it is impossible to enumerate or tell all the chiefs of Connaught, Munster, and Meath, who fell in this battle. This terrible battle was fought on the festival day of St. Lawrence lOth of August. Felim O'Conor was twenty-three years of age at the time. Rory na-bhFeadh, the son of Donough, son of Owen, son of Rory O'Conor was then inaugurated king of Connaught.

M1316.4

A numerous army was led by William Burke into Sil-Murray; and O'Conor and the Sil-Murray, with many of the tribes and chiefs of Connaught, made peace with him. Mac Dermot, however, did not consent to make this peace; and Mac William for that reason afterwards made an incursion into Moylurg, committed great depredations about Ath-an-chip, and in Uachtar-tire, and burned and destroyed the whole country; but his men departed without fighting a battle, or obtaining pledges of submission. Rory, the son of Donough O'Conor, was afterwards deposed by Mac Dermot.

M1316.5

Dervorgilla, the daughter of Manus O'Conor, and wife of Hugh O'Donnell, died.

Annal M1317.

M1317.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1317. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventeen.

M1317.1

Donough O'Brien, king of Munster, was slain.

M1317.2

Turlough, the son of Hugh, son of Owen, son of Rory, son of Hugh, son of Cathal Crovderg, was inaugurated by the Connacians as their king.

M1317.3

Robert Bruce came from Scotland to Ireland with a great army, to assist his brother, and expel the English from Ireland.

M1317.4

Meyler de Exeter, Lord of Athleathan Ballylahan, in the county of Mayo, was slain by Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor; and Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Donnell-Erris O'Conor, was slain along with him, together with fourteen


p.517

of their people. It was on the brink of the Methenagh (i.e. a river) of Drumcliff, that these deeds were done.

M1317.5

The castle of Ath-cliath an Chorainn (i.e. of Ballymote) was demolished.

M1317.6

Melaghlin Carragh Mac Dermot, heir to the lordship of Moylurg; Conor O'Conor (i.e. the son of the coarb of St. Coman); Manus O'Flanagan, heir to the chieftainship of Clann-Cathail, and many others, were slain by Gilbert Mac Costello.

M1317.7

The son of Rory and the men of Breifny were defeated at Kilmore, where the son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor was taken prisoner, and the two sons of Niall O'Rourke, Conor Boy Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach Dunchadha, Mahon Mac Tiernan, Gillaroe, son of the Erenagh Mac Tiernan, Nicholas Mac-an-Master, one hundred and forty of the gallowglasses of the people of the son of Rory, and others not enumerated, were slain.

M1317.8

Maelisa Roe Mac Egan, the most learned man in Ireland in law and judicature, died.

M1317.9

Randal Mac Rannall, Chief of Muntir-Eolais in the county of Leitrim, was treacherously taken prisoner, and Geoffrey Mac Rannall was made Chief in his place.

Annal M1318.

M1318.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1318. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred eighteen.

M1318.1

A great victory was gained over the English in Ely, by O'Carroll; and Adam Mares and many other Englishmen were slain.


p.519

M1318.2

A great host was mustered by Mulrony Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, with which he marched to Fassa-Coille, to attack Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor. In this army came Turlough, son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor; Ualgarg O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny; Conor O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many; and Tomaltagh Mac Donough, Lord of Tirerrill. On the arrival of these chieftains at Fassa-Coille, Cathal offered them great presents; but these were not accepted from him, and they charged him in the very middle of his fortified camp. Cathal, however, was in nowise daunted or disheartened at this, but resisted them with fierceness and bravery; and a furious and desperate battle was fought between them, in which Brian, the son of Turlough O'Conor, heir presumptive to the government of Connaught, Conor O'Kelly, Brian Mac Manus, Cathal, son of Gilchreest Mac Dermot, and many others of the nobles and plebeians of the army, were slain by Cathal and his people.

M1318.3

Cathal, son of Donnell, afterwards marched against the O'Conor and Mac Dermot, and committed great depredations in Moylurg, and deposed Turlough, the son of Hugh, and assumed the sovereignty of Connaught himself; upon which Turlough went to seek refuge from William Burke and the English.

M1318.4

John, son of Donnell O'Neill, was slain by O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Donnell Oge) at Derry-Columbkille, and Mac Donnell and many others were slain and drowned.


p.521

M1318.5

Edward Bruce, the destroyer of the people of Ireland in general, both English and Irish, was slain by the English, through dint of battle and bravery, at Dundalk, where also Mac Rory, Lord of the lnse-Gall the Hebrides, Mac Donnell, Lord of Argyle, and many others of the chiefs of Scotland, were slain. And no achievement had been performed in Ireland for a long time before, from which greater benefit had accrued to the country than from this; for, during the three and a half years that this Edward spent in it, a universal famine prevailed to such a degree, that men were wont to devour one another.

M1318.6

John O'Farrell was slain by his son with one shot from an arrow.

M1318.7

Geoffrey, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died.

M1318.8

Cathal, son of Gilchreest Mag-Rannall, was slain.

M1318.9

Gilla an-Choimhdhe, son of Kenny O'Gormly, and Gormlaith, daughter of Mac Branan, his wife, died.

Annal M1319.

M1319.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1319. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred nineteen.

M1319.1

Henry Mac-an-Chrosain, Bishop of Raphoe, died; and Thomas, son of Cormac O'Donnell, Abbot of Assaroe, was then elected to the bishopric of Raphoe.


p.523

M1319.2

The Bishop of Derry, O'Banan, Bishop of Clogher, and the Bishop of Clonfert, died.

M1319.3

Aine, daughter of Mac Dermot, and wife of Mac Consnava, died.

M1319.4

Eachmarcach Mac Branan, Chief of Corcachlann, slew Tomaltagh O'Mulrenin; but he himself did not escape scathless, for, on the third day afterwards, he died of the wounds which Tomaltagh had inflicted upon him.

M1319.5

Donnell O'Neill, Lord of Tyrone, was expelled from his lordship through the power of the English and the Clann-Hugh-Boy, and went to Fermanagh under the protection of Flaherty Maguire ; but the inhabitants of Fermanagh plundered his people.

M1319.6

O'Neill, i.e. Donnell, assumed his own lordship again.

M1319.7

Brian, son of Donnell O'Neill, Tanist of Tyrone, was slain by the Clann-Hugh-Boy and Henry Mac Davill at Rath-lury.

Annal M1320.

M1320.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1320 The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty.

M1320.1

The monastery of Bantry, in O'Sullivan's country, in the bishopric of Ross, was founded by O'Sullivan for Franciscan Friars. In this monastery O'Sullivan and many other nobles chose burial places for themselves.

M1320.2

A meeting and conference took place between Cathal O'Conor and Mulrony Mac Dermot: a kindly and amicable peace was concluded between them,


p.525

and Mac Dermot then returned to his own country. Cathal, however, afterwards violated the conditions of this peace, for he made a prisoner of Mac Dermot at Mullagh Doramhnach, and also of his wife, the daughter of Mac Manus, at Port-na-Cairrge. Maelisa Don Mac Egan and his son, and Tomaltagh Mac Donough, Lord of Tirerrill, were also made prisoners, and the country was entirely plundered.

M1320.3

Hugh, son of Teige O'Conor, a good materies of a king of Connaught, by reason of his personal shape, nobility, and hospitality, was slain by Mac Martin, who was himself slain in revenge of it.

M1320.4

Mahon, son of Donnell Connaghtagh O'Brien, Tanist of Munster, was slain by the Clann-Cuilein.

M1320.5

More, daughter of O'Boyle, and wife of O'Farrell, died.

M1320.6

Mac Martin was slain in his own house by Hugh, the son of Teige O'Conor; but the Clann-Martin and the Clann-Hugh-Boy pursued Hugh to Clogher, where they killed him.

Annal M1321.

M1321.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1321. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-one.

M1321.1

Grainne, daughter of Mac Manus, and wife of Mulrony Mac Dermot, died.

M1321.2

Rory of the Faes, the son of Donough, son of Owen O'Conor, was treacherously slain by Cathal, the son of Hugh, son of Owen.

M1321.3

The Rock of Lough Key was destroyed by Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor.

M1321.4

Manus O'Hanlon, Lord of Orior, was blinded on Spy-Wednesday by his own kinsman, Niall, son of Cu-Uladh O'Hanlon.

M1321.5

Niall O'Hanlon, Lord of Orior, was treacherously slain by the English of Dundalk.


p.527

M1321.6

A great defeat was given by Andrew Mac Feorais Bermingham and the English of Meath to the sons of the Chieftains of Offaly.

M1321.7

William and Matthew Mac Gillafinnen were slain by Henry Mac Gillafinnen, at a meeting of his own tribe.

M1322.0

THe AGE OF CHRIST, 1322. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-two.

M1322.1

Mathew O'Hoey, Bishop of Conmaicne or Ardagh, and Andreas Mag-Mailin, Chief Professor of the Law of New Witness, of the Ancient Law, and of the Canon Law, died.

M1322.2

Lucas O'Murray, Archdeacon of Cluain, died.

M1322.3

Murrough, the son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, was treacherously slain at Cluain-lis-Bec by his brother's son, Seoinin O'Farrell. Murtough, the son of Auliffe O'Farrell, was treacherously slain on the same day, by his own kinsmen (Loughlin and Robert). Loughlin, the son of Auliffe O'Farrell, was afterwards slain by Seoinin O'Farrell.

M1322.4

Donough, the son of Donough Mac Dermot, died.

M1322.5

Henry Mac Gillafinnen, Chief of Muintir-Feodachain, was slain by the sons of Auliffe Maguire.

M1322.6

Gilbert O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died.

M1322.7

Mulrony Mac Dermot was taken prisoner by Conor, son of Teige O'Conor, and by the household of Cathal O'Conor, at Cluain-Cummisc, which town they plundered.

M1322.8

Richard Mac Feorais Bermingham, Lord of Athenry, died.

M1322.9

The English suffered a signal defeat from Brian O'Brien.

M1322.10

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Geoffrey, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, assumed the lordship of Annaly.

M1322.11

William Liath Burke, son of William More, died.

M1322.12

Mulrony Mac Dermot, the son of Gilchreest, son of Conor, son of Cormac, son of Tomaltagh of the Rock, Lord of Moylurg died.


p.525

M1322.13

Maurice, son of the Coarb, died.

M1322.14

Osgar, the son of Loughlin Maguire, was slain by Cathal O'Rourke.

M1322.15

Petrus O'Breslen, Chief Brehon of Fermanagh, died.

M1322.16

Fineen O'Cassidy, Chief Physician of Fermanagh, died.

M1322.17

Farrell Roe Magauran and Gilla-Isa Magauran were slain by the sons of Auliffe Maguire.

Annal M1323.

M1323.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1323. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-three.

M1323.1

Gilla-airnin O'Casey, Erenagh of Cluain-da-rath, died.

M1323.2

Carbry an Sgregain, son of Cormac O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, was treacherously slain by Donnell O'Molloy.

M1323.3

Maelmora Mageoghegan died.

M1323.4

Seoinin O'Farrell was slain by the sons of John O'Farrell.

M1323.5

O'Hara (Farrell) was slain by O'Connmachain, one of his own people.

M1323.6

Rory Mac Mahon, son of the Lord of Oriel, Melaghlin O'Seagannain, and Mac Muldoon, were slain by Cathal O'Rourke at Bel-atha-Chonaill.

M1323.7

Niall, son of Niall Cam, was slain by Loughlin and Melaghlin O'Reilly.

M1323.8

Mac Feorais (Bermingham) and the English marched with a great army against Donnell, son of John O'Farrell, to Coill-na-n-amhas, where Kepagh and Calvagh, and many of the English, were slain.

M1323.9

Maelmeadha, daughter of Mac Tiernan, and wife of Magauran, died.

M1323.10

Gillapatrick O'Duigennan, Chief Historian of Conmaicne, and Lucas, his son, were slain by Conor, the son of Garvey Maguire.

M1323.11

Loughlin, the son of Owen O'Daly, was slain by the tribe of Hugh Boy O'Neill.


p.531

M1323.12

Godfrey, son of Gilla-Isa O'Daly, was slain by Brian, the son of Rory O'Conor.

Annal M1324.

M1324.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1324. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-four.

M1324.1

The King of Connaught, Cathal, the son of Donnell, son of Brian, son of Andreas, son of Brian Luighneach, son of Turlough More O'Conor, the most energetic, the best, and the most successful man of his time, was slain by Turlough O'Conor, in Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna; and the son of O'Donnell, i.e. Melaghlin, the son of Turlough of Cnoc-an-madhma, son of Donnell Oge, Tanist of Tirconnell, who had been banished by O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh, the son of Donnell Oge, Gilchreest Oge Mac Donough, and many others, were slain along with Cathal O'Conor. Turlough assumed the government of Connaught after him.

M1324.2

Rannall Oge Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir Eolais, was slain.

M1324.3

William Burke, son of William More, died.

M1324.4

Teige O'Rourke and Tiernan Mac Rourke were made prisoners by the sons of Matthew O'Reilly, and delivered by them into the hands of Mac Mahon, by whom they were put to death in revenge of his son Rory, whom they had slain some time before.

M1324.5

Donough Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory, died.

M1324.6

Brian O'Reilly and Gilchreest O'Reilly were slain by the O'Rourkes.

Annal M1325.

M1325.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1325. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-five.

M1325.1

Donnell, the son of Brian O'Neill, Lord of Tyrone, died at Lough-Laeghaire.

M1325.2

Cu-Uladh, the son of Donnell, son of Brian O'Neill, a good materies of a Lord of Tyrone, was slain by the sons of Niall, the son of Brian, i.e. the sons of his father's brother.


p.533

M1325.3

Gilchreest Cleireach Mac Dermot and Brian O'Gara died.

M1325.4

Dermot O'Mulrenin, Head Chieftain of Clann-Conor, died.

M1325.5

Melaghlin O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-ratha in Fermanagh, was slain by the sons of Dermot O'Flanagan.

M1325.6

Dermot O'Mulrenin (the great chieftain), the Manannan of the chiefs of Connaught in his time, died.

M1325.7

Thomas O'Connery, Deacon of Breifny, died.

M1325.8

A victory was gained by the sons of Turlough O'Brien, over the sons of Brian Roe O'Brien; and Brian, the son of Mahon O'Brien, and many others, were slain.

M1325.9

Randal O'Higgin and Nicholas, son of the Coarb of St. Maidoc, died.

M1325.10

Raghnailt, daughter of Annadh O'Reilly, and wife of Donough Mac Brady, died.

M1325.11

Donough Mac Kenna was slain in Mac Mahon's church.

Annal M1326.

M1326.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1326. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-six.

M1326.1

Laurence O'Laghtnan, Bishop of Elphin, died; and John O'Finnaghty was elected his successor in the bishopric.

M1326.2

Richard Burke, i.e. the Red Earl, Lord of Ulster, and of the greater part of Connaught, the choicest of all the English of Ireland, died at the close of Summer.


p.535

M1326.3

Ivor Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by his kinsmen.

M1326.4

Nicholas O'Heyne died.

M1326.5

Turlough Mac-an-Chaoich O'Reilly died.

M1326.6

Turlough Mac Mahon died.

M1326.7

Edward III. was made King of England on the 23rd of January.

M1326.8

O'Rourke, Ualgarg, plundered Magh-hionais, where Godfrey Mac Caffrey was slain by Cathal O'Rourke.

M1326.9

A victory was gained by Donnell Cairbreach Mac Carthy over Mac Thomas and the English of Munster. Many knights were slain.

M1326.10

Auliffe Maguire died.

Annal M1327.

M1327.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1327. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-seven.

M1327.1

Flaherty Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, and Gormlaith, the daughter of Mac Dermot, and wife of Manus, son of Donnell O'Conor, Tanist of Connaught, for some time afterwards wife of Conor O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, and afterwards wife of Farrell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died, after the victory of penance, hospitality, and renown.

M1327.2

Melaghlin Reagh, son of Donnell, son of Teige O'Conor, died of Galar breac.

M1327.3

Farrell, son of Ualgarg O'Rourke, Cuilen O'Dempsey, and Sabia, daughter of Mac Egan, died.

M1327.4

A great war broke out between the King of England and his queen, the daughter of the King of France. The king had been dethroned by this woman, and her son had in the past year assumed the government by her order, in


p.537

opposition to his father. He was crowned by the council i.e. the parliament of England.

M1327.5

The King of Scotland came to Ireland.

M1327.6

A war broke out between the O'Rourkes and O'Reillys; and the castle of Lough Oughter was taken by Cathal O'Rourke.

M1327.7

The castle of Lough Oughter was taken by O'Rourke by cunning, for twenty cows.

M1327.8

Gilchreest Dall Mac Rannall was slain in his own bed by the son of O'Mulvey.

M1327.9

The Galar Breac raged throughout Ireland, of which many died.

Annal M1328.

M1328.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1328. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-eight.

M1328.1

The Bishop of Breifny Kilmore, O'Cridagain, died.

M1328.2

Thomas O'Meallaigh, Bishop of Annadown, died at Rome.

M1328.3

Maurice O'Gibellan, Chief Professor of the New Law, the Old Law, and the Canon Law, a truly profound philosopher, a learned poet, and a canon chorister of Tuam, Elphin, and Achad-Chonaire, Killala, Annadown, and Clonfert, the official and the general Brehon i.e. Judge of the archbishopric, died.


p.539

M1328.4

Gilla-na-nangel O'Taichligh, Archdeacon of Innis recte Devenish, died.

M1328.5

Melaghlin O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir-Maelmora, was wounded by the English of meath, who afterwards took him prisoner, and received hostages for his ranson. He afterwards died of his wounds in his own house.

M1328.6

Gilla-Adamnan O'Firghil O'Freel, Coarb of St. Adamnan at Raphoe, died.

M1328.7

Great thunder and lightning occurred in the summer of this year, by which the fruits and crops of Ireland were very much injured, and the corn grew whitish and unprofitable.

M1328.8

A disease, called Slaedán, raged universally throughout Ireland, which afflicted, for three or four days successively, every person who took it. It was second in pain only to the agony of death.

M1328.9

William Burke, i.e. an t-Iarla Donn, the son of Sir John (i.e. Earl), the son of the Red Earl, came to Ireland.

M1328.10

Donough Roe O'Gara and five of his tribe were killed.

M1328.11

Conor Mac Branan, heir to the chieftainship of Corcachlann, was slain by the people of Annaly.

M1328.12

An army was led by Walter Burke into Connaught. Many of the retainers of Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, were plundered by him.

M1328.13

Sir John Mac Feorais Birmingham, Earl of Louth, the most vigorous, puissant, and hospitable of the English of Ireland, was treacherously slain by his own people, namely, by the English of Oriel. With him were also slain


p.541

many others of the English and Irish, amongst whom was the Blind O'Carroll recte Mac Carroll, i.e. Mulrony, Chief Minstrel of Ireland and Scotland in his time.

M1328.14

Brian, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Donough, was slain by Brian, the son of Teige Mac Donough.

M1328.15

A great army was led by the Earl of Ulster, Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, and Murtough O'Brien, King of Munster, against Brian Bane O'Brien; but they were defeated by Brian Bane. Conor O'Brien, a good materies for a King of Ireland, by reason of his personal shape, wisdom, hospitality, and renown, was slain on this occasion, as were also eighty persons, including chieftains and plebeians.

M1328.16

Teige, son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain by Dermot O'Gara.

M1328.17

A meeting for a conference took place at Ath-chinn-Locha Techet between Walter, son of William Burke, and Gilbert Mac Costello, on the one side; and Mulrony Mac Dermot, Tomaltagh, his son, Tomaltagh Mac Donough, and the chiefs of Clann-Mulrony, on the other: and Walter, Gilbert, and their people, were defeated by Mac Dermot.

M1328.18

Donough Gallda, the son of Donnell O'Conor, was slain by Hugh, the son of Teige, son of Melaghlin, son of Manus O'Conor.

M1328.19

Matthew Reagh Mac Caffrey was slain by Muintir Gearan.

M1328.20

Ivor Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by the sons of Gilchreest Mac Rannall.

M1328.21

Duvesa, daughter of O'Farrell, and wife of Mac Murrough of the Mountain, died.

M1328.22

The Blind Mac Carroll, whose name was Mulrony, the chief of the minstrels of Ireland in his time, was slain.

M1328.23

Edwina, daughter of Mac Mahon, and wife of Maguire, died.

M1328.24

Duvesa, the daughter of O'Healy, and wife of Donnell, the son of Teige O'Conor, died.


p.543

M1328.25

Another army was led by Murtough O'Brien and the Clann-Cuilein the Mac Namaras against Brian; but Murtough was defeated, and Conor O'Brien, Donnell of the Donnells, the son of Cumara Mac Namara, with many others, were slain.

M1328.26

The English sustained a great defeat from Mageoghegan, three thousand five hundred of them being slain in the contest, together with some of the Daltons, and the son of the Proud Knight.

M1328.27

Auliffe Mac Finnvar was slain by Cathal O'Rourke.

Annal M1329.

M1329.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1329. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred twenty-nine.

M1329.1

Augustine, Abbot of Lisgabhail on Lough Erne, died.

M1329.2

Cathal, the son of Donnell O'Rourke, a good materies of an Earl of Breifny, and others, were treacherously slain by the sons of John O'Farrell, and the English of Meath, in the house of Richard Tuite, at the monastery of Fore.

M1329.3

Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Conor, Lord of Carbury, and a good materies of a King of Connaught, died.

M1329.4

Cathal, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor, was forcibly expelled from the Faes and from Tir-Many by order of Walter Bourke, to the O'Kellys, and the other tribes of Hy-Many.

M1329.5

A great war broke out between Turlough O'Conor and the Clann-Mulrony, and much property was destroyed between them.


p.545

M1329.6

A depredation was committed by Tomaltagh Mac Dermot upon Dermot O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Cathail.

M1329.7

Aine, daughter of Farrell O'Reilly, and wife of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, died.

M1329.8

Teige, the son of Turlough, son of Mahon O'Conor, was slain by O'Gara and the people of Airteach.

M1329.9

Mac William Burke and the Earl of Ulster made peace with Mac Thomas.

M1329.10

Daboc Donn Mac William Burke, a noble and wealthy knight, died.

M1329.11

Donough Mac Gillapatrick was slain by the Earl of Ulster.

M1329.12

Maelisa Donn Mac Egan, Chief Ollav of Connaught, died.

M1329.13

The corn fields remained unreaped throughouht Ireland until after Michaelmas, in consequence of wet weather.

Annal M1330.

M1330.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1330. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty.

M1330.1

Maelisa O'Coinel, Coarb of Drumcliff, died.

M1330.2

Benedict O'Flanagan, Prior of Kilmore-na-Sinna, died.

M1330.3

Manus, the son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, was slain at Fearonn nadarach by Cathal, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor; and Simon Mac-in-Fhailghe was slain with him.

M1330.4

Gilla-Isa Roe O'Reilly, Lord of Muintir-Maelmora, and of the entire territory of Breifny for a long time previously, died at an advanced age, victorious over the world and the devil. He was interred in the Abbey of the Friars Minor in Cavan, of which he himself was the original founder.

M1330.5

Melaghlin Mac Carmaic, a wealthy Brughaidh Cedach, died.

M1330.6

An army was led by Ualgarg O'Rourke to Fiodh-an-atha, whereupon the English of that town rose up against him. O'Rourke's people were defeated; and Art O'Rourke, a materies of a chief lord of Breifny, Rory Magauran, and many others, were slain by the English.

M1330.7

An attack was made by Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, upon the


p.547

camp of Walter, the son of William Burke, at Leagmagh, in Moylurg, and forced him to retreat from thence to Cairthe-liag-fada. Gilbert Mac Costello (at that time Lord of Slieve-Lugha) came with all his forces to aid Mac William; and Tomaltagh Mac Donough, with his people, having turned against O'Conor, came also to Mac William's assistance. These combined forces attacked O'Conor, and an engagement took place between both parties at Ath-Disirt-Nuadan, where Donough, son of Donnell Mac Mahon, Mac Gillacowan and a few of O'Conor's people, were slain. Around the ford O'Conor and the chiefs of his people effected a retreat into the Tuathas by force; and Mac William (then) pitched his camp at Killomad, near O'Conor. The forces of Connaught, both English and Irish (i.e. all those who sided with him), were assembled by Mac William, in order to obtain the kingdom of Connaught for himself, and he had them in readiness to depose O'Conor. When Mac Dermot received intelligence of this, he turned against Mac William. and took part with O'Conor; and a kindly and amicable peace was concluded between both.

M1330.8

A great defeat was given by Conor, son of Teige, son of Brian, son of Andreas, son of Brian Luighneach O'Conor, to the people of Dartry, and many of them were killed by him.

M1330.9

Turlough O'Conor, attended by a few distinguished persons, went to William Burke, i.e. the Dun Earl, to request his assistance against Mac William.

M1330.10

Brian, the son of Gilchreest Mac Rannall, was slain by Teige Mac Rannall.


p.549

M1330.11

Hugh and Dermot, two sons of Murrough O'Farrell, were slain by Hugh O'Farrell.

M1330.12

Petrus, son of the Coarb of St. Maedoc, was slain by the English of Kells.

Annal M1331.

M1331.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1331. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-one.

M1331.1

The Coarb of St. Caillin, Gilla-na-naev Mac Cele, died in the monastery of Maethail.

M1331.2

Mulrony Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, resigned his lordship, and assumed the habit of a monk in the abbey of Boyle; and Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, his son, assumed the lordship of Moylurg on the 7th of May.

M1331.3

Farrell, son of Melaghlin Carragh Mac Dermot, was slain by Teige, son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor.

M1331.4

An army was led by Walter Mac William Burke into Moylurg, and he plundered all the country, excepting only the churches, to which he gave protection and respect. Tomaltagh, with his people, opposed them, but the English attacked Tomaltagh, and killed some of his people. They afterwards made peace with each other, and Walter left the country.

M1331.5

Meyler Mageoghegan died.

M1331.6

Murrough Mac Mahon was slain by John Mac Mahon and the English of Machaire Oirghiall.

M1331.7

Thomas, the son of Cuchairrge O'Flynn, died.


p.551

M1332.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1332. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-two.

M1332.1

Walter, son of Sir Walter Burke, was taken prisoner by the Dun Earl, and brought to the new castle of Inishowen; and he afterwards died of hunger in the prison of this castle.

M1332.2

Tomaltagh Mac Dermot and Mac William. were defeated, with the loss of numbers of their people, at Berna-an-mhil, by the son of the Earl, and by Tomaltagh Mac Donough.

M1332.3

William Gallda, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

Annal M1333.

M1333.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1333. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-three.

M1333.1

Florence Mac-an-Oglaich, Archdeacon of Cill-Oiridh, died.

M1333.2

William Burke, Earl of Ulster, was killed by the English of Ulster. The Englishmen who committed this deed were put to death, in divers ways, by the people of the King of England; some were hanged, others killed, and others torn asunder, in revenge of hiS death.


p.553

M1333.3

Tomaltagh Mac Donough Mac Dermot, Lord of Tirerrill, the most celebrated man of his time for veracity, honour, and protection, died.

M1333.4

Felim O'Donnell, a Tanist Lord, the noblest and most illustrious, and from whom the Irish people expected most, died.

M1333.5

Gilbert Mac Costello was treacherously slain in the middle of his own house by Cathal Mac Dermot Gall.

M1333.6

Hugh Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, died.

M1333.7

Mac-na-h-Oidhche Oge Mac Clancy was slain by the Connacians (i.e. by Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, assisted by Tiernan Mag-Ruairc); and the lordship of Breifny was given to O'Reilly.

M1333.8

Donough, son of Hugh O'Kelly, was taken prisoner by Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught.

M1333.9

A peace was proclaimed by the King of England to the Clann-William Burke.

M1333.10

Conor Mac Branan, Chief of Corcachlann, died.

M1333.11

Hugh, the son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, Kinel-Moen, Inishowen, Fermanagh, and Breifny, and a materies of a king of Ulster; of all the Irish the most successful, and the most dreaded by his enemies; he who had slain the largest number both of the English and Irish who were opposed to him ; the most eminent man of his time for jurisdiction, laws, and regulations, and the chief patron of the hospitality and munificence of the West of Europe, died, victorious over the world and the devil, in the habit of a monk, on the island of Inis-Saimer, and was interred with great honour and solemnity in the monastery of Assaroe. Conor O'Donnell (his son) assumed his place. A dispute afterwards arose between this Conor and Art, his brother, concerning the lordship; and Art was soon killed by Conor in combat.


p.555

Annal M1334.

M1334.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1334. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-four.

M1334.1

A great army, both of English and Irish, was led by the Connacians into Munster against Mac Namara; and they took hostages from him, and obtained sway over him. A party of this army burned a church, in which were one hundred and eighty persons, and two priests along with them; and not one of them escaped the conflagration.

M1334.2

Ten of the people of Donough, the son of Melaghlin Carragh Mac Dermot, were drowned in Loch Techet.

M1334.3

Teige, the son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor, died.

M1334.4

Donough Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, and Johnock, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

M1334.5

Conor Mac Branan died.

M1334.6

John Mac Gilla-Ultan was slain by Donnell Mac Hugh.

Annal M1335.

M1335.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1335. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-five.

M1335.1

Finola, the daughter of O'Brien, and wife of Turlough O'Conor, died.

M1335.2

John, son of Art O'Hara, was taken prisoner by the son of the Earl; and the greater part of his people were plundered.

M1335.3

A depredation was committed by the sons of Donnell O'Conor upon the descendants of Maurice Sugach Fitzgerald, on which occasion the son of Mac Maurice was killed. Another depredation was committed in retaliation by the Clann-Maurice upon the sons of Donnell.

M1335.4

The entire of the West of Connaught was desolated by Edmond Burke. Great evils were also wrought by him, both by burning and slaying, upon the son of the Earl and the race of Richard Burke. They afterwards made peace with one another.

M1335.5

Gilla-na-n-Angel O'Cassidy, Chief Physician of Fermanagh, died.


p.557

Annal M1336.

M1336.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1336. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-six.

M1336.1

Trionoit O'Naan, Chief Professor of many Sciences, and of the Civil and Canon Laws, died.

M1336.2

Tomaltagh Gearr na-g-creach timchil Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, the most victorious man of his tribe over his enemies, the most honourable man, the best protector, and the most expert at arms, and hospitable, died on the night of Trinity Sunday, at his own house at Cala-na-Cairrge, and was interred with honour in the abbey of Boyle. Conor, his son, assumed the lordship after him.

M1336.3

Theobald Burke Mac William and Meyler Mac Jordan de Exeter died.

M1336.4

Owen O'Madden defeated the Clanrickard Burke, and kiled sixty-six of them.

M1336.5

A great depredation was committed by the sons of Dermot Gall Mac Dermot and the son of Felim O'Conor, upon the Clann-Costello; and Maiduic Mac Waldrin was slain while in pursuit of the booty.

M1336.6

A depredation was committed by Edmond Mac William Burke upon the Clann-Cathail, on which occasion Conor O'Flanagan and many others were plundered. Melaghlin O'Flanagan was slain while in pursuit of the prey, and a brother of Mac Aveely was taken and carried away as a prisoner.

M1336.7

Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, Hugh, the son of Felim, son of Hugh O'Conor, accompanied by O'Conor's household and the Clann-Donough, and Cormac, the son of Rory, with the young soldiers of the territory of Carbury, set out on a predatory excursion into Tireragh, and advanced as far as Mullagh-Ratha.


p.559

The cows of the country were driven off before them. They carried away many inanimate spoils, many horses of burden, a few steeds, and many flocks of small cattle; and after they had killed countless persons they returned in safety to their houses.

M1336.8

Dermot O'Flanagan, Lord of Clann-Cathail, died.

M1336.9

Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, collected the flitting forces of the Tuathas, Clann-Chathail, Clann-Conor, and Moylurg, and conveyed them to Airteach. Castlemore-Costello was taken and demolished by O'Conor on this occasion, and the kern who guarded it came out under protection of Mac Dermot.

M1336.10

Donnell, the son of John, son of Donnell O'Conor, died.

M1336.11

Niall, the son of Conor Mac Teige, was killed.

M1336.12

The Franciscan Monastery at Carrick-on-Suir, in the diocese of Lismore, was founded by James Butler, Earl of Ormond.

M1336.13

Mahon O'Reilly was slain by the English.

M1336.14

O'Meehin, Coarb of St. Molaisse, died.


p.561

Annal M1337.

M1337.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1337. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty seven

M1337.1

Lughaidh O'Daly, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, died after a well-spent life.

M1337.2

Thomas, the son of Cormac O'Donnell, Bishop of Raphoe, a man eminent for wisdom and piety, died.

M1337.3

The Master Professor O'Rothlain died.

M1337.4

A peace was concluded between William, son of the Earl of Ulster, and Brian Bún (the Fair) O'Brien; and the lands which O'Brien had taken from the son of the Earl were given back to him at their former rent.

M1337.5

A camp was pitched at Athleague by the King of Connaught, to oppose Edmond Burke

M1337.6

John O'Fallon, Lord of Clann-Uadagh, died.

M1337.7

Teige Mac Clancy, Lord of Dartry, was slain by Cormac, the son of Rory, son of Donnell O'Conor, as were also numbers of others, in revenge of John, the son of Donnell.

M1337.8

Great depredations were afterwards committed in Dartry by O'Conor; and the son of Maurice Mac Clancy was killed while in pursuit of the preys.

M1337.9

Teige and Melaghlin, two sons of Ivor Mac Rannall, were taken prisoners by Cathal Mac Rannall. Cathal was afterwards slain by their kinsmen, who, having collected a considerable force, being joined by William Mac Mahon, and by Conor and Tomaltagh, the two other sons of Ivor Mac Rannall, went to rescue the sons of Ivor. Manus O'Farrell was slain by them on the same day. Teige, the son of Ivor Mac Rannall, was then made chieftain.

M1337.10

Donnell Roe O'Malley and Cormac, his son, were slain on St. Martin's night by Clann-Merrick, and other Englishmen who were along with them.

M1337.11

Matthew O'Higgin, a man eminent for poetry and humanity, died.

M1337.12

Henry Mac Martin was slain.


p.563

M1337.13

Donough, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, was slain by the people of Offaly.

M1337.14

Hugh Reamhar O'Neill made peace with the people of Oriel and Fermanagh.

M1337.15

Donough More O'Dowda, Tanist of Hy-Fiachrach, died.

Annal M1338.

M1338.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1338. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-eight.

M1338.1

Rory-an-einigh Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, a man who had bestowed more silver, apparel, steeds, and cattle, on the learned men and chief professors of Ireland, than any other of the Sil-Uidhir, in his time, died.

M1338.2

Donough, son of Rory O'Conor, was killed.

M1338.3

The son of the Earl of Ulster, i.e. Edmond, was taken prisoner by Edmond Burke, who fastened a stone to his neck and drowned him in Lough Mask. The destruction of the English of Connaught, and of his own in particular, resulted from this deed. Turlough O'Conor afterwards banished Edmond Mac William Burke out of Connaught, after the territories and churches of the west of Connaught had been greatly destroyed between them; and O'Conor then assumed the sway of the whole province.

M1338.4

A large fleet of ships and barks was, after this, collected by Edmond Burke; and he remained for a long time on the islands of the sea.

M1338.5

Leyny and Corran were laid waste and wrested from the English, and the chieftainship of them assumed by the hereditary Irish chieftains, after the expulsion of the English.

M1338.6

Teige, son of Rory, son of Cathal O'Conor (who was usually called Bratach Righin), was taken prisoner by Thomas Magauran, and many of his people were killed. Magauran (i.e. Thomas) afterwards went to the house of O'Conor; but, on his return, the Clann-Murtough, and the Muintir-Eolais, assembled to meet him, and took him prisoner, after having slain many of his people.


p.565

M1338.7

Hugh an Chletigh, son of Rory O'Conor, was wounded in the rear of his own army, and died in consequence.

M1338.8

Dearbhail, daughter of Cathal Mac Murrough, and wife of Donough, son of Hugh Oge, died.

Annal M1339.

M1339.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1339. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred thirty-nine.

M1339.1

Rory O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was slain by Cathal, son of Hugh O'Conor, while he was returning from O'Conor's residence to his own.

M1339.2

Thomas Magauran was liberated by the Clann-Murtough.

M1339.3

A great army was led by Hugh Reamhar O'Neill into Tirconnell ; and the son of John O'Neill and Godfrey O'Donnell were slain in the course of this expedition by the people of O'Doherty.

M1339.4

Edmond Mac William Burke was driven, With all his feet, from the islands of the sea into Ulster, by Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught.

M1339.5

The daughter of Turlough O'Brien, wife of the son of the Earl of Ulster, was taken to wife by Turlough O'Conor, who put away Dearbhail, daughter of Hugh O'Donnell.

M1339.6

A great war broke out in Meath between the English and Irish.

M1339.7

The church of Kilronan was erected by Farrell Muimhneach O'Duigenan.


p.567

Annal M1340.

M1340.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1340. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty.

M1340.1

The monastery of Oirbhealach at Carraig-an-chiuil, at the eastern end of Loch Lein, in the diocese of Ardfert, in Munster, was founded for Franciscan Friars by Mac Carthy More, Prince of Desmond (Donnell, the son of Teige); and the chiefs of the country selected burial places for themselves in this monastery. Among these were O'Sullivan More and the two O'Donohoes.

M1340.2

A war arose between the Hy-Manians, namely, between Teige, the son of Teige O'Kelly (to whom Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, had given the chieftainship of Hy-Many), and William, the son of Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly: and William was banished from Hy-Many, and, though he had left the country, Teige O'Kelly, with his kinsmen and people, went in pursuit of him; and when they had reached a spot upon which to fight a battle, William and his people turned round on them their pursuers; and a fierce battle was fought between them, in which Donough, the son of Hugh O'Kelly, was killed; and Teige O'Relly was captured, after having received wounds, of which he died soon afterwards.

M1340.3

Melaghlin O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died.


p.569

M1340.4

The sons of Ualgarg O'Rourke, Donnell, Hugh, Gilchreest, and Rory, went upon a predatory excursion against Cathal, the son of Hugh Breifneach, and took a prey from him. Conor, the son of Donough Reagh, son of Manus, son of Murtough Muimhneach, and many others, were slain by them on the same day. This was the first rupture between the O'Rourkes and the race of Murtough Muimhneach. Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach, afterwards went in pursuit of the prey, and overtook the sons of Ualgarg O'Rourke. A fierce battle was fought between them, in which Donnell O'Rourke (only choice of Breifny for a materies of a lord), and many others with him, were slain. Gilchreest O'Rourke and Mac Consnava were taken prisoners, after the defeat of their people. Teige, the son of Rory, son of Cathal O'Conor, who had been imprisoned by O'Rourke, was liberated as the condition of the ransom of Gilchreest O'Rourke.

M1340.5

Hugh, the son of Felim O'Conor, was taken prisoner by the King of Connaught, and sent to be confined in the Castle of Roscommon. A great war and disturbance arose between O'Conor and Mac Dermot, in consequence of this capture, and much destruction was caused by them on both sides. O'Conor was in jeopardy and extreme peril on the occasion of an incursion which Mac Dermot made against him into Corran, when he was forcibly driven into the Castle of Ballymote, where they afterwards concluded a peace with each other.

M1340.6

Jordan Roe Mac Costello was slain by Cathal Mac Dermot Gall.

M1340.7

Cathal Mac Dermot Gall, the only choice of his tribe for his prowess, valour, might, and puissance, was treacherously slain by Donough Reagh, the son of Melaghlin Carragh Mac Dermot, at Lis-sealbhaigh in Clann-Conor.


p.571

M1340.8

Manus, the son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor, was slain by Cathal, son of Hugh Brefneach O'Conor.

M1340.9

Brian Oge Magauran was slain by the people of Teallach Dunchadha.

M1340.10

Owen O'Heyne, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach-Aidhne, was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1340.11

Owen, son of Geoffrey Mac Rannall, and Hugh O'Mulvey, slew each other.

M1340.12

Philip O'Duigenan, Ollav i.e. Chief Poet of Conmaicne, died.

M1340.13

William, the son of Gilbert Mac Costello, was slain in a conflict in Breifny by the people of Teallach-Eachdhach.

M1340.14

Rory, the son of Manus O'Hara, died.

M1340.15

Mahon, the son of Annadh O'Reilly, was slain by Andreas, the son of Brian O'Reilly, who afterwards committed great depredations in the district of Bolgan.

M1340.16

The church of Kilronan was burned.

M1340.17

Niall O'Higgin, a learned poet, was drowned.

M1340.18

Conor O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, proceeded with his troops into Connaught.

Annal M1341.

M1341.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1341. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-one.

M1341.1

Murtough Mac-an-Gowan, Abbot of Clogher, died.

M1341.2

The Clann-Maurice sustained a severe defeat from Mac William Burke. Thomas Mac Maurice, Maurice, son of Johnock Roe, and seventy men along with him, were slain in the battle.

M1341.3

Donnell Mac Dorcy, Chief of Kinel-Duachain, died.

M1341.4

Donogh, grandson of Mac-na-h-Oidhche Mac Clancy, was slain by Hugh, son of Teige Mac Cany.

M1341.5

O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died.

M1341.6

Cathal Mac Keheeny was killed by a fall.


p.573

M1341.7

The Castle of Roscommon was taken by Turlough O'Conor; and Hugh, the son of Felim, who was a prisoner therein, was liberated, and a ransom was given for him.

M1341.8

John Mac Mahon was banished from Oriel.

M1341.9

Brian O'Flynn, Lord of Teallach-Curnain, died.

M1341.10

Cuconnaught O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan, died.

M1341.11

Dermot Roe, son of Cormac Oge Mac Dermot, died in the habit of a monk, in the Ahbey of Boyle.

M1342.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1342. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-two.

M1342.1

A war broke out between Turlough O'Conor and Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg; and Edmond Burke rose to assist Mac Dermot against O'Conor.

M1342.2

Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, and Donough O'Beirne, Chief of Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna, drove Turlough O'Conor into the church of Elphin, after he had gone to obtain reprisals for a prey which O'Beirne's people had carried off from Hubert Burke. On this occasion some of O'Conor's gallowglasses, and his constable, Mac Rory, were slain by them.

M1342.3

After this a general war broke out in Connaught. The Clann-Murtough O'Conor, at first took part with O'Conor against Mac Dermot; but afterwards turned over to the side of Mac Dermot and Mac William Burke. An abominable act of treachery was committed by the Clann-Maurice at a meeting


p.575

of their own people against the Clann-William Burke: Thomas Burke was killed by them; and, with similar treachery, Seoinin Burke was slain by the Clann-Rickard, at the instigation of the Clann-Maurice and O'Conor. In the same war Cathal, son of Gilchreest Mac Dermot, was slain by Farrell O'Teige; and Farrell, the son of Gilchreest Finn Mac Cormac, was slain also.

M1342.4

Mac Dermot, and the chieftains who assisted him, gave O'Conor a fierce battle at Beal-atha-Slisen, where they crossed the ford in despite of him. Dermot, the son of Brian O'Farrell, the best man of the Conmaicni in his time, the son of Hubert Burke, and Conor, the son of Donough Duv O'Healy, were slain on this occasion.

M1342.5

John Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, set out upon a predatory excursion against Hugh, son of Roolv Rodolph Mac Mahon; and was slain in the rere of the prey, and his gallowglasses were destroyed by killing and drowning.

M1342.6

Cormac, the son of Rory, son of Donnell O'Conor, was taken prisoner by Conor, the son of Teige, and Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor; and Conor, the Son of Teige, was afterwards taken prisoner by Brian, the son of Rory, and delivered up by him to Conor Mac Dermot, who sent him to be imprisoned in the Rock of Lough Key.

M1342.7

Donnell O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, and of the cantred of Tir-Enda, a man full of hospitality and prowess, died, and John O'Doherty assumed his place.

M1342.8

All the Sil-Murray turned against Turlough, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor, and joined the other chieftains who were for deposing him. Of those who rose up against him at that time, the following were the most distinguished, namely, Edmond Mac William Burke; Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, with his brothers, and all their adherents; Hugh, son of Hugh Breifneach, Son of Cathal Roe O'Conor; Teige, the son of Rory O'Conor; Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach, son of Cathal Roe, with all the forces of Breifny, and Conmaicne; and Hugh, son of Felim, who was son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor. All these assembled against O'Conor, and banished him by force from his country and lands; whereupon his friends advised him to go secretly, and without acquainting any with his intention, to Mac Dermot, to ascertain if he would make peace with him. But the Clann-Murtough had


p.577

intelligence of this intention, and of the particular night on which O'Conor would come to Mac Dermot ; and they posted themselves at the several dangerous passes of the road by which he was to pass to Mac Dermot's fortress. Turlough, nevertheless, accompanied by only three horsemen, passed them all, and was not attacked until he had reached the causeway of the fortress. Cathal, the son of Hugh Breifneach, was at once wounded by him; and although he and his three attendants were but the few against the many, compared with the great body of men who opposed them, he made his escape without receiving himself, or any of his attendants, the slightest wound or injury. Mac Dermot, in the mean while, did not know the exceeding danger that Turlough was in, until he heard the cries, groans, and imprecations that were uttered through the garrison; but as soon as he had obtained information, he privately dispatched trusty persons to conduct O'Conor to the castle of the Rock, to protect him until he should determine whether he could make peace for him. Here O'Conor remained for a week, during which time, by order of Mac Dermot, the chieftains of the country visited him; but Mac Dermot, not having obtained permission from the other chieftains to conclude peace with him, he escorted him with a troop of cavalry, and left him at Roscommon.

M1342.9

Conor (i.e. Conor Roe) Mageoghegan, Lord of the Kinel-Fiachach, was slain by the English.

M1342.10

Thomas O'Kinga, Maurice Mageoghegan and Simon, son of Conor, son of Simon Mac Gillaarraith, one of the chieftains of Leyny, died.

M1342.11

Murrough, son of Tomaltagh O'Flanagan, the third best man of his tribe, was slain by the Gallowglasses of the son of Cathal O'Conor.

M1342.12

Hugh, the son of Hugh Breifneach, son of Cathal Roe O'Conor, was inaugurated by the Connacians and Mac William Burke, on the first Monday of winter, after the deposing of Turlough; and the Tanistship of Connaught was


p.579

given to Hugh, the son of Felim O'Conor. Tirerrill was given to Farrell Mac Dermot.

M1342.13

Teige, son of Tomaltagh, son of Maurice Mac Donough, was banished from his own patrimony by Conor Mac Dermot and his kinsmen ; whereupon he went over to Turlough O'Conor; and Farrell, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot took possession of Tirerrill after him.

M1342.14

Gilladuv Maguire was drowned in Lough Erne.

M1342.15

Matthew Mac Manus a general and wealthy Brughaidh farmer, who never rejected the countenance of man, whether mean or mighty, died.

M1342.16

Conor, the son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Kinel-Connell, Lower Connaught, Fermanagh, Kinel-Moen, and Inishowen, and worthy heir to the monarchy of Ireland by reason of his personal form, wisdom, hospitality, renown, discretion, and ingenuity, magnanimity, intellectuality, valour, prowess, and his piety and charity, was slain by his brother, Niall O'Donnell, who attacked him by night in his own fortress at Murbhach: and Niall himself assumed his place.

M1342.17

Flann Oge O'Donnellan, Ollav of Connaught in poetry, died.

M1342.18

Donnell O'Coinleisg, a learned historian, was slain, a short time before Easter, by the Hy-Diarmada.

M1342.19

Thomas Mac Gilla Coisgligh, celebrated for his hospitality and prowess, died.

M1342.20

Pierce Albanagh was slain by the sons of Meyler Mac Feorais Bermingham.


p.581

Annal M1343.

M1343.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1343. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-three.

M1343.1

John Mac-Eoaigh, Bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, died.

M1343.2

Johannes O'Laithimh, Bishop of Killala, and Cathal Mac-an-Liathanaigh, Abbot of the Monastery of the Blessed Trinity, died.

M1343.3

Donough Cleireach O'Mulrenin, a Canon chorister of Elphin, was slain with one shot of an arrow by the people of Hubert, son of David Donn Mac William Burke.

M1343.4

Slaine, daughter of O'Brien, and wife of Turlough O'Conor, King of Connaught, died.

M1343.5

Cathal O'Madden, the most distinguished of his own tribe for hospitality and renown, was slain by the Clann Rickard.

M1343.6

Dearbhail, daughter of Hugh O'Donnell, came on a visit to Mac Dermot to Inis-Doighre, where she was seized with a fatal sickness and died, and was nobly and honourably interred, in the monastery of Boyle. There never was borne a woman of her tribe who surpassed her in goodness.

M1343.7

Duvcowlagh, daughter of Mac Dermot, and wife of O'Beirne, died.

M1343.8

Murtough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, died; and Dermot O'Brien assumed the lordship, but he was banished from his chieftainship by Brian O'Brien; and the chieftains of Thomond then submitted to Brian.

M1343.9

Thomas Magauran, chief of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1343.10

Ulick, the son of Richard, son of William Liath Burke, the most illustrious of the English youths of Ireland for hospitality and expertness at arms, died.

M1343.11

The Hy-Many suffered a great defeat from the Clann-Feorais Berminghams, and the Clann-Rickard, on which occasion eleven of the chieftains of Hy-Many, together with Conor Cearbhach O'Kelly were slain.


p.583

M1343.12

Niall O'Donnell was driven from his principality by Aengus O'Donnell, Donnell Duv O'Boyle and O'Doherty, by the power of Hugh Reamhar O'Neill and the Mac Sweenys; and Aengus, the son of Conor, son of Hugh Oge, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, was installed in the lordship of Tirconnell.

M1343.13

The Clann-Murtough O'Conor, were driven out of Breify by Ualgarg O'Rourke, Turlough O'Conor, and Teige Mac Rannall. They passed into Tirhugh to O'Donnell; and Aengus (i.e. the O'Donnell), made them a grant of the territory of Tirhugh. Some time afterwards a battle was fought at Achadhmona between Aengus and Niall; and the Clann-Murtough rose up with Aengus against Niall, and they defeated Niall and his people. In this battle Aindiles O'Boyle, chief of Tir-Ainmirech, with his son, Owen, son of Art O'Donnell, and many others, were slain, and Aengus gained the victory.

M1343.14

David Mageraghty, coarb of St. Patrick, died.

M1343.15

John Mac Duibhne, Archdeacon of Drumlahan, died.

M1343.16

Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, fountain of the splendour and pre-eminence of the race of Mulrony More the son of Teige, on of Cathal, son of Conor, died at his own house a week before Allhallowtide, on a Saturday, after having overcome the world and the devil, and was buried in the abbey of Boyle. Farrell Mac Dermott, his own brother, was installed his successor.

M1343.17

Rory Magrath, Ollav of Leth-Mogha in poetry, died.


p.585

Annal M1344.

M1344.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1344. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-four.

M1344.1

The Bishop of Leyny Achonry died.

M1344.2

Murrough, son of Molloy O'Hara, Abbot of Boyle, and intended Bishop of Leyny, died.

M1344.3

Nicholas Magrath, coarb of Termon-Daveog, died.

M1344.4

Art More, son of Cormac O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, was slain by Cormac Ballagh O'Melaghlin, who installed himself in his place.

M1344.5

Hugh, son of Roolbh Rodolph Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, died, and Murrough Oge Mac Mahon next assumed the lordship, but died in a week afterwards; and the lordship was then assumed by Manus, son of Cochy, son of Rodolph Mac Mahon.

M1344.6

William, the son of Mahon Mac Rannall, was slain by the sons of Cathal Mac Rannall.

M1344.7

Mahon, the son of Gilchreest Cleireach Mac Dermot, was slain on the Coirsliabh the Curlieu Mountain, by Muintir-Healy.

M1344.8

Brian, son of Rory Maguire, died.

Annal M1345.

M1345.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1345. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-five.

M1345.1

Gilla-na-naev O'Keenan, Abbot of Lisgabhail, died.

M1345.2

Turlough, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor, King of Connaught, was killed in Autumn by one shot of an arrow, at Fidh doradha, in the territory of Muintir-Eolais, after he had gone to Loch-Airinn to aid Teige Mac Rannall


p.587

against the descendants of Murtough Muimhneach O'Conor. The Clann-Murtough and the rest of the Muinter-Eolais pursued him as far as Fidh Doradha, and killed him at Gurtin-na-spideoige. For a long time before there had not fallen of the Gaels, any one more to be lamented than he. Hugh, son of Turlough, was inaugurated in his place.

M1345.3

Brian O'Farrell, worthy materies of a lord of Annaly, died. He was a man who never earned censure, on account of anything he ever acquired, even up to the hour when he overcame the world and the devil.

M1345.4

Hugh O'Neill went with a fleet on Lough Neagh, and the Clann-Hugh-Boy, with their muster, overtook him, and many persons were wounded and killed in the contest between them; but Hugh made his escape, in despite of them, in his ships.

M1345.5

Manus O'Flynn Line i.e. of Moylinny, was slain by Donnell Donn and Brian O'Neill.

M1345.6

Cormac, the son of Rory O'Conor, died.

M1345.7

Cormac, son of Murtough Mac Loughlin, was slain by the sons of Ualgarg, son of Farrell O'Rourke.

Annal M1346.

M1346.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1346. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-six.

M1346.1

A war broke out between O'Rourke, i.e. Ualgarg, and Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor; and an engagement took place between them in Calry-Lough-Gill,


p.589

in which O'Rourke was routed, and all his gallowglasses slain, i.e. Mac Buirrce, and Mac Neill Cam with their people. O'Rourke was afterwards pursued by Rory O'Conor and the Clann-Donough, and was killed by Mulrony Mac Donough. This was a lamentable deed.

M1346.2

The four sons of Cathal, the son of the Caech Monoculus Mac Rannall, were taken prisoners on Loch-an-Sguir by Conor Mac Rannall. Tomaltagh Mac Rannall afterwards brought them to Caisiol Cosgraigh, where they were put to death by him.

M1346.3

Cu-Uladh Mac Cawell, chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Donnell Mac Cawell.

M1346.4

A victory was gained by Brian Mac Mahon over the English, and three hundred of their heads) were counted after the battle.

M1346.5

Niall O'Donnell, the Clann-Murtough O'Conor, the son of Felin O'Conor and Maurice Mac Dermot, pursued Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor to Cul-Maoile Coloony, where they defeated him and the Clann-Donough with great slaughter. They afterwards plundered them, and carried off abundance of booty.

M1346.6

Mac Dermot Gall was treacherously killed in his own house by the sons of Waldrin Mac Costello; and Cormac Caech Mac Fineen was slain along with him.

M1346.7

Ivor, the son of Murrough O'Farrell, was slain by Brian Mac Tiernan and the Clann Murtough.

M1346.8

Art, son of Thomas O'Rourke, was slain by Donell Mac Tiernan.

Annal M1347.

M1347.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1347. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-seven.

M1347.1

Maelmaedhog O'Taichligh, Official of Lough Erne, died.

M1347.2

Gilla-na-naev, the son of Geoffrey, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, chief protector of the Conmaicni, for his prowess, valour, hospitality, and renown, died at Cluain-lis-bec, after having been for a long time Chief of Annaly, and after having gained the victory over the world and the devil. Cathal, the son of Murrough, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, assumed the lord-ship of Annaly after him.

M1347.3

Maurice Mac Dermot was slain by John Roe Mac David Burke.

M1347.4

Teige Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was taken prisoner by the Clann-Murtough O'Conor.

M1347.5

William Mac David Burke was slain at Ballintober by Teige Roe Mac Dermot Gall.

M1347.6

Thomas Mac Artan, Lord of Iveagh, in Ulidia, was hanged by the English.

M1347.7

Owen O'Madden, Chief of Sil-Anmchadha, died; and Murrough, his son, assumed the chieftainship of Sil-Anmchadha.

M1347.8

Aengus, the son of Gara O'Madden, died.

M1347.9

The church of Kilronan was re-erected by Farrell O'Duigenan.

M1347.10

Finola, daughter of Mac Fineen, and wife of Farrell O'Duigenan, died.

M1347.11

Henry, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill; Finola, daughter of Melaghlin O'Reilly; and Gilladuv Mac Gillamochua, died.

M1347.12

Donough, the son of Hugh Oge O'Farrell, died.

M1347.13

Siry O'Curnin, a learned poet and Ollav of Breifny, died.


p.593

Annal M1348.

M1348.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1348. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-eight.

M1348.1

Gilla-na-naev O'Keenan, Abbot of Lisgabhail, died.

M1348.2

Niall Garve O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, after having experienced much contention, before and during the term of his lordship, was treacherously and murderously slain by Manus Meabhlach O'Donnell, his kinsman, at the port of Inis-Saimer. Niall was a brave, puissant, and defensive hero till then, and it was a sorrowful thing that he should have died in such a way. Aengus, the Son of Conor O'Donnell, who had been in contention with Niall, assumed the lordship.

M1348.3

Cathal O'Farrell, Bord of Annaly, died.

M1348.4

Melaghlin Mageraghty, Chief of Muinter Rodiv, and Donough Mac Brady, chief of Cuil Brighde, died.

M1348.5

A war broke out between Farrell Mac Dermot, and Rory, the son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Connor. Mac Dermot's fortress was burned by Rory.

M1348.6

Dermot afterwards assembled his friends, and they pursued Rory to his fortress at Ballymote, and burned the town, both stone and wooden edifices, and they did not meet any opposition until they reached home.They took away the son of O'Rourke, that was in captivity in the town, together with every other captive they found there.

M1348.7

The Clann-Feorais the Berminghams, were banished by Edmond Burke, and Mac Feorais was compelled to go to the house of O'Conor or his support.


p.595

Annal M1349.

M1349.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1349. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred forty-nine.

M1349.1

Hugh O'Rourke defeated Flaherty O'Rourke, Donough O'Donnell, and the people of Dartry; and Hugh Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry, Gilchreest Mac Clancy, Loughlin, son of Aindiles O'Boyle, and many others, were slain in the engagement.

M1349.2

John Duv Mac Donnell was slain by Manus, son of Eochy Mac Mahon.

M1349.3

Gilla-na naev O'Higgin, a learned poet, died.

M1349.4

Another contest arose between Mac Dermot and Rory O'Conor. Mac Dermot assembled all the English and Irish whom he found to aid him, together with the Clann-Murtough and the Kinel-Connell, against the son of Cathal. Rory moved before these, and they drove him to Clann-Fermaighe, but the entire body of them, both English and Irish, were unable to take him. They afterwards returned without acquiring power or obtaining hostages; and Rory then mustered a force and burned, wasted, and plundered the greater part of Moylurg.

M1349.5

A great plague raged in Ireland, and more especially in Moylurg, by which great numbers were carried off. Matthew, the son of Cathal O'Rourke. died of this plague.

M1349.6

Donough Reagh, the son of Melaghlin Carragh Mac Dermot, was taken prisoner by Cormac Bodhar Mac Dermot, who led him to Airteach; and he was filled in secret murder by the people of Airteach, i.e. by the son of Gilchreest Mac Taichligh and O'Kearney.

M1349.7

Richard O'Reilly, Lord of East Breifny, and the son of the Earl, died.

M1349.8

Gilbert O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath Ratha, was slain by the sons of Brian O Flanagan.


p.597

M1349.9

Murtough Riaganagh Magennis was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1349.10

Rory O'Kane, Lord of Creeve and Ard-Keanaghta, died.

M1349.11

Hugh O'Reilly died.

M1349.12

Gilla-Caech Mac Dorcy died.

M1349.13

Maurice Mac Donough, Chief of Corran, a man full of intelligence and hospitality, died.

M1349.14

A great defeat was given by the Lord Justice and the English of Meath to O'Melaghlin and the Irish of Meath, in which many of their chieftains were slain.

Annal M1350.

M1350.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1350. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty.

M1350.1

William O'Dowda, Bishop of Killala, founder of many churches and sanctuaries, and a godly, charitable, and humane man, died.

M1350.2

Hugh (i.e. the King of Connaught), the son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, and who was called the O'Conor, was slain in Magh-Angaidhe by Hugh O'Rourke.

M1350.3

Farrell O'Rourke, the son of Ualgarg, was slain by the son of Cathal Cleirach Mac Donough.

M1350.4

Brian Mac Dermot, materies of a lord of Moylurg, was accidentally slain at Roscommon with one shot of a javelin by the people of Bishop O'Finaghty; and the man who was charged with having cast the dart (Rory-an-t-Seomra O'Donohoe), was immediately mangled as an eric retaliation for him Brian.


p.599

M1350.5

Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Brian Roe O'Brien, was treacherously slain by the sons of Lorcan Mac Lorcan. Of him was said:

    1. Pity the only son of Donnell of the meeting;
      Pity the heir of Brian Borumha;
      Pity his going as was not expected;
      Pity the Clann-Keogh should triumph over him.

M1350.6

Turlough Oge O'Brien killed sixteen of the Clann-Keogh in revenge of this evil deed, and despoiled them, besides, of their lands and cattle.

M1350.7

Rory, the son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor, was treacherously slain at Garrdha-na-Fiongaile on Brecshliabh, by the sons of Farrell Mac Donough, at the instigation of Hugh, the son of Turlough.

M1350.8

Hugh, the son of Turlough, was deposed by Mac William Burke and by the people of the Tuathas of Connaught; and Hugh, the son of Felim, was inaugurated by them in opposition to him.

M1350.9

Cucogry More Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, Hugh, the son of Auliffe Maguire, and Maurice Mac Donough, died.

M1350.10

Aengus Roe O'Daly, the most learned of the poets of Ireland, and Aengus O'Hosey, a good poet, died.

Annal M1351.

M1351.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1351. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-one.

M1351.1

The monastery of Ros-Oirbhealagh, in the diocese of Tuam, was erected for Franciscan friars.

M1351.2

Owen-na-Cathaighe Mac Sweeny was slain by Manus O'Donnell.

M1351.3

Philip Maguire, Chief of Muinter-Pheodachain, and Enna O'Flanagan, Chief of Tuath-ratha, died.


p.601

M1351.4

Hugh, son of Turlough, having again acquired power, the hostages of Connaught were delivered up to him; and Hugh, son of Felim, was banished from the country.

M1351.5

Hugh O'Rourke, on his return from Croagh-Patrick, was taken prisoner by Mac Philbin Mac William Burke; in consequence of which act Mac Dermot rose up against the Clann-Philbin. Great ravages and depredations were mutually committed by them on account of it.

M1351.6

Mahon Mac Consnava was slain by the sons of Donough Mac Consnava.

M1351.7

A general invitation was given at Christmas by William, the son of Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly, to the learned of Ireland, travellers, the poor and the indigent, and they were all served to their satisfaction, both good and bad, noble and ignoble, so that they were all thankful to him and his son, Melaghlin.

M1352.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1352. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-two.

M1352.1

Hugh, the son of Turlough O'Conor, assumed the government of Connaught again, in despite of all the English and Irish who were opposed to him.

M1352.2

Hugh O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by Cathal, the son of Hugh the Breifneach O'Conor and the Clann-Murtough, and a great slaughter was made of the gallowglasses of the Mac Sweenys on the occasion.

M1352.3

Hugh O'Mulrenin and his two sons were slain by Hugh, the son of Felim O'Conor.


p.603

M1352.4

Aengus, the son of Conor, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, a vigorous and high-spirited man, the most distinguished in Ulster at this time for prowess and nobleness, was slain by Manus O'Donnell. Felim O'Donnell assumed his place; but John, the son of Conor O'Donnell, warred contended with him for the lordship.

M1352.5

Baile an Duin was demolished by Hugh, son of Turlough O'Conor.

M1352.6

Conor, the son of Maurice Mac Donough, general patron of men of all arts; Dabuck Dillon, the son of Ulick of Umallia, Chief of the kerns and of the Dillons of Connaught; Thomas Mac Rannall, and Teige, the son of Siacus O'Kelly, died.

Annal M1353.

M1353.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1353. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-three.

M1353.1

John O'Carbry, Coarb of Tighernach of Cluain-eois, died.

M1353.2

Gormlaith, daughter of O'Donnell, and wife of Hugh O'Neill, died; and there was not in her time a woman of greater name and renown.

M1353.3

Hugh, the son of Rory O'Neill, died.

M1353.4

Mahon, son of Gilla-na-naev O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died.

M1353.5

Teige Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by the sons of Geoffrey Mac Rannall.

M1353.6

Hugh, the son of Turlough, was deposed; and Mac Branan detained him in the country.

M1353.7

The monastery of Kilconnell, in the diocese of Clonfert, in Connaught, was founded for Franciscan friars by William O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many.


p.605

Annal M1354.

M1354.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1354 The age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-four.

M1354.1

O'Laghtnan, bishop of Connaught, and John O'Finaghty, Bishop of Elphin, died.

M1354.2

Mac Murrough was put to death by the English; in consequence of which a great war broke out between the English and Irish.

M1354.3

Rory O'More, Lord of Leix was slain by his own kinsmen and household.

M1354.4

Brian O'Dowda, Chief of Tireragh, died, and his son, Donnell, assumed his place.

M1354.5

Brian, the son of Hugh More O'Neill; Cathal, the son of Niall O'Rourke; Geoffrey Mac Rannall; Geoffrey O'Reilly; Sitric Magauran; and Farrell Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

M1354.6

Rory, the son of John Mac Mahon, was slain in Mac Mahon's fortress.

M1354.7

Hugh O'Neill received a great defeat from the race of Hugh Boy O'Neill, and the English, in which many were slain.

M1354.8

Dervorgilla, the daughter of O'Conor; Felim, the son of Cathal O'Conor. and Hubert Burke, died.

M1354.9

Flaherty Mac Gillafinnen and his kinsman, were killed by their own people.

M1354.10

Murrough, the son of Cathal O'Farrell, and Teige Mac Shanly, died.

M1354.11

Saerbhreathach, son of Maelisa Donn Mac Egan, Ollave of Conmaicne, died on Inis Cloghrann.

M1354.12

Melaghlin Mac Rithbheartaigh, Ollav of Fermanagh, in poetry, died.


p.607

Annal M1355.

M1355.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1355. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-five.

M1355.1

Conor Mac Consnava, Bishop of Breifny Kilmore, from Drumcliff to Kells, died, Mac Gallgael, Prior of the monastery of the Blessed Trinity, died, and Mac Cathail, Abbot of Sruthair, died.

M1355.2

Donough, the son of Felim, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell. was slain as he was carrying off Gormlaith, daughter of Hugh Roe Maguire (i.e. the Maguire), by force. It was Donn Mac Murrough who slew him in Maguire's fortress.

M1355.3

Donnell, son of John O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly, died.

M1355.4

Dermot O'Mulvey, Chief of Muintir-Carolan, and many of the Muintir-Eolais, were slain by the Muintir-Birn.

M1355.5

Cathal O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan, and five others, were slain by the Clann-Shane and the Clann-Hugh.

M1355.6

Cormac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by the sons of Ivor Mac Rannall.

M1355.7

Farrell, the son of Farrell, son of Murtough More, son of Congalagh Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, died.

M1355.8

Murrough, the son of Cathal O'Farrell; Dervorgilla, the daughter of O'Farrell; and Teige Mac Egan, a man learned in the Fenechas, died.

M1355.9

The English of West Connaught defeated Mac William Burke, and killed many of his people.


p.609

M1355.10

Edmond, the son of William, son of Richard Burke, was slain by the Sil-Anmchadha.

M1355.11

A great defeat was given by Richard Oge Burke, to the household of Mac William (i.e. Edmond), and to the Sil-Anmchadha, in which Stephen Mac Jordan, Henry Mac Philbin, and sixteen of the chiefs of Sil-Anmchadha, were slain.

M1355.12

Niall Mac Mahon was slain by the sons of John Mac Mahon.

M1355.13

Aduc (Mac Quillin) was slain by the people of Oirthear.

M1355.14

Ten lambs were brought forth at once by one sheep.

Annal M1356.

M1356.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1356. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-six.

M1356.1

Farrell, the son of Jeffrey Mac Rannall, Primate of Armagh, and representative of St. Patrick, died.

M1356.2

Nicholas Mac Cahasy, Bishop of Oriel Clogher, died.

M1356.3

Solomon O'Mellan, the keeper of the Clog-an-Eadhachta, died. He was the general patron of the clergy of Ireland.

M1356.4

Hugh, the son of Turlough O'Connor, King of Connaught, was slain at Baile-Locha-Deacair by Donough Carragh O'Kelly and the sons of Mac-an-Ward, at the instigation of the Hy-Many. This was in revenge of his having some time before carried off privately and clandestinely the daughter of Seoinin Burke, the wife of O'Kelly.


p.611

M1356.5

Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor, then assumed the entire government of Connaught.

M1356.6

Conor, the son of Teige O'Kelly, was slain by Teige, the son of Dermot O'Kelly.

M1356.7

Turlough, the son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, was slain by the Clann-Donough.

M1356.8

Dermot, the son of Dermot Mac Carthy, and Donough, his son, were slain by the son of O'Sullivan.

M1356.9

More, daughter of O'Conor, died. She was the wife of O'Farrell.

M1356.10

Murtough, son of John O'Neill, was slain by Philip Maguire.

M1356.11

Dowell Mac Sweeny was slain by Donnell O'Conor.

M1356.12

Rory, son of Hugh O'Conor, and Donnell, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor, died.

M1356.13

Donough Mac Namara, the best son of a chieftain in Leth-Mogha in his time, was slain by the O'Briens.

M1356.14

Donough Proisteach was treacherously slain by two of his own people.

M1356.15

Gearoidin Tyrrell was put to death on the green of Dublin by the people of the King of England.

M1356.16

Murrough, the son of Brian O'Neill, died.

M1356.17

Felim, the son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, was slain by the son of his own brother,viz. John,son of Conor O'Donnell, and John then assumed the lordship of Tirconnell without opposition.

Annal M1357.

M1357.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1357. the Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-seven.

M1357.1

Clement O'Duigenan, Vicar of Kilronan, died. He was called Sagart-na-Sinnach.

M1357.2

Manus Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel; Loughlin, son of Murtough; and Farrell


p.613

Muimhneach O'Duigennan, Ollav of Conmaicne and Clann-Mulrony, Lower and Upper, died.

M1357.3

John, son of Brian O'Reilly, was slain by the English.

M1357.4

Brian, son of Gilchreest O'Rourke, and Manus Boy Magauran, were slain in the Route, Mac Quillin's territory, by Hugh O'Neill.

M1357.5

Donslevy Mac Caroll, a noble master of music and melody, the best of his time, died.

M1357.6

A general peace was ratified between the two Cathals, namely, between Cathal, the son of Hugh Breifneach, and Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal, son of Donnell.

Annal M1358.

M1358.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1358. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-eiqht.

M1358.1

Brian Mac Cawell, Bishop of Oriel Clogher, died.

M1358.2

Manus Maguire was slain by the Clann-Cawell.

M1358.3

Donnell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died on Easter day.

M1358.4

Conor O'Hanly, Chief of the Race of Dofa, son of Aengus, died, after gaining victory over the world and the Devil.

M1358.5

A victory was gained by Hugh O'Neill over the people of Oriel and Fermanagh in a battle, in which Hugh Mac Cabe, Melaghlin, the son of the Bishop O'Dowda, and many others were slain.

M1358.6

A great defeat was given to the English of Dublin by O'More; and two hundred and forty of them were killed by him on the field of battle.


p.615

M1358.7

Turlough, the son of Hugh na Fidhbhaighe O'Neill, and the son of Andrew Mac Feorais Bermingham, died.

M1358.8

A heavy shower of hail fell in Carbury in the summer, each stone of which was not smaller than a wild apple.

M1358.9

Senicin Jenkin Mac Quillin, High Constable of the province of Ulster, died.

M1358.10

The son of Gilla-Isa O'Flanagan was slain by Manus, the son of Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor.

Annal M1359.

M1359.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1359. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred fifty-nine.

M1359.1

Cormac Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, and Donnell, the son of Teige O'Mahony, died.

M1359.2

A great victory was gained at Ballyshannon by Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal O'Conor, over John, the son of Conor O'Donnell, and the Kinel-Connell. John O'Doherty, Chief of Ardmire, Owen Connaghtagh, and Turlough Mac Sweeny, were taken prisoners on this occasion by the son of O'Conor, and many persons were slain by him. Matthew Magauran, materies of a lord of Teallach Eachdhach was wounded on that day, and died of his wounds after his return to his own house. During the same war Cathal Bodhar, the son of Cathal O'Rourke, and Melaghlin O'Gormly, fell by each other's hand in the same war. This occurred when Cathal O'Conor marched with a second army


p.617

into Tirconnell, and a party of his people arrived in O'Gormly's territory under the command of Cathal Bodhar O'Rourke.

M1359.3

Murtough, the son of Thomas O'Flynn Line, heir-apparent to Hy-Tuirtre, was slain by Hugh, the son of Brian, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill.

M1359.4

Brian Mac Donnell, heir to the lordship of Tirerrill, was slain by Mac Seancha, one of the adherents of O'Gara.

M1359.5

Henry, the son of Ulick, son of Richard Burke, died.

M1359.6

Murrough Oge Mac Mahon, heir apparent to the lordship of Corco-Vaskin. was slain by the O'Briens.

M1359.7

Manus O'Dowda, son of the Lord of Hy Fiachrach, and Hugh, the son of Conor Mac Egan, the choicest of the Brehons of Ireland, died.

M1359.8

Donnell, son of Teige O'Mahony, was slain.

M1359.9

Art, the son of Auliffe O'Rourke, was slain by Magennis.

Annal M1360.

M1360.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1360. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty.

M1360.1

Mulrony, son of the Cammhuinelach the Wry-necked O'Boyle, Chief of the three Tuathas, a man illustrious for his hospitality, nobleness, wisdom, conquests, and protection, died.

M1360.2

Auliffe, son of Geoffrey Mac Rannall, died.

M1360.3

Sir Robert Savadge and Dermot O'Hanly died.

M1360.4

Roscommon, Devenish, Sligo, the monastery of Lisgool, Fenagh, and Druimlias, were burned.

M1360.5

John, son of Gilchreest O'Rourke, was slain by Hugh Mac Dorcy.

M1360.6

Dermot O'Brien was deposed by the son of his own brother.


p.619

M1360.7

Dermot, son of Donough Reagh Mac Dermot, was slain by Cathal Oge, son of Cathal O'Conor.

M1360.8

The daughter of Turlough O'Conor, and wife of Farrell O'Reilly, was killed by a fall.

M1360.9

A bridge of lime and stone was built by Cathal O'Conor across the river of Eas-dara.

M1360.10

Farrell, the son of Geoffrey Mac Rannall, and Tuathal O'Finnaghty, died.

M1360.11

Naevag O'Duigennan died.

M1360.12

Cathal, son of the Caoch Mac Rannall, was slain.

M1360.13

Gilla-na-naev O'Conmhaigh, Chief Professor of Music in Thomond, died.

M1360.14

The son of the King of England came to Ireland.

M1360.15

Art, son of Gillareagh Magennis, was treacherously slain by the sons of Savadge and the son of Murtough Riaganagh Magennis.

M1360.16

Cathal (O'Conor) marched. with an army into Tirawley, and destroyed many of its houses and churches.

Annal M1361.

M1361.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1361. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-one.

M1361.1

Benedict O'Mochain, Erenagh of Killaraght, died.

M1361.2

Art Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, and Donnell Reagh, heir apparent


p.621

to the throne of Leinster, were treacherously made prisoners by the son of the King of England. They afterwards died in prison.

M1361.3

Cormac Ballach O'Melaghlin, King of Meath; Donough O'Loughlin, Lord of Corcomroe; Cathal and Murtough, two sons of Hugh, son of Owen O'Conor; Dublióg, daughter of Hugh Maguire, and wife of Cuconnaught, son of Philip Mac Mahon; Thomas Mac Tiernan, Chief of Teallach-Dunchadha Tullyhunco in the county of Cavan; Nicholas O'Finnaghty, and Tuathal O'Malley, all died.

M1361.4

Sir Edmond Burke, Redmond, son of Burke of Muine, Walter Staunton, and Gilbert Mac Meyler, died.

M1361.5

Cluithe an righ was rife throughout all Ireland in general, and Richard Savadge died of it.

M1361.6

Magrath O'Finnaghty, Chief Musician and Tympanist to the Sil-Murray, died.

M1361.7

Great depredations were committed by Mac William Burke and Mac Feorais Bermingham, and by the English of all Connaught, upon Cathal Oge, son of Cathal O'Conor; and they ravaged and wasted Leyny and Tireragh. An army was led by Cathal afterwards, to take revenge for what they had done; and he plundered Mac Feorais's people and the territory of Edmund Mac Hubert Burke, and spoiled and destroyed the whole country.


p.621

M1362.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1362. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-two.

M1362.1

O'Beollan, Coarb of Drumcliff; Gilla-an-choimhdhe Mac Mughroin, Erenagh of Cill-an-iomaire; Oireachtach Mac Branan, Erenagh of Elphin; Aengus


p.623

Mac an Oglaoich, Erenagh of Cillairedh; O'Fergusa, Vicar of Imaidh; and Murrough, the monk, Mac Teige, died.

M1362.2

Owen Finn O'Conor, son of the King of Connaught; Mulrony O'Dowda and his wife, daughter of Mac Donough; Niall Magauran, Chief of Teallach Eachdhach Tullyhaw; Dermot, son of John O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly; Carbry O'Quin, Chief of Muintir-Gillagan; Donnell, son of Rory O'Kelly; Tomaltagh O'Beirne, Murtough Donn Mageraghty, Owen O'Malley, and Dermot, his son, Lords of Umallia, died.

M1362.3

Cucogry Mageoghegan, the son of Dermot Mageoghegan, and Maurice, the son of Murtough Mageoghegan, died.

M1362.4

The castle of Ballintober was taken by Cathal Oge and the son of Felim O'Conor.

M1362.5

A very great army was led by the King of Connaught, Hugh, son of Felim and Cathal O'Conor, into Meath, which they triumphantly desolated by fire. They burned the church of Kilkenny and fourteen other churches, in which the English had garrison. Many other injuries they also did them the English, after which they returned in safety to their homes.

M1362.6

Teige, son of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, was slain by the Clann-Coilen.

M1362.7

Cathal Oge O'Conor, a Roydamna of more fame, renown, strength, heroism, hospitality, and prowess, than any in his time, died of the plague at Sligo.


p.625

M1362.8

Murtough the son of Thomas, son of Cathal Reagh O'Rourke, died.

M1362.9

Donnell, the son of O'Kelly, died.

M1362.10

Cuconnaught O'Duigennan, Vicar of Kilronan, died.

M1362.11

Auliffe Mac Firbis, intended Ollav of Tireragh; Farrell, the son of Teige Mac Egan, a learned Brehon; John, son of Donough Mac Firbis, intended Ollav of Tireragh; Dermot, son of Mac Carthy; Conor, son of Melaghlin Carragh O'Dowda, and Murtough, his son, all died.

Annal M1363.

M1363.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1363. The age of christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-three.

M1363.1

Manus Eoghanach, the son of Conor, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, and Hugh Roe Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, died.

M1363.2

Manus Meabhlach, son of Hugh O'Donnell, heir to the lordship of Tir-connell, a man who had performed a greater number of noble and perilous actions than any other man of his time, was slain by Manus, son of Cathal Sramach O'Conor.

M1363.3

Teige Mac Consnava, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, was wounded, and afterwards taken prisoner, by Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach O'Conor. He died in his confinement.

M1363.4

Lasarina, daughter of O'Farrell, and wife of O'Reilly, died.

M1363.5

Murtough Roe, the son of Donnell-Erris O'Conor, was slain by Teige Mac Manus.

M1363.6

Bevin, the daughter of Mageoghegan, and wife of the Sinnach the Fox, died.

M1363.7

Cathal Mac Donough was slain by the people of Moylurg.

M1363.8

A very great storm in this year threw down several churches and houses, and also sank many ships and boats.

M1363.9

Conor O'Dowda was slain by Donough O'Dowda, and Murtough, son of Donough O'Dowda.


p.627

Annal M1364.

M1364.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1364. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-four.

M1364.1

Hugh O'Neill, King of Kinel-Owen, the best man of the Irish of his time, died, after having gained the palm for humanity, hospitality, valour, and renown.

M1364.2

Dermot O'Brien, Lord of Thomond; Melaghlin, the son of Murrough, son of Gilla-na-naev, son of Hugh, son of Auliffe O'Farrell, Lord of Annaly; Derbhail, daughter of O'Donnell, and wife of Maguire; Margaret, daughter of Walter Burke, and wife of Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor; Donnell Maguire, Chief of Clann-Fergaile; Gilla-na-naev O'Duvdavoran, Chief Brehon of Corcomroe; and Affrica, daughter of Brian O'Reilly, and wife of Brian Mac Tiarnan, died.

M1364.3

Donnell, son of Rory O'Kelly, heir to the lordship of Hy-Many, died.

M1364.4

Gilla-na-naev Mac Gowan, surnamed na Sgel, a learned historian; Dermot O'Sgingin, Ollav of Tirconnell in History; and Margaret, daughter of Walter Burke, and wife of Felim O Conor, King of Connaught, died.

Annal M1365.

M1365.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1365 The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-five.

M1365.1

Paidin O'Congaile, Parson and Erenagh of Ross-Airthir, died.

M1365.2

Rory, the son of Donnell O'Neill, was killed with one shot of an arrow by Melaghlin Mac-an-Girr Mac Cawell.


p.629

M1365.3

Felim an-einigh, son of Donnell O'Conor, Lord of Corcomroe, a man of unebbing hospitality and prowess, died.

M1365.4

Thomas, son of Murrough O'Farrell, died.

M1365.5

An attack was made by the Clann-Costello upon the people of Leyny, on which occasion Cormac O'Hara, and six of the chiefs of his tribe along with him, were slain.

M1365.6

Hugh Mac Dermot made an incursion into the country of the Muintir Eolais, and committed great depredations upon them, but not with impunity; for Cormac Mac Dermot Roe, General Biatach of Connaught; the two sons of Cormac O'Beirne, Melaghlin Dall and Gilchreest, and many others, were slain by the Muintir Eolais, who went in pursuit of the prey. After the defeat of their people, Dermot Mac Dermot and Mulrony, son of Donough Reagh, were taken prisoners.

M1365.7

Brian, the son of Matthew Mac Tiernarn, Chief of Teallach Dunchadha Tullyhunco, the most distinguished for valour, renown, fame, and power, of the sub-chieftains of Breifny, died. Of him was said:

    1. Brian Mac Tiernan of the battles,
      Whose hospitality was incomparable;
      He followed generosity without hatred,
      And heaven was the goal of his career.

M1365.8

Brian, the son of Hugh Mac Mahon, assumed the lordship of Oriel. He sued for an alliance by marriage with Sorley, son of Owen Duv Mac Donnell, heir to the lordship of the Insi-Gall, and High Constable of the province of Ulster; and he induced him to put away O'Reilly's daughter, and espouse his


p.641

own. Not long after this Mac Mahon invited him Mac Donnell to a feast. and they continued drinking for some time. Anon a dispute arose between them; whereupon Brian threw his arms about him Sorley, and ordered that he should be fast and strongly fettered, and cast into a neighbouring lake: and this being accordingly done he was at once drowned. Upon this Donnell. son of Hugh O'Neill, and his brother, Brian, son of Henry O'Neill, with the chief of Clannaboy, and Turlough More Mac Donnell, with all of his tribe in Ulster, assembled together, and, with one accord, marched into Oriel as far as the confines of Rath-Tulach, the mansion-seat of Mac Mahon. Intelligence of this having reached Brian, he fled, leaving the town empty and desolate to them. They, however, pursued Mac Mahon, who, with the chiefs of his territory, was engaged placing their herds and flocks in the fastnesses of the country. The men of Oriel were defeated, and deprived of their arms and cattle. After this Mac Mahon was banished from his own country to Muintir-Maelmora, and his wife and his daughter were made prisoners.

M1365.9

Cuconnaught O'Reilly, Lord of Breifny, retired among the friars, and resigned his lordship to his brother Philip.

M1365.10

Hugh, the son of Niall O'Donnell, heir to the lordship of Tirconnell, was slain by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor. On the same day Teige, the son of Manus O'Conor, encountered Donnell, and defeated him, with the loss of a great number of his people, among whom was Hugh, the son of Conor, son of Teige.

M1365.11

Robert Mac Wattin Barrett, died.

M1365.12

The son of the King of England left Ireland.


p.633

Annal M1366.

M1366.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1366. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-six.

M1366.1

The Bishop of Raphoe, i.e. Mac Maengail, died.

M1366.2

Cathal, the son of Hugh Breifneach, son of Cathal Roe, and Manus, his son, and also Murtough Mac Dail-re-docair, Maurice O'Maeltuile, Dermot Mac Simon, and Dermot Mac Gilla-Bearaigh, were treacherously slain at Srath-Fear-Luirg by the people of Fermanagh, who, to annoy the Clann-Murtough, made peace with the O'Rourkes, and forgave them all their past hostilities; and the O'Rourkes agreed to their proposals. The son of Rory O'Conor after this assumed the place of Cathal. The O'Rourkes went on a migratory excursion, accompanied by the people of Fermanagh; but the youths of the Clann-Murtough attacked and surrounded them, and killed Cathal Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry.

M1366.3

Murtough Mac Rannall, the son of Randal More Mac Rannall, who u-as a materies of a chieftain without dispute, was treacherously slain by Melaghlin Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais. Melaghlin himself died in two months afterwards.

M1366.4

Cormac Don Mac Carthy, Lord of Carbery, and of Ivahagh of Munster, was treacherously slain by his relative, the son of Donnell na-n-Domhnall.

M1366.5

Conor O'Conor, Lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was slain by the Branaghs.

M1366.6

Rory, son of Murtough O'Conor, was drowned in the Shannon.

M1366.7

A victory was gained by Teige, the son of Manus O'Conor, over John


p.635

O'Donnell and his gallowglasses. Many were slain in the conflict; and Mac Sweeny and many of the chiefs of Tirconnell were taken and led away prisoners.

M1366.8

An army was mustered by Donnell O'Neill and the Clann-Donnell, i.e. Turlough, the son of Donnell, and Alexander, his son; and they marched against Niall O'Neill. They expelled Mac Cawell from the country, upon which he went over to the side of Niall O'Neill. They came up with the rear body of Mac Cawell's people and their cattle; and, having worsted them, they took their cattle from them.

M1366.9

Randal, son of Alexander, the heir to Clann-Alexander, arrived at this time from the Inis-Gall the Hebrides, to assist Niall O'Neil. The kerns of both parties met close together, i.e. the troops of the Clann-Donnell. And Randal sent messengers to Turlough and his son Alexander, with their people, to request of them to permit him to pass in honour of his seniority, and for sake of their mutual relationship; but this request was made light of by the others, for they advanced to the ford, which they saw him Randal crossing. Here they gave each other a fierce and stubborn battle, in which countless numbers were killed and wounded on both sides. One of Randal's sons was killed by Turlough in the heat of the conflict ; and Turlough's son, Alexander, was taken prisoner by Randal's people, who meditated putting him to death at once; but Randal did not consent to this, for he said that he would not be deprived of his son and his kinsman on the one day.

M1366.10

A great war broke out between the English of Connaught. Mac Maurice was banished from his territory by Mac William; and Mac Maurice fled for protection to the Clann-Rickard. Mac William, Hugh O'Conor, King of Connaught, and William O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, marched with an army to Upper Connaught against the Clann-Rickard, and remained there nearly three months engaged in mutual hostilities, until at last Mac William subdued the


p.637

Clann-Rickard; whereupon the hostages of these latter were delivered up to him, and he returned to his country in triumph.

M1366.11

John Mac Costello, Lord of Sliabh Lugha, died.

M1366.12

Huggin Tyrrell, Lord of Fer-Tulach was slain by the Clann-Feorais Berminghams.

Annal M1367.

M1367.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1367. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-seven.

M1367.1

The bishops O'Farrell (i.e. Melaghlin), Bishop of Ardagh, a sage not wanting in piety, charity, humanity, or wisdom; and Malachias Maguire, Archdeacon of Oriel Clogher, died.

M1367.2

Cuconnaught O'Reilly, Lord of Breifny until he resigned the lordship for the sake of God, took holy orders; and Philip assumed his place.

M1367.3

The Clann-Murtough came upon a migratory excursion to Magh-nisse, and made an incursion into : Moylurg. The most illustrious of those who set out on this incursion were Teige, son of Rory O'Conor; Farrell Mac Tiernan, Lord of Teallach Dunchadha; and Dermot Mac Rannall, Lord of Muintir-Eolais: these were accompanied by many gallowglasses. They burned the fortified residence of Hugh Mac Dermot; but Farrell Mac Dermot and Hugh Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, opposed them ; and a battle ensued, in which many were slain on both sides. Teige O'Conor and Mac Rannall then returned, without having gained either booty or consideration.

M1367.4

A victory was gained by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, the O'Rourkes, and the Clann-Donough, with their retained kerns, over Teige, the son of Manus, on Traigh Eothuile an t-Saoir. The gallowglasses of the son of


p.639

Manus, one hundred and fifty in number, were slain; as were also Donnell son of Sorley, Donnell Oge, his son, the two Mac Sweenys, the son of the Bishop O'Dowda, and William Mac Sheehy.

M1367.5

Derbhail, daughter of Mulrony More Mac Dermot, and wife of Ualgarg O'Rourke, was killed by the Clann-Murtough.

M1367.6

Melaghlin, the son of Geoffry Mac Gillapatrick, and a party of his people were treacherously slain by the English.

M1367.7

Teige Magauran and Aengus, son of the Deacon Magauran, died.

M1367.8

Teige and Loughlin, two sons of Aengus Roe O'Daly, and Mulmurry Oge Magrath, died.

M1367.9

Mac Maurice na-m-Brigh; Owen, son of Rory O'Kelly; Murtough, son of Murtough O'Conor; and Bebinn, daughter of Ualgarg O'Rourke and wife of Tomaltagh Mac Donough, died.

M1367.10

The Clann-Murtough made an incursion into Fermanagh, and plundered Inis-mór, Loch m-Berraid, and Senad Mac Manus; and, after carrying off a great quantity of booty, returned home in safety.

Annal M1368.

M1368.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1368. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-eight.

M1368.1

The Coarb of St. Maidoc and Archdeacon of Breifny, a man filled with the grace of the Holy Ghost, died, after overcoming the world and the devil.


p.641

M1368.2

Hugh, son of Felim O'Conor.

M1368.3

King of Connaught, the foremost among the Irish for valour and prowess, and the Lughaidh Long-handed of Leth-Chuinn, against the English and his other enemies, died, after penance, at Roscommon; and Rory, the son of Turlough, assumed the government of Connaught.

M1368.4

The territory of Carbury was partitioned equally between the son of Manus and Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor.

M1368.5

Farrell Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, the lion of the nobility and valour of his tribe; Tomaltagh, son of Farrell Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg; and Cormac Mac Dermot, died.

M1368.6

Hugh, son of Cormac Mac Dermot, assumed the lordship of Moylurg.

M1368.7

Rory, the son of Johnock Mageoghegan, the hawk of the nobility and prowess of his tribe, and the most hospitable man from Dublin to Drogheda; and Tiernan, the son of Cathal O'Rourke, died.

M1368.8

Dermot, the son of Cormac Donn Mac Carthy, was taken prisoner by Mac Carthy, of Carbery, and by him delivered up to the English, who afterwards put him to death.

M1368.9

David O'Toole was slain by the English of Dublin.

M1368.10

William Samonagh, the son of Sir Edmond Burke, the heir of the Mac Williams, died of the small-pox on Inis-Cua.

M1368.11

Fiachra O'Flynn, heir to Sil-Maelruain, the best man of his tribe in his time, died; and his wife died also.


p.643

M1368.12

A great army was led by Niall O'Neill, King of the Kinel-Owen, who was joined by the chieftains of the entire province of Ulster, into Oriel, to attack Brian Mac Mahon; and they pitched a camp in the very centre of the territory. Mac Mahon offered him great terms, namely, to cede one-half of the territory of Oriel to Niall, the son of Murrough. son of Brian na g-Coileach n-Oifrinn, i.e. he who had been lord over the territory before himself; and other great gifts to O'Neill himself, as eric for the death of Mac Donnell. O'Neill consented to make peace with him on these conditions; but the son of Murrough Mac Mahon and Alexander Oge Mac Donnell, Lord of the Gallowglasses, without O'Neill's permission, marched, with one accord, with three battalions of kerns against Mac Mahon, and made an assault upon his fortress; but Mac Mahon and his household, being upon their guard, armed and accoutred within their fortress, they responded without delay to the attack; and a fierce and furious conflict ensued, in which they the assailants were defeated by Mac Mahon. The son of Murrough Mac Mahon, Tanist of Oriel; Alexander, the son of Turlough Mac Donnell, Constable of the Gallowglasses; and Owen, the son of Turlough, son of Melaghlin O'Donnell, together with a great number of others, were slain on that occasion.

M1368.13

Thomas O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre, a man full of hospitality and renown, died.

M1368.14

Teige, the son of Manus, son of Cathal, son of Donnell O'Conor, was treacherously taken prisoner by Rory, the son of Turlough (i.e. the O'Conor), in his Rory's own fortress at Ard-an-choillin, after he had been brought thither by Cormac Mac Donough to O'Conor's house. He was afterwards given up to Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, by whom he was at last killed in the castle of Sligo. It was afterwards common to compare any evil deed with those acts committed against the son of Manus O'Conor; so that it became a proverb familiar with every one, that ‘the taking and killing of the son of


p.645

Manus was not worse than whatever treacherous deed they used to hear of being perpetrated.’ In consequence of this taking and killing, a great war broke out in Connaught between O'Conor, Mac William, and Mac Dermot.

M1368.15

Cu-Uladh Mac-an-Ghirr Mac Cawell, chief of his own tribe, and a son of his, who was a learned and illustrious Professor of Sciences, died in England.

M1368.16

William, son of Donough Muimhneach O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was taken prisoner by O'Madden and the Clann-mic-n-Eoghain. On the same day Donnell, son of Conor O'Kelly, and Ardgal Oge O'Concannon, were slain by O'Maden.

M1368.17

Donnell Mac Namara died.

M1368.18

Slevny Mac Quillin, Constable of the Province of Ulster, died.

M1368.19

Murray O'Farrelly, Coarb of St. Maidoc, and Archdeacon of Breifny Kilmore, died.

M1368.20

Dermot, the Redhanded, Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, was taken prisoner by the English. He was the most valiant of the Irish provincial kings in his time.

Annal M1369.

M1369.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1369. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred sixty-nine.

M1369.1

Hugh O'Neill, Bishop of Clogher, a pious and humane man, and Richard O'Reilly, Bishop of Kilmore, died.

M1369.2

The Deacon O'Bardon died.


p.647

M1369.3

Cuconnaught O'Reilly, some time Lord of Breifny, died.

M1369.4

Philip O'Reilly was taken prisoner by his kinsmen, and was placed by them in the castle of Clough-Lough Oughter, severely bound and fettered. Manus O'Reilly then assumed the lordship. In consequence of this capture, war and disturbance broke out in Breifny. A great army was mustered by Annadh, the son of Richard O'Reilly, who was joined by Mac Mahon and all the other chiefs of Oriel, to rescue Philip O'Reilly from Manus by force. Manus and his kinsmen however, came, together with their entire forces, to contest the chieftainship of the country for themselves. A battle was fought between them at Blen-cupa, where Manus was defeated. In this conflict were slain the three sons of Cormac O'Farrell, viz. Johnin, Melaghlin, and Fergus; Felim, son of Hugh an Chleitigh O'Conor; the two sons of Flaithim More Mac Conruva, namely, Donn and Brian ; Sitric na Srona Mac Master, and a number of others.

M1369.5

Gerald Kavanagh, heir to the kingdom of Leinster was slain by the Back knight.

M1369.6

Tiernan O'Rourke went upon a predatory excursion into Lurg, and carried off a great prey; but Hugh Oge, son of Hugh O'Rourke, was slain by O'Muldoon, Chief of Lurg, who had followed in pursuit of it.

M1369.7

Dermot Lavderg Mac Murrough, after having been confined for a long time by the English of Dublin, was put to death by them.

M1369.8

Mahon Moinmoy O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, the best and most illustrious of the Irish, died in his own fortress, after the victory of penance. Brian O'Brien assumed the lordship of Thomond after Mahon.

M1369.9

O'Muldoon (Donnell), Lord of the territory of Lurg was slain by the sons


p.649

of Niall O'Donnell, who carried the spoils of his territory with them to one of the islands of Lough Erne which is called Badhbha. Philip Maguire, Lord of the Seven Tuathas, set out with a large fleet to take revenge upon the sons of O'Donnell for the death of his Oglach; and a naval engagement took place, in which Niall Oge, son of Niall Garv, the son of Hugh, son of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, was slain on Finn-loch, close to the island.

1369.10

Brian, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, a good materies of a king of Ireland, for his nobleness, hospitality, and prowess, died.

M1369.11

A great defeat was given by Brian O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, to the English of Munster. Garrett, Earl of Desmond, and many of the chiefs of the English, were taken prisoners by him, and the remainder cut off with indescribable slaughter. Limerick was burned on this occasion by the Thomonians and the Clann-Culein, upon which the inhabitants of the town capitulated with O'Brien. Sheeda Cam Mac Namara, son of the daughter of O'Dwyre, assumed the wardenship of the town; but the English who were in the town acted treacherously towards him, and killed him. This was a lamentable treatment of the son of a chieftain.

M1369.12

Philip Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh, brought vessels to Lough Oughter took the castle of Clough-Lough-Oughter, and liberated Philip O'Reilly, who was confined therein, and who thereupon re-assumed the lordship.

M1369.13

Melaghlin Mac Mahon, heir to the lordship of Oriel; Brian, the son of Murtough O'Conor; John, the son of Edward Mac Hubert; Donough O'Beirne, Chief of Tir-Briuin; Randal O'Hanly; Cormac O'Hanly; also John Mac Egan, and Gilbert O'Bardan, two accomplished young harpers of Conmaicne, died.

M1369.14

William O'Farrelly, Coarb of St. Maidoc, and Archdeacon of Breifny, died.


p.651

Annal M1370.

M1370.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1370. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy.

M1370.1

A firm and sincere peace was made by the Kinel-Owen with each other. Donnell O'Neill gave hostages to Niall as pledges, that he would not contest the lordship with him; and Niall then gave Donnell a share of territory and lands.

M1370.2

Gillapatrick Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry; Cu-uladh, his son, and his wife, the daughter of Manus Mac Mahon, were treacherously slain by the sons of Hugh Mac Cawell. Murrough, his Gillapatrick's brother then became Chieftain of Kinel-Farry.

M1370.3

Cahir O'Conor, heir of Offaly, and Murtough O'More, were killed on a predatory excursion by the English of Leinster.

M1370.4

Duvcovla, the daughter of O'Reilly, and wife of Philip Maguire, died.

M1370.5

Manus O'Reilly was taken prisoner by the sons of Thomas, the son of Mahon O'Reilly, and confined in the castle of Clough-Lough-Oughter.

M1370.6

Cathal, son of Davock O'Concannon, Lord of Hy-Diarmada; Joanna Cam, daughter of Mac Carthy, and wife of Mac Namara; Sheeda, of Kilkenny, son of John Mac Namara; John O'Hara, heir to the lordship of Leyny; and Dermot, son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, died.

M1370.7

Niall O'Neill, Lord of Kinel-Owen, routed Brian Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel; and very great numbers of Mac Mahon's people were cut off by slaying and drowning.

M1370.8

Donnell, son of Melaghlin, and Teige, son of Loughlin O'Kelly, with his two sons, died.


p.653

M1370.9

Melaghlin Connaughtagh O'Farrell, and Cathal Oge O'Farrell, died.

M1370.10

Teige O'Rourke assumed the lordship of Breifny; but the Clann-Murtough, Mac Tiernan, and Conor Roe, the son of Cathal, son of Hugh Breifneach, banished him to the territory of Mac William.

M1370.11

William Donn, the son of Ulick Burke, died.

Annal M1371.

M1371.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1371. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-one.

M1371.1

John O'Grady, Archbishop of Tuam, the leading man for wisdom and hospitality in his time, died.

M1371.2

Farrell Mac Coghlan died while detained in prison by O'Kennedy.

M1371.3

Farrell Mageoghegan died.

M1371.4

Durrough O'Madden (i.e. the son of Owen), general patron of the literati, the poor, and the destitute of Ireland, was killed by one shot of an arrow, in the rear of a predatory party in Ormond.

M1371.5

Brian O'Kennedy, Lord of Ormond, was treacherously slain by the English.

M1371.6

Edmond O'Kennedy, heir to the lordship of Ormond, died.

M1371.7

Teige Oge, the son of Manus O'Conor, was treacherously killed in the castle of Sligo by Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Conor, after he had been sent to him, as already mentioned, by the King of Connaught (Rory, the son of Turlough).

M1371.8

Eachmarcach, the son of Manus, son of Rory, son of Manus, son of Donn More Maguire, a general brughaidh farmer, who dwelt on Lough Erne, died.


p.655

M1371.9

Meyler Mac Hubert was slain by o'Conor.

M1371.10

Great depredations were ommitted by O'Dowda (Donnell) in Tir-Fhiachrach Muaidhe ; the whole country was ravaged by him, and its castles were taken, namely, the castles of Ard-na-riagh and Castle-mic-Conor, and all the English that were in them were driven out; and the country was after this parcelled out amongst his kinsmen and his own people.

M1372.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1372. The Age of Christ, one thousand three hundred seventy-two.

M1372.1

Brian More Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, marched to give battle to the English; but he was privily and treacherously slain by a gallowglass of his own people, who thereupon fled from the army.

M1372.2

John More O'Dugan, a learned historian and ollav of Hy-Many, died, after the victory of Extreme Unction and penance, at Rinn-duin, among the monks of John the Baptist.

M1372.3

Murtough Muimhneach, son of Murtough More Mageoghegan, Chief of Kinel-Fiachach, died, after the victory of penance.

M1372.4

Mac Feorais Bermingham was taken prisoner by O'Kelly and his sons; and Richard Mac Feorais, his heir, was slain.

M1372.5

William, the son of Ulick, the most distinguished man of the Burkes for gaiety and polite manners, and William Oge O'Kelly, heir to the lordship of Hy-Many, died.