Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

Annals of the Four Masters

Author: Unknown

File Description

Electronic edition compiled by Myriam Priour, Stephen Beechinor

Funded by University College,Cork and
Seoirse Ó Luasa, An Caifé Liteartha, An Daingean, who donated a copy of the Annals of the Four Masters to the CELT Project.

2. Second draft, revised and corrected.

Proof corrections by Orla McDonald, Winifred Power, Myriam Priour, Stephen Beechinor

Extent of text: 104230 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts; a Project of University College, Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland—http://www.ucc.ie/celt

(2002) (2008)

Distributed by CELT online at University College,Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: T100005B

Availability [RESTRICTED]

Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Notes

[The precise relationship between MSS 1–4 (below) is a matter for scholarly debate. Two views have been put forward, that of Walsh and Mooney (for bibliographical details of their publications, see below). According to Walsh, MSS 1 and 4 are what remains of theset presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 3 are the copies forwarded to Louvain for possible printing. According to Mooney, MSS 1 and 3 are the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 4 are what remains of the set forwarded to Louvain. It is more likely that Walsh's view is correct. For an excellent and fully documented discussion of the problem, see Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters, Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95.]

Sources

    Manuscript sources
  1. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 1220 olim C iii 3; paper; s. xvii; five hands, including Míchél Ó Cléirigh and Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh; 522 folios. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1171. Used by Dubhaltach Mac Fir Bhisigh, who refers to it as belonging to Fearghal Ó Gadhra. For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone & Elizabeth FitzPatrick, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 26 (Dublin 1943) 3276–82; ; Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95: 88–92.
  2. Dublin, University College L, OFM, A 13; paper; s. xvii; an autograph copy but scribal signatures are absent in the body of the text. The hands resemble those of Míchél Ó Cléirigh, but there are other hands including marginal notes by John Colgan. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1169. For a description of the MS, see Myles Dillon, Canice Mooney, & Pádraig de Brún, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Franciscan Library, Killiney (Dublin 1969) 24–27; Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17–24; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 94–95.
  3. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 687 and 688 olim 23 P 6 and 23 P 7; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Míchél Ó Cléirigh, Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, and Conaire Ó Cléirigh, and two others. Annals from 1170 to 1616. For a description of the MSS, see Lilian Duncan, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 17 (1936) 2112–2114; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95; annals from 1170 to 1616); Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=MSS 687–8]) Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81–3; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95.
  4. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1301 olim H. 2. 11; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Conaire Ó Cléirigh; and two other Ó Cléirigh scribes. Annals from 1334 (beginning acephalous) to 1605 in 466 folios. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82–83; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 92–94.
  5. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1300 olim H. 2. 9 and H. 2. 10; paper; s. xviii (1734–5) scribe: Hugh O'Mulloy (Aodh Ó Maolmhuaidh); a transcript of MS (i) made for John O'Fergus. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82).
  6. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 988 and 989 olim 23 F 2 and 23 F 3; paper; s. xviii; scribe not named; the text was transcribed in the house of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, and apparently under his supervision. This is a transcript of MS (i). For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy, fasc. 22 (1940) 2829–30).
    Editions and Translations
  1. Charles O'Conor (ed.) Rerum Hibernicarum scriptores veteres iii: Quatuor Magistrorum Annales Hibernici usque ad annum M.CLXXII. ex ipso O'Clerii autographo in Biblioteca Stowense servato, nunc primum uersione donati ac notis illustrati (Buckingham, 1826) [O'Conor's edition, though based on MS (i) is seriously defective].
  2. John O'Donovan (ed. & trans.) Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes, 7 vols. (Dublin 1848–51; repr. Dublin, 1856; repr. Dublin, 1990.) [volumes i–ii: pp v–vi (dedicatory letter of the editor) + pp vii–liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv–lxi (epistle dedicatory of Míchél Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii–lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2–1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189–93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii–vi: pp 2–2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377–2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494–8 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i–ii, volumes iii–vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The edition of volumes i–ii, AM 2242–AD 1171, is made from a corrected copy of Charles O'Conor's edition (Buckingham, 1826). This edition is based on MS (i) which was not available to O'Donovan. O'Donovan collated the text so derived with MS (v) and MS (vi) both eighteenth-century transcripts of MS (i). MS (ii) was not known to O'Conor or O'Donovan. The text of the remainder of the remainder of the Annals (volumes iii–vi) is edited from MS (iii) collated with MS (iv).]
  3. Owen Connellan, The Annals of Ireland, translated from the original Irish of the Four Masters (Dublin, 1846) [Annals from 1171 to 1616].
  4. Henri Lizeray, Le livre des quatre maîtres: Annales du royaume d'Irlande, depuis les origines jusqu'à l'arrivée de saint Patrice (Leroux, 1882).
    Literature
  1. George Petrie, 'Remarks on the history and authenticity of the Annals of the Four Masters', Trans Roy Ir Acad 16 (1831) 381-93 [repr. O'Donovan, op. cit. i, pp vii-xix].
  2. Sir John T. Gilbert, 'The Celtic records of Ireland', Ir Q Rev 1 (1852) 588-700 [notice of O'Donovan's edition].
  3. Eugene O'Curry, Lectures on the manuscript materials of ancient Irish history (Dublin, 1861; repr. Dublin, 1878) 141-61 [note O'Curry's translation of John Colgan's remarks about Míchél Ó Cléirigh (143-45) and his sardonic comments on the Stowe sale of Irish MSS and the attitude of Lords Macaulay and Ashburnham].
  4. P. Mac Suibhne, 'A great historical work: the Annals of the Four Masters', J Ivernian Soc 7 (1915) 66-93.
  5. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24.
  6. E. J. Gwynn, 'Miscellanea', Ériu 9 (1921-23) 27-30: 27-8 [verse fragments in Annals of the Four Masters].
  7. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters', in Paul Walsh, Gleanings from Irish manuscripts, 2nd ed. (Dublin, 1933) 69-85.
  8. Paul Walsh, 'The Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 22 (1934) 128-31.
  9. Paul Walsh, 'The convent of Donegal, 1632-36', Ir Book Lover 23 (1935) 109-15.
  10. Brendan Jennings, Michael O Cleirigh, chief of the Four Masters, and his associates (Dublin, 1936) [an inadequate account of the MSS, otherwise very valuable].
  11. Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MSS 687-8])', Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3 [repr. for the most part in a chapter of his The Four Masters and their work].
  12. Paul Walsh, 'Slips in O'Donovan's Four Masters, vol. V', Ir Book Lover 25 (1937) 100-02.
  13. M. A. O'Brien, 'Miscellanea Hibernica, 5: a wrong entry in AU and FM [A.D. 603], Études Celtiques 3 (1939) 365.
  14. Paul Walsh, 'The dating of Irish annals', Ir Hist Stud 2, (1941) 355-75.
  15. Canice Mooney, 'Irish Franciscan libraries of the past', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser., 60 (1942) 223-4.
  16. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'John O Donovan and the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 29 (1943-5) 4-8.
  17. Paul Walsh, The Four Masters and their work (Dublin, 1944).
  18. Michael Duignan [notice of Walsh's Four Masters and their work], Éigse 4 (1943-4) 312.
  19. Helena Concannon, 'John O'Donovan and the Annals of the Four Masters', Studies (Dublin) 37 (1948) 300-7.
  20. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'Annals of the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 31 (1949-51) 126-8.
  21. Alexander Boyle, 'Fergal Ó Gadhra and the Four Masters', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser, 100 (1963) 100-14.
  22. Cathaldus Giblin, 'The Annals of the Four Masters', in Liam de Paor (ed.) Great books of Ireland (Dublin, 1967) 90-103, repr. in Benignus Millett & Anthony Lynch (ed.) Dún Mhuire, Killiney, 1945-95 (Dublin, 1995) 135-43.
  23. David Greene & Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry (London, 1967; repr. Dingle, 1990) 107-9, 200-01 [edition of restored text and translation of four verse epigrams that occur s. aa. 606, 614, 1022, and 1088].
  24. Pádraig Ó Súilleabháin, 'Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála', Éigse 15 (1973) 20-22.
  25. Alan Mac an Bhaird, 'Dán díreach agus ranna as na hannála 867-1134', Éigse 17 (1977) 157C168.
  26. Breandán Ó Buachalla, 'Annála ríoghachta Éireann is Foras feasa ar Éirinn: an comhthéacs comhaimseartha', Studia Hibernica, 22-3 (1982-3) 59-105.
  27. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75-95.
  28. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Vikings II: Ross Cam', Peritia 10 (1996) 236.
  29. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The celebrated antiquary: Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh (c.1600-71): his lineage life and learning (Maynooth, 1996) 6-10, 100-101, 186-89.
  30. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'Cathal Ó Mac Maghnusa: his time, life and legacy', Clogher Rec 16/2 (1998) 45-64.
  31. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Ad Annals of the Four Masters, 823-24', Peritia 13 (1999) 141.
  32. William O'Sullivan, 'The Slane manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters'. Ríocht na Mídhe [Journal of the County Meath Historical Society] 10 (1999) 78-85.
  33. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, 'The chronology and sources of the early Irish annals', Early Medieval Europe 10:3 (2001) 323341.
  34. Pádraig A. Breatnach, 'Irish records of the Nine Years' War: a brief survey, with particular notice of the relationship between Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill and the Annals of the Four Masters'. In Ó Riain, Pádraig (ed.), Beatha Aodha Ruaidh: the life of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Historical and literary contexts (Irish Texts Society, subsidiary series 12) (London 2002) 124-147.
  35. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, on his website at http://www.cs.tcd.ie/misc/kronos/chronology/synchronisms/annals-chron.htm offers comprehensive information on two traditions of dating used in the Irish Annals, together with two ancillary articles, 'Chronological synchronisation of the Irish annals', and 'Collation of the Irish regnal canon'.
  36. Bernadette Cunningham, O'Donnell Histories: Donegal and the Annals of the Four Masters (Rathmullan, 2007).
  37. Edel Bhreatnach and Bernadette Cunningham (eds.), Writing Irish History: the Four Masters and their World (Dublin, 2007).
  38. Bernadette Cunningham, 'The Ó Duibhgeannáin family of historians and the Annals of the Four Masters', Breifne 44 (2008) 557-572.
  39. Bernadette Cunningham, 'John O'Donovan's edition of the Annals of the Four Masters: an Irish classic?' in Dirk van Hulle and Joep Leersen (eds.), Editing the Nation's Memory: Textual Scholarship and Nation-building in Nineteenth-century Europe (Amsterdam, 2008), 129-149.
  40. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish Annals: their genesis, evolution and history (Dublin 2008).
  41. Nicholas Evans, The present and the past in medieval Irish chronicles, Studies in Celtic History 27 (Woodbridge, 2010).
  42. Bernadette Cunningham, The Annals of the Four Masters (Dublin, 2010).
  43. Pádraig A.Breatnach, The Four Masters and their manuscripts: studies in palaeography and text (Dublin, 2013).
    The edition used in the digital edition
  1. Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes.. in Volume 2: translationJohn O'Donovan (ed), First edition [Seven volumes. Volumes i—ii: pp v—vi (dedicatory letter of the editor)+ pp vii—liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv—lxi (epistle dedicatory of Mícheál Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii—lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2—1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189—93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii—vi: pp 2—2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377—2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494—98 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i–ii, volumes iii—vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The whole work extends to 4167 pp.] Hodges & Smith Dublin (1848–51)

Encoding

Project Description

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Sampling Declaration

The present text represents pages 565–1187 of the translation of volume 2, being the years A. D. 903 to A. D. 1171, in the chronology of the compilers. That chronology deviates from the historical chronology,but it has not been corrected in this edition. All editorial introduction, notes and indexes have been omitted. Editorial corrigenda are integrated into the electronic edition. Missing text supplied by the editor is tagged sup. Translation omitted by the editor is tagged . Translation supplied by persons other than the editor is tagged sup with appropriate responsibility ID.

Editorial Declaration

Correction

Text has been checked and proofread twice. All corrections and supplied text are tagged. The Annals of the Four Masters is an extremely large and complex work. Any corrections of errors in the original text, as edited by O'Donovan,corrections to O'Donovan's translation, or to this digital edition of his translation are welcome. They will be credited to the scholars who make them.

The editors of this digital edition reproduce O'Donovan's translation, with a few obvious corrections, in full knowledge of its limitations. Its limitations are particularly evident in the translations of the embedded verse in Old and Middle Irish, many of which (given the stage of development of Irish studies in the mid-nineteenth century) are approximations or mistaken. Their correction cannot be undertaken in this digital edition and must await a new scholarly edition of the Annals as a whole. O'Donovan omits diacritics in the English translation, but quantities are marked in the digital edition of the Irish text, and this should be consulted on this point.

Normalization

The electronic text represents the edited text. The editor's divisions of words have been retained.

Quotation

Quotation marks are rendered q.

Hyphenation

Soft hyphens are silently removed. When a hyphenated word (hard or soft) crosses a page-break, the page-break is marked after the completion of the hyphenated word.

Segmentation

div0=the whole work; div1=the individual annals (i.e. the annalistic matter gathered under one year); div2=the annalistic entry; paragraphs are marked; passages of verse occurring within paragraphs are treated as embedded texts and the stanzas are marked lg and metrical lines are marked l. Page-breaks are marked pb n=""; words in languages other than English are tagged.

Standard Values

Dates are encoded in the format yyyy-mm-dd (but not tagged within the body of this text).

Canonical References

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Refs: EVENT (<DIV2>)

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Profile Description

Created: Translation by John O'Donovan (for source text see CELT file G100005B) Date range: c.1846–1850.

Use of language

Language: [EN] The text is in English.
Language: [LA] Some words are in Latin.
Language: [GA] Some words are in Irish.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: T100005B

Annals of the Four Masters: Author: Unknown


p.565

M903.0

The Age of Christ, 903.

M903.1

The twenty-seventh year of Flann.

M903.2

Maelmartin, Abbot of Lughmhadh;

M903.3

Diarmaid, Abbot of Doire-Chalgaigh;

M903.4

Cormac, Abbot of Druim-mor;

M903.5

and Suibhne, son of Dubhdabhoireann, Prior of Cill-dara, died.

M903.6

Maeloghrai, son of Conghalach, lord of Loch-Gabhar, was slain by Fogartach, son of Tolarg.

M903.7

The battle of Bealach-Mughna was fought by Flann, son of


p.567

Maelseachlainn, King of Ireland, and Cearbhall, son of Muirigen, King of Leinster, and by Cathal, son of Conchobhar, King of Connaught, against Cormac,

p.569

son of Cuileannan, King of Caiseal. The battle was gained over Cormac, and he himself was slain, though his loss was mournful, for he was a king, a bishop, an anchorite, a scribe, and profoundly learned in the Scotic tongue. These were the nobles who fell along with him, name, Fogartach the Wise, son of Suibhne, lord of Ciarraighe-Cuirche; Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, lord of Osraighe; Maelgorm, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra; Maelmorda, lord of Raith-linn; Ailill, son of Eoghan, Abbot of Trian-Corcaighe; Colman, Abbot of Ceann-Eitigh; and the lord of Corca-Duibhne; and many other nobles besides them, and six thousand men along with them. It was in commemoration of this the following lines were composed by Dallan, son of Mor:

p.571

    1. Cormac of Feimhin, Fogartach, Colman, Ceallach of the hard conflicts,
      They perished with many thousands in the great battle of Bealach-Mughna.
      Flann of Teamhair, of the plain of Tailltin, Cearbhall of Carman without fail,
      On the seventh of the Calends of September, gained the battle of which hundreds were joyful.
      The bishop, the souls' director, the renowned, illustrious doctor,
      King of Caiseal, King of Iarmumha; O God! alas for Cormac!
It was of the year of Cormac's death was also said:
    1. Since Jesus was born of heaven, three, nine hundred years,
      Till the death of Cormac, were clearly fulfilled; sorrowful the death of the King of Munster.
Fiach Ua Ugfadan of Denlis was he who beheaded Cormac.

M903.8

A hosting was made by the Cinel-Eoghain, i.e. by Domhnall, son of Aedh, and Niall, son of Aedh; and Tlachtgha was burned by them.

M903.9

Cnaimheini, son of Maenach, lord of Eile, died.

Annal M904.

M904.0

The Age of Christ, 904.

M904.1

The twenty-eighth year of Flann.

M904.2

Ruadhan, Bishop of Lusca,

M904.3

and Cumascach, son of Ailell,[OElig ]conomus of Ard-Macha, died.

M904.4

Mughroin, son of Sochlachan, lord of Ui-Maine, died.

M904.5

Amhalghaidh, son of Conghalach, Tanist of Breagh, and Flann, his brother, were slain by the Conailli-Muirtheimhne.

M904.6

Colman, son of Cinaeth, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, died.

M904.7

The Daimhliag of Cluain-mic-Nois was erected by the king, Flann Sinna, and by Colman Conailleach.

M904.8

Bec Ua Leathlobhair, lord of Dal-Araidhe, died. Of him was said:


p.573

    1. Awful news that now disperses those ships of the sea that have braved many dangers and perils,
      That no longer lives the golden scion, the sage, the beloved, the famed chieftain of Tuagh-inbhir.

M904.9

Cearbhall, son of Muirigen, King of Leinster, was killed. In lamentation of him was said:

    1. Great grief that Liffe of ships is without Cearbhall, its befitting spouse,
      A generous, staid, prolific man, to whom Ireland was obedient.
      Sorrowful to me the hills of Almhain and Ailleann without soldiers,
      Sorrowful to me is Carman, I do not conceal it, as grass is on its roads.
      Not long was his life after Cormac who was dishonoured,
      A day and a half, no false rule, and one year, without addition.
      Ruler of a noble kingdom, King of Leinster of the troops of heroes;
      Alas! that the lofty chief of Almhain has died through a bitter painful way.
      Sorrowful for brilliant jewels, to be without the valiant, illustrious lord of Nas.
      Although dense hosts have been slain; greater than all their sorrows is this sorrow.

Of Cearbhall also:

    1. Cearbhall was always a conservator, his rule was vigorous till death;
      What lay of his tributes unpaid, he brought by his strength to Nas.

Gormlaith said:

    1. Evil towards me the compliment of the two foreigners who slew Niall and Cearbhall;
      Cearbhall was slain by Hulb, a great achievement; Niall Glundubh, by Amhlaeibh.


p.575

M904.10

At Cill-Corbain Cearbhall was interred, as stated in the following verses:

    1. There are nine kings of famous career, in a noble church of shining lustre,
      Muiregan, hero without mistake, Cellach, and Cearbhall the prudent,
      Colman, Broen, and Bran the lively, Finn, Faelan, Dunchadh the bold;
      In Cill-Chorbain, I have heard, their warlike graves were made.

Annal M905.

M905.0

The Age of Christ, 905.

M905.1

The twenty-ninth year of Flann.

M905.2

Maelmordha, airchinneach of Tir-da-ghlas,died.

M905.3

Uallachan, son of Cathal, Tanist of Ui-Failghe, was slain.

M905.4

The battle of Magh-Cumma was gained by Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, and by his sons, over the men of Breifne, wherein were slain Flann, son of Tighearnan, lord of Breifne, and his son, and many others of the nobility, together with three thousand men, who fell along with them in that battle.

M905.5

A fleet by Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, and by Innreachtach, son of Conchobhar,upon Loch Deirgdherc, so that they defeated the fleet of Munster; and great numbers were killed by them.

M905.6

A wonderful sign appeared in this year, namely, two suns were seen moving together during one day.

M905.7

The oratory of Magh-eo was burned.

M905.8

Aedh, son of Maelpadraig, lord of Ui-Fiachrach, was slain by Niall, son of Aedh.

M905.9

Buadhach, son of Mothla, Tanist of the Deisi, died.

Annal M906.

M906.0

The Age of Christ, 906.

M906.1

The thirtieth year of Flann.

M906.2

Etigen, son of Finghin, Abbot of Treoit, died.

M906.3

Fogartach, son of Cele, lord of Ui-mic-Uais, died.

M906.4

Aedh, son of Dubhghilla, lord of Ui-Drona of the Three Plains, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was slain by the Ui-Bairrche. Of him was said:

    1. O youths of pleasant Ailbhe, mourn ye the king of noble Slaine,
      Slain is the populous Aedh of the Bearbha, the just king of the land of peaceful Fearna.
      To great Fearna of the thousand noble graces there came not, if I remember rightly,
      A corpse of more illustrious fame, since the populous Bran Dubh was slain.
      My shelter, my protection has departed, may the King of kings make smooth his way,
      'Tis easily known by Aedhan's rath that Aedh is dead, O youths.

M906.5

Dunlang, son of Cairbre, heir apparent of Leinster, died.

M906.6

Domhnall, son of Aedh Finnliath, lord of Aileach, took the pilgrim's staff.

M906.7

Gaithine, son of Aughran, Tanist of Laighis, died.

M906.8

Buadhach, son of Gusan, Tanist of Ui-Bairrche-tire, died.

M906.9

Dianimh, daughter of Duibhghilla, the wife of Dunlang, died; of whom was said:

    1. Dianimh, protection of our purity, is fettered by the power of the King of the elements;
      Alas! that the long and beautiful person is in a cold house of clay.

Annal M907.

M907.0

The Age of Christ, 907.

M907.1

The thirtieth year of Flann.

M907.2

Finnachta, bishop, died.

M907.3

Cormac, Bishop of Saighir, died.

M907.4

Maelbrighde, son of Maeldomhnaigh, Abbot of Lis-mor,

M907.5

and Flann, son of Laegh, Abbot of Corcach, died.

M907.6

The violation of Ard-Macha by Cearnachan, son of Duilgen, i.e. a captive was taken from the church, and drowned in Loch-Cirr, to the west of Ard-Macha. Cearnachan was soon afterwards drowned by Niall, son of Aedh, King of the North, in the same lake, in revenge of the violation of Patrick.

M907.7

Ruarc, son of


p.579

Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, died.

M907.8

Muireadhach, son of Mughron, lord of Clann-Cathail, died.

Annal M908.

M908.0

The Age of Christ, 908.

M908.1

The thirty-second year of Flann.

M908.2

Tibraide, son of Maelfinn, Bishop and Abbot of Imleach-Iubhair, died.

M908.3

Muireadhach, son of Cormac, Abbot of Druim-Inesclainn,

M908.4

and Gairbhith, son of Maelmordha, Tanist of Conaille-Muirtheimhne, were destroyed in the refectory of Druim-Inesclainn, by Conghalach, son of Gairbhith, lord of Conaille-Muirtheimhne. It was in lamentation of Muireadhach these verses were composed:

    1. Muireadhach,—who does not lament him, O ye learned!
      It is a cause of human plague, it is a cloud to sacred heaven!
      Great loss is the illustrious man, son of Cormac of a thousand charms;
      The great and well-tested relic, who was the lamp of every choir.

M908.5

Sochlachan, son of Diarmaid, lord of Ui-Maine, died in religion.

M908.6

Cleirchen, son of Murchadh, lord of Ui-Briuin-Seola, died.

M908.7

Cuileannan,son of Mael-brighde, died.

M908.8

Conghalach, son of Gairbhith, lord of Conaille-Muirtheimhne, was slain by the Conailli themselves, the ninth month after destroying the abbot's house at Druim-Inesclainn, against Maelmordha, and Muireadhach, son of Cormac, Abbot of Druim-Inesclainn.

M908.9

A battle was gained by the foreigners over a crew or fleet of Ulidians, in the region of Saxonland i.e. in England, where many were slain with Cumascach, son of Maelmoicheirghe, Tanist of Leath-Cathail.

M908.10

Maelbrighde, son of Tornan, repaired to Munster, to ransom a pilgrim of the Britons.


p.581

Annal M909.

M909.0

The Age of Christ, 909.

M909.1

The Thirty-third year of Flann.

M909.2

Tibraide, Bishop of Cluain-eidhneach;

M909.3

and Maelmaedhog, Abbot of Druim-mor, died.

M909.4

Litheach, Abbot of Cluain-eidhneach;

M909.5

and Maelcaisil,Abbot of Mungairit, died.

M909.6

A battle was gained at Gulban-Guirt by Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, over the Connaughtmen, i.e. Maelcluiche, son of Conchobhar, where a slaughter was made of the Connaughtmen, together with Maelcluiche himself, and many others of the nobility.

M909.7

A battle was gained by Maelmithidh, son of Flannagan, and Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, over Lorcan, son of Dunchadh, and Fogartach, son of Tolairg, and the Leinstermen, wherein many persons were slain, and great numbers taken prisoners.

M909.8

Maelpatraig, son of Flathrai, lord of Rath-Tamhnaighe, died.

Annal M910.

M910.0

The Age of Christ, 910.

M910.1

The thirty-fourth year of Flann.

M910.2

Foreigners arrived in Ireland, and took up at Port-Lairge.

M910.3

A hosting of the Fochla, and of all Ulidia, with Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh, into Meath, as far as Greallach-Eillte, where they were there defeated by Flann Sinna and his sons, and some of their friends slain, together with Fearghal, son of Aenghus, son of Maelduin; Maelmordha, son of Eremhon, son of Aedh, of the Ulidians; and Erudan, son of Gairbhith, chief of Ui-Breasail; Diarmaid, son of Sealbhach, lord of Dal-Riada; Maelmuire, son of Flannagan, lord of Fearnmhagh; Domhnall, son of Gairbhith, lord of Conaille; Connican, son of Aireachtach; and Cormac, son of Innreachtach, lord of Ciarraighe; and other nobles besides them. Of this battle was said:

    1. Sorrow to the cold Greallach-Eillte, we found hosts by its side;
      Cormac said to Niall, we shall not be permitted to go westwards, let us move eastwards.


p.583

Annal M911.

M911.0

The Age of Christ, 911.

M911.1

The thirty-fifth year of Flann.

M911.2

The plundering of the south of Breagh, and of the south of Cianachta, by Flann, son of Maelseachlainn.

M911.3

Maelbrighde, son of Geibhleachan, lord of Conaille, was slain by the Ui-Eathach, in the fourth month after his having taken the chieftainship.

M911.4

Aenghus, son of Flann, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, was mortally wounded at Greallach-Eillte, by Cernn, son of Bernn; and he died at the end of sixty days afterwards. In attestation of which was said:

    1. A blessing on the hand of Cern, son of Bernn, who slew Aenghus Finn, the pride of Fail;
      It was a good achievement of his sharp valour to avenge the noble Aedh Ollan.

M911.5

Domhnall, son of Aedh (i.e. of Aedh Finnliath), son of Niall, lord of Aileach, died in religion, after a good life. In lamentation of him and of Aenghus was said:

    1. From the birth of Christ, body of purity, till the death of Domhnall, according to the chronicles,—
      A better guide cannot be found,—one year and ten above nine hundred,
      The history of this year is heavy mist to fertile Banbha,
      Aenghus of Meath, the great champion, and Domhnall, son of Aedh of Aileach perished.
      There came not of the Irish a youth like Aenghus of Codail,
      In the latter ages there was not a royal hero like Domhnall of Dobhail.
      Heavy sorrow to the Gaeidhil that these chiefs have perished
      The first two of this spring; their times will be found in the histories.

Annal M912.

M912.0

The Age of Christ, 912.

M912.1

The thirty-sixth year of Flann.

M912.2

Maelciarain,son of Eochagan, Abbot of Cluain-Eois and Mucnamh, died. He was the foster-son


p.585

of the archbishop Fethghna.

M912.3

An army was led by Niall, son of Aedh Finnliath, into Dal-Araidhe, in the month of June precisely. Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, lord of Dal-Araidhe, met them at Freghabhail where he was defeated by Niall; and he lost his brother in the conflict, i.e. Flathrua Ua Leathlobhair. Aedh, son of Eochagan, king of the province, and Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, afterwards pursued them to Carn-Ereann, where Niall again defeated them, and where Cearran, son of Colman, chief of Cinel-Mailche, and the son of Allacan, son of Lachten, were slain, and Dubhghall, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, was severely wounded; and great numbers of the Ulidians were slain in the pursuit besides these distinguished men. A peace was afterwards, on the Calends of November, made at Tealach-Og, between Niall, lord of Aileach, and Aedh, King of the province.

M912.4

A great new fleet of foreigners came to Loch-Dachaech, and placed a stronghold there.

M913.0

The Age of Christ, 913.

M913.1

The thirty-seventh year of Flann.

M913.2

Scannlan, Abbot and Bishop of Tamhlacht, died.

M913.3

Scannlan, airchinneach of Congbhail-Glinne-Suilighe, died.

M913.4

The plundering of Corcach, Lis-mor, and Achadh-bo,


p.587

by strangers.

M913.5.

Ruarc, son of Maelbrighde, lord of Muscraighe-thire, died.

M913.6.

The harassing of Flann Sinna by his sons, namely, Donnchadh and Conchobhar; and Meath was plundered by them as far as Loch Ribh. A hosting of the North was made by Niall, son of Aedh, King of Aileach, and, marching into Meath, he obtained the pledges of Donnchadh and Conchobhar, that they would obey their father; and he left peace between Meath and Breagh.

M913.7

Great and frequent reinforcements of foreigners arrived in Loch-Dachaech; and the lay districts and churches of Munster were constantly plundered by them.

M913.8

Lenae, son of Catharnach, lord of Corca-Bhaiscinn, died.

Annal M914.

M914.0

The Age of Christ, 914.

M914.1

Aedh, son of Ailell, Abbot of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn;

M914.2

Maenach, son of Dailigein, Abbot of Achadh-bo-Cainnigh;

M914.3

Maelbairrfinn, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M914.4

and Martin, Abbotof Ros-Commain, died.

M914.5

Cobhflaith, daughter of Duibhduin, Abbess of Cill-dara, died.

M914.6

Fogartach, son of Tolarg, lord of South Breagh; and Cathalan, son of Finnsneachta, heir apparent of Leinster, died.

M914.7

Gebhennach, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Fidhgeinte, was slain by the Norsemen.

M914.8

Bran, son of Echtighearn, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was slain by the Norsemen, and by Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall, lord of Osraighe.

M914.9

Ard-Macha was burned.

M914.10

After Flann, the son of Maelsechlainn, had been thirty-eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died at Tailltin. It was in lamentation of Flann the following verses were composed:

    1. Flann, the fair of Freamhain, better than all children, monarch of Ireland, fierce his valour;
      It was he that ruled our people, until placed beneath the earth's heavy surface.
      Flowing flood of great wealth, pure carbuncle of beauteous form,
      Fine-shaped hero who subdued all, chief of the men of Fail of august mien,
      Pillar of dignity over every head, fair chief of valour, caster of the spears,
      Sun-flash, noble, pleasant, head of the men of hospitality is Flann.


p.589

M914.11

Ainle, son of Cathan, lord of Uaithne-Cliach, was put to death by the foreigners of Loch Dachaech.

M914.12

The foreigners of Loch Dachaech still continued to plunder Munster and Leinster.

Annal M915.

M915.0

The Age of Christ, 915.

M915.1

The first year of Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, over Ireland in sovereignty.

M915.2

Maelgiric, Abbot of Cill-achaidh, died.

M915.3

The fair of Tailltin was renewed by Niall.

M915.4

Sitric, grandson of Imhar, with his fleet, took up at Ceann-fuait, in the east of Leinster.Raghnall, grandson of Imhar, with another fleet, went to the foreigners of Loch Dachaech.

M915.5

A slaughter was made of the foreigners by the Munstermen. Another slaughter was made of the foreigners by the Eoghanachta, and by the Ciarraighi.

M915.6

The army of the Ui-Neill of the South and North was led by Niall, son of Aedh, King of Ireland, to the men of Munster, to wage war with the foreigners. He pitched his camp at Tobar-Glethrach, in Magh-Feimhin, on the 22nd of August. The foreigners went into the territory on the same day. The Irish attacked them the third hour before mid-day, so that one thousand one hundred men were slain between them; but more of the foreigners fell, and they were defeated. There fell here in the heat of the conflict the chief of Carraig-Brachaidhe,and Maelfinnen, son of Donnagan, chief of Ui-Cearnaigh; Fearghal, son of Muirigen, chief of Ui-Creamhthainn; and others besides them. Reinforcements set out from the fortress of the foreigners to relieve their people. The Irish returned back to their camp before the arrival of the last host, i.e. before the arrival of Raghnall, king of the black foreigners, who had an army of foreigners with him. Niall set out with a small force against the foreigners, so that God prevented their slaughter through him. Niall after this remained twenty nights encamped against the foreigners. He requested of the Leinstermen to remain in siege against the foreigners. This they did, and continued the siege until Sitric, the grandson of Imhar, and the foreigners, gave the battle of Ceannfuait to the Leinstermen, wherein six hundred were slain about the lords of Leinster, together


p.591

with the king Ugaire, son of Ailell. These are the names of some of their chiefs: Maelmordha, son of Muireagan, lord of Airther-Life; Mughron, son of Cinneidigh, lord of the three Comainns and of Laighis; Cinaedh, son of Tuathal, lord of Ui-Feineachlais; and many other chieftains, with the arch-bishop Maelmaedhog, son of Diarmaid, who was one of the Ui-Conannla, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, a distinguished scribe, anchorite, and an adept in the Latin learning and the Scotic language. It was concerning the battle of Ceann-Fuaid the following lines were composed:
    1. The expedition of the Leinstermen of many youths, upon a very fine road, royal the march;
      Scarcely heard they the sound of the road; they received death at Ceann-Fuaid.
      The chiefs of Liphe of broad deeds waged a battle with a sacred shrine.
      There were cut off five hundred heads in the valley over Tigh-Moling.
      Great its renown in every thing, rightly indeed, for celebrated is the spot,
      Over the plain with thousands of hundreds, Leinster sends its troops of youths.

915.7

The plundering of Cill-dara by the foreigners of Ceann-Fuaid.

915.8

Maelruanaidh, son of Niall, Tanist of the Deisi, was slain by Cormac, son of Mothla, lord of the Deisi.

915.9

Culothair, son of Matudhan, chief of Ui-Ceallaigh-Cualann, died.


p.593

Annal M916.

M916.0

The Age of Christ, 916.

M916.1

The second year of Niall.

M916.2

Egnech, successor of Enda of Ara, bishop and anchorite, died.

M916.3

Fearadhach, Abbot of Inis-bo-finne;

M916.4

Maeleoin, Abbot of Ros-Cre;

M916.5

and Ceallachan Ua Daint, Abbot of Tuaim-inbhir, died.

M916.6

Muireann, daughter of Suart, Abbess of Cill-dara, died on the 26th of May.

M916.7

Daniel of Cluain-Coirpthe, a celebrated historian, died.

M916.8

Eithne, daughter of Aedh, son of Niall, queen of the men of Breagh, died on the festival day of St. Martin.

M916.9

Mor, daughter of Cearbhall, son of Dunghal, Queen of South Leinster, died after a good life.

M916.10

Tighearnach Ua Cleirigh, lord of Aidhne, died.

M916.11

Ceat, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, died.

M916.12

Cill-dara was plundered by the foreigners of Athcliath.

M916.13

The plundering of Leithghlinn by the foreigners, where Maelpadraig, a priest and anchorite, and Mongan, anchorite, and many others along with them, were slain.

M916.14

Oitir and the foreigners went from Loch Dachaech to Alba; and Constantine, the son of Aedh, gave them battle, and Oitir was slain, with a slaughter of the foreigners along with him.

Annal M917.

M917.0

The Age of Christ, 917.

M917.1

Domhnall, son of Diarmaid, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean,

M917.2

and Maelcoe, Abbot of Oendruim, died.

M917.3

Innreachtach, Abbot of Trefoit, was slain in his own abbatical house.

M917.4

Maelene, son of Maelbrighde, Abbot of Lann-Eala and Connor, and the glory of Ireland, died.

M917.5

Duibhghilla, son of Lachtnan, lord of Teathbha, was slain.

M917.6

Cormac, son of Mothla, lord of the Deisi, died.

M917.7

The battle of Ath-cliath (i.e. of Cill-Mosamhog, by the side of Ath-cliath) was gained over the Irish, by Imhar and Sitric Gale, on the 17th of October, in which were slain Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, King of Ireland, after he had been three years in the sovereignty; Conchobhar


p.595

Ua Maeleachlainn, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland; Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia; Maelmithidh, son of Flannagan, lord of Breagh; Maelcraeibhe Ua Duibhsinaich, lord of Oirghialla; Maelcraeibhe, son of Doilghen, lord of Tortan; Ceallach, son of Fogartach, lord of South Breagh; Cromman, son of Cinneitich; and many other noblemen and plebeians, who are not enumerated, along with the king. Of this battle was said:
    1. Fierce and hard was the Wednesday
      On which hosts were strewn under the feet of shields:
      It shall be called, till Judgment's day,
      The destructive morning of Ath-cliath,
      On which fell Niall, the noble hero;
      Conchobhar, chief of fierce valour;
      Aedh, son of valiant Eochaidh of Ulidia;
      Maelmithidh of the proud, lofty dignity.
      Many a countenance of well-known Gaeidhil,
      Many a chief of grey-haired heroes,
      Of the sons of queens and kings,
      Were slain at Ath-cliath of swords.
      The strength of a brave lord was subdued.
      Alas that he was deceived in the strength of an army,
      There would otherwise be no moan upon the strand.
      Fierce was the hard Wednesday!

In lamentation of Niall was moreover said:

    1. Sorrowful this day is sacred Ireland,
      Without a valiant chief of hostage reign;
      It is to see the heavens without a sun
      To view Magh-Neill without Niall.
      There is no cheerfulness in the happiness of men;
      There is no peace or joy among the hosts;
      No fair can be celebrated
      Since the sorrow of sorrow died.

      p.597

      This is a pity, O beloved Magh-Breagh,
      Country of beautiful face,
      Thou hast parted with thy lordly king,
      Thou hast lost Niall the wounding hero.
      Where is the chief of the western world?
      Where the sun of every clash of arms?
      The place of great Niall of Cnucha
      Has been changed, ye great wretches!

Niall said this before the battle:

    1. Whoever wishes for a speckled boss, and a sword of sore-inflicting wounds,
      And a green javelin for wounding wretches, let him go early in the morning to Ath-cliath.

Celedabhaill, son of Scannall, successor of Comhghall, and confessor of Niall Glundubh, was he who had requested of Niall to come to this battle; and it was he that gave the viaticum to Niall, after having refused to give him a horse to carry him from the battle. Gormlaith, daughter of Flann, said:

    1. Evil to me the compliment of the two foreigners who slew Niall and Cearbhall;
      Cearbhall was slain by Hulb, a great deed; Niall Glundubh by Amhlaeibh.

M917.8

Easter day fell on the 25th of April, and little Easter in the summer. This happened after three hundred and sixty-five years.

    1. Easter in summer, marching of armies during three fully accomplished years,
      There was a red slaughter of the Gaelidhil in every path, through-out the points of fair great Fail along with Niall.


p.599

M917.8

Comhghall said:

    1. The festival of Coemhan Liath in Lent, denotes a year of storms,
      Five days of spring after Easter, Little Easter to be in summer.

M917.9

The plundering of Fearna and Teach-Munna by the foreigners.

Annal M918.

M918.0

The Age of Christ, 918.

M918.1

The first year of Donnchadh, son of Flann Sinna, in sovereignty over Ireland.

M918.2

Finchar, Bishop of Daimhliag;

M918.3

Cormac, son of Cuilennan, Bishop of Lis-mor, and lord of the Deisi Mumhan;

M918.4

Loingseach, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M918.5

Maelmaire, Abbot of Ard-Breacain;

M918.6

Ciaran, Abbot of Devenish

M918.7

Scannlan, son of Gorman, wise man, excellent scribe, and Abbot of Ros-Cre;

M918.8

and Meraighe of Cluainmor-Maedhog, died.

M918.9

A great flood in this year, so that the water reached the Abbot's Fort of Cluain-mic-Nois, and to the causeway of the Monument of the Three Crosses.

M918.10

Ceanannus was plundered by the foreigners, and the Daimhliag was demolished.

M918.11

A great slaughter was made of the Ui-Maine at Grian.

M918.12

A battle was gained in Cianachta-Breagh (i.e. at Tigh-mic-nEathach) by Donnchadh, son of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, over the foreigners, wherein a countless number of the foreigners was slain; indeed in this battle revenge was had of them for the battle of Ath-cliath, for there fell of the nobles of the Norsemen here as many as had fallen of the nobles and plebeians of the Irish in the battle of Ath-cliath. Muircheartach, son of Tighearnan, i.e. heir apparent of Breifne, was wounded in the battle of Cianachta, and he afterwards died of his wounds.

M918.13

Murchadh, son of Flann, lord of Corca-Bhaiscinn, died.

M918.14

Flann,


p.601

son of Lonan, the Virgil of the race of Scota, the best poet that was in Ireland in his time, was treacherously slain by the sons of Corrbuidhe, who were of the Ui-Fothaidh, at Loch Dachaech, in Deisi-Mumhan.

Annal M919.

M919.0

The Age of Christ, 919.

M919.1

The second year of Donnchadh.

M919.2

Ciaran, Bishop of Tolan,

M919.3

and Ruman, son of Cathasach, Bishop of Cluain-Iraird, died. It was for him this quatrain was composed:

    1. Shrine of wisdom illustrious, acute, a man of virgin purity,
      By the hosts of people assembled was he loved, Ruman, son of Cathasach the amiable.

M919.4

Maenach, son of Siadhal, Abbot of Beannchair, and the best scribe of all the Irish race, died.

M919.5

Cairbre, son of Fearadhach, head of the piety of Leinster, successor of Diarmaid, son of Aedh Roin, airchinneach of Tigh-Mochua, and an anchorite, died, after a good life, at a very advanced age;

M919.6

and Fearghal, son of Maelmordha, Abbot of Saighir, died. Of them was said:

    1. It was not a year without events; premature died the Abbot of lasting Beannchair,
      And the successor of Diarmaid, Cairbre, the gifted above all good pillar.
      The Abbot of Saighir with multitudes; Fearghal, man of gentle exactions;
      Domhnall, a scion all-good; a plague among the Gaeidhil.
      I have not enumerated, I shall not enumerate, because I am sorrowful,
      What misfortunes came upon Ireland in this year.

M919.7

Domhnall, son of Flann, son of Maeleachlainn, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by his brother, Donnchadh, at Bruighean-Dachoga. It was of the death of the same Maenach, son of Siadhal, and of Domhnall, was said:


p.603

    1. The fifth year, disastrous, sweet,
      From Flann of Teamhair, a company have died,
      Maenach of happy Comhgall's city,
      Domhnall was slain by Donnchadh Donn.
      Great grief is Maenach, O dear God!
      The illustrious, black-haired man of the charming face,
      The paragon of Ireland between two seas,
      The successor of the mild Comhgall,
      Head of counsel of the just province,
      Its golden crown to be sorrowfully regretted,
      Grievous to me that the wise man of Inis-Fail
      Died from the assembly of the brave Gaeidhil.
      A gem of the full precious stone,
      As far as noble Rome it is sign of sorrow.
      That Maenach of noble Munster does not live,
      'Tis sufficient cause of grief, O great God.

M919.8

Ceallach, son of Conghalach, Abbot of Cill-achaidh;

M919.9

Cinaedh, son of Domhnall, Abbot of Doire-Chalgaigh, and of Druim-Thuama, head of the council of the Cinel-Conaill, died.

M919.10

Flaithbeartach, son of Muircheartach, Abbot of Cluainmor, died. Of him was said:

    1. Where is the resting place of the sacred ornament? Where the renown of great poetic powers?
      Behold Flaithbheartach, the fair of Fail, has separated from the honours of Cluain-mor.

M919.11

Maelsinchill, son of Canannan, died; for him this quatrain was composed:

    1. The flame of wide Leinster to the shore, he was not feeble in the unequal strife,
      Mild clerkship, without violation of chastity, descended as a blessing on the gentle Maelsinchill.


p.605

M919.12

Cearnach, son of Flann, Abbot of Lann-Leire, died; of whom was said:

    1. The torch of the plain (good in battle) of Bregia the fair and lovely, stout his strength,
      Brilliance of the sun, the sun upon his cheek. Cearnach of Leire, mournful the loss of him.

M919.13

Macrodaidhe, son of Dunchadh, airchinneach of Cluain-Boireann, died.

M919.14

Maenach, a Ceile-De Culdee, came across the sea westwards, to establish laws in Ireland.

M919.15

Godfrey, grandson of Imhar, took up his residence at Ath-cliath; and Ard-Macha was afterwards plundered by him and his army, on the Saturday before St. Martin's festival; but he spared the oratories, with their Ceile-Des Culdees, and the sick. The country was plundered by him in every direction, i.e. westwards as far as Inis-Labhradha, eastwards as far as the Banna, and northwards as far as Magh-Uillseann. But, however, the host that went northwards was overtaken by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and Aighneart, son of Murchadh, so that the foreigners were defeated, a very great number of them was slain; but a few escaped in the darkness of the very beginning of the night, because they were not visible to them the Irish.

M919.16

A fleet of foreigners, consisting of thirty-two ships, at Loch-Feabhail, under Olbh; and Inis-Eoghain was plundered by them. Fearghal, son of Domhnall, lord of the North, was at strife with them, so that he slew the crew of one of their ships, broke the ship itself, and carried off its wealth and goods. Twenty ships more arrived at Ceann-Maghair, in the east of Tir-Chonaill, under the conduct of Uathmharan,


p.607

son of Barith, but they committed no depredation on that occasion.

M919.17

Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, died.

M919.18

The plundering of Cluain-eidhneach, the burning of the oratory of Mochua, and the burning of Fearna-mor-Maedhog, by the foreigners.

Annal M920.

M920.0

The Age of Christ, 920.

M920.1

The third year of Donnchadh.

M920.2

Maelpoil, son of Ailell, bishop, anchorite, and best scribe of Leath-Chuinn, and Abbot of Indedhnen, died. Concerning his death the following quatrain was composed:

    1. Maelpoil, who was in great dignity, a bishop who took the road of a king,
      A sage who enforced the law upon all, a man who dispensed peace all round.

M920.3

Cormac, Bishop of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn;

M920.4

and Ailell, son of Flaithim, Abbot of Cluain-mor-Maedhog, died.

M920.5

Flannagan Ua-Riagain, Abbot of Cill-dara, and heir apparent of Leinster, died.

M920.6

Maelinmhain Ua-Glascon, Abbot of Cluain-Dolcain;

M920.7

Colga, son of Feadhach, Abbot of Slaine;

M920.8

Alldghus of Cill-Scire;

M920.9

Aedh Ua Raithnen, old sage of Ireland,and wise man of Saighir;

M920.10

Feardalach, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M920.11

and Loingseach, son of Aenagan, [OElig ]conomus of Daimhliag, died.

M920.12

Tadhg, son of Faelan, lord of South Leinster, who was called Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died; of whom was said:

    1. Twice ten years, have followed upon nine hundred more,
      Since Christ was born, by rule, till the year in which we are.
      It is in this year certainly, according to the clear rule, occurred
      The death of Tadhg, the illustrious, happy, the noble King of Deasgabhair.

M920.13

Innreachtach, son of Conchobhar, heir apparent of Connaught, died.

M920.14

Mael-micduach, lord of Aidhne, was slain by the foreigners.

M920.15

Aedh, son of Lonan O'Guaire, Tanist of Aidhne, died.

M920.16

Finnguine Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, died.

M920.17

An army was led by Donnchadh, King of Ireland, into Connaught, so that a great part of his people was killed in Duibhthir-Atha-Luain, where Cinaedh, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain.

M920.18

Maelmordha, son


p.609

of Riagan, Tanist of Osraighe, died.

M920.19

The plundering of Cluain-mic-Nois by the foreigners of Luimneach; and they came upon Loch Ribh, and plundered all its islands.

M920.20

The plundering of En-inis in Fotharta-tire, by the foreigners, where twelve hundred of the Irish were slain, and Abel the scribe was martyred along with them.

M920.21

The plundering of Cluain-mic-Nois by the son of Ailgi, who afterwards burned it.

M920.22

Uathmharan,son of Dobhailen, lord of Luighne in Connaught, died.

M920.23

Flaithbheartach, son of Inmhainen, King of Caiseal, went upon his pilgrimage; and Lorcan, son of Conlingan, assumed the kingdom of Caiseal.

Annal M921.

M921.0

The Age of Christ, 921.

M921.1

The fourth year of Donnchadh.

M921.2

Maelcallann, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada;

M921.3

Maelpadraig, son of Morann, Abbot of Druim-cliabh and Ard-sratha;

M921.4

Dubhdabhraine, Abbot of Ross-ailithir;

M921.5

Maeltuile, son of Colman, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois; and Fiachra of Eaglais-beag at Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M921.6

Duibhlitir of Cill-Sleibhthe, priest of Ard-Macha, was martyred by the foreigners of Snamh-Aighneach.

M921.7

Cucongalta, priest of Lann-Leire, the Tethra (i. e. the singer or orator) for voice, personal form, and knowledge, died.

M921.8

Maelmordha, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Failghe;

M921.9

and Find son of Cearran, lord of Muscraighe, died.

M921.10

Lighach, daughter of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, and wife of Maelmithidh, lord of all Breagh, died, and was buried with great veneration at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M921.11

Spelan, son of Conghalach, lord of Conaille-Muirtheimhne, was killed.

M921.12

The plundering of Feara-Arda and Lann-Leire, and of Feara-Rois, in this year.

M921.13

Cele, son of Anrothan, lord of Ui-Crimhthannain,


p.611

died.

M921.14

Maelcluithe, son of Conchobhar, heir apparent of Connaught, was killed.

M921.15

Finn, son of Maelmordha, son of Muiregan, heir apparent of Leinster, was slain by Ceallach, son of Cearbhall.

M921.16

Flaithbheartach, son of Inmainen, was taken by the foreigners on the island of Loch-Cre, and conveyed to Limerick.

Annal M922.

M922.0

The Age of Christ, 922.

M922.1

The fifth year of Donnchadh.

M922.2

Duibhlitir, Abbot of Cluain-eidhneach;

M922.3

Muireadhach, son of Domhnall, Abbot of Mainistir-Buithe, head of the counsel of all the men of Breagh, lay and ecclesiastical, and steward of Patrick's people, from Sliabh Fuaid to Leinster, died.

M922.4

Maelmordha, son of Conghalach, Abbot of Daimhinis,

M922.5

Mochta of the Island, son of Cearnachan, priest of Ard-Macha, died.

M922.6

Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, heir apparent of Leinster, was slain by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall; and Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, heir apparent of Teamhair, was slain by Maelruanaidh, son of Conchobhar, in revenge of Ceallach, son of Cearbhall, son of Muirigen.

M922.7

A fleet of foreigners upon Loch Eirne, so that they plundered the islands and islets of the lake, and the districts on every side of it; and they remained on the lake till the ensuing summer, and they left the country at the end of that time.

M922.8

Foreigners came upon Loch Cuan; and Maelduin, son of Aedh, heir apparent of the province, fell by them. Twelve hundred of the foreigners were drowned in Loch Rudhruidhe.

M922.9

Foreigners upon Loch Ribh, i.e. under the conduct of Colla, son of Barith, lord of Luimneach; and it was by them Eachtighearn, son of Flannchadh, lord of Breaghmhaine, was slain.


p.613

M923.0

The Age of Christ, 923.

M923.1

The sixth year of Donnchadh.

M923.2

Failbhe, anchorite, died.

M923.3

Cathal, son of Conchobhar, king of the three divisions of Connaught, died.

M923.4

Dubhghall, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ulidians, i.e. by the Cinel-Maelche.

M923.5

Lorcan, son of Dunchadh, lord of Breagh, died. Of their deaths was said:

    1. Nine years, it is known, exact the computation, from Flann of Teamhair, it is not a charming circumstance,
      Till Cathal of Connaught, king of the nobles, and Dubhghall of Tuagha, strong King of Breagh.

M923.6

Domhnall, son of Cathal, heir apparent of Connaught, was killed by his brother, Tadhg, son of Cathal; and Tadhg assumed the place of his father.

M923.7

Faelan, son of Muireadhach, King of Leinster, with his son, i.e. Lorcan, was taken prisoner by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M923.8

Tomrar, son of Tomralt, was slain by the Conmaicni-mara.

M923.9

Flaithchius, son of Scorachan, lord of Ui-Crimhthannain, died.

Annal M924.

M924.0

The Age of Christ, 924.

M924.1

The seventh year of Donnchadh.

M924.2

Colman, son of Ailill, Abbot of Cluain-Iraird and Cluain-mic-Nois, a bishop and wise doctor, died. It was by him the Daimhliag of Cluain-mic-Nois was built; he was of the tribe of the Conailli-Muirtheimhne.

    1. The tenth year, a just deeree, joy and sorrow reigned,
      Colman of Cluain, the joy of every tower, died; Albdann went beyond sea.


p.615

M924.3

Maelsechlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Teamhair;

M924.4

and Duineachaidh, son of Laeghaire, chief of Feara-Ceall, died.

M924.5

Dun-Sobhairce was plundered by the foreigners, and many persons were slain by them.

    1. Twenty-four years exactly, and nine hundred without curtailment,
      From the birth of the son of the living God to the plundering of Dun-Sobhairci.

M924.6

A victory was gained by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and the Ulidians, at the bridge of Cluain-na-gCruimhther, on the 28th of December, being Thursday, where were slain eight hundred men with their chieftains, Albdann, son of Godfrey, Aufer, and Roilt. The other half of them were besieged for a week at Ath-Cruithne, until Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, came to their assistance from Ath-cliath.

M924.7

Cill-dara was plundered by the foreigners of Port-Lairge. It was plundered again by the foreigners of Ath-cliath in the same year.

M924.8

Fearghus, son of Duiligen, lord of Lurg, was slain by the men of Breifne.

M924.9

Mochta, Bishop of Ui-Neill, and priest of Ard-Macha; and Muireadhach, son of Domhnall, Tanist-abbot of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M925.

M925.0

The Age of Christ, 925.

M925.1

The eighth year of Donnhhadh.

M925.2

Cormac, son of Fithbran, Abbot of Gleann-da-locha;

M925.3

Maelpeadair, Abbot of Cluain-fearta-Molua, died.

M925.4

Soichleachan of Teach-Munna was wounded, and died of the


p.617

wound.

M925.5

Brian, son of Ceinnedigh, was born in this year, i.e. twenty-four years before Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall.

M925.6

Donnghal of Ros-Commain, died.

M925.7

Caindealbhan, son of Maelcron, lord of Ui-Laeghaire; and Fogartach, son of Lachtnan, lord of Teathbha, died.

M925.8

Goach, son of Dubhroa, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin, was slain by Muircheartach, son of Niall.

M925.9

Sitric, son of Imhar, lord of the Dubhghoill and Finnghoill, died.

M925.10

Godfrey, with his foreigners, left Ath-cliath, but came back after six months.

M925.11

The foreigners of Linn-Duachaill deserted (i.e. left) Ireland.

M925.12

The fair of Tailltin was prevented by Muircheartach, son of Niall, against Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, in consequence of a challenge of battle which was between them; but God separated them, without slaughter or bloodshed on either side.

M925.13

St. Maelbrighde, son of Tornan, successor of Patrick, Colum Cille and Adamnan, head of the piety of all Ireland, and of the greater part of Europe, died at a good old age, on the 22nd of February; in commemoration of whose death was said:

    1. Twelve years not trifling
      On the eighth of the Calends of July, Flann was buried,
      On the eighth of the Calends of noble March,
      Maelbrighde most gifted of the brave Gaeidhil died.
      Since the divine Son of God was born
      Upon the earthly world in carnal shape,
      Five years and twenty, nine hundred,
      To the death of Maelbrighde in evil hour.
      It was not a year without events;
      Premature the death of the Abbot of Ard-Macha,
      Maelbrighde, head of Europe,
      Cormac of Gleann-da-locha.


p.619

M925.14

Anrothan, son of Maelgorm, assumed the lordship of Corca-Modhruadh.

Annal M926.

M926.0

The Age of Christ, 926.

M926.1

The ninth year of Donnchadh.

M926.2

Baeithine, Abbot of Birra;

M926.3

Finnachta, Abbot of Corcach, head of the rule of the most of Ireland;

M926.4

Ciaran, Abbot of Achadh-bo-Cainnigh;

M926.5

Celedabhaill, son of Scannal, went to Rome on his pilgrimage from the abbacy of Beannchair; and he composed these quatrains at his departure:

    1. Time for me to prepare to pass from the shelter of a habitation,
      To journey as a pilgrim over the surface of the noble, lively sea.
      Time to depart from the snares of the flesh, with all its guilt,
      Time now to ruminate how I may find the great son of Mary.
      Time to seek virtue, to trample upon the will with sorrow,
      Time to reject vices, and to renounce the Demon.
      Time to reproach the body, for of its crime it is putrid,
      Time to rest after we have reached the place wherein we may shed our tears.
      Time to talk of the last day, to separate from familiar faces,
      Time to dread the terrors of the tumults of the day of judgment.
      Time to defy the clayey body, to reduce it to religious rule,
      Time to barter the transitory things for the country of the King of heaven.
      Time to defy the ease of the little earthly world of a hundred pleasures,
      Time to work at prayer, in adoration of the high King of angels.
      But only a part of one year is wanting of my three score,
      To remain under holy rule in one place it is time.
      Those of my own age are not living, who were given to ardent devotion,
      To desist from the course of great folly, in one place it is time.

      p.621

      It was grievous that Cormac the hospitable was wounded with long lances,
      Indreachtach the noble, Muireadhach, Maenach, the great Maelmithigh.

M926.6

Muirgheal, daughter of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, died at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M926.7

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, heir apparent of the North, was slain by the Norsemen.

M926.8

Lorcan, son of Maelcein, lord of the Ui-Failghe, died.

M926.9

Finnachta, son of Tadhg, heir apparent of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died.

M926.10

Cinaedh, son of Oghran, lord of Laeighis, was killed.

M926.11

Eaghra, son of Poprigh, lord of Luighne, in Connaught; and Ceat, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Corca-Modh-ruadh, died.

M926.12

The plundering of Cill-dara by the son of Godfrey Port-Lairge, who carried away captives and great spoils from thence.

M926.13

Maelruanaidh, son of Conchobhar, was slain by king Donnchadh.

Annal M927.

M927.0

The Age of Christ, 927.

M927.1

The tenth year of Donnchadh.

M927.2

Tuathal, son of Oenacan, Bishop of Daimhliag and Lusca, and steward of the family of Patrick;

M927.3

Celedabhaill, son of Scannall, successor of Comhgall of Beannchair, throughout Ireland, bishop, scribe, preacher, and learned doctor, died on his pilgrimage at Rome, on the 14th of September, and in the fifty-ninth year of his age. Of the year of his death was said:

    1. Three times nine, nine hundred years, are reckoned by plain rules
      From the birth of Christ, deed of purity, to the holy death of Cele the Cleric.

M927.4

Caencomhrac, son of Maeluidhir, Abbot and Bishop of Doire-Chalgaigh, and steward of Adamnan's law;

M927.5

Tuathal, son of Maelciarain, Abbot of Cluain-eidhneach, died.

M927.6

Ferghil, Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas, died at Rome on his pilgrimage.

M927.7

Dunchadh, son of Braenan, priest of Cill-dara;

M927.8

Maelgiric, Abbot of the house


p.623

of the Seniors at Cluain-mic-Nois;

M927.9

Maelpadraig, son of Celen, priest and Vice-abbot of Beannchair;

M927.10

Maelmoicheirghe, [OElig ]conomus of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M927.11

Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall, lord of Osraighe;

M927.12

Innreachtach, son of Cathal, lord of Leath-Chathail died.

M927.13

The foreigners of Luimneach went upon Loch Oirbsen, and the islands of the lake were plundered by them.

M927.14

A new fleet was launched upon Loch Ribh, between Conmaicne and Tuath-nElla, where Cathal Ua Maele, and Flaithbheartach, son of Tuathghal, and some others along with them, were slain.

M927.15

An army was led by Donnchadh to Liathdruim, against Muircheartach; but they separated without battle, or shedding blood on either side. When Donnchadh was setting out on this expedition, these lines were composed:

    1. Let one say to Donnchadh the brown, to the bulwark of plundering septs,
      That though Liathdruim be before him, there is an angry fellow there.

M927.16

Caineach, daughter of Canannan, and wife of the King of Ireland, died.

M927.17

Domhnall, son of Tadhg, heir apparent of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died.

927.18

The plundering of Cill-dara by Godfrey, on the festival day of St.Brighit.

Annal M928.

M928.0

The Age of Christ, 928.

M928.1

The eleventh year of Donnchadh.

M928.2

Nuadha, Bishop of Gleann-da-locha;

M928.3

Flann of Fobhar, Abbot of Lughmhadh;

M928.4

Mael-caeimhghin, son of Scannlan, Abbot of Teach-Mochua;

M928.5

and Donnghal, Abbot of Ros-Comain, died.

M928.6

Maol Da Bhonna, son of Dobhailen, lord of Luighne

M928.7

Muircheartach, son of Eagra, lord of Luighne,

M928.8

and Idhnaidhe Ua Mannachain, were slain.

M928.9

Godfrey, grandson of Imhar, with the foreigners of Ath-cliath, demolished and plundered Dearc Fearna, where one thousand persons were killed in this year, as is stated in this quatrain:


p.625

    1. Nine hundred years without sorrow, twenty-eight, it has been proved,
      Since Christ came to our relief, to the plundering of Dearc-Fearna.

M928.10

A slaughter was made of the foreigners who were on Loch Oirbsen by the Connaughtmen.

M928.11

The foreigners of Luimneach encamped in Magh-Roighne.

M928.12

The foreigners, i.e. those under the command of Torolbh, took up their station at Loch-Eathach, and had their camp at Rubha-Mena.

M928.13

Accolbh Earl, with a slaughter of the foreigners about him, was slain by the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M928.14

Finn, son of Maelmordha, heir apparent of Ui-Failghe, and Flann, his brother, were slain.

Annal M929.

M929.0

The Age of Christ, 929.

M929.1

The twelfth year of Donnchadh.

M929.2

Crunnmhael, Bishop of Cill-dara,

M928.3

Tibraide, son of Ainnsene, Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, of the sept of the Ui-Briuin, died.

M929.4

Maeleoin, bishop and anchorite of Ath-Truim, died, after a good life.

M929.5

Ceannfaeladh, son of Lorcan, comharba of Cluain-Eois and Clochar-mac-Daimheini, died.

M929.6

Bran, son of Colman, Abbot of Ros-Cre, was slain by the foreigners.

M929.7

Maelbrighde, son of Feadacan, Abbot of Lann-mic-Luachain;

M929.8

and Onchu, priest of Cill-dara, died.

M929.9

Cearnachan, son of Tighearnan, lord of Breifne, died.

M929.10

The foreigners of Luimneach took up their station upon Loch Ribh.

M929.11

Godfrey went into Osraighe, to expel the grandson of Imhar from Magh-Roighne.

M929.12

Donncuan, son of Faelan, heir apparent of Leinster, died.

M929.13

Dearbhail, daughter of Maelfinnia, Queen of Teamhair, died.

Annal M930.

M930.0

The Age of Christ, 930.

M930.1

The thirteenth year of Donnchadh.

M930.2

Suibhne, Abbot of Lann-Leire;

M930.3

Duibhlitir, son of Sealbhach, Abbot of Teach-Moling,


p.627

and Lector of Gleann-da-locha;

M930.4

Feardomhnach, son of Flannagan, Abbot of Cluain-Iraird;

M930.5

Fuacarta, Abbot of Inis-Caindeagha;

M930.6

Maenghal, son of Becan, Abbot of Druim-chliabh;

M930.7

and Maelgiric, Abbot of Fobhar, died.

M930.8

Airmheadh, Abbot of Cuil-rathain, was killed by the foreigners.

M930.9

Aenghus, son of Anghus, chief poet of Ireland, died.

M930.10

Flann, son of Maelfinnia, lord of Breagh, was slain by one of the Ui-Eathach, i.e. by Cummascach, son of Egceartach; of whose death was said:

    1. It would be lawful for the Gaeidhil, if they should shed tears of blood,
      As Taillte of Taeidhen is not walked by the grandson of Flann, Flann of Brugh.

M930.11

Cinaedh, son of Caindealbhan, lord of Cinel-Laeghaire, died.

M930.12

The crozier of Ciaran, i.e. the Oraineach was lost in Loch Techet, now Loch-Ui-Ghadhra, and twelve men along with it; but it was found immediately.

M930.13

Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, King of Ulidia, died.

M930.14

Torolbh the Earl was killed by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and the Dal-Araidhe.

M930.15

Flann, son of Muireadhach, heir apparent of Leinster; and Lorcan, son of Cathal, royal heir of Leinster, died.

Annal M931.

M931.0

The Age of Christ, 931.

M931.1

The fourteenth year of Donnchadh.

M931.2

Cosgrach, son of Maelmochoirghi, Bishop of Teach-Mochua, and of the Commans;

M931.3

Seachnasach, priest of Dearmhach;

M931.4

and Fedhelm, i.e. daughter of Domhnall, Abbess of Cluain-Bronaigh, died.

M931.5

Cathal, son of Odhran, lord of Laeighis;

M931.6

and Cuilen, son of Ceallach, lord of Osraighe, died.

M931.7

Celecen, i.e. the son of Gairbhith, lord of the Airtheara, died.

M931.8

Lorcan, son of Eochaidh, the second lord that was at that time over Airther-Life, died.

M931.9

A battle was gained in Magh-Uatha by Fearghal, son of Domhnall; and Sichfraidh, son of Uathmharan, i.e. the son of the daughter of Domhnall, over Muircheartach, son of Niall, where were slain


p.629

Maelgarbh, son of Gairbhith, lord of Dearlas; and Conmhal, son of Bruadhran; and many others along with them.

M931.10

A battle was gained by Conaing, son of Niall, and the foreigners of Loch Eathach, over the province of Ulidia, wherein twelve hundred were slain.

M931.11

The foreigners took up their station upon the lakes of Erne; and they spoiled and plundered many districts and churches, as far as Loch Gamhna.

M931.12

Ard-Macha was plundered about the festival of St. Martin, by the son of Godfrey, i.e. Amlaeibh, with the foreigners of Loch-Cuan about him. Matadhan, son of Aedh, with the inhabitants of the pro-vince of Ulidia, and Amhlaeibh, son of Godfrey, with the foreigners, spoiled and plundered the province of Ulster as far as Sliabh-Beatha to the west, and and as far as Mucnamha to the east; but they were overtaken by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and a battle was fought between them, in which he defeated them; and they left with him two hundred heads cut off, besides prisoners and spoils.

M931.13

Bard Boinne, chief poet of Ireland, was slain by the Ui-Cormaic-Cobha.

M931.14

Domhnall, son of Gadhra, lord of Luighne, was slain.

M931.15

The victory of Duibhthir was gained by Amhlaeibh Ceanncairech of Luimneach, where some of the nobles of Ui-Maine were slain.

Annal M932.

M932.0

The Age of Christ, 932.

M932.1

The fifteenth year of Donnchadh.

M932.2

The foreigners of Luimneach plundered Connaught as far as Magh-Luirg to the north, and as far as Badhbhghna to the east.

M932.3

Duibhghilla, son of Robachan, lord of Ui-Cormaic,


p.631

was treacherously slain by Conghalach, son of Lorcan.

M932.4

Uallach, daughter of Muimhneachan, chief poetess of Ireland, died.

M932.5

Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, died.

M932.6

Fire from heaven burned the mountains of Connaught this year, and the lakes and streams dried up; and many persons were also burned by it.

M933.0

The Age of Christ, 933.

M933.1

The sixteenth year of Donnchadh.

M933.2

Cormac, son of Maenach, Abbot of Achadh-bo, and

M933.3

Macclenna, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair and Liath-mor-Mochaemhog, were slain.

M933.4

Maelbrighde, Abbot of Mainistir-Buithe;

M933.5

and Muireadhach, son of Maelbrighde, Abbot of Daimhliag, died.

M933.6

Anlaith, Abbess of Cluain-Bronaigh and Cluain-Boireann, which was blessed by Caireach Deargain, died.

M933.7

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall, heir apparent of Aileach, died, and was interred with great honour at Ard-Macha.

M933.8

Cinaedh, son of Cairbre, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was slain by the foreigners of Loch Garman, in a nocturnal attack.

M933.9

Maelmuire, son of Ceanndubhan, Tanist of Laeighis, died.

M933.10

The islands of Loch Gabhar and the Cave of Cnodhbha were attacked and plundered by the foreigners.

Annal M934.

M934.0

The Age of Christ, 934.

M934.1

The seventeenth year of Donnchadh.

M934.2

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall, was slain by the son of Finn, son of Maelmordha.

M934.3

Bec, son of Gairbhith, lord of Dearlass, died.

M934.4

Anrudhan, son of Maelgorm, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, died.

M934.5

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and it was plundered again by Ceallachan Caisil and the men of Munster.

M934.6

Amhlaibh Ceannchairech, with the foreigners, came from Loch Eirne across Breifne to Loch Ribh. On the night of Great Christmas they reached


p.633

the Sinainn, and they remained seven months there; and Magh-Aei was spoiled and plundered by them.

M934.7

The burning of Ath-cliath by Donnchadh, son of Flann, King of Ireland.

M934.8

Arthur Ua Tuathail died.

Annal M935.

M935.0

The Age of Christ, 935.

M935.1

The eighteenth year of Donnchadh.

M935.2

Aireach-tach, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada;

M935.3

Fedhach, Abbot of Slaine;

M935.4

Muireadhach, Abbot of Beannchair, died.

M935.5

Diarmaid, son of Ailell, Abbot of Cill-Cuilinn, died at an advanced age.

M935.6

Aenghus, son of Muircheartach, a learned man, anchorite, and Tanist-abbot of Ia, died.

M935.7

Aireachtach, priest of Cill-achaidh, died.

M935.8

Eochaidh, son of Conall, King of Ulidia, died.

M935.9

Clerchen, son of Tighearnan, son of the lord of Breifne, died.

M935.10

Conghalach, son of Cathalan lord of Breifne; Conaing, son of Niall Glundubh, heir-apparent to the monarchy of Ireland, died.

M935.11

Croinghilla, son of Cuileannan, lord of Conaille-Muirtheimhne, died.

M935.12

Macetigh Mac Ainseamain, lord of Mughdhorna-Maighen; and

M935.13

Lorcan, son of Conghalach, lord of Ui-Mic-Uais of Breagh, died.

M935.14

Gairbhith, son of Maeleitigh, lord of Feara-Rois, was slain.

M935.15

Bruadar, son of Duibhghilla, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was slain by Tuathal, son of Ugaire.

M935.16

Amhlaeibh, son of Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, came at Lammas from Ath-cliath, and carried off as prisoners Amhlaeibh Ceanncairech from Loch Ribh, and the foreigners who were with him (i.e. with Cairech), after breaking their ships.

M935.17

The foreigners of Athcliath left their fortress, and went to England.

M935.18

Cill-Cleithe was plundered by the son of Barith, and the


p.635

church was burned, and a great prey was carried out of it.

M935.19

A battle was gained by the Leinstermen over the forces of the North, i.e. over the people of the son of Niall, where many fell with Diarmaid, son of Maelmuire, son of Flannagan, and Ceallach, son of Cumasgach, who were of the men of Breagh, and num-bers of others of distinction.

Annal M936.

M936.0

The Age of Christ, 936.

M936.1

The nineteenth year of Donnchadh.

M936.2

Mael-padraig, i.e. the son of Bran, Bishop of Lughmhadh;

M936.3

Dubhthach, successor of Colum Cille and Adamnan in Ireland and Alba;

M936.4

and Caencomhrac of Muc-shnamh, anchorite, died.

M936.5

Ciaran, son of Ciarman, Abbot of Lis-mor, died.

M936.6

Conaingen, Abbot of Teach-Fethghna, and chief priest of Ard-Macha;

M936.7

and Finguine, son of Fubhthaidh, son of Donnagan, son of Fogartach, son of Duine-chdha, son of Bearach, son of Mescell, Vice-abbot of Teach-Mochua, and lord of Magh-Abhna, died.

M936.8

Maelcairnigh, Abbot of Tulan, died.

M936.9

Robhartach of Teach-Theille, died.

M936.10

Fearghal, son of Domhnall, lord of the North;

M936.11

and Murchadh, son of Sochlachan, lord of Ui-Maine, died.

M936.12

Conchobhar, son of Maelchein, lord of Ui-Failghe, and his two sons, were killed by Lorcan, son of Faelan, lord of Leinster.

M936.13

Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn plundered Airthear-Liffe.

M936.14

Amhlaibh, son of Godfrey, came to Dublin again, and plundered Cill-Cuilinn, and carried off ten hundred prisoners from thence.

M936.15

A challenge of battle between Donnchadh, King of Ireland, and Muircheartach, son of Niall Glundubh, lord of Oileach; but God pacified them. Donnchadh and Muir-cheartach went with the forces of both fully assembled to lay siege to the foreigners of Ath-cliath, so that they spoiled and plundered all that was under the dominion of the foreigners from Ath-cliath to Ath-Truisten; of which Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, said:


p.637

    1. Muircheartach, above all the men of Fail, has not seized upon place or prey,
      Although he has been burning our corn, and well eating our bread.
Muircheartach replied:
    1. Conghalach of the fertile Breagh is like unto a mute or stammering man,
      Out of his head no muttering is understood, but what is like the bubbling of boiling meat.

M936.16

The two successors of Patrick, namely, Joseph, scribe, bishop, and ancho-rite, the wisest of the Irish;

M936.17

and Maelpadraig, son of Maeltuile, bishop and wise man, died. The latter was five months in the abbacy when he died.

Annal M937.

M937.0

The Age of Christ, 937.

M937.1

The twentieth year of Donnchadh.

M937.2

Maeldomh-naigh, Abbot of Tamhlacht;

M937.3

and Ceallach, son of Caellaidhe, Prior of Saighir, died.

M937.4

Finnachta, son of Ceallach, Comharba of Doire, bishop, and adept in the Bearla-Feine;

M937.5

Laighnen, comharba of Fearna and Tamhlacht, died.

M937.6

Aileach was plundered by the foreigners against Muircheartach, son of Niall; and they took him prisoner, and carried him off to their ships, but God redeemed him from them.

M937.7

A battle was gained by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, over the Gailengs Great and Small, at Ath-da-laarg, where four score of them were slain.

M937.8

Domhnall, son of Lorcan, lord of Aidhne, died at Cluain-mic-Nois.


p.639

M937.9

Crichan, son of Maelmuire, lord of Ui-Fiachrach, died.

M937.10

Flann, son of Ceallach, Tanist of Osraighe, died.

M937.11

Cian, son of Aenghus, was slain by the Ui-Failghe.

M937.12

Murchadh, son of Finn, was mortally wounded by Tuathal.

M937.13

Canoin-Phadraig was covered by Donnchadh, son of Flann, King of Ireland.

M937.14

Ceallachan, King of Caiseal, with the men of Munster, and Macca Cuinn, with the foreigners of Port-Lairge, went into Meath, and seized upon a great prey, and took the spoils and prisoners of Cill-eidhneach and Cill-achaidh; and took their two abbots, namely, Muireadhach Ua Conchobhair, and Coibhdeanach, son of Beargdha; but they left behind Oilill, son of Aenghus, lord of Ui-Fothaidh, and many others, in the hands of Aimhergin, lord of Ui-Failghe.

M937.15

The men of Munster, under Ceallachan, King of Munster, who had the foreigners along with him, plundered the churches of Cluain-eidhneach and Cill-achaidh, and the territory of Meath, as far as Cluain-Iraird.

M937.16

The foreigners deserted Ath-cliath by the help of God and Mactail.

Annal M938.

M938.0

The Age of Christ, 938.

M938.1

The twenty-first year of Donnchadh.

M938.2

Muirchear-tach of Camus, Abbot of Beannchair;

M938.3

Duibhinnreacht, son of Ronan, Abbot of Cluain-Dolcain;

M938.4

and Ainbhith, son of Domhnall, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, died.

M938.5

Coibhdeanach, Abbot of Cill-achaidh, was drowned in the sea of Delginis-Cualann, while fleeing from the foreigners.

M938.6

Flann Ua Cathail suffered martyrdom at Cluain-an-dobhair, by the foreigners.

M937.7

Suibhne, son of Cu-Breatan, Abbot of Slaine, was killed by the foreigners.

M938.8

Maelbeannachta, anchorite, died.

M938.9

Maelmartin Ua Scellain, Lector of Leithghlinn, died.

M938.10

An army was led by the king, Donnchadh, and by Muircheartach, son of Niall, to Leinster, and to the men of Munster; and they took their hostages.

M938.11

Niall, son of Fearghal, heir of Oileach, was mortally wounded and drowned by Muircheartach.

M938.12

Flann, daughter of Donnchadh, and Queen of Oileach, died.

M938.13

Aralt, grandson of Imhar,


p.641

i.e. the son of Sitric, lord of the foreigners of Luimneach, was killed in Connaught by the Caenraighi of Aidhne.

M938.14

A great slaughter was made of the Osraig by Ceallachan, King of Caiseal.

M938.15

Amhlaeibh Cuaran went to Cair-Abroc; and Blacaire, son of Godfrey, came to Ath-cliath.

M938.16

Depredations were committed by the Leinstermen in Leath-Chuinn; namely, by Braen in Meath, Lorcan in Breagh, and Muircheartach in Cualann; and they carried great preys from these places.

M938.17

Cairbre Ua Cinaeidh, lord of Ui-Aitheachda, died.

M938.18

A victory was gained by the King of the Saxons over Constantine, son of Aedh; Anlaf, or Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric; and the Britons.

Annal M939.

M939.0

The Age of Christ, 939.

M939.1

The twenty-second year of Donnchadh.

M939.2

Eocha, son of Scannal, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair;

M938.3

and Oeonacan, priest of Dun-Leath-ghlaisi, died.

M939.4

Maelbrighde, son of Nechtrai, the glory of Cualann, died at an advanced age.

M939.5

Muircheartach, son of Niall, with the men of the North and of Breagha, went into the territory of Osraighe and Deisi; and he totally plundered and ravaged the entire country as far as Leas-Ruadhrach, so that they the inhabitants submitted to him.

M939.6

A fleet was conducted by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and he carried off much plunder and booty from the Insi-Gall, after gaining victory and triumph.

M939.7

A slaughter was made of the Deisi by Ceallachan and the men of Munster, because they had submitted to Muircheartach, son of Niall; and he slew two thousand of them, together with Ceileachair, son of Cormac; Maelgorm, son of Gibhleachan; Seghdha, son of Noebelan; Cleireach, son of Sesta, &c.

M939.8

Another battle was gained by the Deisi and the Osraighi


p.643

over the King of Caiseal, where many were slain.

M939.9

Muircheartach afterwards assembled the Cinel-Conaill and Cinell-Eoghain, and the people of the North in general, at Oileach, where he selected ten hundred of the chosen heroes, and made a circuit of Ireland, keeping his left hand to the sea, until he arrived at Ath-cliath; and he brought Sitric, lord of Ath-cliath, with him as a hostage. He afterwards proceeded into Leinster, and the Leinstermen began to oppose him but finally agreed to submit to him; and he carried Lorcan, King of Leinster, with him. He then went to the men of Munster, who were in readiness on his arrival to give him battle; but they ultimately resolved to give up their king Ceallachan, and a fetter was put upon him by Muircheartach. He afterwards proceeded into Connaught, where Conchobhar, son of Tadhg, came to meet him, but no gyve or lock was put upon him. He then returned to Oileach, carrying these kings with him as hostages; and they were for nine months feasting there; and at the end of that time he sent the hostages to Donnchadh, because it was he that was at Teamhair, and the sovereignty had come to him. Concerning the carrying away of Ceallachan the following quatrain was composed:

    1. Muircheartach went to the South,
      To the beautiful chalk-white Caiseal,
      And he brought with him Ceallachan of troops;
      He did not accept of any other hostage for him.


p.645

M939.10

A slaughter was made of the foreigners by the Ui-Failghi, i.e. by Aimhergin, son of Cinaedh, and the Cinel-Fhiachach, who slew twelve hundred of them at Magh-Cisi.

M939.11

Unusual frost, so that the rivers and lakes were passable; and the foreigners plundered Inis-Mochta on the ice.

M939.12

Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, Tanist of Oileach, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill.

M939.13

A battle was gained over the foreigners of Ath-cliath by the Ui-Failghe, i.e. by Aimhergin, son of Cin-aedh, lord of Ui-Failghe, where there fell a thousand of the foreigners, with Aedh Albanach, and many chieftains besides him.

Annal M940.

M940.0

The Age of Christ, 940.

M940.1

The twenty-third year of Donnchadh.

M940.2

Dun-chadh, son of Suthainen, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M940.3

and Ceallach, son of Eporan, Bishop of Cluain-eidhneach, died.

M940.4

Maelmochta, scribe and Abbot of Cluain-Iraird, died; he was the head of the piety and wisdom of Ireland.

    1. Maelmochta of the plain of Meath,—
      Great grief is the beauteous sweet branch,—
      The chief of spiritual direction,
      The centre of the praise of Mugain.

M940.5

Faelan, son of Muireadhach, King of Leinster, died of a fall at Aenach-Colmain:

    1. Faelan of resounding rapidity, whose shout overwhelmed the plain,
      Lord of Cualann of the harbours, the subduer of champions, King of Leinster
      The flame of Eromhon's Ireland, he subdued hosts singlehanded,—
      Cause of tears is his total separation. Alas for the Prince of Faelan's land!


p.647

M940.6

Conghalach and Ailpin, two sons of Lorcan, son of Dunchadh, were slain by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh.

M940.7

Dunlaith, daughter of Maelmithigh, died.

M940.8

Cluain-mic-Nois and Cill-dara were plundered by Blacaire, son of Godfrey, and the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M940.9

Dun-Leathghlaise was plundered by the son of Raghnall and his foreigners. God and Patrick quickly took vengeance of him for this deed, for foreigners came across the sea, and attacked them on their island, so that the son of Raghnall, their chief, escaped to the main land; he was killed by Madudhan, King of Ulidia, in revenge of Patrick, before the end of a week after the plundering.

M940.10

A great flood in this year, so that the lower half of Cluain-mic-Nois was swept away by the water.

Annal M941.

M941.0

The Age of Christ, 941.

M941.1

The twenty-fourth year of Donnchadh.

M941.2

Connla, son of Dunacan, Bishop and Abbot of Leithghlinn;

M941.3

Caenchomhrac, Bishop of Daimhliag;

M941.4

Fogartach, Abbot of Saighir;

M941.5

and Feardomhnach, Abbot of Fobhar, died.

M941.6

Aedh, son of Scannlan, lord of Irluachair, a wise man, learned in Latin and Irish, died.

M941.7

Muircheartach of the Leather Cloaks, son of Niall Glundubh, lord of Aileach, the Hector of the west of Europe in his time, was slain at Ath-Fhirdiadh by Blacaire, son of Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, on the 26th of March. In lamentation of him was said:


p.649

    1. Vengeance and destruction have descended upon the race of the Clann-Cuinn for ever,
      As Muircheartach does not live; alas, the country of the Gaeidhil will be always an orphan.
Ard-Macha was plundered by the same foreigners on the day after the killing of Muircheartach. Mughron composed this:
    1. One, nine hundred, four times ten, since Christ was born of Virgin birth,
      Is the number of years that have come, to the great death of the Muircheartach.

M941.8

A victory was gained at Tracht-Mugha, by Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, over the Cinel-Eoghain and the foreigners of Loch-Feabhail, where three hundred of the Cinel-Eoghain and foreigners were slain, together with Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, heir apparent of the North.

M941.9

Lorcan, son of Faelan, King of Leinster, was slain by the Norsemen, as he was plundering Ath-cliath, after having first defeated the foreigners, where many of them were slain by him; of which was said:

    1. Since the descendant of Breasal Breac has been slain,
      A rapid brave king, subduer of princes,
      From this day till the fierce and terrific day of judgment,
      No Leinsterman shall march in his army.
      Lorcan of Leinster in a wretched house,
      The theme of a hundred renowns, the friend of poetry.
      Alas, the world has been filled with wailing,
      It is trembling, it is weeping, it is battle.
      Lord of provinces of the wise Gaedhil,
      If he wounded a hero, it is not joyous;
      He was a puissant Lugh to jump into the ford,
      It is a stain for ever if he has been slain.

M941.10

Ceallach, son of Bec, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was killed at Oentrobh by his own tribe.

M941.11

Flann Ua Fogarta, lord of Breacraighe, and lord of Teathbha;


p.651

M941.12

Duibhleambna, daughter of Tighearnan, i.e. lord of Breifne, and wife of Donn-chadh, son of Flann, King of Ireland, died.

Annal M942.

M.942.0

The Age of Christ, 942.

M.942.1

Robhartach, son of Maelcainnigh, Abbot of Cluain-an-dobhair;

M.942.2

Maelfeichine, Abbot of Cluain-Iraird;

M.942.3

Dubhthach, son of Maelseampul, Lector of Cluain-Iraird;

M.942.4

and Guaire, son of Maelecan, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M.942.5

Flaithbheartach, son of Inmainen, King of Caiseal;

M.942.6

Flann, son of Finn,

M.942.7

and Muireadhach, son of Maelmordha, two royal heirs of Leinster, died.

M.942.8

Finn, son of Matan, lord of Corca-Laighdhe, was slain by Feara-Maighe-Feine.

M.942.9

Conn, son of Donnchadh, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M.942.10

Cairbre, son of Maelpadraig, lord of Ui-Liathain, died.

M.942.11

A victory was gained by Ceallachan of Caiseal, over Ceinneidigh, son of Lorcan, at Magh-duin, where many were slain.

M.942.12

The destruction of Ath-cliath by the Irish, i.e. by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh,


p.653

heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland; Braen, son of Maelmordha, King of Leinster; Ceallach, son of Faelan, heir of Leinster. The destruction brought upon it was this, i.e. its houses, divisions, ships, and all other structures, were burned; its women, boys, and plebeians, were carried into bondage. It was totally destroyed, from four to one man, by killing and drowning, burning and capturing, excepting a small number who fled in a few ships, and reached Deilginis. Of which was said:
    1. Nine hundred years of lasting harmony,
      Four times ten and two, is seen,
      Since the birth of Christ, according to rule,
      Till this year, have been spent,
      Ath-cliath of swords was destroyed,
      Of many shields and families,
      The race of Tomar were tormented,
      In the western world, it has been manifested.
      Braen of Carman went to the victorious battle,
      The golden Rock of Almbain with his host,
      It was by the King of Leinster of swords
      It was oppressed and destroyed.
      Swelling for the contention was Conghalach,
      The fine vigorous chief of Breag,
      The sun of the bright western world,
      With battalions destroying it.

M942.13

Donnchadh, son of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, King of Ireland, died after the twenty-fifth year of his reign. It was to commemorate and lament Donnchadh the following quatrain was composed:


p.655

    1. Since Donnchadh's death,— unspeakable misfortune,—Teamhair the threatener has changed its hue,
      Without the enlightening laws of a king to bind it, the land of Ireland is for ever ruined.

M943.0

The Age of Christ, 943.

M943.1

The first year of Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, in sovereignty over Ireland.

M943.2

Maeltuile, son of Dunan, successor of Tighear-nach and Cairneach, i.e. of Tuilen, died; he was a bishop.

M943.3

Guaire, son of Sealbhach, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada, died.

M943.4

Aenghus, son of Donnchadh, son of Flann, lord of Meath, died.

M943.5

Aerchadh, son of Murchadh, lord of West Connaught, died.

M943.6

Aireachtach, son of Ainbhith, chief of Calraighe, was slain.

M943.7

The foreigners of Loch-Eathach were slain, together with their king, in a battle by Domhnall Ua Neill, i. e. the son of Muircheartach, son of Niall Glundubh, and by his brother.

M943.8

Blacaire, one of the chiefs of the foreigners, was expelled from Dublin; and Amhlaeibh remained after him there.

M943.9

Ua Canannan, i.e. Ru-aidhri, proceeded into Breagh, and left some of his army there with Conghalach.

M943.10

The hostages of Connaught were delivered to Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh.

M943.11

Two pillars of fire were a week before Allhallowtide, and they illumined the whole world.

M.943.12

Cuileannan, son of Coibhdheanach, lord of Ui-Bairche, died.

Annal M944.

M944.0

The Age of Christ, 944.

M944.1

The second year of Conghalach.

M944.2

Flathghus, Abbot of Fearna-mor;

M943.3

Scannlan, Abbot of Tuaim-Finnlocha;

M943.4

Maelbeathadh, Abbot of Daimhinis;

M943.5

and Guaire, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M944.6

Aimhirgin, son of Cinaedh, lord of Ui-Failghe, died on the third day of January.

M944.7

Dunlaing, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Drona, was slain.

M944.8

Domhnall, son of Maelmhuaidh, lord of Connaught, died.

M944.9

Domhnall, son of Uathmharan, son of Dobhailen, lord of Corca-Firtri, died.


p.657

M944.10

The plundering of Cluain-mic-Nois, and the other churches of Meath, by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M944.11

The plundering of Cill-Cuilinn by the foreigners, i.e. by Amhlaeibh Cuaran and his followers.

M944.12

Athelstan, the celebrated king of the Saxons, died.

Annal M945.

M945.0

The Age of Christ, 945.

M945.1

The third year of Conghalach.

M945.2

Caenchomhrac, Abbot of Ia;

M945.3

and Cathasach, son of Guasan, Lector of Ard-Macha, died.

M945.4

A battle was gained by Donnchadh, son of Ceallach, lord of Osraighe; over the Leinstermen, in which Braen, son of Maelmordha, King of Leinster, was slain; of which was said:

    1. Nine hundred, nine times five years, not a course without gloom and grief,
      From the birth of our noble redeeming treasure till the death of Braen, son of Maelmordha.
And Ceallach, son of Cinaedh, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was also slain in that battle, and many others along with them; in commemoration of which was said:
    1. Braen, the valorous chief of Leinster, Conghalach the heroic, illustrious,
      And four hundred valiant men, were slain at Ath-cliath of swords.
      From the birth of the Son of God, are clearly set down by rules,
      Five besides forty and nine hundred of years.

M945.5

The full of the Finnfadhach of silver was given by the Cinel-Eoghain for the blessing of Patrick and his successor at that time, i.e. Joseph.

M945.6

A battle between the birds of the sea and the birds of the land at Luimneach.

M945.7

A battle between the ravens of Munster, in Gleann-Damhain, at Darinis; and the ravens of the west were defeated and slaughtered there.

M945.8

An army was led by Ruaidhri


p.659

Ua Canannain to Slaine, where the foreigners and the Irish met him, namely, Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, and Amhlaeibh Cuaran; and the foreigners of Ath-cliath were defeated, and numbers slain and drowned.

M945.9

Scolaighe O'hAedhagain, lord of Dartraighe; Gairbhith, son of Muireadhach, Tanist of Ui-Creamhthain; and Aedh Ua Ruairc, son of Tighearnan, in the heat of the battle.

M945.10

The plundering of Ath-cliath by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh.

Annal M946.

M946.0

The Age of Christ, 946.

M946.1

The fourth year of Conghalach.

M946.2

Ainmir Ua cathlai, Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois,

M946.3

and Leacain in Meath died. He was of the Ui-Mic-Uais of Meath.

M946.4

Cathasach, son of Domhnall, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, died.

M946.5

Colman, son of Maelpadraig, airchinneach of Slaine, was slain by the foreigners.

M946.6

Corc, son of Coinligan, Abbot of Lothra, died.

M946.7

Cormacan, son of Maelbrighdhe, the chief poet, the play-mate of Niall Glundubh, died.

M946.8

The battle of Ath-cliath was gained by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, over Blacaire, grandson of Imhar, lord of the Norsemen, wherein Blacaire himself; and sixteen hundred men were lost, both wounded and captives, and upwards of a thousand along with him. Of this was said:

    1. The Thursday of Conghalach of chiefs
      At Ath-cliath was a conflict of heroes,
      As long as his children live to propagate children,
      They shall bring the foreigners to all kinds of trouble.


p.661

M946.9

Gormfhlaith, daughter of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, queen of Niall Glundubh, died after intense penance in her sins and transgressions.

M946.10

An army was led by the foreigners over Druim-raithe; and they burned the oratory and seven score and ten persons within it.

M946.11

Cathusach, son of Ailchi, Bishop of Cinel-Eoghain, died.

Annal M947.

M947.0

The Age of Christ, 947.

M947.1

The fifth year of Conghalach.

M947.2

Oenacan, son of Egceartach, airchinneach of Eaglais-beag at Cluain-mic-Nois, bishop and pure virgin,—the brother of Dunadhach, son of Egceartach, of the tribe of Mugh-dhorna-Maighen,—died.

M947.3

Aedhan, son of Anailedh, airchinneach of Tuaim-da-Ghualann, died.

M947.4

Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach, son of Niall Glun-dubh, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill.

M947.5

Laidhgnen, son of Conghalach, lord of Gaileanga, was slain by the Feara-Cul.

M947.6

Dormhnall, son of Finn, royal heir of Leinster, died.

M947.7

Fogartach, son of Donnagan, lord of Oirghialla, died, after the victory of penance.

M947.8

Madudhan, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ulidians themselves.

M947.9

A hosting by Conghalach, son of Mael-mithigh; and he plundered Ui-Meith and Fearnmhagh.

Annal M948.

M948.0

The Age of Christ, 948.

M948.1

The sixth year of Conghalach.

M948.2

Finnachta, son of Echthighern, bishop, scribe, and Abbot of Lughmhadh, and steward of Patrick's people from the mountain southwards;

M948.3

Colman, Bishop and Abbot of Fidh-duin, died.

M948.4

Maelfinnen, learned bishop of Doire-Chalgaigh;

M948.5

Cormac Ua h-Ailella, airchinneach of Cill-Cuilinn;

M948.6

and Scuithine, Abbot of Dearmach,


p.663

died.

M948.7

Donnghal Ua Maelmidhe, Lector of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M948.8

Flann Ua Anaile, airchinneach of Gleann-da-locha, head of the dignity of the province, died.

M948.9

Eochagan Ua Cleirigh, a lawgiver, died.

M948.10

Dariet, a wise man, died.

M948.11

Reachtabhra, son of Maenach, chief priest of Cluain-mic-Nois; airchinneach of Imleach-Fia, i.e. of Imleach-Beccain;

M948.12

Oenghus, son of Bran, priest of the learned seniors of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M948.13

The belfry of Slaine was burned by the foreigners, with its full of relics and distinguished persons, together with Caeineachair, Lector of Slaine, and the crozier of the patron saint, and a bell which was the best of bells.

M948.14

A victory was gained by Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, in Meath, over Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, where fell Conghalach, son of Ceallach, lord of Feara-Rois, and a number of others along with him.

M948.15

Another hosting by Ruaidhri Ua Canannain into Breagha; and he plundered all Breagha, and he reduced Conghalach to great straits. He encamped for the space of six months at Muine-Brocain, to reduce Meath and Breagha; and the dues of the King of Ireland were sent him from every quarter. A conflict afterwards took place between the Irish and the foreigners, namely, between Ruaidhri Ua Canannain and the foreigners of Ath-cliath, on the festival of Andrew the apostle precisely. The foreigners were defeated and slaughtered, for there fell six thousand mighty men, besides boys and calones; but Ruaidhri, heir to the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the heat of that conflict, and Imhar, Tanist of the foreigners, also. Godfrey, however, i.e. the son of Sitric, escaped, and a few persons along with him.

M948.16

Donnchadh son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn heir-apparent of Meath, was killed by his own kinsmen themselves i.e. by Fearghal son of Aengus.

M948.17

An army was led by Conghalach into Munster; and he plundered West Munster, and slew the two sons of Ceinneidigh, son of Lorcan, namely, Echthighern and Donnchuan.

M948.18

The plundering of Magh Finn by Conghalach.

M948.19

Ruarc, son of Anfith Ua Laeghachain, lord of Feara-Cul-Teathbha, died.

M948.20

Madudhan, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Ulidians themselves.


p.665

Annal M949.

M949.0

The Age of Christ, 949.

M949.1

The seventh year of Conghalach.

M949.2

Aileall, son of Corc Abbot of Corcach;died

M949.3

Guaire Ua Forannain, airchinneach of Ard-stratha, died.

M949.4

Aedh, son of Maelruanaidh, royal heir of Teamhair, was killed by Domhnall, son of Donnchadh.

M.949.5

Maceitigh, son of Cuileannan, lord of Conaille-Muirtheimhne, was slain by the Mughdhorna-Maighen.

M949.6

Bec, son of Donnchuan, lord of Teathbha, died.

M949.7

Niall Mothlach Ua Canannain was slain by the Cairbri-Mora.

M949.8

Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, with the great fleet of Leath-Chuinn, upon Loch-Deirgdherc.They plundered all the islands of the lake, and obtained the hostages of the Munstermen,over whom they obtained sway, after some opposition.

M949.9

Godfrey, son of Sitric, with the foreigners of Ath-cliath, plundered Ceanannus, Domhnach-Padraig, Ard-Breacain, Tulan, Disert-Chiarain, Cill-Scire, and other churches of Meath in like manner; but it was out of Ceanannus they were all plundered. They carried upwards of three thousand persons with them into captivity, besides gold, silver, raiment, and various wealth and goods of every description.

M949.10

The spoiling of Sil-Anmchadha, and the plundering of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, by Ceallachan and the men of Munster. The plundering of Dealbhna-Beathra by the same party; and the Daimh-liag of Gailine was burned by them.

M949.11

The freedom of Cluain-Iraird was granted by Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, no king or prince having clain of coigny upon it.

M949.12

A victory was gained over the men of Muscraighe-thire by Ua-Lomain-Gaela.

M949.13

A victory was gained over the Ui-Failghe at Birra,


p.667

where many were slain, together with Cinaeth Cruach.

M949.14

Dubhdabharc, son of Maelmordha, lord of Uaithne-tire, died.

M949.15

Great lues and bloody flux among the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

Annal M950.

M950.0

The Age of Christ, 950.

M950.1

The eighth year of Conghalach.

M950.2

Adhlann, son of Egneach, son of Dalach, comharba of Doire-Choluim-Cille, the Guaire Aidhne of the clergy of Ireland, died.

M950.3

Blathmhac of Sgeillic died.

M950.4

Flann Ua Becain, airchinneach of Druim-cliabh, scribe of Ireland, died.

M950.5

Feardomhnach Ua Maenaigh, Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois and Gleann-da-locha, of the tribe of Corca-Mogha;

M950.6

Celeclamh, anchorite of Ard-Macha;

M950.7

and Flann, son of Mael-fiachrach, airchinnech of Magh-etir-di-ghlais, died.

M950.8

Flann Ua Cleirigh, lord of South Connaught, and royal heir to all Connaught, was slain by the men of Munster.

M950.9

Domhnall Donn, son of Donnchadh, royal heir of Teamhair; and Oebhinn, daughter of Donnchadh, died.

M950.10

Canannan, son of Ceallach, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died, after being mortally wounded.

M950.11

A victory was gained over the Cinel-Conaill by Fearghal, son of Art, where Fiachra Ua Canannain was slain.

M950.12

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Ireland, was slain by his own tribe.

M950.13

A victory was gained over the people of Laighis and the Ui-Faircheallain by Tuathal, son of Ugaire, in which many


p.669

were slain; and Cuilen, son of Gusan, was taken prisoner.

M950.14

A battle was gained by the foreigners over the men of Alba, the Britons and the Saxons, in which many were slain.

Annal M951.

M.951.0

The Age of Christ, 951.

M.951.1

The ninth year of Conghalach.

M.951.2

Ciaran Ua Gabhla, Bishop of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn;

M.951.3

Duibhinnsi, a sage and bishop of the family of Beannchair;

M.951.4

Diarmaid, son of Caicher,Bishop of Inis-Cealtra;

M.951.5

Maelcothaigh, son of Lachtnan, successor of Comhghall and Mocholmog, died.

M.951.6

Ceannfaeladh, son of Suibhne, Abbot of Saighir, died on his pilgrimage at Gleann-da-locha.

M.951.7

Diarmaid, son of Torpthach, Abbot of Lis-mor;

M.951.8

Feidhlimidh, fosterson of Maelmaedhog, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, the sage of Leinster;

M.951.9

Maelmaire, airchinneach of Teach-Fethghna;

M.951.10

Maelmartan, son of Maenach, priest of Dun-Leathghlaisi;

M.951.11

Maelpadraig, son of Coscan, Lector of Ard-Macha;

M.951.12

and Gormghal, Lector of Teach-Mochua and Inis Robhartaigh, died.

M.951.13

Cormac,son of Maelsluaigh, sage of Munster;

M.951.14

Anghal, Lector of Cluain-Iraird;

M.951.15

and Colgga, anchorite of Ard-Macha, died.

M.951.16

Eithne, daughter of Fearghal, Queen of Ireland, wife of Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh,died.

M.951.17

Echthighern, son of Cinaedh, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was killed by the sons of Ceallach.

M.951.18

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the men of Munster, and the Danes of Luimneach along with them.

M.951.19

Ruadhacan, son of Eitigen, lord of East Gaileanga;

M.951.20

Faelan, son of Tadhg, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh;

M.951.21

and Duibhginn, son of Cuileannan, lord of Ui-Duach, died on the same day.

M.951.22

The plundering of Inis-Doimhle and Inis-Uladh by Amhlaibh Cuaran and Tuathal, son of Ugaire.

M.951.23

The plundering of Teach-Moling from the sea by Laraic.

Annal M952.

M.952.0

The Age of Christ, 952.

M.952.1

The tenth year of Conghalach.

M.952.2

Robhartach, successor of Colum-Cille and Adamnan;

M.952.3

Reachtabhra, Bishop and Abbot of Cill-achaidh;

M.952.4

Caenchomhrac, Abbot of Cill-Easpuig, Sanctain, and Sruthair;


p.671

M952.5

Flannagan, son of Allchu, successor of Mac Neisi and Colman Eala;

M952.6

Celeachair, son of Robhartach, successor of Finnen

M952.7

and Ciaran, of the tribe of the Ui-Mic-Uais of Meath;

M952.8

and Ceallachan, King of Caiseal, died.

M.952.9

Aedh, son of Gair-bhith, lord rectè Abbot of Corcach-mor, and lord of Dartraighe, was killed.

M.952.10

Niall Ua Tolairg, lord of Cuircne, and the person from whom is named Carn Ui Tholairg, on the margin of Loch Ribh, died.

M.952.11

Saighir-Chiarain was plundered by the men of Munster.

M.952.12

Bran, son of Domhnall, lord of Cinel-Laeghaire-Breagh, was slain.

M.952.13

Conn, son of Eradan, son of Gairbhith, lord of Magh-dumha, was slain.

M.952.14

A great slaughter was made of the people of Cairbre and Teathbha by Ua Ruairc, on which occasion Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre was slain.

M.952.15

Ualgharg, son of Cianan, lord of Dal-Meisincuirb, was slain by Cathal, son of Lorcan; and Cathal died immediately of the wounds inflicted by him Ualgharg.

M.952.16

Dunlang Ua Dubhain was slain.

M.952.17

A hosting of the Cinel-Eoghain by Domhnall Ua Neill; and they plundered Breagha by consent of the foreigners.

M953.0

The Age of Christ, 953.

M953.1

The eleventh year of Conghalach.

M953.2

Dunadhach, son of Egeartach, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M953.3

Dunlang Mac-Ua-Donnagain, Abbot of Inis-Doimhle and Teach-Munna;

M953.4

Maelinmhain, wise man and anchorite of Gleann-da-locha, died.

M953.5

Cuilen, son of Ceallach, Abbot of Cill-dara, was slain.

M953.6

Aenghus, son of Loingseach, airchinneach of Magh-bile, died.

M953.7

Aenghus, son of Maelbrighde, airchinneach of Daimhliag;

M953.8

Ailinne, lord of Mughdhorna-Maighen;

M953.9

and Braen, son of Cathacan, lord of Rath-inbhir, died.

M953.10

Mithighen, son of Cinaedh, lord of Ui-Mailhena;

M953.11

Murchadh, son of Cumasgach, lord of Feara-Rois;

M953.12

and Flann, son of Glethneachan, chief of Clann-Murchadha, died.

M953.13

Innerghe, son of Mochan, lord of Cianachta, was slain in Connaught, in the army


p.673

of Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh.

M953.14

A hosting by Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, with the boats of Tuaign-inbhir, which he convened on Loch Eathach, over the Dabhall, over the Airghialla, upon Loch-Eirne, and afterwards upon Loch-Uachtair; and he plundered and devastated Breifne, and carried off the hostages of O'Ruairc.

Annal M954.

M954.0

The Age of Christ, 954.

M954.1

Gaeithine, learned Bishop of Dun-Leathglaise;

M954.2

Oenghus, son of Noachan, successor of Feichin;

M954.3

Maelpadraig, son of Cubreatan, airchinneach of Slaine;

M954.4

Maenach, successor of Finnen, and Lector of Ard-Macha;

M954.5

and Maelbrighde, son of Redan, successor of Mac Neissi and Colman Eala, died.

M954.6

Tadhg of the Three Towers, son of Cathal, King of Connaught, died.

M954.7

A hosting by Conghalach, son of Maelmithig, King of Ireland, into Leinster; and after he had plundered Leinster, and held the Fair of the Liffe for three days, information was sent from Leinster to the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and Amhlaeibh, son of Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, with his foreigners went and laid a battle-ambush for Conghalach, by means of which stratagem he was taken with his chieftains at Tigh-Gighrainn.

M954.8

The following were they who were slain there: Conghalach himself; Madudhan, son of Aedh, son of Mael-mithigh; Aedh, son of Aithide, lord of Teathbha; Cormac, son of Cathalan, lord of Feara-Arda; and a great many others along with them. Concerning


p.675

the length of Conghalach's reign, and the age of our Lord Christ, when this king was killed, Aedh Ua Raithnen said:
    1. After despoiling of pleasant Ath-cliath,
      Which sent the foreigners out of Ireland,
      Was two years over ten
      Of the reign of fair Conghalach.
      Four, fifty, in truth,
      And nine hundred,—no slight fact,—
      From the birth of Christ at fair
      Bethil Till the death of the noble son of Maelmithigh.

Annal M955.

M955.0

The Age of Christ, 955.

M955.1

The first year of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, in sovereignty over Ireland.

M955.2

Flann, son of Aedhagan, Abbot of Gleann-da-locha;

M955.3

Maelceallaigh, son of Aedh,successor of Ailbhe of Imleach;

M955.4

Colman, son of Conghal, successor of Molaise of Daimhinis;

M955.5

Diarmaid, anchorite of Gleann-da-locha;

M955.6

Mocoluim Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died.

M955.7

Maelfothartaigh, son of Flann, King of Caiseal;

M955.8

and Muireadhach Ua Lachtnain, lord of Teathbha, died.

M955.9

Eochaidh, lord of Loch Cal;

M955.10

and Maelsinchill, son of Dubhcinn, chief of Ui-Briuin-Cualann, died.

M955.11

The fleet of Fearghal, son of Art, upon Loch-Ce.

M955.12

The mortal wounding of Cairbri Finn Ua Bruadair and his son, i.e. Aedh.

M955.13

Riagan, son of Fiannachta Ui Lorcain died.

M955.14

Maelsechlainn, son of Aimhirgin, lord of Ui-Failghe, died.

M955.15

A battle was gained by Tuathal, son of Ugaire, over the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, in which many were slain.

M955.16

An army was led by Domhnall son of Muircheartach into Leinster, and plundered Magh Liffe and the Comainns, as far as Dun Salach.

Annal M956.

M956.0

The Age of Christ, 956.

M956.1

The second year of Domhnall.

M956.2

Flann, son of Mochloingseach, successor of Tighearnach and Maeldoith;

M956.3

Tanaidhe Mac


p.677

Uidhir, successor of Comhghall, was killed by the foreigners.

M956.4

Finnachta, son of Lachtnan, airchinneach of Fearna;

M956.5

Aedh, son of Ceallach, successor of Brenainn;

M956.6

and Lughaidh, son of Colgan, airchinneach of Slaine, died.

M956.7

Tuathal, son of Ugaire, King of Leinster, died.

M956.8

Niall Ua hEruilbh, died.

M956.9

A victory was gained over the Ui-Dunchadha, the Ui-Failghe, and the Clann Ceallaig, at Fidh-Chuilinn; namely, over Domhnall, son of Lorcan, and Domhnall, son of Maelmordha, by the Ui-Faelain; namely, by Murchadh, son of Finn; in which were slain Cearnach, son of Lorcan, chief of Clann-Ceallaigh, and Naeideanan Ua Domhnaill, and many others of the nobility besides them.

M956.10

Domhnall Mac Aenghusa, lord of Ui-Eathach, died.

Annal M957.

M957.0

The Age of Christ, 957.

M957.1

The third year of Domhnall.

M957.2

Oenghus Ua Lapain, Bishop of Rath-bhoth;

M956.3

Dubhduin, successor of Colum Cille;

M956.4

Martin, anchorite, successor of Caeimhghin and Maelruain;

M956.5

Maenach, son of Cormac, Abbot of Lis-mor;

M956.6

and Maenach, airchinneach of Lothra, died.

M957.7

Dubhdabhoireann, son of Domhnall, King of Caiseal, died.

M957.8

Domhnall, son of Maelmordha, lord of Ui-Failghe, died.

M957.9

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, and the men of Munster.

M957.10

The Termon of Ciarain was burned this year, from the High Cross to the Sinainn, both corn and mills.

M957.11

A plundering army was led to Inis-Eanaigh by Fearghal Ua Ruairc; and the battle of Magh-Itha was gained, wherein Aedh, son of Flaithbheartach, heir apparent of Cinel-Eoghain, was slain.

M957.12

Cathasach of Druim-thorraidh, son of Duilgen, successor of Patrick, the most distinguished bishop of the Irish, died.


p.679

Annal M958.

M958.0

The Age of Christ, 958.

M958.1

The fourth year of Domhnall.

M958.2

Dubhduin Ua Steafain, successor of Colum Cille,

M958.3

and Cathmogh, Abbot of Lis-mor and Bishop of Corcach, died.

M958.4

Carlus, son of Conn, son of Donnchadh, was slain by the Norsemen.

M958.5

Fearghal, son of Aughran, lord of Laeighis-Retae, died.

M958.6

Faelan, son of Fearghal, Tanist of Laeighis-Retae, was slain.

M958.7

An army was led by Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, to Dal-Araidhe; and he carried away their hostages.

M958.8

Feargraidh, son of Cleireach, Tanist of Caiseal, died.

M958.9

Donnchadh, son of Lorcan, son of Cathal, was wounded in the territory of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M958.10

Faifne the Poet, chief poet of Leinster, died.

M958.11

Finshneachta Ua Cuill, poet of Munster, died.

Annal M959.

M959.0

The Age of Christ, 959.

M959.1

The fifth year of Domhnall.

M959.2

Conaing Ua Domhnallain, airchinneach of Clochar-Daimheni, and

M959.3

Donnchadh, son of Aurchadh, lord of Ui-Briuin-Seola, died.

M959.4

Feargraidh, son of Cleireach, King of Caiseal, died.

M959.5

Foghartach, son of Ciarmhac, was treacherously killed.

M959.6

Ualgharg, lord of Dartraighe, was killed.

M959.7

A bolt of fire passed south-westwards through Leinster, and it killed a thousand persons and flocks as far as Ath-cliath.

M959.8

Niall, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia, died.

Annal M960.

M960.0

The Age of Christ, 960.

M960.1

The sixth year of Domhnall.

M960.2

An army was led by Flaithbheartach, son of Conchobhar, lord of Oileach, into Dal-Araidhe, and he plundered Connor; but the Ulidians overtook him, so that Flaithbheartach


p.681

and his two brothers, Tadhg and Conn, and many others along with them, were slain.

M960.3

Aenghus Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill themselves.

M960.4

Eoghan, son of Muireadhach, was slain by the Ui-Failghe.

M960.5

Murchadh, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Maine of Connaught, died.

M960.6

Mughron Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, died.

M960.7

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the Osraighi.

M960.8

Inis-mor in Loch-Ribh was taken by Murchadh Ua Ceallaigh from Ceallach, son of Ruarc, lord of Feara-Cul Teathbha, i.e. lord of the Sil-Ronain; and he was carried as a prisoner with his fleet into Ui-Maine.

M960.9

The fleet of the men of Munster upon the Sinainn; and they plundered the Termon of Ciaran, from the river westwards. The people of Domhnall, son of Dunchadh, set out after them, and the men of Munster left their fleet to them; and a great number of them was slain, after leaving their ships behind.

M960.10

Murcheartach, son of Eigneachan, son of Dalach, died.

M960.11

An army was led by the Ui-Neill into Munster, and they committed great plunders there.

M960.12

Fearghal Ua Ruairc devastated Meath.

M960.13

Lightning destroyed the swans and the barnacle ducks in Airthear Liffe.

M960.14

The fleet of the son of Amhlaeibh and of the Ladgmanns came to Ireland, and plundered Conaille and Edar, with Inis-mac-Neasain; and the Ladgmanns afterwards went to the men of Munster, to avenge their brother, i.e. Oin, so that they plundered Inis-Doimhle and Ui-Liathain, and robbed Lis-mor and Corcach, and did many other evils. They afterwards went


p.683

into Ui-Liathain, where they were overtaken by Maelcluiche Ua Maeleitinn, who made a slaughter of them, i.e. killing three hundred and sixty-five, so that there escaped not one of them but the crews of three ships.

M960.15

A prey was carried off by the son of Amhlaeibh from Inis-mac-Neasain to Britain, and to Mon-Conain.

M960.16

A prey by Sitric Cam from the sea to Ui-Colgain; but he was over-taken by Amhlaeibh, with the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and the Leinstermen; in the conflict Amhlaeibh was wounded through his thigh with an arrow,and escaped to his ships, after the slaughter of his people.

M960.17

Buadhach, son of Cormac, and Donnchadh, son of Ceannfaeladh, were killed by the Eoghanachta in one month.

M960.18

Dunchadh, son of Laeghaire, lord of Fearnmhagh, died.

M960.19

An army was led by Domhnall Ua Neill upon the circuit of Ireland, and he remained three days at Rath-Edain.

Annal M961.

M.961.0

The Age of Christ, 961.

M.961.1

The seventh year of Domhnall.

M.961.2

Fothadh, son of Bran, scribe and Bishop of Insi-Alban;

M.961.3

Cosgrach, son of Donnagan, distinguished Bishop and airchinneach of Inis-Caeindeagha;

M.961.4

Cathal, son of Cormac, distinguished Bishop of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn died.

M.961.5

Anaile, scribe of Daimhliag-Cianain, died at an advanced age.

M.961.6

Dubhthach of Disert-Chiarain; Caencomhrac, son of Curan, distinguished Bishop and Abbot of Cluain-Eois.

M.961.7

An unusual thing was done by the King Domhnall, son of Muircheartach; namely, he brought vessels over Dabhall, and across Sliabh Fuaid, to Loch Ainninn, so that the islands of the lake were plundered by him.

M.961.8

Egneach, son of Dalach, lord of Oirghialla, and his son, i.e. Dubhdara, were killed; but God took vengeance of him for that deed, for he was, after some time, killed by O'Canannain.

M.961.9

Ua Canannain carried vessels with him on the lakes of Erne, so that the islands thereof were plundered by him.

M.961.10

A victory was gained by Fearghal, King of Connaught, over the Munstermen, upon the Sinainn, i.e. the victory of Catinchi, between Cluain-fearta and Cluain-mic-Nois; and Dal-gCais was afterwards plundered


p.685

by him.

M961.11

A slaughter was made against Mathghamain, son of Ceinneidigh, by Fearghal Ua Ruairc, where fell the three grandsons of Lorcan, and seven score along with them.

M961.12

Donnchadh, son of Ceallachan, King of Caiseal, was mortally wounded by his own kingsman.

M961.13

Fearghal,son of Ceallach, died at Saighir, after penance.

Annal M962.

M962.0

The Age of Christ, 962.

M962.1

The eighth year of Domhnall.

M962.2

Dubscuile, son of Cinaedh, successor of Colum Cille;

M962.3

Suibhni, son of Niamhan, Abbot of Mughna, died.

M962.4

Suibhne, son of Segonan, Bishop and ruler of Cill-Cuilinn, died.

M962.5

Finghin, distinguished Bishop of Dun-leathghlaisi; and Cormac,Bishop of Tamhlacht, died.

M962.6

Colman, son of Cobradh, Lector of Cill-dara;

M962.7

and Muireann, daughter of Mac Colman, Abbess of Cill-dara, died.

M962.8

Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, son of Egneachan, and his son, were killed by the Clann-Fianghusa.

M962.9

Furadhran, son of Bece, lord of Dearlas, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M962.10

Muircheartach, son of Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, heir to the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Domhnall, son of Conghalach.

M962.11

Cill-dara was plundered by the foreigners, and a great number of seniors and ecclesiastics were taken prisoners there; but Niall Ua h-Eruilbh ransomed them.The full of St. Bridget's Great House, and the full of the oratory of them, is what Niall purchased with his own money.

M962.12

Muircheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was killed by his own tribe.

M962.13

The victory of Bealach was gained by Fearghal Ua Ruairc over the men of Tethbha, where Domhnall,


p.687

son of Muireagan, was slain.

M962.14

A victory was gained over Amlaeibh, son of Sitric, by the Osraighi, i.e. at Inis-Teoc, where many of the foreigners were slain, together with Batbarr, son of Nira.

M962.15

Cairbre Ua Guaire, head of the hospitality of Leinster, died.

M963.0

The Age of Christ, 963.

M963.1

The ninth year of Domhnall.

M963.2

Dunchadh, son of Ceallach, Bishop and Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas,

M963.3

and Colman, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada, died.

M963.4

Joseph, successor of Mac Neisi and Colman-Eala;

M963.5

Cinaedh, son of Maelchiarain, Abbot of Lis-mor-Mochuda;

M963.6

and Gebhennach, son of Cathal, Abbot of Inis-Cathaigh, died.

M963.7

A hosting by Domhnall Ua Neill, so that he plundered Connaught, and carried off the hostages of O'Ruairc.

M963.8

Aedh, son of Maelmithigh, died on his pilgrimage.

M963.9

A change of kings by the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh; namely, Domhnall, son of Ceallaigh, in the place of Donnchadh, son of Tadhg.

M963.10

An intolerable famine in Ireland, so that the father used to sell his son and daughter for food.

Annal M964.

M964.0

The Age of Christ, 964.

M964.1

The tenth year of Domhnall.

M964.2

Cormac Ua Cillene, successor of Ciarain, a bishop and a wise man of great age, died.

M964.3

Finghin, anchorite and Bishop of Ia, died.

M964.4

Crunnmhael, Abbot of Beg-Eire, Bishop and lector of Tamhlacht, was drowned at Tochar-Eachdhach.

M964.5

Artagan Ua Manchain, lector of Gleann-da-locha, died.

M964.6

Dubhdabhoireann, distinguished Bishop of Magh-Breagh, and successor of Buite, died. He was a paragon of wisdom.

M964.7

A victory was gained by Comhaltan Ua Cleirigh, i.e. lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, and by Maelseachlainn, son of Arcda, over Fearghal Ua Ruairc, where seven hundred were lost, together with Toichleach Ua Gadhra, lord of South Luighne.

M964.8

Ceallach, son of Faelan, King of Leinster, died.

M964.9

Donnchadh, son of Tuathal, royal heir of Leinster;

M964.10

Faelan, son of Cormac, lord of


p.689

the Deise-Mumhan

M964.11

and Maelmaire, daughter of Niall, son of Aedh, died.

M964.12

Fearghal Ua Ruairc, King of Connaught, was slain by Domhnall, son of Conghalach, lord of Breagha and Cnoghbha.

Annal M965.

M965.0

The Age of Christ, 965.

M965.1

The eleventh year of Domhnall.

M965.2

Ailill, son of Maenach, Bishop of Sord and Lusca;

M965.3

Daniel, Bishop of Leithghlinn;

M965.4

Flann, son of Aenghus, Abbot of Lann-Leire;

M965.5

Cairbre, son of Laidhgnen, Abbot of Fearna-mor and Teach Moling;

M965.6

Conn, son of Corcran, Abbot of Mungairit, and head of all Munster;

M965.7

and Conchobhar, Lector of Cill-dara, died.

M965.8

Dubh-scuile Ua Manchain, anchorite, and head of the rule of Gleann-da-locha, died.

M965.9

Muireadhach, son of Faelan, Abbot of Cill-dara, and royal heir of Leinster, was slain by Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, and by Cearbhall, son of Lorcan.

M965.10

Gormghilla, son of Ceanndubhan, chief Vice-abbot of Cluain-eidhneach, was killed by the Osraighi.

M965.11

The battle of Formaeil, at Rath-beg, was gained by the Cinel-Eoghain over the Cinel-Conaill, where Maelisa Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, and Muircheartach Ua-Taidhg, royal heir to Connaught, were slain, together with many others.

M965.12

Aedh Ua hAitidhe, King of Ui-Eathach-Cobha, was killed by his own tribe.

M965.13

Cearbhall, son of Lorcan, royal heir of Leinster, was slain by Domhnall, lord of Breagha.

M965.14

Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, King of Caiseal, plundered Luimneach, and burned it.

M965.15

Tighearnach, son of Ruarc, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, died.

M965.16

A battle was gained by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, over the foreigners of Luimneach, where he made a slaughter of the foreigners, and burned their ships; and he plundered Inis-Ubtain; and Maelruanaidhe, son of Flann, Tanist of Osraighe, was slain in the heat of the conflict, while plundering the fortress.

M965.17

An army was led by Mathghamain to Sciath-an-Eigis; and he carried the hostages of Munster with him to his house, and expelled the son of Bran, lord of Desmond.

M965.18

The army of the foreigners of Ath-cliath and of Leinster, into Breagha; and Cearbhall, son of Lorcan, royal heir of Leinster, was there wounded, so that he afterwards died.

M965.19

An army was led by Murchadh, son of Finn, King of Leinster, into Osraighe, where he remained four nights, after having plundered Magh-Raighne; but Mathghamhain and the men of Munster overtook him, as did the Deisi and the Osraighi, from Ath-Buana to Commur; but Murchadh escaped


p.691

from them in safety, without leaving horse or man behind.

M965.20

A change of abbots at Ard-Macha, i.e. Dubhdalethe in the place of Muireadhach of Sliabh-Cuilenn.

Annal M966.

M966.0

The Age of Christ, 966.

M966.1

The twelfth year of Domhnall.

M966.2

Ceallach Ua Banain, successor of Comhghall;

M966.3

Muireadhach, the foster-son of Maenach, successor of Cainneach;

M966.4

Erc Ua Suailen, bishop or abbot of Tamhlacht;

M966.5

Connmhac, i.e. the son of Ainniarraidh, successor of Ulltan, and priest of Ceanannus, died.

M966.6

An army was led by Domhnall Ua Neill into Leinster; and he plundered from the Bearbha westwards rectè eastwards to the sea; and he carried off a great prey of cows; and he laid siege to the foreigners and the Leinstermen for two months. On this occasion were slain Finn, son of Goirmghilla; Dunghal, son of Dunghal Ua Riagain; Ronan, son of Bruadar, son of Duibhghilla, and other nobles of the Leinstermen along with them.

M966.7

Maelmordha, son of Finn, royal heir of Leinster, was mortally wounded.

M966.8

Ruaidhri, son of Maelmartain, lord of Fotharta, was slain.

M966.9

Flaithbheartach Ua Muireadhaigh, lord of Ui-Eathach, died.

M966.10

Muireadhach, son of Fearghus, successor of Patrick, died.

M966.11

Cathasach, son of Murchadhan, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M967.

M967.0

The Age of Christ, 967.

M967.1

The thirteenth year of Domhnall.

M967.2

Maelfinnen, son of Uchtan, Bishop of Ceanannas, successor of Ulltan and Cairneach;

M967.3

Eoghan Ua Cleirigh, Bishop of Connaught;

M967.4

Maelgorm, son of Maelcheallaigh, Abbot of Inis-Cealtra;

M967.5

and Donnchadh, son of Cathlan, Abbot of Cill-mic-Duach, died.

M967.6

Muirigen, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada, died.

M967.7

Aenghus Ua Robhartaigh, anchorite of Doire-Chalgaigh;

M967.8

and Cinaedh Ua Cathmbaeil, airchinneach of Doire-Chalgaigh, died.

M967.9

Beollan, son of Ciarmhac, lord of Loch-Gabhar, died.

M967.10

Treasach, son of Maelmuine, lord of Ui-Conaill-Gabhra, was killed.

M967.11

Very great fruit, so that eight sacks were brought from the foot of one tree.

M967.12

An army was


p.693

led by Murchadh, son of Finn, into Leinster and Osraighe, and they remained five nights there; but he was overtaken by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, with the men of Munster, the two Eili, the Deisi, and Imhar of Port-Lairge, with the foreigners and the Osraigh. Murchadh burned Dun-Ua-Tochmairc by force; but they escaped before his eyes, without leaving a man or a horse behind.

M967.13

An army was led by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, into Desmond, and remained three nights in Corcach, and carried off the hostages of Desmond.

M967.14

Ceanannas was plundered by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, and by Murchadh, son of Finn, King of Leinster; but Domhnall Ua Neill, King of Ireland, overtook and defeated them.

M967.15

Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, lord of Osraighe; and Echthighern, son of Eitech, lord of the Comainns, died.

Annal M968.

M968.0

The age of Christ, 968

M968.1

The fourteenth year of Domhnall.

M968.2

Ceanannas was plundered by Amhlaeibh Cuaran, with the foreigners and Leinstermen; and he carried off a great prey of cows, but lost numbers of his people, together with Breasal, son of Ailill; and he gained a victory over the Ui-Neill at Ard-Maelchon.

M968.3

A victory was gained over Ualgharg Ua Ruairc by Conchobhar, son of Tadhg, in which were slain Ualgharg, and among the rest Duibhghilla, i.e. the son of Laidhgnen.

M968.4

An army was led by the King of Ulidia, Artghal, son of Madudhan, against the foreigners; and he plundered Coindere, then in their possession, but left behind a number of heads.

M968.5

The plundering of Lughmhadh and Druim-Inesclainn by Muircheartach, son of Domhnall, King of Aileach, and son of the King of Ireland, against the foreigners, in which many were slain.

M968.6

The plundering of Mainistir-Buithe by Domhnall, King of Ireland, against the foreigners; and three hundred of them were burned by him in one house.

M968.7

The refectory of Lann-Leire was burned by Domhnall, son of Murchadh; and four hundred persons were destroyed by wounding and burning there, both men and women. Lughmhadh and Druim-Ineasclainn were plundered by Glunillar, i.e. by Murchadh Ua Flaithbheartaigh.


p.695

Annal M969.

M969.0

The Age of Christ, 969.

M969.1

The fifteenth year of Domhnall.

M969.2

Tuathal, successor of Ciaran, Bishop and Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M969.3

Maenach, bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois,

M969.4

Finnguine Ua Fiachrach, Abbot of Teach-Mochua,

M969.5

and Maelsamhna, successor of Cainneach, died.

M969.6

Ceallach Ua Nuadhait was killed by the foreigners in the doorway of his refectory.

M969.7

Domhnall Ua Neill, the king, was driven from Meath north-wards, across Sliabh Fuaid, by the Clann-Colmain; of which was said:

    1. Not well we have heard the voice, that the prince of Teamhair was removed;
      Scarcity of corn, much of grass, will dry up the mind of the terrible.

M969.8

An army was afterwards led by Domhnall Ua Neill, with the soldiers of the North, i.e. the races of Conall and Eoghan, against the men of Meath and the foreigners, so that he plundered all their forts and fortresses, and spoiled Ui-Failghe and Fotharta; and he took revenge on them on that occasion for their opposition to him, for he erected a camp in every cantred of Meath, from the Sinainn to the Bealach-duin.

M969.9

The foreigners of Luimneach were driven from Inis-Ubhdain by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh.

M969.10

Two suns of equal size were seen at high noon-day.

Annal M970.

M970.0

The Age of Christ, 970.

M970.1

The sixteenth year of Domhnall.

M970.2

Crunnmhael, successor of Caeimghin, died.

M970.3

Muireadhach Ua Conchobhair, bishop, and successor of Finntan of Cluain-eidhneach;

M970.4

and Cathasach, son of Fearghus, comharba of Dun, died.

M970.5

Foghartach, son of Niall Ua Tolairg, was treacherously killed by Domhnall, son of Conghalach.

M970.6

Murchadh, son of Finn, King of Leinster, was killed by Domhnall Claen, son of Lorcan, after they had eaten and drank together. Of the year of his death was said:

    1. Of years seventy, nine hundred, from birth of Christ,—no small deed,—
      Till death of Murchadh, son of Finn, chief King of Leinster in his time.


p.697

M970.7

Gebheannach, son of Diarmaid, lord of Ciarraighe, died.

M970.8

An army was led by Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, into Ciarraighe, where he demolished many forts, and among others Dun-na-fithrech.

M970.9

Madudhan, son of Bran, was killed by Mac Brain.

M970.10

Finn, son of Bran, was killed by Ceallach, son of Domhnall, son of Finn, son of Maelmordha, lord of Ui-Faelain.

M970.11

Cluain-Iraird, Fobhar, Lann-Eala, and Disert-Tola, were burned and plundered by Domhnall, son of Murchadh.

Annal M971.

M971.0

The Age of Christ, 971.

M971.1

The seventeenth year of Domhnall.

M971.2

Dunchadh, the foster-son of Diarmaid, distinguished bishop and chief poet of Osraighe, died.

M971.3

Maelmoire, Abbot of Dearmhach, was drowned in Eas-Ruaidh.

M971.4

Becan, i.e. son of Lachtnan, successor of Finnen, i.e. of Cluain-Iraird;

M971.5

Ailill, i.e. son of Laighneach, Abbot of Gleann-da-locha, died.

M971.6

Cinaedh of the Oratory, anchorite of Cluain-fearta, died.

M971.7

Finachta Ua Flaithri, Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas,

M971.8

and Conchobhar, son of Tadhg of the Tower, King of Connaught, died.

M971.9

The battle of Ceis-Corainn between Murchadh Ua Flaithbheartach, i.e. Glun-Illar, King of Aileach, and Cathal, son of Tadhg, King of Connaught, wherein fell Cathal himself, and Geibheannach, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Maine; Tadhg, son of Muircheartach, chief of Ui-Diarmada; Murchadh, son of Flann, son of Glethneachan, chief of Clann-Murchadha; and Seirridh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, with a countless number along with them: and Murchadh totally plundered Connaught afterwards.

Annal M972.

M972.0

The Age of Christ, 972 rectè 974.

M972.1

The eighteenth year of Domhnall.

M972.2

Maelbrighde, son of Cathasach, Bishop and Abbot of Druim-mor-Mocholmog,

M972.3

and Diarmaid, son of Dochartach, Abbot of Daimhinis, died.

M972.4

Cairbre Ua Corra,


p.699

successor of Caeimhghin;

M972.5

Roithechtach, airchinneach of Cuil-raithin, anchorite and wise man;

M972.6

Cairbre, son of Echtighern, comharba of Cluain-mor-Maedhog, died.

M972.7

Murchadh Ua Flaithbheartaigh went upon a predatory excursion into Cinel-Conaill, and took a great prey; but being pursued and overtaken, Murchadh, i.e. lord of Aileach, was wounded, and died thereof at Dun-Cloitighe, after communion and penance.

M972.8

Donnchadh Finn, son of Aedh, lord of Meath, was killed by Aghda, son of Duibhcenn, son of Tadhgan, lord of Teathbha.

M972.9

Another battle was gained by the Osraighi over the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, wherein Domhnall, son of Ceallach, was slain.

M972.10

Finnsnechta, son of Cinaedh, lord of Fortuatha-Laighean, died.

M972.11

A slaughter was made of the Osraighi in Iarthar-Liphi, in which were slain two thousand men and sixty young lords, and among the rest Diarmaid, son of Donnchad, Tanist of Osraighe, and Echthighern Ua Luanaigh, lord of the North; of which was said:

    1. Nine hundred and seventy-two years,
      It was victory without abatement,
      From Christ to the slaughter of the Osraighi,
      In the west of warlike Liphi.
      The host of the Ui-Muirithaigh slaughtered them,—
      Not hasty he who reckoned them,—
      With three score young lords,
      Twenty hundred, or two thousand men.

M972.12

The Ui-Ceinnsealaigh were plundered in Osraighe, where Domhnall, son of Ceallach, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and many others, were slain.

M972.13

The plundering of Inis-Cathaigh by Maghnus, son of Aralt, with the Lag-manns of the islands along with him; and Imhar, lord of the foreigners of Luimneach, was carried off from the island, and the violation of Seanan thereby.

M972.14

Muircheartach,


p.701

son of Aedh, son of Flann Ua Maelseachlainn, King of Meath, was slain by Domhnall, son of Conghalach.

M973.0

The Age of Christ, 973 rectè 975.

M973.1

The nineteenth year of Domhnall.

M973.2

Foghartach, Abbot of Doire-Chalgaigh, died.

M973.3

Artghal, son of Coscrachan, successor of Comhghall and Finnen, died, after a long and virtuous life.

M973.4

Feardalach, Abbot of Reachrainn, was killed by the foreigners.

M973.5

Cinaedh Ua hArtagain, chief poet of Ireland in his time, died.

M973.6

Ceallach, son of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Faelain, was slain by Broen, son of Murchadh.

M973.7

Muireadhach, son of Donnchadh, son of Ceallach, Tanist of Osraighe, died.

M973.8

Too much wet, so that the fruits were destroyed.

M973.9

Dubhdalethe, successor of Patrick, made a circuit of Munster, and obtained his demand.

Annal M974.

M974.0

The Age of Christ, 974.

M974.1

The twentieth year of Domhnall.

M974.2

Conaing, son of Finan, Abbot of Coindere and Lann-Etala, died.

M974.3

Sedna Ua Demain, Abbot of Aendruim, was burned in his own house.

M974.4

Donnchadh, son of Ceallach, lord of Osraighe, died.

M974.5

Domhnall, son of Conghalach, lord of Breagha, died; he was named Triubhus Fliuch.

M974.6

Tadhg Ua Ruadhrach, lord of Cianachta, was slain in Ulidia.

M974.7

Gilla-Coluim Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, went upon a predatory excursion into Ui-Failghe, where the lord of Cairbre-mor, i.e. Fearghal, son of Fogartach, was lost on the expedition.

M974.8

Dunchadh Ua Braein, successor of Ciaran of Cluain-mic-Nois, went on his pilgrimage to Ard-Macha.

M974.9

Mathghamhain, son of Ceinneidigh, supreme King of all Munster, was treacherously taken prisoner by Donnabhan, son of Cathal, lord of Ui-Fidhgeinte, who


p.703

delivered him up to Maelmhuaidh, son of Bran, lord of Desmond, who put him to death, against the protection of saints and just men.


p.705

Annal M975.

M975.0

The Age of Christ, 975 rectè 977.

M975.1

The twenty-first year of Domhnall.

M975.2

Gormghal, successor of Tola;

M975.3

Conaing, son of Cathan, Abbot of Fearna;

M975.4

and Noemhan of Inis-Cathaigh, died.

M975.5

Muircheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, and Conghalach, son of Domhnall, son of Conghalach, two heirs to the monarchy of Ireland, were slain by Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric.

M975.6

Gilla-Coluim Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the king, Domhnall Ua Neill.

M975.7

Maelruanaidh God Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Teamhair, was treacherously killed.

M975.8

Inis-Cathaigh was violated by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, against the foreigners of Luimneach, with Imhar and his two sons, namely, Amhlaeibh and Duibhchenn. Brian was fifty years of age at that time.

M975.9

Seachnasach, son of Hiruadh, lord of Eile, was slain.

Annal M976.

M976.0

The Age of Christ, 976 rectè 978.

M976.1

The twenty-second year of Domhnall.

M976.2

Fiachra Ua hArtagain, Abbot of Ia-Choluim Chille,

M976.3

and Maenach, son of Muireadhach, Abbot of Druim-Inesclainn, died.

M976.4

The battle of Bealach-Leachta between Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, and Maelmhuaidh, lord of Des-mond, wherein Maelmhuaidh was slain, and the men of Munster slaughtered.

M976.5

The battle of Bithlann was gained over the Leinstermen by the foreigners


p.707

of Ath-cliath, wherein were slain Augaire, son of Tuathal, King of Leinster; Muireadhach, son of Rian, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh; and Conghalach, son of Flann, lord of Leighe and Rechet, with numbers of others along with them.

M976.6

A naval victory was gained on Loch Eirne by the Airghialla, over the Cinel-Conaill, where many were slain, together with Niall Ua Canannain, and Ua Conghalaigh, and the son of Murchadh Glunillar, and other nobles.

M976.7

Comaltan Ua Cleirigh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, died.

M976.8

The battle of Cill-mona was gained by Domhnall, son of Conghalach, and Amhlaeibh, over the king, Domhnall Ua Neill, wherein fell Ardghal, son of Madadhan, King of Ulidia; Donnagan, son of Maelmuire; and Cinaedh, son of Croinghille, lord of Conaille, with a large number besides them.

M976.9

A battle was gained by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, over the foreigners of Luimneach, and Donnabhan, son of Cathal, lord of Ui-Fidhgeinte, wherein the foreigners of Luimneach were defeated and slaughtered.


p.709

Annal M977.

M977.0

The Age of Christ, 977 rectè 979.

M977.1

The twenty-third year of Domhnall.

M977.2

Cormac Ua Maelbearaigh, Abbot of Gleann-Fuaid, died.

M977.3

Flann, son of Maelmichil, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, Bishop and airchinneach of Cluain-Deochra;

M977.4

Flann, son of Maelmaedhog, airchinneach of Gleann-Uisean;

M977.5

Cathasach, airchinneach of Eaglais-beg at Cluain-mic-Nois;

M977.6

and Muireann, daughter of Conghalach, Abbess of Cill-dara, died.

M977.7

Conchobhar, son of Finn, lord of Ui-Failghe, died.

M977.8

Domhnall Claen, King of Leinster, was taken prisoner by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M977.9

Leathlobhar Ua Fiachna, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was killed.

M977.10

Cill-dara was plundered by the foreigners.

Annal M978.

M978.0

The Age of Christ, 978 rectè, 979.

M978.1

Mughroin, Abbot of Ia, scribe and bishop, the most learned of the three divisions,

M978.2

and Rumann Ua hAedhagain, Abbot of Cluain-Eois, died.

M978.3

The battle of Teamhair was gained by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, over the foreigners of Ath-cliath and of the Islands, and over the sons of Amhlaeibh in particular, where many were slain, together with Raghnall, son of Amhlaeibh, heir to the sovereignty of the foreigners; Conamhail, son of Gilla-Arri; and the orator of Ath-cliath; and a dreadful slaughter of the foreigners along with them. There fell also in the heat of the battle Braen, son of Murchadh, royal heir of Leinster; Conghalach, son of Flann, lord of Gaileanga, and his son, i.e. Maelan; Fiachna and Cuduilich, the two sons of Dubhlaech, two lords of Feara Tulach; and Lachtnan, lord of Mughdhorn-Maighen. After this Amhlaeibh went across the sea, and died at I-Coluim-Cille.

M978.4

After Domhnall, the son of Muircheartach of the Leather Cloaks, son of Niall Glundubh, had been twenty-four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died at Ard-Macha, after the victory of penance. In commemoration of this, Dubhdalethe said:


p.711

    1. From the birth of the son of God,—no falsehood,—
      Eight, seventy, and nine hundred,
      Till the death of Mughroin whom verses extol,
      The comely successor of Colum;
      Till the battle of strong Teamhair,
      Wherein blood was spilled over shields,
      Wherein the Gaeidhil and Galls were slaughtered
      By the noble famous Maelseachlainn;
      And till the death of Domhnall Ua Neill
      At Ard-Macha of majestic hostages,
      Monarch of Ireland who bestowed horses, than whom a worthier man
      On the surface of the earth was never born.

M978.5

A battle between the Ulidians and Dal-Araidhe, wherein the king of the province, i.e. Aedh, son of Loingseach, and many others, were slain by Eochaidh, son of Ardgar.

M978.6

Dubhghall, son of Donnchadh, Tanist of Aileach, was slain by his kinsman, Muireadhach, son of Flann; and Muireadhach himself was slain by his tribe before the end of a month, in revenge of Dubhghall.

M978.7

Tighearnan Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain.

M978.8

Dunghal, son of Donnchadh, Tanist of Osraighe, died.

Annal M979.

M979.0

The Age of Christ, 979 rectè 980.

M979.1

The first year of Maelseachlainn Mor, son of Domhnall, son of Donnchadh, son of Flann, in sovereignty of Ireland.

M979.2

Faelan, son of Coellaidhe, distinguished Bishop and Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair;

M979.3

and Murchadh, son of Riada, Abbot of Ross-Chomain, and Prior of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M979.4

Aghda, son of Duibhcenn, lord of Teathbha, died in Imdhaidh-Chiarain, after a good life.

M979.5

Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric, chief lord of the foreigners of


p.713

Ath-cliath, went to Hi on his pilgrimage; and he died there, after penance and a good life.

M979.6

A great army was led by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, King of Ireland, and by Eochaidh, son of Ardgar, King of Ulidia, against the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and they laid siege to them for three days and three nights, and carried thence the hostages of Ireland, and among the rest Domhnall Claen, King of Leinster, and all the hostages of the Ui-Neill. Two thousand was the number of the hostages, besides jewels and goods, and the freedom of the Ui- Neill, from the Sinainn to the sea, from tribute and exaction. It was then Maelseachlainn himself issued the famous proclamation, in which he said:— "Every one of the Gaeidhil who is in the territory of the foreigners, in servitude and bondage, let him go to his own territory in peace and happiness." This captivity was the Babylonian captivity of Ireland, until they were released by Maelseachlainn; it was indeed next to the captivity of hell.

Annal M980.

M980.0

The Age of Christ, 980 rectè 981.

M980.1

The second year of Maelseachlainn.

M980.2

Anmchadh, Bishop of Cill-dara, completed his virtuous life in this world, at an advanced life.

M980.3

Eoghan Ua Cathain, Abbot of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn;

M980.4

Sinach, son of Murthuilen, Abbot of Beannchair;

M980.5

Clerchen, son of Donnghal, successor of Feichin;

M980.6

Conaing Ua Flannagain, vice-airchinneach of Ard-Macha;

M980.7

and Rothechtach of Daimhinis, a priest, died.

M980.8

Domhnall Ua hAiteidh, lord of Ui-Eathach, and Loingseach, son of Foghartach, chief of Ui-Niallain, mutually fell by each other.

M980.9

Donnghal, son of Duibhrighe, Abbot of Fidh-duin, died.

Annal M981.

M981.0

The Age of Christ, 981 rectè982.

M981.1

The third year of Maelseachlainn.

M981.2

Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, successor of Fechin,

M981.3

and Bruadar, son of Echthighern, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died.

M981.4

Archu, son of Niall, royal heir


p.715

of Ulidia, was slain by his kinsmen.

M981.5

Aedh Ua Dubda, lord of North Connaught, died.

M981.6

Flaithbheartach, Abbot of Leithghlinn, died.

M981.7

Ailell, the fosterson of Dunchadh, died.

M981.8

Dal-gCais was plundered by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, and the Tree of Aenach-Maighe-Adhair was cut, after being dug from the earth with its roots.

M981.9

Cill-dara was plundered by Imhar of Port-Lairge.

M981.10

Osraighe was plundered by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh.

M981.11

Gilla-Caeimhghin was blinded by Domhnall, son of Lorcan.

Annal M982.

M982.0

The Age of Christ, 982.

M982.1

The fourth year of Maelseachlainn.

M982.2

Cormac, son of Maelchiarain, successor of Mochta;

M982.3

Aedh Ua Mothrain, successor of the two Sinchealls;

M982.4

Muireadhach, son of Muiregan, Prior of Ard-Macha, died.

M982.5

A battle was gained by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, and by Gluniairn, son of Amhlaeibh, i.e. the son of Maelseachlainn's mother, over Domhnall Claen and Imhar of Port-Lairge, where many perished, both by drowning and killing, and among the rest Gilla-Padraig, son of Imhar, and many others of distinction along with him. Leinster was spoiled and ravaged by Maelseachlainn as far as the sea.

M982.6

Gleann-da-locha was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M982.7

Gilla-Phadraig plundered Leithghlinn, in atonement for which he gave the mainchine gifts of his two sons to Molaisi for ever, besides doing penance for it.

M982.8

Gilla-Phadraig was taken prisoner by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh.


p.717

M983.0

The Age of Christ, 983.

M983.1

The fifth year of Maelseachlainn.

M983.2

Uissine Ua Lapain, airchinneach of Doire-Chalgaigh,

M983.3

and Muireadhach Ua Flannagain, lector of Ard-Macha, died.

M983.4

Domhnall Claen was slain by Aedh, son of Echthighern, one of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and Fiachra, son of Finnshneacta, chief of Fortuatha-Laighean, and also Maelmithigh, son of Gairbheth, by treachery.

M983.5

Lochlainn, lord of Corca-Modhruaidh, and Maelseachlainn, son of Cosgrach, died.

M983.6

The three sons of Cearbhall, son of Lorcan, plundered the Termon of Caeimhghin at Gleann-da-locha; and the three were killed before night, through the miracles of God and Caeimhghin.

M983.7

Flaithbheartach Ua hAnluain, lord of Ui-Niallain, was treacherously slain by the Ui-Breasail.

M983.8

Dubhdarach, son of Domhnallan, lord of Dearlus, was slain.

M983.9

The west of Meath was plundered by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh.

M983.10

Aedh Ua Dubhda, lord of all North Connaught, died.

Annal M984.

M984.0

The Age of Christ, 984.

M984.1

The sixth year of Maelseachlainn.

M984.2

Foghartach Ua Conghaile, a distinguished scribe, and Abbot of Daimhinis;

M984.3

Flaithlemh, airchinneach of Saighir, died.

M984.4

Eochaidh, son of Soerghus, airchinneach of Daimhliag-Chianain, was slain.

M984.5

Maelfinnia, airchinneach of Domhnach-Padraig, died

M984.6

Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, plundered Connaught, destroyed its islands, and killed its chieftains, and reduced Magh-Aei to ashes. A depredation was committed by the Connaughtmen, in retaliation, as far as Loch-Ainninn;


p.719

and they burned Feara-Ceall, and slew the lord of Feara-Ceall.

M984.7

Fearghal, son of Lorcan, lord of Cinel-Fiachach, was killed.

M984.8

Diarmaid, son of Uathmharan, lord of Luighne, died.

Annal M985.

M985.0

The Age of Christ, 985.

M985.1

The seventh year of Maelseachlainn.

M985.2

Maelciarain Ua Maighne, successor of Colum-Cille, was cruelly martyred by the Danes at Ath-cliath.

M985.3

Muireadhach, son of Flann, successor of Connlath, died.

M985.4

The abduction of the shrine of Patrick, by Maelseachlainn, from Ath-Fhirdiadh to Ath-Sighe, in consequence of the rebellion of the son of Cairelan. They afterwards made peace; and Maelseachlainn submitted to the award of the successor of Patrick, i e. the visitation of Meath, both church and state, and a banquet for every fort from Maelseachlainn himself; besides seven cumhals, and every other demand in full.

M985.5

Mor, daughter of Donnchadh, son of Ceallach, Queen of Ireland, died.

M985.6

Muirgheas, son of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Maine, was slain.

M985.7

A great contention at Ard-Macha, on the Sunday before Lammas, between the Ui-Eathach and the Ui-Niallain, wherein the son of Trenfhear, son of Celechan, and many others, were slain.

M985.8

The Danes came to the coast of Dal-Riada in three ships; seven score of them were hanged, and otherwise cut off; after they were defeated.

M985.9

Hi-Choluim-Chillem was plundered by the Danes on Christmas night; and they killed the abbot, and fifteen of the seniors of the church along with him.

M985.10

Cluain-mic-Nois was burned on the Friday night before Easter.

M985.11

Flathrui Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was slain by his own tribe.

M985.12

An army was led by the Leinstermen into Osraighe; and they plundered the north of Osraighe, and they slew there Riagan, son of Muireadhach, and the son of Cuiliun.

M985.13

Domhnall, son of Amhalgaidh, Tanist of Ulidia, died.

Annal M986.

M986.0

The Age of Christ, 986 rectè987.

M986.1

The eighth year of Maelseachlainn.

M986.2

Maelpadraig, Abbot of Ros-Cre;

M985.3

Caenchomhrac, son of Ainbhithe, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, died.

M986.4

Broen Ua hAedha, airchinneach of Eaglais-beg at Cluain-mic-Nois,


p.721

died.

M986.5

Ceallach, the holy virgin, died.

M986.6

Great and unusual wind, which prostrated many buildings and houses, and among others the oratory of Lughmhadh, and many other buildings.

M986.7

A great slaughter was made of the Danes who had plundered Hi, for three hundred and sixty of them were slain through the miracles of God and Colum-Cille.

M986.8

Preternatural (i.e. magical) sickness was brought on by demons in the east of Ireland, which caused mortality of men plainly before men's eyes.

M986.9

The commencement of the great murrain of cows, i.e. the strange Maelgarbh, which had never come before.

M986.10

An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Leinster, whence he carried off a great spoil of cows.

Annal M987.

M987.0

The Age of Christ, 987 rectè 988.

M987.1

The ninth year of Maelseachlainn.

M987.2

Dunchadh Ua Braein, Abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, a celebrated wise man and anchorite, died on the 17th of the Calends of February at Ard-Macha, at the end of the thirteenth year of his pilgrimage. He proposed to set out for Cluain every year, but different parties of the people of the church of Ard-Macha used to come at the end of each year to detain him; but they found no force able to detain him but the solicitation of the clergy, and he was wont to remain for them a year. He was the last that resuscitated the dead from death in Ireland. It is of him Eochaidh O'Flannagain, the most distinguished historian of Ireland, gave this testimony:

    1. The seat of Macha i.e. Queen Macha the treacherous, voluptuous, haughty,
      Is a psalm-singing house possessed by saints;
      There came not within the walls of her fort
      A being like unto Dunchadh O'Braein.


p.723

M987.3

Colum, airchinneach of Corcach, died; and Dubhdabhoireann, airchinneach of Both-Chonais, died.

M987.4

The men of Munster came in hosts upon Loch Ribh, and the foreigners of Port-Lairge. The Connaughtmen assembled to oppose them, and a battle was fought between them. A great number of the Munstermen and the foreigners were slaughtered by the Connaughtmen. Among the slain was Dunlaing, son of Dubhdabhoireann, royal heir of Munster, and many others along with him. Muirgheas, son of Conchobhar, royal heir of Connaught, was slain by them in the heat of the conflict.

M987.5

Laidhgnen, son of Cearbhall, lord of Fearnmhagh, was slain in the middle of Trian-Arda-Macha, by Fearghal, son of Conaing, lord of Oileach, and the Cinel-Eoghain.

M987.6

Conghalach Ua Cui-lennain, lord of Conaille and Ciarcaille, son of Cairellan, lord of North Breagha, mutually fell by each other.

M987.7

Conghal, son of Anrudhan, lord of Corca-Modh-ruadh, died.

Annal M988.

M988.0

The Age of Christ, 988 rectè989.

M988.1

The tenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M988.2

Dunchadh Ua Robhachain, successor of Colum-Cille and Adamnan;

M988.3

Loingseach, son of Maelpadraig, rector of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M988.4

Maelmoghna Ua Cairill, airchin-neach of Dun-Leathghlais;

M988.5

Cetfaidh, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair;

M988.6

and Mac-leighinn Ua Murchadhain,airchinneach of Cuil-rathain, died.

M988.7

Cairbre, son of Rian, died.

M988.8

Muireadhach Ua Cleirigh, lord of Aidhne, died.

M988.9

Echmhilidh, son of Ronan, lord of the Airtheara, was slain by the Conailli-Cerd.

M988.10

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall, lord of Luighne, died.

M988.11

The battle of Athcliath was gained over the foreigners by Maelseachlainn, in which many of the foreigners were slain by him. And he afterwards laid siege to the fortress for the space of


p.725

twenty nights, so that they drank no water during this time but the brine. At length they gave him his own full demand while he should be king, and an ounce of gold for every garden, to be paid on Christmas night, for ever.

M988.12

Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, went upon an expedition into Cinel-Eoghain, and lost Ua h-Aitidhe.

M988.13

Dubhdaleithe, successor of Patrick, assumed the successorship of Colum-Cille, by the advice of the men of Ireland and Alba.

M988.14

Gluiniarn, son of Amlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, was killed by his own slave through drunkenness; Colbain was the name of the slave.

M988.15

Gofraid son of Aralt lord of the Hebridies fell by the Dá Riada.

M988.16

Dun-Leathghlaissi was plundered and burned by the foreigners.

M988.17

Maelruanaidh, son of Donnchadh, died.

Annal M989.

M989.0

The Age of Christ, 989 rectè990.

M989.1

The eleventh year of Maelseachlainn.

M989.2

Cormac, son of Congaltach, successor of Brenainn of Birra, died.

M989.3

Aedh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died.

M989.4

The battle of Carn-Fordromas was gained by Maelseachlainn over the people of Thomond, wherein fell Domhnall, son of Lorcan, lord of Muscraighe-thire and Ui-Forggo, and six


p.727

hundred men along with him.

M989.5

Doire-Chalgaigh was plundered by the foreigners.

M989.6

An army of the foreigners, Danes, and Leinstermen marched into Meath, and they plundered as far as Loch Ainninn.

M989.7

Domhnall, son of Tuathal, was taken prisoner by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, King of Leinster.

M989.8

Donnchadh, King of Leinster, was taken prisoner by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, King of Ireland.

M989.9

Dubhdalethe, successor, assumed the successorship of Colum Cille, by advice of the men of Ireland and Alba.

Annal M990.

M990.0

The Age of Christ, 990 rectè 991.

M990.1

The twelfth year of Maelseachlainn.

M990.2

Duibhlitir Ua Bruadair, lector of Leithghlinn, died. It was of him this testimony was given:

    1. Duibhliter, the stronghold of perfect wisdom, the gifted respondent to every challenge;
      He was an adept in learning of various books, a flame of gold over noble Ireland.

M990.3

Ceallach, son of Cinaedh, Abbot of Imleach-Fia, i.e. Imleach-Becain, died.

M990.4

Donnchadh Ua Conghalaigh, royal heir of Teamhair, was treacherously slain at Comarchu, by the Clann-Colmain in particular, i.e. by Conchobhar, son of Cearbhall.

M990.5

Tadhg, son of Donnchadh, Tanist of Osraighe was slain by the men of Munster.

M990.6

Aedh Ua Ruairc, royal heir of Connaught, and Dubhdarach, Ua Fiachna, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M990.7

The wind sunk the island of Loch Cimbe suddenly, with its dreach and rampart, i.e. thirty feet.

M990.8

The Sinnach Ua Leochain, lord of Gaileanga, died.

M990.9

Donnsleibhe, son of Diarmaid, died.

M990.10

Ua Dunghalaigh, lord of Muscraighe, was slain.


p.729

Annal M991.

M991.0

The Age of Christ, 991 rectè 992.

M991.1

The thirteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M991.2

Diarmaid, rector of Cill-dara and Abbot of Cluain-eidhneach, died; of whom was said:

    1. Diarmaid, stronghold of noble wisdom, a man of generous fame, of great battle
      Pity, O king of the righteous laws, that death has now approached him.

M991.3

Maelpeadair Ua Tolaid, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta;

M991.4

and Mael-finnia, son of Spelan, successor of Ciaran, son of the artificer, died.

M991.5

Gillacom-main, son of Niall, lord of Ui-Diarmada; and Cuceanann, son of Tadhg, mutually fell by each other.

M991.6

Donn, son of Donnghal, son of Donncuan, was slain by his own people.

M991.7

An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Connaught; and he brought from thence a prey of cattle, the greatest that a king had ever brought. After this, Brian came with the men of Munster and Connaught into Meath, as far as Loch Ainninn; and he did not take a cow or person, but went off from thence by secret flight.

M991.8

Mor, daughter of Tadhg of the Tower, son of Cathal, Queen of Ireland, died.

Annal M992.

M992.0

The Age of Christ, 992.

M992.1

The fourteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M992.2

Mael-poil, Bishop of Mughain, died.

M992.3

Tuathal, son of Maelrubha, successor of Finnia, and successor of Mocholmoc, a wise man and governor, died.

M992.4

Macleighinn, son of Dunghalan, airchinneach of Dun-Leathghlaisi;

M992.5

Dunchadh, rector of Dun;

M992.6

Maelfinnia Ua hAenaigh, lector of Fobhar, and Bishop of Tuath-Luighne, died.

M992.7

Dunchadh Ua hUchtain, lector of Ceanannas, died.

M992.8

Domhnall and Flaithbheartach, two sons of Gillacoluim, son of Canannan, were slain.

M992.9

Ruaidhri, son of


p.731

Cosgrach, lord of South Connaught, was slain by Conchobhar, son of Mael-seachlainn, and by the son of Comhaltan Ua Cleirigh.

M992.10

Conchobhar, son of Cearbhall Ua Maelseachlainn, died after a good life.

M992.11

Maelruanaidh Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was slain by the men of Teathbha.

M992.12

Egnech Ua Leochain, lord of Tuath-Luighne, was slain by Maelseachlainn, and Cathal, son of Labbraidh.

M992.13

Cleircen, son of Maelduin, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by his own people.

M992.14

Muireagan of Both-Domhnaigh, successor of Patrick, went upon his visitation in Tir-Eoghain; and he conferred the degree of king upon Aedh, son of Domhnall, in the presence of Patrick's congregation, and he afterwards made a great visitation of the north of Ireland.

M992.15

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, King of Leinster, was ransomed from Maelseachlainn.

M992.16

A new fleet upon Loch-Ribh by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, who plundered the men of Breifne.

M992.17

Dunadhach, son of Diarmaid, lord of Corca-Bhaiscinn, died.

M992.18

A predatory incursion by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, so that they plundered Ard-Brecain, Domhnach-Padraig, and Muine-Brocain.

M992.19

The colour of fire was in the heavens till morning.

M992.20

Aedh, son of Echthighern, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died.

M992.21

Imhar was expelled from Ath-cliath through the intercession of the saints.

M992.22

Donn, son of Donnghal, lord of Teathbha, died.

M992.23

Ruaidhri Ua Gusang died.

M993.0

The Age of Christ, 993.

M993.1

The fifteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M993.2

Muirgheas, son of Muireadhach, Abbot of Mungairid.

M993.3

Fogartach, son of Diarmaid, son of Uathmharan, lord of Corca-Firtri in Connaught, was slain by the Gaileanga of Corann.

M993.4

Conghalach, son of Laidhgnen, i.e. Ua Gadhra, lord of Gaileanga, died.

M993.5

Maelcairearda,lord of Ui-Briuin;

M993.6

Aedh, son of Dubhghall, son of Donn-chadh, lord of Magh-Ithe, and royal heir of Oileach, died.

M993.7

Conn, son of Conghalach,


p.733

lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain.

M993.8

Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, was expelled from Dublin.

M993.9

Gillacele, son of Cearbhall, royal heir of Leinster, was slain by the son of Amhlaeibh.

M993.10

Muireagan of Both-Domhnaigh, successor of Patrick, was on his visitation in Tir-Eoghain, and he conferred the degree of king upon the son of Domhnall, in the presence of the congregation of Patrick, and made a great visitation of the north of Ireland.

Annal M994.

M994.0

The Age of Christ, 994.

M994.1

The sixteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M994.2

Rebachan, son of Dunchadh, airchinneach of Mungairid;

M994.3

Colla, Abbot and wise man of Inis-Cathaigh.

M994.4

Clerchen, son of Leran,priest of Ard-Macha,

M994.5

and Odhran Ua h-Eolais, scribe of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M994.6

Imhar came to Ath-cliath after Sitric, son of Amblaeibh.

M994.7

Domhnach-Padraig was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath and Muircheartach Ua Conghalaigh; but God took vengeance on him, for he died before the end of a month afterwards.

M994.8

Maelseachlainn burned Aenach-Thete, and plundered Urmhumhain, and routed before him Brian and the men of Munster in general.

M994.9

The ring of Tomar and the sword of Carlus were carried away by force, by Maelseachlainn, from the foreigners of Ath-cliath


p.735

M994.10

Raghnall was slain by the Leinstermen, i.e. by the son of Murchadh, son of Finn; and Imhar fled again from Ath-cliath, and Sitric took his place.

M994.11

Gilla-phadraig, son of Donncuan, lord of Teathbha, was slain.

M994.12

Maelmaire, son of Scannlan, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M995.

M995.0

The Age of Christ, 995.

M995.1

The seventeenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M995.2

Cormac Ua Conghaile, Abbot of Daimhinis, died.

M995.3

Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was killed by Donndubhan, son of Imhar, through treachery.

M995.4

Gillaphadraig, son of Donnchadh, lord of Osraighe, was killed by Donndubhan, son of Imhar, and by Domhnall, son of Faelan, lord of the Deisi. Donndubhan, son of Imhar, was afterwards slain by the Leinstermen, namely, by Cuduiligh, son of Cinaedh, one of the Ui-Failghe, at the end of a week, in revenge of Diarmaid, son of Domhnall.

M995.5

Domhnall, son of Faelan, lord of the Deisi, died.

M995.6

Ard-Macha was burned by lightning, both houses, churches, and cloictheacha, and its Fidh-neimedh, with all destruction. There came not in Ireland, since it was discovered, and there never will come till the day of judgment, a vengeance like it; of which was said:

    1. Five years, ninety, nine hundred, from birth of Christ, it is told,
      Till the burning of the city without sparing, of the great son of Calphrann, son of Oitidh.

M995.7

An army by the Conaille and Mughdhorna, and the north of Breagha, to Gleann-Righe; but they were overtaken by Aedh, son of Domhnall, lord of Oileach, who gave them battle, in which they were defeated, and the lord of Conaille, i.e. Matudhan Ua Croinghille, and two hundred along with him, were slain.

M995.8

A battle was gained over the men of Munster by Cathal and Muirgheas, the two sons of Ruaidhri, son of Coscrach, and by Ua Ceallaigh,


p.737

wherein many were slain; and Muirgheas, son of Ruaidhri, fell in the heat of the conflict.

M995.9

Gillapadraig, son of Flannagan, lord of Teathbha, was slain by Fiachra, son of Rodubh, chief of Muintir-Maelfhinna.

M995.10

Muircheartach Breag Ua Conghalaigh was slain.

M995.11

Mathghamhain, son of Cearbhall, lord of Ui-Dun-chadha, was slain at Ath-cliath by Maelmordha, son of Murchadh, in revenge of his father.

Annal M996.

M996.0

The Age of Christ, 996.

M996.1

The eighteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M996.2

Colman of Corcach, pillar of the dignity of Ireland;

M996.3

Conn Ua Laidhgnen, Abbot of Fearna;

M996.4

and Dubhthach Ua Tadhgain, i.e. the son of Duibhfinn, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M996.5

Ruaidhri, son of Niall Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died.

M996.6

A battle was gained over the Ui-Meith, at Sruthair, by the son of Donnchadh Finn and the Feara-Rois, wherein the lord of Ui-Meith and many others were slain.

M996.7

Cluain-Iraird and Ceanannus were plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M996.8

Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, royal heir of Oileach, died.

M996.9

Domhnall, son of Donnchadh Finn, was blinded by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall.

Annal M997.

M997.0

The Age of Christ, 997.

M997.1

The nineteenth year of Maelseachlainn.

M997.2

Conaing Ua Cosgraigh, distinguished Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M997.3

Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh;

M997.4

and Gillapadraig, son of Donnchadh, lord of Osraighe, died.

M997.5

Gilla-Ernain, son of Aghda, lord of Teathbha, was slain by the Sil-Ronain.

M997.6

Oissine Ua Machainen, lord of Mughdhorna, was slain by Maelseachlainn on Inis-Mocha.

M997.7

An army was led by Maelseachlainn and Brian, so that they obtained the hostages of the foreigners, to the joy of the Irish. Maelseachlainn, with the men of Meath, and Brian, with the men of Munster, collected immediately to Ath-cliath, and carried off the hostages and the best part of their jewels from them.

M997.8

Doire-Calgaich was plundered by the


p.739

foreigners.

M997.9

An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Connaught; and he plundered or burned Magh-Aei, and the son of the lord of Ciarraighe was lost by them.

M997.10

Imhar, with the foreigners, went on a predatory excursion into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, where they lost the great part of their horses, and some of their army.

Annal M998.

M998.0

The Age of Christ, 998.

M998.1

The twentieth year of Maelseachlainn.

M998.2

Dubh-daleithe, son of Ceallach, successor of Patrick and Colum-Cille, died on the 2nd of June, in the eighty-third year of his age.

M998.3

Cill-dara was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M998.4

Niall, son of Aghda, royal heir of Teathbha, was slain by the Calraighi, at Cluain-mic-Nois, on the festival of Ciaran.

M998.5

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, was taken prisoner by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, and by Maelmordha, son of Murchadh.

M998.6

Diarmaid, son of Dunadhach, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by the son of Comhaltan Ua Clei-righ, lord of Aidhne.

M998.7

A battle between the Oirghialla and Conailli, in which fell Gillachrist Ua Cuilennain, lord of Conailli, and many others along with him.

M998.8

Maelseachlainn Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Creamhthainn, was slain by the Ui-Ceallaigh.

M998.9

The plundering of Ui-Eathach by Aedh, son of Domhnall, so that he carried off a great cattle spoil; and this was called the great prey of Magh-Cobha.

M998.10

The stone of Lia Ailbhe fell (and Magh-Ailbhe was the chief fort of Magh-Breagh), and four mill-stones were made of it by Maelseachlainn.

M998.11

An army was led by the king, Maelseachlainn, and by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, to Gleann Mama. The foreigners of Ath-cliath came to attack them, but the


p.741

foreigners were routed and slaughtered, together with Aralt, son of Amhlaeibh, and Cuilen, son of Eitigen, and other chiefs of Ath-cliath; and many of the foreigners were cut off in this conflict. After this Maelseachlainn and Brian proceeded to Ath-cliath, where they remained for a full week, and carried off its gold, silver, and prisoners. They burned the fortress, and expelled the lord of the foreigners, namely, Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh. To predict this battle was said:
    1. They shall come to Gleann-Mama,
      It will not be water over hands,
      Persons shall drink a deadly draught
      Around the stone at Claen-Conghair.
      From the victorious overthrow they shall retreat,
      Till they reach past the wood northwards,
      And Ath-cliath the fair shall be burned,
      After the ravaging the Leinster plain.

M998.12

Mac-Egnigh, son of Dalach, lord of Airghialla, was slain by the son of Ua Ruairc.

M998.13

The son of Dunadhach, son of Gadhra, was slain.

M998.14

Dunghal, son of Cinaedh, was slain by Gillacaeimhghin, son of Cinaedh.

Annal M999.

M999.0

The Age of Christ, 999.

M999.1

The twenty-ninth year of Maelseachlainn.

M999.2

Diarmaid, i.e. Conaillech, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M999.3

Flaithbheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by his own tribe.

M999.4

Ua Domhnall, i.e. Cuchaill, lord of Durlas, was slain by Ua Neill, i.e. by Aedh.

M999.5

Muirgheas,


p.743

son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Diarmada, was slain by his own people.

M999.6

Ceallach Ua Maelcorghais, chief poet of Connaught, died.

M999.7

Imhar of Port Lairge died.

M999.8

The foreigners again at Ath-cliath, and their hostages to Brian.

M999.9

Aedh Ua Ciardha was blinded by his brother, i.e. Ualgharg Ua Ciardha.

M999.10

A great hosting by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, with the chiefs and forces of South Connaught, with the men of Osraighe and Leinster, and with the foreigners of Ath-cliath, to proceed to Teamhair; but the foreigners set out before them, with a plundering party of cavalry, into Magh Breagh, where Maelseachlainn opposed them; and a spirited battle was fought between them, in which the foreigners were defeated, and only a few of them escaped. Brian afterwards proceeded to Fearta-neimbeadh in Magh-Breagh, but returned back without battle, without plundering, without burning. This was the first turning of Brian and the Connaughtmen against Maelseachlainn.

Annal M1000.

M1000.0

The Age of Christ, 1000.

M1000.1

The twenty-second year of Maelseachlainn.

M1000.2

Maelpoil, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois, and successor of Feichin;

M999.3

and Flaithemh, Abbot of Corcach, died.

M1000.4

Fearghal, son of Conaing, lord of Oileach, died.

M1000.5

Dubhdara Ua Maelduin, lord of Feara-Luirg, was slain.

M1000.6

Laidhgnen Ua Leog-gan was slain by the Ulidians.

M1000.7

Niall Ua Ruairc was slain by the Cinel-Conaill


p.745

and Hugh Ua Neill.

M1000.8

Ceannfaeladh, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Conaill Gabhra, and Righbhardan, son of Dubhcron, died.

M1000.9

A great depredation by the men of Munster in the south of Meath, on the Nones of January; but Aenghus, son of Carrach, with a few of his people, overtook them, so that they left behind the spoils and a slaughter of heads with him.

M1000.10

The causeway of Ath-Luain was made by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, and by Cathal, son of Conchobhar.

M1000.11

The causeway of Ath-liag was made by Maelseachlainn to the middle of the river.

M1000.12

Diarmaid Ua Lachtnain, lord of Teathbha, was killed by his own people.

Annal M1001.

M1001.0

The Age of Christ, 1001.

M1001.1

The twenty-third year of Maelseachlainn.

M1001.2

Colum, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair, died.

M1001.3

Treinfher, son of Celecan, Prior of Ard-Macha, was slain.

M1001.4

Conaing Ua Fiachrach, Abbot of Teach-Mochua;

M1001.5

Cele, son of Suibhne, Abbot of Slaine;

M1001.6

Cathalan Ua Corcrain, Abbot of Daimhinis;

M1001.7

Maenach, Ostiarius of Ceanannus;

M1001.8

and Flann, son of Eoghan, chief Brehon of Leath-Chuinn, died.

M1001.9

Maelmhuaidh, son of Duibhghilla, lord of Dealbhna-Beathra, died.

M1001.10

Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, set out on a predatory excursion into Ulidia, in his ships; and he plundered Cill-cleithe and Inis-Cumhscraigh, and carried off many prisoners from both.

M1001.11

An army was led by Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, to Tailltin; but he returned back in peace and tranquillity.

M1001.12

Connaught was plundered by Aedh, son of Domhnall.

M1001.13

Cearnachan, son of Flann, lord of Luighne, went upon a predatory excursion into Fearnmhagh; and he was killed by Muircheartach Ua Ciardha, Tanist of Cairbre.

M1001.14

A hosting by Brian, with the foreigners, Leinstermen, and Munstermen, to Ath-Luain, so


p.747

that he weakened the Ui-Neill of the South and the Connaughtmen, and took their hostages. After this Brian and Maelseachlainn, accompanied by the men of Ireland, as well Meathmen, Connaughtmen, Munstermen, and Leinstermen, as the foreigners, proceeded to Dun-Dealgan, in Conaille-Muirtheimhne. Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, and Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, with the Ulidians, Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, and Airghialla, repaired to the same place to meet them, and did not permit them to advance further, so that they separated in peace, without hostages or booty, spoils or pledges.

M1001.15

Meirleachan, i.e. the son of Conn, lord of Gaileanga, and Brodubh, i.e. the son of Diarmaid, were slain by Maelseachlainn.

M1001.16

A change of abbots at Ard-Macha, i e. Maelmuire, son of Eochaidh, in the place of Muireagan, of Both-Domhnaigh.

M1001.17

An army was led by Brian to Ath-cliath; and he received the hostages of Meath and Connaught.

Annal M1002.

M1002.0

The Age of Christ, 1002.

M1002.1

The first year of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, son of Lorcan, in sovereignty over Ireland. Seventy-six years was his age at that time.

M1002.2

Dunchadh Ua Manchain, successor of Caeimhghin;

M1002.3

Flannchadh Ua Ruaidhine, successor of Ciaran, son of the artificer, of the tribe of Corca-Mogha;

M1002.4

Eoghan, son of Ceallach, airchinneach of Ard-Breacain; and

M1002.5

Donnghal, son of Beoan, Abbot of Tuaim-Greine, died.

M1002.6

A great depredation by Donnchadh, son of Donnchadh Finn, and the Ui-Meith, and they plundered Lann-Leire; but Cathal, son of Labhraidh, and the men of Breagha, overtook and defeated them, and they left behind their booty; and they were afterwards slaughtered or led captive, together with Sinnach Ua hUarghusa, lord of Ui-Meith. Cathal, son of Labhraidh, and Lorcan, son of Brotaidh, fell fighting


p.749

face to face.

M1002.7

Donnghal, son of Donncothaigh, lord of Gaileanga, was slain by Trotan, son of Bolgargait (or Tortan, son of Bolgargait), son of Maelmordha, lord of Feara-Cul, in his own house.

M1002.8

Ceallach, son of Diarmaid, lord of Osraighe, was slain by Donnchadh, son of Gillaphadraig, the son of his father's brother.

M1002.9

Aedh, son of O'Coinfhiacla, lord of Teathbha, was slain by the Ui Conchille.

M1002.10

Conchobhar, son of Maelseachlainn, lord of Corca-Modhruadh; and Aicher Ua Traighthech, with many others, were slain by the men of Umhall.

M1002.11

Aedh, son of Echthighern, was slain in the oratory of Fearna-mor-Maedhog, by Mael-na-mbo.

M1003.0

The Age of Christ, 1003.

M1003.1

The second year of Brian.

M1003.2

Aenghus, son of Breasal, successor of Cainneach, died on his pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1003.3

Dubhshlaine Ua Lorcain, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair, died.

M1003.4

Eochaidh Ua Flannagain, airchinneach of the Lis-aeidheadh of Ard-Macha, and of Cluain-Fiachna, the most distinguished historian of the Irish, died.

M1003.5

An army was led by Brian and Maelseachlainn into North Connaught, as far as Traigh-Eothaile, to proceed around Ireland; but they were prevented by the Ui-Neill of the North.

M1003.6

Domhnall, son of Flannagan, lord of Feara-Li, died.

M1003.7

Iarnan, son of Finn, son of


p.751

Duibhghilla, was slain by Corc, son of Aedh, son of Duibhghilla, in the doorway of the oratory of Gailinne, by treachery. Two of his own people slew this Corc immediately, by which the name of God and Mochonog was magnified.

M1003.8

Brian, son of Maelruanaidh, lord of West Connaught, was slain by his own people.

M1003.9

The two O'Canannains were slain by O'Maeldoraidh.

M1003.10

Muireadhach, son of Diarmaid, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, died.

M1003.11

Naebhan, son of Maelchiarain, chief artificer of Ireland, died.

M1003.12

The battle of Craebh-tulcha, between the Ulidians and the Cinel-Eoghain, in which the Ulidians were defeated. In this battle were slain Eochaidh, son of Ardghair, King of Ulidia, and Dubhtuinne, his brother; and the two sons of Eochaidh, i.e. Cuduiligh and Domhnall; Gairbhidh, lord of Ui-Eathach; Gillapadraig, son of Tomaltach; Cumuscach, son of Flathrai; Dubhshlangha, son of Aedh; Cathal, son of Etroch; Conene, son of Muircheartach; and the most part of the Ulidians in like manner; and the battle extended as far as Dun-Eathach and Druim-bo. Donnchadh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, and royal heir of Ulidia, was slain on the following day by the Cinel-Eoghain. Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, lord of Oileach, and heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the heat of the conflict, in the fifteenth year of his reign, and the twenty-ninth of his age.

M1003.13

A battle between Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh with the Ui-Maine, and the men of West Meath assisting the Ui-Maine on the one side, and the Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne aided by West Connaught on the other, wherein fell Gillaceallaigh, son of Comhaltan Ua Cleirigh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach; Conchobhar, son of Ubban; Ceannfaeladh, son of Ruaidhri, and many others. Finn, son of Marcan, Tanist of Ui-Maine, fell in the heat of the conflict.

M1003.14

Domhnall, son of Flannagan, died.

M1003.15

Madadhan, son of Aenghus, chief of Gaileanga-Beaga and Feara-Cul, was slain.


p.753

Annal M1004.

M1004.0

The Age of Christ, 1004.

M1004.1

The third year of Brian.

M1004.2

Domhnall, son of Maicniadh, Abbot of Mainstir-Buithe, a bishop and holy senior, died.

M1004.3

St. Aedh, lector of Frefoit, bishop, wise man, and pilgrim, died after a good life at Ard-Macha, with great honour and veneration. In lamentation of him was said:

    1. The wise man, the archbishop,
      The saint of God of comely face,—
      Apostleship has departed from us,
      Since Aedh departed from the side of Teamhair,
      Since Aedh of sweet Breaghmhagh liveth not,
      Of bright renown, in sweet verses sung;
      A loss is the gem, shining and pleasant,
      The learning of Ireland has perished in him.

M1004.4

Maelbrighde Ua Rimheadha, Abbot of Ia, died.

M1004.5

Domhnall, son of Niall, Abbot of Cill-Lamhraighe, died.

M1004.6

Foghartach, Abbot of Leithghlinn and Saighir, died.

M1004.7

Muireadhach, lord of Conaille, was slain by the Mughdhorna.

M1004.8

Gillacomhghaill, son of Ardghar, and his son, and two hundred along with them, were slain by Maelruanaidh, son of Ardghar, contending for the kingdom of Ulidia.

M1004.9

A hosting by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, with the men of the south of Ireland, into Cinel-Eoghain and Ulidia, to demand hostages. They proceeded through Meath, where they remained a night at Tailltin. They afterwards marched northwards, and remained a week at Ard-Macha; and Brian left twenty ounces of gold as an offering upon the altar of Ard-Macha. After that they went into Dal-Araidhe, and carried off the pledges of the Dal-Araidhe and Dal-Fiatach in general.

M1004.10

Ingeirci, lord of Conailli, was slain.

M1004.11

Ath-cliath was burned by the people of South Breagha, by secrecy.

M1004.12

Leath-Chathail was plundered by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill; and Aedh, son of Tomaltach, lord of


p.755

Leath-Chathail, was slain by him.

M1004.13

A battle was gained at Loch-Bricrenn, by Flaithbheartach, over the Ui-Eathach and the Ulidians,where Artan, royal heir of Ui-Eathach, was slain.

Annal M1005.

M1005.0

The Age of Christ, 1005.

M1005.1

The fourth year of Brian.

M1005.2

Finghin, Abbot of Ros-Cre, died.

M1005.3

Dunchadh, son of Dunadhach, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, and its anchorite afterwards, head of its rule and history, died; he was the senior of the race of Conn-na-mbocht.

M1005.4

Maelruanaidh, son of Aedh Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Muirisge, and his son, i.e. Maelseachlainn, and his brother, i.e. Gebhennach, son of Aedh, died.

M1005.5

A great prey was made by Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Aileach, in Conaille-Muirtheimhne; but Maelseachlainn, King of Teamhair, overtook him and his party, and they lost two hundred men by killing and capturing, together with the lord of Ui-Fiachrach Arda-sratha.

M1005.6

Cathal, son of Dunchadh, lord of Gaileanga-Mora, was slain.

M1005.7

Echmhilidh Ua hAitidhe, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by the Ulidians themselves.

Extract from the Book of Cluain-mic-Nois, and the Book of the Island, i.e. the Island of the Saints, in Loch Ribh.

A great army was led by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, into Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, to demand hostages. The route they took was through the middle of Connaught, over Eas-Ruaidh, through the middle of Tir-Conaill, through Cinel-Eoghain, over Feartas Camsa, into Dal-Riada, into Dal-Araidhe, into Ulidia, into Conaille-Muirtheimhne; and they arrived, about Lammas, at Bealach-duin. The Leinstermen then proceeded southwards across Breagha


p.757

to their territory, and the foreigners by sea round eastwards southwards? to their fortress. The Munstermen also and the Osraighi went through Meath westwards to their countries. The Ulidians rendered hostages on this occasion; but they Brian Borumha and his party did not obtain the hostages of the races of Conall and Eoghan.

M1005.9

Mael-na-mbo, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was killed by his own tribe.

M1005.10

Maelruanaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, was slain by Madadhan, son of Domhnall, after being one-half year in the government of the province. Madadhan, son of Domhnall, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Torc, i.e. Dubhtuinne, in the middle of Dun-Leathghlaise, in violation of the guarantees of the saints of Ireland. Dubhtuinne, i.e. the Torc, King of Ulidia, was slain, through the miracles of God and Patrick, by Muireadhach, son of Madadhan, in revenge of his father.

M1005.11

Muiregen Bocht, of Both-Domhnaigh, successor of Patrick, died; seventy years his age.

Annal M1006.

M1006.0

The Age of Christ, 1006.

M1006.1

The fifth year of Brian.

M1006.2

Ceannfaeladh, airchinneach of Druim-mor-Mocholmog;

M1006.3

Caicher, son of Maenach, Abbot of Mungairid;

M1006.4

and Ceallach Ua Meanngorain, airchinneach of Corcach, died.

M1006.5

Fiachra Ua Focarta, priest of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, died. Of him was said:

    1. Of all I traversed of Ireland,
      Both field and church,
      I did not get cold or want,
      Till I reached the fair Cluain-fearta.
      O Christ, we would not have parted in happiness,
      Were it not for Fiachra of the sweet language.

M1006.6

Tuathal Ua Maoilmacha, a learned man, and comharba of Patrick in Munster;

M1006.7

and Robhartach Ua hAilghiusa, anchorite of Cluain-mic-Nois, died; he was of the tribe of Breaghmhaine.

M1006.8

Trenfhear Ua Baigheallain, lord of Dartraighe,


p.759

was slain by the Cinel-Conaill on Loch-Eirne.

M1006.9

Cuconnacht, son of Dunadhaigh, chief of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by Murchadh, son of Brian Borumha. Ua Dunghalaigh, lord of Muscraighe-thire, slew him in the vicinity of Lothra.

M1006.10

Muireadhach, son of Crichan, resigned the successorship of Colum Cille for the sake of God.

M1006.11

The renewal of the fair of Tailltin by Maelseachlainn; and Feardomhnach was appointed to the successorship of Colum Cill, by advice of the men of Ireland.

M1006.12

The Great Gospel of Colum Cille was stolen at night from the western Erdomh of the great church of Ceanannus. This was the principal relic of the western world, on account of its singular cover; and it was found after twenty nights and two months, its gold having been stolen off it, and a sod over it.

M1006.13

An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill into Ulidia, and carried off seven hostages from them, and slew the lord of Leath-Chathail, i.e. Cuuladh, son of Aenghus.

M1006.14

Domhnall, son of Dubhtuinne, King of Ulidia, was slain by Muireadhach, son of Madudhan, and Uarghaeth of Sliabh Fuaid.

M1006.15

Airmeadhach, son of Cosgrach, Bishop and scribe of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M1007.

M1007.0

The Age of Christ, 1007.

M1007.1

The sixth year of Brian.

M1007.2

Muireadhach, a distinguished bishop, son of the brother of Ainmire Bocht, was suffocated in a cave, in Gaileanga of Corann.

M1007.3

Feardomhnach, successor of Colum Cille in Kells and Fachtna successor of Finnen of Cluain-Iraird, died.

M1007.4

Finshnechta Ua Fiachra, Abbot of Teach-Mochua;

M1007.5

and Tuathal O'Conchobhair, successor of Finntan, died.

M1007.6

Maelmaire Ua Gearagain, successor of Cainneach; and Ceileachair, son of Donncuan, son of Ceinneidigh, Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas, died.

M1007.7

A victory was gained by Aenghus, son of Carrach, over the Feara-Ceall, wherein fell Demon Gatlach Ua Maelmhuaidh.

M1007.8

Great frost and


p.761

snow from the eighth of the Ides of January till Easter.

M1007.9

Muireadhach, son of Dubhtuinne, King of Ulidia, was slain.

Annal M1008.

M1008.0

The Age of Christ, 1008.

M1008.1

The seventh year of Brian.

M1008.2

Cathal, son of Carlus, successor of Cainneach;

M1008.3

Maelmuire Ua hUchtain, comharba of Ceanannus, died.

M1008.4

Echthighearn Ua Goirmghilla, died.

M1008.5

Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of the King of Connaught, and wife of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, died.

M1008.6

Tadhg Dubhshuileach, son of the King of Connaught, was slain by the Conmaicni.

M1008.7

Gussan, son of Ua Treassach, lord of Ui-Bairrche, died.

M1008.8

Madudhan, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by his brother.

M1008.9

An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill against the men of Breagha, and carried off a great cattle spoil.

M1008.10

A battle was gained over the Conmaicni by the men of Breifne. A battle was gained over the men of Breifne by the Connaughtmen.

M1008.11

Clothna, son of Aenghus, chief poet of Ireland in his time, died.

M1008.12

Gusan, son of Treasach, lord of Ui-Bairche, died.

Annal M1009.

M1009.0

The Age of Christ, 1009 rectè 1010.

M1009.1

The eighth year of Brian.

M1009.2

Conaing, son of Aedhagan, a bishop, died at Cluain-mic-Nois; he was of the tribe of the Mughdhorna-Maighen.

M1009.3

Crunnmhael, a bishop, died.

M1009.4

Scannlan Ua Dunghalain, Abbot of Dun-Leathghlaise, was blinded.

M1009.5

Diarmaid, successor of Bearrach;

M1009.6

Muireadhach, son of Mochloingseach, airchinneach of Mucnamh;

M1009.7

Maelsuthain Ua Cearbhaill, one of the family of Inis-Faithleann, chief doctor of the western world in his time, and lord of Eoghanacht of Loch-Lein, died after a good life.

M1009.8

Marcan, son of Ceinneidigh, head of the clergy of Munster, died. The comharba of Colum, son of Crimhthainn, i.e. of Tir-da-ghlas, Innis-Cealtra and Cill-Dalua, died.

M1009.9

Cathal, son of Conchobhar, King of Connaught, died after penance; he was the grandson of Tadhg of the Tower.

M1009.10

Dearbhail,


p.763

daughter of Tadhg, son of Cathal, died.

M1009.11

Cathal, son of Dubhdara, lord of Feara-Manach, died.

M1009.12

Muireadhach Ua hAedha, lord of Muscraighe, died.

M1009.13

An army was led by Brian to Claenloch of Sliabh-Fuaid, and he obtained the hostages of the Cinel-Eoghain and Ulidians.

M1009.14

Aedh, son of Conn, royal heir of Oileach; and Donncuan, lord of Mughdhorna, were slain.

Annal M1010.

M1010.0

The Age of Christ, 1010 rectè 1011.

M1010.1

The ninth year of Brian.

M1010.2

Muireadhach, son of Crichan, successor of Colum-Cille and Adamnan, a learned man, bishop, and virgin, rector of Ard-Macha, and intended successor of Patrick, died after the seventy-fourth year of his age, on the fifth of the Calends of January, on Saturday night precisely; and he was buried with great honour and veneration in the great church of Ard-Macha, before the altar.

M1010.3

Flann Ua Donnchadha, successor of Oenna, died.

M1010.4

Flaithbheartach Ua Cethenen,successor of Tighearnach, a venerable senior and distinguished bishop, was mortally wounded by the men of Breifne; and he afterwards died in his own church at Cluain-Eois.

M1010.5

Dubhthach, son of Iarnan, airchinneach of Dearmhach;

M1010.6

Dalach of Disert-Tola, successor of Feichin and Tola, and a distinguished scribe;

M1010.7

and Fachtna, successor of Finnen of Cluain-Iraird, died.

M1010.8

An army was led by Brian to Magh-Corrann, and he took with him the lord of Cinel-Conaill, i.e. Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh, in obedience, to Ceann-Coradh.

M1010.9

Maelruanaidh Ua Domhnaill, lord of Cinel-Luighdheach, was slain by the men


p.765

of Magh-Ithe.

M1010.10

Oenghus Ua Lapain, lord of Cinel-Enda, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain of the Island.

M1010.11

Murchadh, son of Brian, with the men of Munster, the Leinstermen, with the Ui-Neill of the South, and Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Oileach, with the soldiers of the North, to plunder Cinel-Luighdheach, and they carried off three hundred and a great prey of cattle.

M1010.12

Domhnall, son of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, son of the king of Ireland, died.

M1010.13

An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill to Dun-Eathach; and he burned the fortress, and demolished the town, and he carried off pledges from Niall, son of Dubhthuinne.

M1010.14

Aedh, son of Mathghamhain, royal heir of Caiseal, died.

M1010.15

Faelan, son of Dunlaing lord of Ui-Buidhe, died.

Annal M1011.

M1011.0

The Age of Christ, 1011 rectè 1012.

M1011.1

The tenth year of Brian.

M1011.2

A great malady, namely, lumps and griping, at Ard-Macha, from Allhallowtide till May, so that a great number of the seniors and students died, together with Ceannfaeladh of Sabhall, bishop, anchorite, and pilgrim; Maelbrighde Mac-an-Ghobhann, lector of Ard-Macha; and Scolaighe, son of Clercen, a noble priest of Ard-Macha. These and many others along with them died of this sickness.

M1011.3

Martin, Abbot of Lughmhadh;

M1011.4

Cian, successor of Cainneach;

M1011.5

Caenchomrac Ua Scannlain, airchinneach of Daimhinis;

M1011.6

Maclonain, Abbot of Ros-Cre;

M1011.7

and Connmhach Ua Tomhrair, priest and chief singer of Cluain-mic-Nois,died.

M1011.8

An army was led by Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach, into Cinel-Conaill, until he arrived at Magh-Cedne; he carried off a great prey of cows, and returned safe to his house. An army was led by Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach, a second time into Cinel-Conaill, until he reached Druim-cliabh and Tracht-Eothaile, where Niall, son of Gillaphadraig, son of Fearghal, was slain, and


p.767

Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh was defeated; but no other one was lost there. An army was led, in their absence, by Maelseachlainn into Tir-Eoghain, as far as Magh-da-ghabhal, which they burned; they preyed as far as Tealach-Oog, and, having obtained spoils, they returned back to his house. An army was afterwards led by Flaithbheartach, till he arrived at Ard-Uladh, so that the whole of the Ardes was plundered by him; and he bore off from thence spoils the most numerous that a king had ever borne, both prisoners and cattle without number.

M1011.9

A battle was gained over Niall, son of Dubhtuinne, i.e. the battle of the Mullachs, by Niall, son of Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, where many were slain, together with Muircheartach, son of Artan, Tanist of Ui-Eathach; and he afterwards deposed Niall, son of Dubhthuinne.

M1012.10

Ailell, son of Gebhennach, royal heir of Ui-Maine, died.

M1011.11

Crinan, son of Gormladh, lord of Conaille, was killed by Cucuailgne.

Annal M1012.

M1012.0

The Age of Christ, 1012.

M1012.1

The twelfth year of Brian.

M1012.2

Mac-Maine, son of Cosgrach, comharba of Cill-Dalua, died.

M1012.3

The Prior of Saighir was killed.

M1012.4

Cian Ua Geargain, successor of Cainneach, and

M1012.5

Dearbhail, daughter of Conghalach, son of Maelmithigh, i.e. daughter of the King of Ireland, died.

M1012.6

Domhnall, i.e. the Cat, royal heir of Connaught, was killed by Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh; and Magh-Aei was totally plundered and burned by him, after defeating and slaughtering the Connaughtmen.

M1012.7

A great depredation was committed by Ualgharg Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, and the son of Niall O'Ruairc, and the men of Teathbha in Gaileanga; but a few good men of the household of Maelseachlainn overtook them, and being at that time intoxicated after drinking, they imprudently gave them battle, through pride. There were


p.769

slain in it Donnchadh, son of Maelseachlainn; Dubhtaichligh Ua Maelchallann, lord of Dealbhna Beag; Donnchadh, son of Donnchadh Finn, royal heir of Teamhair; Cearnachan, son of Flann, lord of Luighne; Seanan Ua Leochain, lord of Gaileanga; and many others along with them. Maelseachlainn after-wards overtook them with his forces, and the spoils were left behind to him; and Ualgharg Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, and many others besides them, were slain.

M1012.8

Great forces were led by Maelseachlainn into the territory of the foreigners, and he burned the country as far as Edar; but Sitric and Maelmordha overtook one of his preying parties, and slew two hundred of them, together with Flann, son of Maelseachlainn; the son of Lorcan, son of Echthigern, lord of Cinel-Meachair; and numbers of others. This was the defeat of Draighnen; in commemoration of which this quatrain was composed:

    1. Not well on Monday on the expedition did the Meathmen go to overrun;
      The foreigners, it was heard, were joyful of the journey at the Draighnen.

M1012.9

An army was led by Flaithbheartach, lord of Aileach, to Maighen-Attaed, by the son of Ceanannus; and Maelseachlainn left the hill undisputed to him.

M1012.10

Gillamochonna, son of Foghartach, lord of South Breagha, plunderer of the foreigners, and flood of the glory of the east of Ireland, died.

M1012.11

A depredation by Murchadh, son of Brian, in Leinster; he plundered the country as far as Gleann-da-locha and Cill-Maighneann, and burned the whole country, and carried off great spoils and innumerable prisoners.

M1012.12

A great fleet of the foreigners arrived in Munster, so that they burned Corcach; but God immediately took vengeance of them for that deed, for Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric, i.e. the son of the lord of the foreigners, and Mathghamhain, son of Dubhghall, and many others, were slain by Cathal, son of Domhnall, son of Dubhdabhoireann.

M1012.13

Muircheartach, son of Aedh O'Neill, was slain by the Dal-Riada, with a number of others along with him.

M1012.14

A great war between the foreigners and the Gaeidhil.

M1012.15

An army was led by Brian to Ath-an-chairthinn, and he there encamped, and laid siege to the foreigners for three months.

M1012.16

Many fortresses were erected by


p.771

Brian, namely, Cathair-Cinn-coradh, Inis-Gaill-duibh, and Inis-Locha-Saighleann, &c.

M1012.17

The Leinstermen and foreigners were at war with Brian; and Brian encamped at Sliabh Mairge, to defend Munster; and Leinster was plundered by him as far as Ath-cliath.

M1012.18

A great depredation upon the Conailli by Maelseachlainn, in revenge of the profanation of the Finnfaidheach, and of the breaking of Patrick's crozier by the Conailli, i.e. by the sons of Cucuailgne.

M1013.0

The Age of Christ, 1013 rectè 1014.

M1013.1

Ronan, successor of Fechin;

M1013.2

Flaithbheartach, son of Domhnall, i.e. of the Clann-Colmain, successor of Ciaran and Finnen;

M1013.3

and Conn Ua Diugraidh, successor of Caeimhghin, died.

M1013.4

Cairbre Fial, son of Cathal, anchorite of Gleann-da-locha,

M1013.5

and Naemhan Ua Seinchinn, died; these were both anchorites.

M1013.6

Dunlang, son of Tuathal, King of Leinster, died.

M1013.7

Cairbre, son of Cleirchen, lord of Ui Fidhgeinte, was treacherously slain by Maelcoluim Caenraigheach.

M1013.8

A battle between the


p.773

Ui-Eathach themselves, i.e. between Cian, son of Maelmhuaidh, and Domhnall, son of Dubh-da-bhoireann, in which were slain Cian, Cathal, and Roghallach, three sons of Maelmhuaidh, with a great slaughter along with them.

M1013.9

An army was led by Donnchadh, son of Brian, to the south of Ireland; and he slew Cathal, son of Domhnall, and carried off hostages from Domhnall.

M1013.10

An army was led by the foreigners and Leinstermen into Meath, and afterwards into Breagha; and they plundered Tearmonn-Feichine, and carried off many captives and countless cattle.

M1013.11

An army was led by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, son of Lorcan, King of Ireland, and by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, King of Teamhair, to Ath-cliath. The foreigners of the west of Europe assembled against Brian and Maelseachlainn; and they took with them ten hundred men with coats of mail. A spirited, fierce, violent, vengeful, and furious battle was fought between them, the likeness of which was not to be found in that time,—at Cluaintarbh, on the Friday before Easter precisely. In this battle were slain Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, monarch of Ireland, who was the Augustus of all the West of Europe, in the eighty-eighth year of his age; Murchadh, son of Brian, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, in the sixty-third year of his age; Conaing, son of Donncuan, the son of Brian's brother; Toirdhealbhach, son of Murchadh, son of Brian; Mothla, son of Domhnall, son of Faelan, lord of the Deisi-Mumhan;


p.775

Eocha, son of Dunadhach, i.e. chief of Clann-Scannlain; Niall Ua Cuinn; Cuduiligh, son of Ceinneidigh, the three companions of Brian; Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui Maine; Maelruanaidh na Paidre Ua hEidhin, lord of Aidhne; Geibheannach, son of Dubhagan, lord of Feara-Maighe; Mac-Beatha, son of Muireadhach Claen, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra; Domhnall, son of Diarmaid, lord of Corca-Bhaiscinn; Scannlan, son of Cathal, lord of Eoghanacht-Locha Lein; and Domhnall, son of Eimhin, son of Cainneach, great steward of Mair in Alba. The forces were afterwards routed by dint of battling,

p.777

bravery, and striking, by Maelseachlainn, from Tulcainn to Ath-cliath, against the foreigners and the Leinstermen; and there fell Maelmordha, son of Murchadh, son of Finn, King of Leinster; the son of Brogarbhan, son of Conchobhar, Tanist of Ui-Failghe; and Tuathal, son of Ugaire, royal heir of Leinster; and a countless slaughter of the Leinstermen along with them. There were also slain Dubhghall, son of Amhlaeibh, and Gillaciarain, son of Gluniairn, two tanists of the foreigners; Sichfrith, son of Loder, Earl of Innsi hOrc; Brodar, chief of the Danes of Denmark, who was the person that slew Brian. The ten hundred in armour were cut to pieces, and at the least three thousand of the

p.779

foreigners were there slain. It was of the death of Brian and of this battle the following quatrain was composed:
    1. Thirteen years, one thousand complete, since Christ was born, not long since the date,
      Of prosperous years—accurate the enumeration—until the foreigners were slaughtered together with Brian.
Maelmuire, son of Eochaidh, successor of Patrick, proceeded with the seniors and relics to Sord-Choluim-Chille; and they carried from thence the body of

p.781

Brian, King of Ireland, and the body of Murchadh, his son, and the head of Conaing, and the head of Mothla. Maelmuire and his clergy waked the bodies with great honour and veneration; and they were interred at Ard-Macha in a new tomb.

M1013.12

A battle between the two sons of Brian, i.e. Donnchadh and Tadhg. Donnchadh was defeated, and Ruaidhri Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh, and many others along with him, fell in the battle.

M1013.13

An army was led by Ua Maeldoraidh and O'Ruairc into Magh-Aei; and they slew Domhnall, son of Cathal, and plundered the plain, and carried off the hostages of Connaught.

Annal M1014.

M1014.0

The Age of Christ, 1014 rectè 1015.

M1014.1

The first year of Maelseachlainn Mor, son of Domhnall over Ireland, after the killing of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh.

M1014.2

Ronan, successor of Fechin;

M1014.3

Colum Ua Flannagain, Abbot of Maein-Choluim-Chille;

M1014.4

and Conaing, son of Finn, Abbot of Doire-mor and Liath-Mochaemhog, died.

M1014.5

Muircheartach Ua Lorcain, airchinneach of Lothra, died.

M1014.6

Niall, son of Dearggan, airchinneach of Mungairit, was killed.

M1014.7

Donnghal Macua Chantene, airchinneach of Tir-da-ghlas, died.

M1014.8

Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach Ua Neill, was slain by Conchobhar Ua Domhnallain, lord of Ui-Tuirtre.


p.783

M1014.9

Donnchadh Ua Goaigh, lord of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, was slain.

M1014.10

Gillachrist, son of Niall, son of Dubhlaech was slain by Maelseachlainn.

M1014.11

Muircheartach, son of Anmccadh, lord of Ui-Liathain, was slain by Mathghamhain, son of Maelmhuaidh.

M1014.12

Meanma, son of the lord of Ui-Caisin, died.

M1014.13

Donnchadh, son of Aedh Beag O'Maeleachlainn, was slain by the foreigners.

M1014.14

Maelisa, son of the lord of Ui-Maine, was slain at Iubhar Arnun, by the men of Teathbha.

M1014.15

The son of Raghnall, son of Imhar, lord of Port-Lairge, was slain by the Ui-Liathain.

M1014.16

Cudubh, son of Maelfabhaill, chief of Carraig-Brachaidhe, was slain by the race of Tadhg in Breagha.

M1014.17

An army was led by Domhnall, son of Dubhdabhoireann, to Luimneach. The two sons of Brian, namely, Donnchadh and Tadhg, met him, and a battle was fought between them, wherein the people of the south of Ireland were defeated, and Domhnall fell, and numbers along with him.

M1014.18

An army was led by Ua Neill, i.e. by Flaithbheartach, with the men of Meath and Breagha about him, into Leinster; and he plundered the country as far as Leithghlinn, carried off spoils and prisoners, and slew thelord of Ui-mBuidhe, and many others.

M1014.19

An army was led by Maelseachlainn, Ua Neill, and Ua Maeldoraidh, to Ath-cliath; and they burned the fortress, and all the houses outside the fortress; and they afterwards proceeded into Ui-Ceinnsealagh, and plundered the whole territory, carrying off many thousand captives and cattle. A party of his marauders were overtaken, and a great number of them killed, together with the son of the King of Connaught, i.e. Sleghanach; and there were also lost Conghalach, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Failghe; Gillacoluim Ua hAghdha, lord of Teathbha, and many others also.

M1014.20

An army was led by Maelseachlainn, Ua Neill, Ua Maeldoraidh, and O'Ruairc, into Leinster; and they carried off the hostages of Leinster, and gave the kingdom


p.785

of Leinster to Donncuan, son of Dunlaing; and they plundered Osraighe, and carried off innumerable preys and many prisoners.

M.1014.21

A great depredation by Maelfothartaigh in Dal-gCais; and Donnchadh, son of Brian, and the Dal-gCais overtook him, but these were defeated, and the son of Ruaidhri Ua Donnagain, the son of Ua Cathalain, and other persons also, were slain; and Maelfothartaigh afterwards bore away the spoils.

M.1014.22

Aedh O'Ruairc, i.e. the son of Sen-Fearghal, lord of Breifne, and royal heir of Connaught, was slain by Tadhg of the White Steed, son of Cathal, son of Conchobhar, King of Connaught, at Loch Neill, in Magh-Aei, in revenge of Domhnall, his brother.

M.1014.23

The Sleghanach Ua Maelseachlainn was slain by the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M.1014.24

Ceinneidigh, son of Fearghal, lord of Laeighis, died.

M.1014.25

Aedh, son of Tadhg, son of Murchadh Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui-Maine, was slain at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M.1014.26

Gillachrist, son of Niall, son of Dubhlaech, was slain by Maelseachlain, son of Domhnall.

M.1014.27

Dunghal Ua Donnchaidh went on a predatory excursion into Aradh Cliach, and Finn, the son of Ruaidhri Ua Donnagain, and Ui-Cuanach, were slain by him.

Annal M1015.

M1015.0

The Age of Christ, 1015 rectè 1016.

M1015.1

The second year of Maelseachlainn.

M1015.2

Flannagan, son of Conaing, Fos-airchinneach of Ard-Macha;

M1015.3

and Muirgheas, airchinneach of Lis-aeidheadh, died.

M1015.4

Diarmaid Ua Maeltelcha, successor of Comhghall;

M1015.5

and Eithne, daughter of Ua Suairt, successor of Brighid, died.

M1015.6

Airbheartach, son of Cosdobhroin, airchinneach of Ros-ailithir; and Maelpadraig Ua Sluaghadhaigh, the most learned of Ireland, died.

M1015.7

Macliag, i.e. Muircheartach, son of Cuceartach, chief poet of Ireland at that time, died. The following was Macliag's first quatrain:


p.787

    1. Muircheartach Beag, son of Maelcertach, who has been herding the cows,
      It is more worthy that he retaliates not,—give him a handful of findraip.
His last quatrain was this:
    1. O Bell, which art at the head of my pillow, to visit thee no friends come;
      Though thou makest thy ‘ding dang,’ it is by thee the salt is measured.

M1015.8

An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Ulidia, and carried off the hostages of the Ulidians.

M1015.9

Gillacoluim Ua hAghdhai, lord of Teathbha, was slain by the son of Donn, son of Donnghal, at Druim-raite.

M1015.10

Macrath, son of Muireadhach Claen, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was killed.

M1015.11

Donncuan, i.e. the Simpleton, son of Dunlaing, lord of Leinster, and Tadhg Ua Riain, lord of Ui-Drona, was slain by Donnchadh, son of Gillaphadraig, at Leithghlinn, after they had made friendship, and taken a mutual oath in the beginning of the day. Moling delivered this prophecy:

    1. Donndurgen, and the royal Bard of lances,
      Shall violate friendship at Glinngerg; mutual oaths shall not prevent bloodshed.

M1015.12

Dun-da-leathghlas was totally burned, with its Daimhliag and Cloictheach, by lightning.

M1015.13

Cluain-mic-Nois, Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, and Ceanannus, were burned.

M1015.14

A battle between the Ulidians and the Dal-Araidhe, wherein the DaI-Araidhe were defeated by Niall, son of Eochaidh; and wherein fell Domhnall, son of Loingseach, lord of Dal-Araidhe; Niall, son of Dubhtuine, son of Eochaidh, son of Ardgar, ex-king of Ulidia; and Conchobhar Ua Domhnallain,lord of Ui-Tuirtri, and others along with them.

M1015.15

An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Ossory; and he plundered Osraighe, and carried off spoils and


p.789

prisoners, and slew Dunghal, son of Gillaphadraig, son of Donnchadh, and many others.

M1015.16

An army was led again by Maelseachlainn into Osraighe; and he plundered half the territory, and carried off hostages. He subsequently proceeded into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, which he plundered, and carried off their cows and prisoners.

M1015.17

The Connaughtmen plundered and demolished Ceann-coradh and Cill-Dalua.

M1015.18

The men of Munster plundered Inis-Clothrann and Inis-bo-fine.

M1015.19

Gebhennach, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Maine, was slain by the Ui-Maine themselves.

M1015.20

Maelisa, son of Flannagan, was killed.

M1015.21

A victory was gained by the Eili over Eoghanacht-Chaisil, where Domhnall, grandson of Domhnall, royal heir of Caiseal, and Domhnall, grandson of Ruaidhri, lord of Aradh, and numbers of others, were slain.

Annal M1016.

M1016.0

The Age of Christ, 1016 rectè 1017.

M1016.1

The third year of Maelseachlainn.

M1016.2

Diarmaid Ua Maeiltealcha, a distinguished wise man, scribe, and bishop, died.

M1016.3

Caenchomhraic Ua Baithin, lector of Gleann-Uisean, died.

M1016.4

Ceallach Ua Maelmidhe, airchinneach of Druim-raithe, died.

M1016.5

Oenghus, son of Flann, airchinneach of Lann-Leire; and Diarmaid Ua Maelmaedhog, Abbot of Gleann-Uisean, died.

M1016.6

Connmhach, lector and Abbot of Achadh-Urghlais, was slain by the Ui-Bairrche.

M1016.7

Oenghus, son of Carrach Calma, royal heir of Teamhair, pillar of the dignity of Ireland, died of the cholic.

M1016.8

Fearghal, son of Domhnall, son of Conchobhar, royal heir of Aileach, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain themselves.

M1016.9

Conn, son of Conchobhar, son of Eigneachan, died.


p.791

M1016.10

Donnchadh, son of Donnchadh Ua Conghalaigh, lord of Breagha, and royal heir of Ireland, was slain by the men of Breagha themselves.

M1016.11

Gillachrist Ua Lorcain, lord of Caille-Follamhain, was killed at Ceanannus.

M1016.12

Flann Ua Beice, lord of Ui-Meith, was killed.

M1016.13

Muireadhach Ua Duibheoin, lord of Ui-Mic-Uais-Breagh, was slain by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill.

M1016.14

A slaughter was made of the foreigners by Maelseachlainn, at Odhbha, where many were slain.

M1016.15

Gaeithini Ua Mordha was slain.

M1016.16

Dubhdabhoirenn Ua Riain was slain.

Annal M1017.

M1017.0

The Age of Christ, 1017rectè 1018.

M1017.1

The fourth year of Maelseachlainn.

M1017.2

Gormghal of Ard-Oilean, chief anmchara of Ireland;

M1017.3

and Cormac Ua Mithi-dhein, Abbot of Achadh-abhla, died.

M1017.4

Muireadhach Ultach, anmchara of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1017.5

Braen, son of Maelmordha, son of Murchadh, King of Leinster, was blinded by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, at Ath-cliath, through treachery; and he died in consequence.

M1017.6

Conghalach, son of Conchobhar, son of Finn, lord of Ui-Failghe, died.

M1017.7

Maelan, son of Egneach Ua Leocain, lord of Gaileanga and all Tuath-Luighne, was killed by the Saithni.

M1017.8

Cearbhall, son of Maelmordha, royal heir of Leinster, was slain by treachery.

M1017.9

A war between Maelseachlainn and the Ui-Neill of the North, so that the Eoghanachs went northwards over Sliabh-Fuaid.

M1017.10

A predatory excursion by Maelseachlainn into


p.793

the territory of the Feara-Ceall; and a party of the army was overtaken by the Feara-Ceall and the Eli, so that Domhnall Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Cinel-Laeghaire, and Cass-Midhe, Maelseachlainn's lawgiver, were slain; and Ua Cleircein, lord of Caille-Follambain, was wounded, and died after a short period. Flannagan Ua Ceallaigh, and Conghalach, son of Maelseachlainn, were mortally wounded at the same place.

M1017.11

Gillacoluim, son of Muireadhach Ua Maeltrea, and Aedh Ua hEradain, lord of Ui-Breasail-Macha, died.

M1017.12

Cearnach Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, was killed.

M1017.13

Muireadhach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Fotharta, was killed.

Annal M1018.

M1018.0

The Age of Christ, 1018 rectè 1019.

M1018.1

The fifth year of Maelseachlainn.

M1018.2

Domhnall, son of Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, successor of Finnen and Mocholmog, died.

M1018.3

Ongharcc Ua Maelduin, vice-abbot i.e prior of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1018.4

Ua Brodubhain, Abbot of Achadhur, was killed.

M1018.5

Cill-dara was all burned by lightning, excepting one house only.

M1018.6

Ceanannus was plundered by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, and the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and they carried off innumerable spoils and prisoners, and slew many persons in the middle of the church.

M1018.7

The shrine of Ciaran was plundered by Domhnall, son of Tadhg; and he himself was killed at the end of a week, through the miracles of God and Ciaran.

M1018.8

Two sons of Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, Ardghar and Ardchu, both royal heirs of Aileach, were killed by the Cinel-Eoghain themselves.

M1018.9

Mathghamhain, son of Conaing,son of Donncuan, royal heir of


p.795

Munster, died.

M1018.10

The son of Catharnach, son of Aedh of the Ui-Caisin, attacked Donnchadh, son of Brian, and gave him a stroke of a sword in his head and across the arm, so that he struck off his right hand, i.e. his right palm. The son of Brian afterwards escaped, and the son of Catharnach was slain.

M1018.11

Maelmordha, son of Maelmhuaidh, Tanist of Dealbhna, was killed.

M1018.12

Ua Geibhennach, Tanist of Ui-Mane, was killed.

M1018.13

Flaithbheartach Ua Neill came into Tir-Conaill, and plundered Tir-Enda and Tir-Lughdhach.

M1018.14

Ruaidhri Ua hAileallain, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by the men of Fearnmhagh; and the two sons of Ceinneidigh, namely, Conghalach and Gillamuire, were immediately slain in revenge of him.

M1018.15

Gillacaeimhghin, son of Dunlaing, son of Tuathal, royal heir of Leinster, was slain by the Leinstermen themselves, i.e. by the people of Laeighis.

M1018.16

Aileni, son of Oissene, lord of Mughdhorna; and Ossene Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne, were slain by the Gaileanga.

M1018.17

Ruaidhri, son of Faelan, lord of Fotharta, was slain.

Annal M1019.

M1019.0

The Age of Christ, 1019 rectè 1020.

M1019.1

The sixth year of Maelseachlainn.

M1019.2

Maelmhuaidh O'Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, was slain in Magh-Lena by Muircheartach Ua Carraigh.

M1019.3

An army was led by Maelseachlainn, Ua Neill, Donnchadh, son of Brian, and Art Ua Ruairc, to the Sinainn; and they gave the hostages of Connaught to Maelseachlainn.

M1019.4

Flaithbheartach Ua hEochaidh was blinded by Niall, son of Eochaidh.

M1019.5

The Termon of Finnia was plundered


p.797

by the Ui-Faelain.

M1019.6

Domhnall, son of Muireadhach, lord of Ui-Maine, was killed.

M1019.7

Aedh Ua h-Innreachtaigh, lord of Ui-Meith, was slain by the Ui-Niallain.

M1019.8

Culuachra Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, died.

Annal M1020.

M1020.0

The Age of Christ, 1020.

M1020.1

The seventh year of Maelseachlainn.

M1020.2

Cormac Ua Finn, a distinguished Bishop of Munster, died.

M1020.3

Ard-Macha was burned, with all the fort, without the saving of any house within it, except the library only, and many houses were burned in the Trians; and the Daimhliag-mor was burned, and the Cloictheach, with its bells; and Daimhliag-na-Toe, and Daimhliag-an-tSabhaill; and the old preaching chair, and the chariot of the abbots, and their books in the houses of the students, with much gold, silver, and other precious things.

M1020.4

Cill-dara, with its oratory, was burned.

M1020.5

Gleann-da-loch, with its oratories, was burned.

M1020.6

The burning of Cluain-Iraird, Ara, Sord, and Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1020.7

The shrine of Patrick, and the Finnfaidheach a bell? of Patrick, were robbed by the plunderers, by Ua hAidith, and the people of Lower Ui-Eathach; and they carried off with them seven hundred cows.

M1020.8

Maelmuire, son of Eochaidh, successor of Patrick, head of the clergy of all the north-west of Europe, and flood of the dignity of the western world,—this


p.799

learned sage died on the third day of the month of June, the Friday before Whitsuntide precisely; and Amhalghaidh was installed in the successorship of Patrick by the laity and the clergy.

Annal M1021.

M1021.0

The Age of Christ, 1021.

M1021.1

The eighth year of Maelseachlainn.

M1021.2

Maenach, priest and airchinneach of Lann-Leire, died.

M1021.3

Maelmaire, daughter of Amhlaeibh, wife of Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, died.

M1021.4

Aedh, son of Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, heir to the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Ua Maighteachain, one of the Feara-Bile.

M1021.5

Branagan, son of Maeluidhir, a chief of Meath, was drowned on May-day, in Loch-Ainninn Lough Ennell, and MacConailligh, chief lawgiver of Maelseachlainn, died, after the plundering of the shrine of Ciaran by them both; this happened at the end of nine days after the plundering.

M1021.6

A victory was gained by Ugaire, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, over Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, and the foreigners of Ath-cliath, at Derge-Mogorog in Ui-Briuin-Cualann, where he made a dreadful slaughter of the foreigners.

M1021.7

Cucaille, son of Dubhlaech, lord of Feara-Tulach, died.

M1021.8

Cucaille, son of Marcan, was slain by the Sil-Anmchadha.

M1021.9

The son of Cuceanann, lord of Ui-Diarmada, was slain by the Ui-Gadhra.

M1021.10

A great depredation by Maelseachlainn upon the foreigners; and on the same night a depredation was committed by the Ui-Neill upon the Cianachta.

M1021.11

A great depredation was committed by Maelseachlainn upon the Cinel-Eoghain; and they were driven northwards over Sliabh-Fuaid.

M1021.12

Mac-Etigh, son of Follamhain, chief of Clann-Uadach, died.


p.801

M1021.13

A shower of wheat was rained in Osraighe.

M1021.14

Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, went into Munster for the first time, and made a great circuit thereof.

Annal M1022.

M1022.0

The Age of Christ, 1022.

M1022.1

The victory of Ath-buidhe-Tlachtgha was gained by Maelseachlainn over the foreigners of Ath-cliath, where many were slain; of which was said:

    1. His last bloody victory was in the evening at Ath-buidhe;
      Thirty revolving days from this until his death.
He lived but a month after this.

M1022.2

Maelseachlainn Mor, son of Domhnall, son of Donnchadh, pillar of the dignity and nobility of the west of the world, died on Cro-inis Locha-Aininn, after having been forty-three years in sovereignty over Ireland, according to the Book of Cluain-mic-Nois, which places the reign of Brian, son of Kennedy, in the enumeration, at the end of nine years after the battle of Cluain-tarbh, in the seventy-third year of his age, on the fourth of the Nones of September, on Sunday precisely, after intense penance for his sins and transgressions, after receiving the body of Christ and his blood, after being anointed by the hands of Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, for he and the successor of Colum Cille, and the successor of Ciaran, and most of the seniors of Ireland, were present at his death; and they sung masses, hymns, psalms, and canticles, for the welfare of his soul. Sorrowful to the poor of the Lord was the death of Maelseachlainn, as is evident from this quatrain:

    1. Three hundred forts had the king, in which flesh and food were given,
      Guests from the king of the elements were in each fort of these.

p.803

Of the year of Maelseachlainn's death was also said:
    1. Two years, twice ten, and a thousand, from the birth of Christ, the head of every king,
      Till the death of the descendant of Colman of preys, Maelseachlainn, the perfect, the memorable.

M1022.3

Flann Ua Tacain, airchinneach of Dearmhach, a distinguished wise man; and Maelcobha Ua Gallchubhair, comharba of Scrin-Adhamhnain, died.

M1022.4

Lachtnan of Inis-caein, successor of Deagha, died at Ard-Macha.

M1022.5

Cathasach Ua Garbhain, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, of the sept of Cuircni; and Joseph, son of Dunchadh, anmchara of Cluain-mic-Nois, died: the latter was the father of Conn-na-mBocht.

M1022.6

Muiren of the tongue was slain by two Gillies of the Luighni.

M1022.7

Domhnall, grandson of Murchadh Glunillar, lord of the North, was slain by the Cianachta of Gleann-Geimhin.

M1022.8

Domhnall, son of Aedh Ua Maeldoraidh, was slain.

M1022.9

Muireadhach Ua Sleibhene Slevin, chief poet of the north of Ireland, was slain by the Feara-Rois.

M1022.10

The son of Cearbhall, lord of Eile; and Domhnall, son of Ceallach, chief of Fotharta, were slain.

M1022.11

Sitric, son of Imhar, lord of Port-Lairge, was slain by the lord of Osraighe.

M1022.12

Macleighinn, son of Coireall, lord of Oirghialla, died, after doing penance for his sins.

M1022.13

Mathghamhain, son of Laidhgnen, son of Cearbhall, lord of Fearnmhagh, was slain at Cluain-Eois, by Cathal Ua Crichain.

M1022.14

Muircheartach Ua Carraigh


p.805

Calma was treacherously slain by Maelseachlainn God.

M1022.15

A battle on the sea between the foreigners of Ath-cliath and Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, wherein the foreigners were defeated, and they themselves led into captivity, and their ships carried away, except a few which fled away. Flathroi, son of Dubhslangha, son of Aedh, son of Tomaltach, fell by the foreigners in that sea battle, in the seventeenth year of his age.

M1022.16

Donnchadh, chief of Clann-Cathail, died.

M1022.17

Very great showers of hail fell in the summer, the stones of which were the size of wild apples; and great thunder and lightning succeeded, so that men and cattle were destroyed throughout Ireland.

M1022.18

The plundering of Cill-dara by Donnsleibhe and the Ui-Faelain.

M1022.19

A victory was gained at Sliabh-Fuaid over the Airghialla, by Niall, son of Eochaidh; and a great slaughter was made of the Airghialla there.

M1023.0

The Age of Christ, 1023.

M1023.1

Maelmaire Ua Cainen, wise man, and Bishop of Sord-Choluim-Chille, died.

M1023.2

Domhnall, son of Aedh Beag Ua Maeleachlainn, the second lord that was over Meath, was slain by the son of Seanan Ua Leocain and the Luighni.

M1023.3

A predatory excursion was made by the foreigners over South Breagh, and to Daimhliag-Chianain; and Ainbhith Ua Cathasaigh, lord of the Saithni, was slain by them on that day.

M1023.4

Donnchadh Ua Duinn, lord of Breagh, was treacherously seized upon by the foreigners at their own assembly; and he was carried eastwards over the sea, in violation of Colum-Cille, whose successor was his guarantee.

M1023.5

Lochlainn, son of Maeleachlainn, lord of Inis-Eoghain and Magh-Itha, was slain by his own brother, Niall, and the Cianachta of Gleann-Geimhin.

M1023.6

Tadhg, son of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, was treacherously slain by the Eili, at the instigation of his own brother, Donnchadh.

M1023.7

Conchobhar, son of Aenghus, son of Carrach Calma, was killed by the Guttas by treachery.

M1023.8

The Termon of Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by Gadhra, son of Dunadhach, and carried off many hundred cows from thence.

M1023.9

An army was led by Ua Conchobhar, i.e. Tadhg of the White Steed, King of


p.807

Connaught, into Ui-Briuin, where Domhnall Ua hEaghra, lord of Luighne in Connaught, was slain.

M1023.10

Erard Mac Coisse, chief chronicler of the Irish, died at Cluain-mic-Nois, after a good life.

Annal M1024.

M1024.0

The Age of Christ, 1024.

M1024.1

Fachtna, lector and priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, airchinneach of Finnabhair-abha, airchinneach of Indeidhnen, and the most distinguished abbot of the Gaeidhil, died at Rome, whither he had gone upon a pilgrimage.

M1024.2

Dubhshlaine, chief anmchara of the Gaeidhil, and priest of Ard-Breacain, died at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1024.3

Donnsleibhe, lord of Ui-Faelain, took a house forcibly at Dubhloch, from Augaire, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, and from Maelmordha, son of Lorcan, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and from his son; and the three were therein slain by Donnsleibhe.

M1024.4

Cuan Ua Lothchain, chief poet of Ireland, and a learned historian, was slain in Teathbha, and the party who killed him became putrid in one hour; and this was a poet's miracle.

M1024.5

Cucaille, son of Gairbhith, one of the men of Breagha, died.

M1024.6

Donnsleibhe, son of Maelmordha, lord of Ui-Faelain, set out upon a predatory excursion into Ui-Failghe; and the lord of Ui-Failghe, and some of the Ui-Muireadhaigh, overtook and slew him as he was plundering Cill-dara.

M1024.7

The battle of Ath-na-croise in Corann, between Ua Maeldoraidh and Ua Ruairc, where Ua Ruairc was defeated, and his people slaughtered, i.e. twenty hundred of them were slain, together with Ruarc, grandson of Diarmaid, Tanist of Breifne. Of him was said:


p.809

    1. In the battle of Ath-na-croise, men looked without pity,
      Corann was filled with carcasses; the Conalls had its glory.
Another battle was fought between them, in which the men of Breifne were defeated, and the son of Tighearnan slain.

M1024.8

An army was led by the son of Eochaidh against the foreigners, so that he burned their territory, and carried away the hostages of the Irish from them.

M1024.9

An army was led by the Osraighi and the Leinstermen to Tulcainne; and they obtained jewels and hostages from the foreigners.

M1024.10

The victory of Erglann, by Gearrgaela, over the foreigners.

M1024.11

Domhnall, son of Aedh, royal heir of Aileach, was slain by Gillamura, son of Ogan.

M1024.12

Maelduin Ua Conchaille, lord of Ui-Niallan, was slain by the Ui-Doctain.

M1024.13

Maelmuaidh Ua Ciarrdha, lord of Cairbre died.

M1024.14

A slaughter was made of the men of Munster by Donnchadh, son of Aedh, in Gleann-Uisean, through the miracles of God and Comhdan.

Annal M1025.

M1025.0

The Age of Christ, 1025.

M1025.1

Flannabhra, comharba of Ia-Choluim-Chille;

M1025.2

Maeleoin Ua Torain, comharba of Doire-Choluim-Chile;

M1025.3

Ceannfaeladh, son of Flaithbheartach, successor of Molaisi of Daimhinis;

M1025.4

and Gillachrist, its lector, died.

M1025.5

Maelbrighde Ua Crichidein, successor of Finnia and Comhgall, died.

M1025.6

Duibhinsi Ua Faircheallaigh, Abbot of Druim-leathan;

M1025.7

Saerbhreathach, Abbot of Imleach Iubhair, who was pillar of the wealth and dignity of the west rectè south of Ireland;

M1025.8

and Muireadhach, son of Mughron, successor of Ciaran and Comman, died; he was of the family of Imleach Fordeorach.

M1025.9

Niall Ua Conchobhar, royal heir of Connaught, was killed.

M1025.10

Mactire, son of Donnghaile,


p.811

Tanist of Teathbha, was killed.

M1025.11

Gearrgaela, lord of Breagha, was killed and burned by the people of South Breagha and Mathghamhain Ua Riagain.

M1025.12

An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill into Breagha, and he carried off the hostages of the Irish from the foreigners. An army was led by Domhnall Gott into Breagha, and he expelled the Ui-Neill northwards over Sliabh-Fuaid; and they left behind their shields and their horses to him, and he took the hostages of the men of Breagha from them. Maelseachlainn Gott, lord of Meath, died immediately afterwards.

M1025.13

The grandson of Comhaltan Ua Cleirigh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne, died.

M1025.14

A predatory excursion was made by Cathalan, lord of Fearnmhagh, against the Feara-Manach.A predatory excursion was made by the Feara-Manach to Loch-Uaithne, and they burned and slew seventeen men on the margin of the lake.

M1025.15

Dunghal Ua Donnchadha, King of Caiseal, died.

M1025.16

Tearmann-Feichin was plundered and burned on Christmas night by the Ui-Crichain.

Annal M1026.

M1026.0

The Age of Christ, 1026.

M1026.1

Conall Ua Cillene, successor of Cronan of Tuaim-Greine; Maelpadraig Ua Ailecain, lector of Dun-Leathghlaise;

M1026.2

Maelruanaidh O'Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, went over the sea on his pilgrimage.

M1026.3

A hosting by Donnchadh, son of Brian, so that he obtained the hostages of the men of Meath, of the men of Breagha, of the foreigners, of the Leinstermen, and of the Osraighi.

M1026.4

An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill, and Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, into Meath; and they obtained hostages, and entered Inis-Mochta upon the ice, and plundered the island, then in the possession of the foreigners.

M1026.5

Muircheartach, son of Conghalach, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M1026.6

Aimergin Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, and Cuduiligh Ua Beargdha, lord of Ui-Duach,


p.813

were mutually slain by each other; and the Ui-Duach and Laeighisi were mutually slaughtered, but the Ui-Duach were defeated.

M1026.7

A battle was gained by Roen over the foreigners of Ath-cliath, at Loch-Rein.

M1026.8

A plundering army was led by the Osraighi into Ui-Muireadhaigh; and they obtained great spoils, and mortally wounded Muircheartach, son of Dunlaing. The Ui-Muireadhaigh went into Osraighe, and plundered Tealach-Dimainn, and slew the Vice-abbot.

M1026.9

An army was led by the lord of Osraighe into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and plundered it.

M1027.10

Three battles were gained by Roen, son of Muircheartach, son of Maeleachlainn (i.e. one of the Clann-Colmain), royal heir of Teamhair,—one battle over the men of Meath, another over the men of Breagha, and the third over the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M1026.11

The paved way from Garrdha-an-bhainbh to Uluidh-na-dtri-gcross was made by Breasal Conailleach, at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1026.12

A great depredation was committed by Gearr-an-chogaidh at Domhnach-Seachnaill; and Gearr-an-chogaidh himself was slain on the following day, and his two brothers along with him, namely, Etigen and Gillamaith, by Muireadhach Ua Ceile, in his own house. This happened through the miracles of God and Seachnall.

Annal M1027.

M1027.0

The Age of Christ, 1027.

M1027.1

Dunchadh, son of Gillamochonna, successor of Seachnall, the most distinguished wise man of the Irish, died at Coloin, in Germany.

M1027.2

Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died on his pilgrimage.

M1027.3

Ruaidhri Mac Fogartaigh, lord of South Breagha, died, after penance, at an advanced age.

M1027.4

Tadhg Mac Gillaphadraig was blinded by the


p.815

lord of Osraighe, Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig.

M1027.5

An army was led by Donnchadh, son of Brian, into Osraighe, where his people were defeated; and there were slain on that occasion Gadhra, son of Dunadhach, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, and Domhnall, son of Seanchan, son of Flaithbheartach, royal heir of Munster; Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, lord of Corca-Modhruadh; and the two sons of Cuilen, son of Conchobhar, lord and Tanist of Ui-Conaill Gabhra; the two sons of Eigceartach, lord and Tanist of Eoghanacht Chaisil; and Ogan Ua Cuirc, son of Anluan, son of Ceinneidigh; and many others not enumerated.

M1027.6

Scrin-Choluim-Cille was plundered by Roen, and a great prey of cows was carried off from thence.

M1027.7

Scrin-Mocholmoc was plundered by Amhlaeibh, and Dunchadh, lord of Breagha.

M1027.8

An army was led by Sitric,son of Amhlaeibh, and Dunchadh, lord of Breagha, into Meath, as far as Leac-Bladhma, where the men of Meath, under the conduct of Roen Ua Maeleachlainn, met them. A battle was fought between them, in which the foreigners and the men of Breagha were defeated and slaughtered, together with Dunchadh, son of Donn, lord of Breagha, and Gillausaille, son of Gillacaeimhghin, lord of Ui-Briuin. They rallied to the fight again, and defeated and slew Roen, lord of Meath, with many others.

M1027.9

Cathalan-Ua-Crichain, lord of Fearnmhagh, and of the Airghialla in general, and Culocha Ua Gairbhith, lord of Ui-Meith, mutually fell by each other.

M1027.10

Domhnall, son of Flaithbheartach Ua Neill, died.

M1027.11

A depredation was committed by the Cinel-Eoghain upon the Ulidians; and they carried off a great prey of cattle.

M1027.12

Mac-Cuinn, son of Donnghaile, royal heir of Teathbha, died.


p.817

Annal M1028.

M1028.0

The Age of Christ, 1028.

M1028.1

Tuathal Ua Dubhanaigh, Bishop of Cluain-Iraird; the Bishop Ua Suairlich; Tadhg, son of Eochaidh, airchinneach of Cill-Dalua, died.

M1028.2

Art Ua Dunchadha, airchinneach of Mungairit, died.

M1028.3

Gillachrist, son of Dubhchuillinn, a noble priest of Ard-Macha, died at Ros-Commain.

M1028.4

Coiseanmach, son of Duibheachtgha, successor of Tola;

M1028.5

Gillapadraig Ua Flaithbheartaigha, airchinneach of Sord;

M1028.6

Cormac, priest of Ceanannus;

M1028.7

Maelpadraig Ua Baeghalain, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1028.8

Flaithnia Ua Tighernain, lector of Cill-Dacheallog;

M1028.9

and Cearnach, Ostiarius of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1028.10

Brian Ua Conchobhair; Scorn Ua Ruairc; Flaithbheartach Ua h-Erudain; and Conchobhar, son of Eochaidh, were slain.

M1028.11

Maelmordha, lord of Feara-Rois, was slain by the Conailli-Muirtheimhne.

M1028.12

Mac Concuailgne, lord of Ui-Eathach, died.

M1028.13

Flannagan Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha; and Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, went to Rome.

M1028.14

A predatory incursion by the Cinel-Eoghain into Tir-Conaill, from whence they carried off great spoils.

M1O28.15

Donn Ua Conghalaigh was slain by the Conailli.

M1028.16

The oratory of Slaine fell.

M1028.17

Bec Ua h-Aghda, lord of Teathbha, was slain.

Annal M1029.

M1029.0

The Age of Christ, 1029.

M1029.1

Donnsleibhe Ua Brogarbhain, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain.

M1029.2

Donnchadh Ua Donnagain, lord of Fearnmhagh; and Cinaedh, son of Angeirrce, lord of Conailli, mutually fell by each other at Cill-sleibhe.

M1029.3

Brian Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was slain by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, lord of Crumhthann.

M1029.4

Muircheartach Ua Maeldoraidh was slain by the O'Canannains, at Rath-Canannain.

M1029.5

Aedh Ua Ruairc, lord of Dartraighe; and the lord of Cairbre; and Aenghus Ua hAenghusa, airchinneach of Druim-cliabh; and three score persons along with them, were burned in Inis-na-lainne,


p.819

in Cairbre-mor.

M1029.6

Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric, lord of the foreigners, was taken prisoner by Mathghamhain Ua Riagain, lord of Breagha, who exacted twelve hundred cows as his ransom, together with seven score British horses and three score ounces of gold, and the sword of Carlus, and the Irish hostages, both of Leinster and Leath-Chuinn, and sixty ounces of white silver, as his fetter-ounce, and eighty cows for word and supplication, and four hostages to Ua Riagain as a security for peace, and the full value of the life of the third hostage.

M1029.7

Maelcoluim, son of Maelbrighde, son of Ruaidhri, died.

M1029.8

Conchobhar, royal heir of Connaught, was blinded by Tadhg Ua Conchobhair.

M1029.9

Maelbrighde, chief artificer of Ireland, died.

Annal M1030.

M1030.0

The Age of Christ, 1030.

M1030.1

Breasal Conailleach, successor of Ciaran, died.

M1030.2

Maelmartin, Bishop of Cill-dara, died.

M1030.3

Eochaidh Ua Cethenen, successor of Tighearnach, chief paragon of Ireland in wisdom, died at Ard-Macha.

M1030.4

Aenghus Ua Cruimthir, successor of Comhghall;

M1030.5

Tuathal O'Garbhain, Bishop of Cill-Chuilinn;

M1030.6

and Maelodhar Dall, lector of Cill-achaidh, died.

M1030.7

Flann Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Coemhghin, died.

M1030.8

An eclipse of the sun on the day before the Calends of September.

M1030.9

The staff of Jesus was profaned in a matter relating to three horses, and the person who profaned it was killed three days after.

M1030.10

Flaithbheartach Ua Neill went to Rome.

M1030.11

Ruaidhri Ua Canannain was slain at Modhairn, by Aedh O'Neill; and the expedition on which he was killed was called the "Prey of the Snow."

M1030.12

Tadhg of the White Steed Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, was slain by the Gott, i.e. Maelseachlainn, grandson of Maelruanaidh, lord of Meath and Cremthainne.

M1030.13

Aedh Ua Maeldoraidh was slain by Art Ua Ruairc.

M1030.14

A battle was gained over Ua Maeleachlainn, i.e. Conchobhar, by the Gott, i.e. Domhnall, wherein fell


p.821

Ua Cearnachain, lord of Luighne. This was the Breach of Ath-fearna.

M1030.15

The kingdom of Meath was assumed by Ua Maeleachlainn, after he had been expelled up Loch Ribh by the Gott Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1030.16

Tadhg, son of Lorcan, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, died on his pilgrimage at Gleann-dalocha.

M1030.17

Cumara, son of Macliag, chief poet of Ireland, died.

M1030.18

Maelduin, son of Ciarmhac, lord of Cinel-Binnigh, was slain by Conchobhar Ua Loingsigh.

M1030.19

Conchobhar, son of Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui-Maine, was slain by the men of Teathbha.

M1030.20

Domhnall Gott, King of Meath, was treacherously slain by Cucaratt Ua Cobhthaigh, one of his own soldiers.

M1030.21

Gormlaith, daughter of Murchadh, son of Finn, mother of the king of the foreigners, i.e. of Sitric; Donnchadh, son of Brian, King of Munster; and ConchoLhar, son of Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair, died. It was this Gormlaith that took the three leaps, of which was said:

    1. Gormlaith took three leaps,
      Which a woman shall never take again,
      A leap at Ath-cliath, a leap at Teamhair,
      A leap at Caiseal of the goblets over all.

M1030.22

Cugaileang and the son of Seanan Ua Leochain, two royal heirs of Gaileanga, mutually fell by each other.

M1030.23

Flann Ua Flainn, lord of Gaileanga, died penitently at Ceanannus.

M1030.24

Donnchadh, lord of Cairbre, was killed by the Ui-Fiachrach-Muirisc, in the doorway of the house of Scrin-Adhamhnain.

M1030.25

Tuathal Ua Dubhanaigh, Bishop of Cluain-Iraird, died after a good life.


p.823

Annal M1031.

M1031.0

The Age of Christ, 1031.

M1031.1

Cathasach, successor of Finghin, was blinded.

M1031.2

Maelsuthain, anmchara of Brian, son of Ceinneidigh;

M1031.3

and Conaing Ua Cearbhaill, airchinneach of Gleann-da-locha, head of the piety and charity of the Gaeidhil, died.

M1031.4

Mac-Finn,airchinneach of the Teach-Aeidheadh of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1031.5

and Mac Dealbhaeth, successor of Cronan of Tuaim-Greine, died.

M1031.6

Flaithbheartach Ua Neill returned from Rome. It was during the reign of Flaithbheartach that the very great bargain used to be got at Ard-Macha, as is evident in this quatrain:

    1. A sesedhach measure of oaten grain,
      Or a third of a measure of black-red sloes,
      Or of the acorns of the brown oak,
      Or of the nuts of the fair hazel-hedge,
      Was got without stiff bargaining,
      At Ard-Macha,for one penny.

M1031.7

Ard-Breacain was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and two hundred persons were burned in the great church, and two hundred were carried into captivity.

M1031.8

Inis-Eoghain was plundered by Flaithbheartach, son of Muircheartach O'Neill, and his son, i.e. Aedh.

M1031.9

An army was led by the son of Eochaidh to Tealach Og, but he seized nothing. Aedh Ua Neill passed him by eastwards, and carried off three thousand cows, and one thousand two hundred captives.

M1031.10

Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh-tire, was slain by O'Briain, i.e. Toirdhealbhach.

M1031.11

Ua hAghda, i.e. Aghda, son of Gillacoluim, lord of Teathbha, was put to death by his kinsmen, the Muinntir-Maelfinn.

M1031.12

Gluniairn, son of Sitric, was killed by the people of South Breagha.

M1031.13

Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, son of Faelan, lord of the Deisi, was slain by Muircheartach, son of Brian, in the battle of Sliabh Cua.

M1031.14

Osraighe was plundered by Donnchadh, son of Brian; and the Osraighi slew on that occasion Gillarintach Ua Anradhain; the two grandsons of Maeleachlainn, son of Flannabhra, both royal heirs of Ui-Conaill-Gabhra; and Maelcoluim Caenraigheach.

M1031.15

Gillachomhghaill


p.825

Ua Slebhene, chief poet of the north of Ireland, died.

M1031.16

Conn-na-mBocht, head of the Culdees, and anchorite of Cluain-mic-Nois, the first that invited a party of the poor of Cluain at Iseal Chiarain, and who presented twenty cows of his own to it. Of this was said:

    1. O Conn of Cluain! thou wert heard from Ireland in Alba;
      O head of dignity, it will not be easy to plunder thy church.

M1031.17

Flaithbheartach Ua Murchadha, chief of Cinel-Boghaine, died.

M1031.18

Cusleibhe Ua Dobhailen, chief of Corca-Firtri, was treacherously slain.

M1031.19

Ua Ruairc, Art, i.e. the Cock, plundered Cluain-fearta-Brenainn; and he was defeated on the same day by Donnchadh, son of Brian, with the loss of men and vessels.

M1031.20

Raghnall, son of Raghnall, son of Imhar of Port-Lairge, was treacherously slain at Ath-cliath.

Annal M1032.

M1032.0

The Age of Christ, 1032.

M1032.1

Maelmordha, anchorite, died.

M1032.2

Mughron Ua Nioc, Abbot of Tuaim-da-ghualann, died.

M1032.3

Duibhinnsi, bell-ringer of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1032.4

Domhnall, son of Maelruanaidh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the Clann-Fianghusa.

M1032.5

The son of Mathghamhain, son of Muireadhach, lord of Ciarraighe, was killed.

M1032.6

Diarmaid, son of Eochaidh, head of Clann-Scannlain, died.

M1032.7

Donnghal, son of Donncathaigh, lord of Gaileanga, was slain by Ua Carraigh.

M1032.8

Edru Ua Conaing, royal heir of Munster, was slain by the people of Imleach-Ibhair.

M1032.9

The victory of Druim-Beannchair was gained over the Ulidians by the Airghialla.

M1032.10

The battle of Inbher-Boinne was gained by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, over the Conailli, the Ui-Tortain, and the Ui-Meith, in which a slaughter was made of them, they having lost three hundred between killing and capturing.

M1032.11

Conchobhar, son of Maeleachlainn Ua Dubhda, was slain by his kinsman, i.e. by the son of Niall Ua Dubhda.

M1032.12

Ceallach, son of


p.827

Dunchadh, lord of Ui-Dunchadha, died.

M1032.13

Mathghamhain Ua Riagain, lord of Breagha, was slain by Domhnall Ua Ceallaigh, on the Sunday before Easter.

M1032.14

Domhnall Ua Ceallaigh, the son of Flannagan, was blinded by Muircheartach Ua Ceallaigh.

M1032.15

Aenghus Ua Tighearnain was slain by the Cinel-Aedha.

M1032.16

Murchadh, son of Searrach, lord of Cairbri-Mor, died.

M1032.17

Muircheartach, son (or grandson) of Maeleachlainn, was blinded by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1032.18

Tadhg Ua Guaire, lord of Ui-Cuilinn, was slain by the son of Mael-na-mbo.

M1032.19

Mac-Connacht, i.e. Ua Dunadhaigh,lord of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain.

M1032.20

Maeltuile, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died.

M1033.0

The Age of Christ, 1033.

M1033.1

Muireadhach Ua Maenagain, a noble bishop and anchorite;

M1033.2

and Muireadhach Ua Manchain, successor of Cronan, died.

M1033.3

Conn Ua Sinaich, chief anchorite of Connaught, died.

M1033.4

Conn, son of Maelpadraig, airchinnech of Mungairit and Disert-Oenghusa, died.

M1033.5

Aedh, son of Flaithbheartach Ua Neill, lord of Oileach, and heir to the sovereignty of Ireland, died, after laudable penance and mortification, on the night of Andrew's festival.

M1033.6

A battle was gained by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn over Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, in which Maelruanaidh Ua Carraigh Calma, Lorcan Ua Caindelbhain, lord of Laeghairi, the lord of Feara-Cul, and many others, were slain.

M1033.7

Conchobhar Ua Muireadhaigh, lord of Ciarraighe, was slain.

M1033.8

The fair of Carman was celebrated by Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig, after he had assumed the kingdom of Leinster, having the chiefs of the laity and clergy of Leinster and Osraighe.

M1033.9

A conflict between the Eli and the Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne, in which Braen Ua Cleirigh and Muireadhach Mac Gillaphadraig, with many others, were slain.

M1033.10

Aimhirgin Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Eile, died.

M1033.11

Aenghus Ua Cathail, lord of Eoghanacht-Locha-Lein, was killed.

M1033.12

The shrine of Peter and Paul emitted blood upon Patrick's altar at Ard-Macha, in the presence of all in general.

M1033.13

Foghartach Ua hAedha, lord of Magh-Luirg (or Tuath-Luirg), and Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha, was killed by the Feara Manach.

M1033.14

Disert-Maeltuile


p.829

was plundered by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1033.15

Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, i.e. the son of Maeleachlainn Gott, was treacherously slain by Mac Iarnain, i.e. the chief of Cuircne, on the island of Loch Semhdidhe.

M1033.16

Finn Ua Dunghalaigh, lord of Muscraighe-thire, died.

M1033.17

Cumumhan, son of Ruaidhri Ua Cetfadha, died.

M1033.18

Disert-Maeltuile was plundered by Murchadh O'Mae-leachlainn.

Annal M1034.

M1034.0

The Age of Christ, 1034.

M1034.1

Cathal Martyr, airchinneach of Corcach, died.

M1034.2

Oenghus, son of Flann, rector of Cluain-mic-Nois, chief sage of the west of the world, died after penance.

M1034.3

Maicnia Ua hUchtain, lector of Ceanannus, was drowned coming from Alba with the cuileabadh of Colum-Cill, and three of Patrick's relics, and thirty persons along with him.

M1034.4

Gillaseachnaill, son of Gillamochonna, lord of South Breagha, was slain by the Feara-Rois.

M1034.5

Dubhdaingean, lord of Connaught, was slain by the Connaughtmen themselves.

M1034.6

Donnchadh, son of Brian, plundered Osraighe.

M1034.7

Gillacoluim Ua Riagain, lord of South Breagh, fell by Muircheartach Ua Ceallaigh.

M1034.8

Gillapadraig Ua Flannagain, lord of Teathbha, fell by the people of Breaghmhaine.

M1034.9

Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartach, lord of Ui-Briuin-Seola, died.

M1034.10

Coirten Ua Maelruain, lord of Dealbhna, was slain on the threshhold of Disert-Tola by his own people; and Tola, through the power of God, wreaked vengeance upon the person who committed the profanation, for he was slain within the same hour.

M1034.11

Gillaulartaigh, lord of the Deisi-Breagh;

M1034.12

Cathal, son of Amhalgaidh, lord of Ui-Ceallaigh-Cualann, and his


p.831

wife, the daughter of Mac Gillacoeimhghin, were slain by the son of Ceallach, son of Dunchadh, and his son Aedh, son of Tuathal.

M1034.13

Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric, was slain by the Saxons, on his way to Rome.

Annal M1035.

M1035.0

The Age of Christ, 1035.

M1035.1

Flaithbheartach Ua Murchadha, lord of Cinel-Boghaine, was killed with others along with him.

M1035.2

Iarnan Ua Flannchadha (who was usually called "Cu na naemh agus na bhfiren"), came upon a predatory excursion into Dealbhna; but a small number of the Dealbhna-men overtook him, and gave him battle, wherein his people were slaughtered, and Iarnan himself was slain, through the miracles of God and the saints.

M1035.3

Raghnall, grandson of Imhar, lord of Port-Lairge, was slain at Ath-cliath by Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh;

M1035.4

Ardbraccan was plundered by Sitric afterwards, and Sord Choluim Chille was plundered and burned by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, in revenge thereof.

M1035.5

Cusleibhe, son of Dobhran, lord of Corca-Firtri, died.

M1035.6

Cill-Usaille and Claenadh were plundered by the foreigners; but the son of Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, overtook them, and made a bloody slaughter of them.

M1035.7

A depredation by Donnchadh, son of Dunlaing, upon the Feara-Cualann; and he carried off a great seizure of cows and prisoners.

Annal M1036.

M1036.0

The Age of Christ, 1036.

M1036.1

Aenghus Ua Flainn, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta;

M1036.2

and Ceallach Ua Sealbhaich, a bishop, successor of Bairri, learned senior of Munster, died.

M1036.3

Aenghus, son of Cathan, Abbot of Corcach, died.

M1036.4

Flaithbheartach an Trostain, lord of Oileach, died after a good life and penance.

M1036.5

Maeleachlainn, lord of Creamthainne, was slain by Aedh Ua Conchobhair, in revenge of Tadhg of the White Steed, and of Brian.

M1036.6

Domhnall Ua h-Uathmharain, lord of Feara-Li, was slain by the Dal-Araidhe.

M1036.7

Donnchadh, son of Flann, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by the men of Breifne.

M1036.8

Scolog,


p.833

i.e. Niall Ua Flannagain, lord of Teathbha, was slain by the men of Teathbha themselves, i.e. by Muintir-Tlamain.

M1036.9

Murchadh Ua an Chapail, i.e. Ua Flaithbheartaigh, and Niall, son of Muirgheas, two royal heirs of West Connaught, were slain.

M1036.10

Cuciche, son of Egneachan,lord of Cinel-Enda, died.

M1036.11

Donnchadh, son of Dunlaing, lord of Leinster, was blinded by Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig, and he died at the end of a week.

M1036.12

Ruaidhri, son of Tadhg, son of Lorcan, was blinded by the son of Mael-na-mbo, i.e. Diarmaid.

M1036.13

Diarmaid, son of Donnchadh, Tanist of Osraighe, was slain.

M1036.14

Muircheartach, son of Gillaphadraig, lord of half Osraighe, was treacherously slain by O'Caellaighe, one of his own people.

M1036.15

Cill-dara and Ceanannus were burned.

M1036.16

The oratory of Laithreach was burned and plundered by the men of Meath.

Annal M1037.

M1037.0

The Age of Christ, 1037.

M1037.1

Flann, Prior of Gleann-Uisean;

M1037.2

Cinaedh Ua Maeltemhin, learned senior of the west of Leinster, died.

M1037.3

Cairbre, son of Rodaighe, airchinneach of Eaglais-Beag at Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1037.4

Cathal, son of Ruaidhri, lord of West Connaught, went on his pilgrimage to Ard-Macha.

M1037.5

Flann, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, was blinded by Conchobhar, his brother.

M1037.6

Three of the Ui-Maeldoraidh were slain by Ua Canannain.

M1037.7

Three of the Ui Follamhain, and Finnachta Ua Earchadha, were slain by Aedh Ua Conchobhair.

M1037.8

Cuinmhain Ua Rubann, lord of Port-Lairge, was slain by his own tribe.

M1037.9

Port-Lairge was plundered and burned by Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo.

M1037.10

Scrin-Choluim-Chille and Daimhliag-Chianain were plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M1037.11

Muirgheas Ua Conceanainn, lord of Ui-Diarmada, died.

M1037.12

Archu Ua Celechain, lord of Ui-Breasail, and Ruaidhri Ua Lorcain, lord of Ui-Niallain, were slain at Craebh-caille, by Muireadhach Ua Ruadhacain and the Ui-Eathach.

M1037.13

Cearnachan Gott was slain by Ua Flannagain, i.e.Sitric, one of the Ui-Maine.

M1037.14

Gillacaeimhghin, son of Amhalghaidh, lord of Ui-Ceallaigh of Cualann, was slain by the sons of Aedh, son of Tuathal.

M1037.15

Imhar was


p.835

killed treacherously by the foreigners of Port-Lairge.

M1037.16

Dunchadh, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, was taken prisoner at Disert-Diarmada, and blinded by Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig; and he died immediately after.

M1037.17

Ruaidhri, son of Tadhg Ua Lorcain, Tanist of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was taken prisoner in the Daimhliag of Cill-Cuilinn, by Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig; and he was afterwards blinded by the son of Mael-na-mbo.

Annal M1038.

M1038.0

The Age of Christ, 1038.

M1038.1

Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, Bishop and rector of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1038.2

Cuinnen, Bishop, Abbot, and lector of Condere, successor of Mac Nisi and Colman Eala;

M1038.3

hUa Gabhaidh, distinguished Bishop of Disert-Diarmada;

M1038.4

and the son of Cian, son of Maelmhuaidh, died.

M1038.5

Ailill Ua Cair, lector of Dearmhach; Maelmartan Cam, lector of Condere; Flannagan, lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1038.6

Cairbre Ua Coimhghillain, successor of Cainneach, died at Rome.

M1038.7

Colman Caech Ua Conghaile, successor of Molaisi, died.

M1038.8

Niall, son of Riagain, airchinneach of Slaine, was killed by O'Conduibh.

M1038.9

Gillachrist, son of Cathbhar Ua Domhnaill, supporting pillar of the war and defence of the Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the son of Conn O'Domhnaill.

M1038.10

Ua Muirigein, lord of Teathbha, was killed.

M1038.11

Laidhgnen Ua Leocain, lord of Gaileanga, was taken prisoner.

M1038.12

Cuduiligh Ua Donnchadha, royal heir of Caiseal, was slain by the Ui-Faelain.

M1038.13

Reachru was plundered by the foreigners.

M1038.14

Very great fruit in this year, so that the orcs of the pigs were fattened.

M1038.15

Two rencounters between the Dealbhna and the Ui-Maine, on the Friday of Ciaran's festival,


p.837

at Cluain-mic-Nois, in both which the Ui-Maine were defeated, and fifty-three of them were killed.

Annal M1039.

M1039.0

The Age of Christ, 1039.

M1039.1

Maicnia, Bishop and Comharba of Mainistir Buithi;

M1039.2

Ceileachair Ua Cuileannain, successor of Tighearnach;

M1039.3

and Muireadhach, son of Flannagain, Fos-airchinneach of Ard-Macha, died.

M1039.4

The Cloictheach of Cluain-Iraird fell.

M1039.5

Domhnall, son of Donnchadh, lord of Ui-Faelain, was slain by Domhnall Ua Fearghaile, lord of the Fortuatha.

M1039.6

Murchadh Ruadh, son of Maeleachainn, was blinded hy Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1039.7

Muireadhach, son of Flaithbheartach Ua Neill, was slain by the Ui-Labhradha.

M1039.8

Donnchadh Dearg, son of Art, i.e. the Cock, Ua Ruairc, lord of East Connaught, in conjunction with his father, was slain by Aedh Ua Conchobhair.

M1039.9

An army was led by Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig and the Osraighi into Meath; and they burned as far as Cnoghbha and Droichead-atha.

M1039.10

Aedh Ua Flannagain, lord of Lurg and Ui-Fiachrach, was slain.

M1039.11

Mac Ruaidhri, lord of Fearnmhagh, fell by his own people.

M1039.12

Mac Ruitsi, lord of Cinel-Fhiachach, was slain by the lord of Feara-Ceall.

M1039.13

Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe and of the greater part of Leinster, died after long illness.

Annal M1040.

M1040.0

The Age of Christ, 1040.

M1040.1

Maelmaire Ua Ochtain, successor of Colum-Cille and Adamnan, died.

M1040.2

Dunchadh Ua hAnchainge, distinguished prelector of Ard-Macha, died.

M1040.3

Cosgrach, son of Aingeadh, successor of Flannan and Brenainn, died after a well-spent life.

M1040.4

Diarmaid Ua Seachnasaigh, the most


p.839

distinguished sage of Leath-Chuinn, and successor of Seachnall, died.

M1040.5

Corcran Cleireach, anchorite, who was the head of the west of Europe for piety and wisdom, died at Lismor.

M1040.6

Echtighearna, son of Bran, lord of Breaghmhaine, died.

M1040.7

Ua Dubhlaich, lord of Fearta-Tulach, was killed by his own people.

M1040.8

The battle of Cill-Dronnan was gained by the foreigners, and the son of Brian, rectè of Bran, over Cearbhall, son of Faelan; and Cearbhall was slain therein.

M1040.9

Cill-dara, Ceanannus, Dun-da-leathghlas, and many other churches, were burned.

M1040.10

Maein-Choluim-Chille, Disert-Diarmada, Moghna-Moshenoc, and Cluain-mor-Maedhog, were plundered by Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh; and he carried many prisoners from the oratories.

M1040.11

The oratory of Laithreach-Briuin was burned and plundered by the men of Meath.

Annal M1041.

M1041.0

The Age of Christ, 1041.

M1041.1

Maelbrighde Ua Maelfinn, priest, anchorite, and bishop, died.

M1041.2

Cosgrach Ua Toicthigh, chief lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1041.3

Soerghus, lector and airchinneach of Torach, died.

M1041.4

Mac Beathaidh, son of Ainmire, chief poet of Ard-Macha, and of Ireland in general, died.

M1041.5

Maelruanaidh, son of Roen, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain.

M1041.6

Faelan Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, was blinded by Murchadh, son of Dunlaing, after having been delivered to him by Donnchadh, son of Aedh, for it was Donnchadh that took him first, and then delivered him up to Murchadh, son of Dunlaing.

M1041.7

Muircheartach Mac Gillaphadraig was slain by the Ui-Caelluidhe by treachery.

M1041.8

Gillachomhghaill, son of Donnchuan, son of Dunlaing, was forcibly carried away from Cille-dara by Murchadh, son of Dunlaing, where the successor of Brighit was violated.

M1041.9

The two sons of the son of Faelan, son of Murchadh, namely, Donnchadh and Gluniarn, were slain at Cill-dara by the two sons of Braen, son of


p.841

Maelmordha.

M1041.10

A preying excursion by the Airghialla, in Conailli; but the Conailli routed them at Magh-da-chainneach.

M1041.11

A preying excursion by the Ua Neills into Ui-Eathach, and they carried off great booty.

M1041.12

A preying excursion by the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh into Ui-Bairrchi; but Murchadh, son of Dunlaing, overtook them, and defeated them at Cill-Molappoc, where they were greatly slaughtered, together with Domhnall Reamhar, i.e. the Fat, heir to the lordship of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M1041.13

Cuciche U Dunlaing, lord of Laeighis, and his son, and Cailleoc his wife, were slain by Mac Conin at Teach-Mochua-mic-Lonain; and he Mac Conin himself was killed on the following day, by Ua Broenain, for this act; and this was a great miracle by Mochua.

M1041.14

Fearna-mor-Maedhog was burned by Donnchadh, son of Brian.

M1041.15

Gleann-Uisean was plundered by the son of Mael-na-mbo, and the oratory was demolished, and seven hundred persons were carried off as prisoners from thence, in revenge of the plundering of Fearna-mor, by the son of Brian, and Murchadh, son of Dunlaing, and in revenge of his brother, Domhnall Reamhar.

Annal M1042.

M1042.0

The Age of Christ, 1042.

M1042.1

Maelbrighde, Bishop of Cill-dara;

M1042.2

Ailill of Mucnamh, head of the monks of the Gaeidhil, died at Cologne.

M1042.3

Eochagan, airchinneach of Slaine, and lector of Sord, and a distinguished scribe;

M1042.4

Loingseach Ua Maelseachlainn lector of Clonard

M1042.5

Loingseach Ua Flaithen, successor of Ciaran and Cronan;

M1042.6

Maelpeadair Ua hAilecain, lector of Ard-Macha, and the chief of the students; were slain.

M1042.7

Fiacha Ua Maelmordha, chief senior of Ireland, died.

M1042.8

Flann, son of Maelseachlainn Gott, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by Conchobhar, son of Maelseachlainn.

M1042.9

Murchadh, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, and Donnchadh, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Bairrche, fell by Gillaphadraig, son of Donnchadh, lord of Osraighe,


p.843

and Cucoigcriche Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, and Macraith Ua Donnchadha, lord of Eoghanacht, at Magh Muilceth, in Laeighis; and in this battle of Magh-Mailceth was slain Gilla-Emhin Ua h-Anrothain, lord of Ui-Cremhthannain, and Eachdonn, son of Dunlaing, Tanist of Leinster, with many others.

M1042.10

Macraith, son of Gorman, son of Treasach, lord of Ui-Bairrche, and his wife, were slain at Disert-Diarmada, by the Ui-Ballain.

M1042.11

Sitric, and Cailleach-Finain, his daughter, died in the one month.

M1043.0

The Age of Christ, 1043.

M1043.1

Flaithbheartach, Bishop of Dun-Leathghlaise, died.

M1043.2

Conchobhar Ua Laidhgnen, airchinneach of Fearna-mor-Maedhoig and Teach-Moling, died.

M1043.3

Aedhan Connachtach, anchorite and lector of Ross-Chommain;

M1043.4

Ceallach Ua Cleircein, successor of Finnen and Mocholmog;

M1043.5

and Cathal, son of Ruaidhri, lord of West Connaught, died on their pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1043.6

Domhnall Ua Fearghaile, lord of Fortuatha-Laighean, was slain by the son of Tuathal, son of Fiachra, in Tearmann-Caeimhghin.

M1043.7

Flann Ua h-Ainfeth, lord of Ui-Meith, was slain by Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Fearnmhagh.

M1043.8

Gillamochonna Ua Duibhdhirma, died.

M1043.9

Ceinneidigh Ua Cuirc, lord of Muscraighe, was slain.

M1043.10

A victory was gained by the Cinel-Conaill, over the Cinel-Eoghain, at Tearmann-Dabheoc.

M1043.11

A plundering excursion was made by Annudh Ua Ruairc, over Lughmhadh and Druim-Ineasclainn, and over all Conaille; but the saints soon took vengeance, namely, Mochta and Ronan, for Annudh was killed before the end of three months by one man, i.e. the son of Art Beag.

M1043.12

The fasting of the clergy of Ciaran at Tealach-Garbha, against Aedh Ua Coinfhiacla, lord of Teathbha; and Bearnan Chiarain was rung with


p.845

the end of the Bachal-Isa against him; and in the place where Aedh turned his back on the clergy, in that very place was he beheaded, before the end of a month, by Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1043.13

A predatory excursion was made by the Osraighi and the men of East Munster, i.e. by Macraith Ua Donnchadha, and Echthighern Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh, as far as Dun-na-sgiath; and they burned the dun, and seized some small spoils. But Carthach, son of Saerbhreathach, lord of Eoghanacht, overtook them at Maeilcaennaigh, on the brink of the Siuir; and he defeated the men of Osraighe and Urmhumhain, where Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh, was slain, together with many others. This was called the defeat of Maeilcaennaigh.

Annal M1044.

M1044.0

The Age of Christ, 1044.

M1044.1

Maelmochta, Bishop of Lughmhadh;

M1042.2

Maenach of Mucnamh;

M1042.3

Aedh of Sgelic-Mhichil;

M1042.4

and Ailill, son of Breasal, resident priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1044.5

Cumasgach Ua h-Ailellain, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by the Ui-Caracain.

M1044.6

Niall Ua Ceileachain, lord of Ui-Breasail, and his brother, i.e. Trenfhear, were blinded by the sons of Madadhan, through guile and treachery.

M1044.7

Domhnall Ua Cuirc, lord of Muscraighe Breogain, was slain by Ua Flaithen and Ua Oissen.

M1044.8

A predatory excursion was made by Niall, son of Maeleachlainn, lord of Aileach, into Ui-Meith and Cuailgne; and he carried off twelve hundred cows, and led numbers into captivity, in revenge


p.847

of the profanation of Clog-an-Eadhachta.

M1044.9

Another predatory excursion was made by Muircheartach Ua Neill into Mughdhorna, whence he carried a cattle spoil and prisoners, in revenge of the profanation of the same bell.

M1044.10

Ua h-Aedha, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Arda-Sratha, was slain by the son of Aralt, by whom also the shrine of Patrick was burned.

M1044.11

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the Munstermen, in the absence of Donnchadh, son of Brian. Donnchadh afterwards gave satisfaction to the church, to wit, perfect freedom of the church to God and to Ciaran till the day of judgment, and forty cows to be given by him immediately; and he gave a curse to any one of the Munstermen that should ever inflict any injury upon the clergy of Ciaran.

M1044.12

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the Conmhaicni, and God and Ciaran wreaked great vengeance upon them for it, i.e. an unknown plague was sent among them, so that the Booleys were left waste with their cattle after the death of all the shepherd people; after which the clergy of Ciaran received their own award in atonement, namely, the manchaine of the son of Ua Ruairc, i.e. Mac-na-h-aidhche, and twelve sons of the sub-chieftains, the best of the Conmhaicni, along with him, and a screaball for every dun.

M1044.13

A slaughter was made of the men of Teathbha and Conmhaicne, by the men of Meath, at the Eithne, where fell the son of Ruithin Ua Doineannaigh, Tanist of Teathbha; Culenai, son of Ualgharg, chief of Muinntir-Scalaighe; Ua Ledban, the second Tanist of Teathbha; and many others besides them.

M1044.14

A slaughter was made of the Ui-Muireadhaigh by the men of Breifne, i.e. by Art Ua Ruairc, where the Cleireach Ua Conchobhair, and others along with him, were slain.

M1044.15

Murchadh, son of Bran, lord of Ui-Faelain, was slain by Mac Gillamocholmog, Tanist of Ui-Dunchadha.


p.849

Annal M1045.

M1045.0

The Age of Christ, 1045.

M1045.1

Maelmartin Finn, lector of Ceanannus;

M1045.2

Cana, noble priest of Achadh-bo;

M1045.3

Muireadhach, son of Mac Saerghusa, airchinneach of Daimhliag;

M1045.4

Cathasach Ua Cathail, successor of Caeimhghin;

M1045.5

Cathasach Ua Corcrain, comharba of Gleann-Uisean;

M1045.6

Cormac Ua Ruadhrach, airchinneach of Tearmann-Feichine;

M1045.7

and Maenach Ua Cirdubhain, successor of Mochta of Lughmhadh, died.

M1045.8

Cluain-Iraird was thrice burned in one week, with its Daimhliag.

M1045.9

Flaithbheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill;

M1045.10

and Gluniarn Ua Clercen, lord of Ui-Cairbre, died.

M1045.11

Conghalach Ua Lochlainn, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, died.

M1045.12

A slaughter was made of the Ulidians at Reachrainn, by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, i.e. Imhar, son of Aralt, in which were slain three hundred men, together with Raghnall Ua h-Eochadha.

M1045.13

A predatory excursion was made by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill against the men of Breagha; but Gairbhith Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Breagha, overtook him at Casan-Linne, when the sea was full in before them, and Muircheartach fell by him, and some of his people along with him.

M1045.14

Carthach, son of Saerbhreathach, lord of Eoghanacht-Chaisil, was burned in a house set on fire by the grandson of Longargain, son of Donncuan, and other persons along with him.

M1045.15

Domhnall Ua Ceatfadha, head of Dal-gCais, and of the dignity of Munster, died.

M1045.16

The son of Maeleachlainn, son of Ceannfaeladh, son of Conchobhar, royal heir of Ui-Conaill, was killed.

M1045.17

Amhalghaidh, son of Flann, chief of Calraighe, died of an unknown disease, before the end of three days, after obtaining forcible refection


p.851

at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1045.18

Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, with its church, was burned by the Ui-Maine. Cuchonnacht, son of Gadhra Ua Dunadhaigh, was there slain.

Annal M1046.

M1046.0

The Age of Christ, 1046.

M1046.1

Maelpadraig Ua Bileoice, chief lector of Ard-Macha, a paragon in piety and chastity,

M1046.2

and Maelbrighde, priest of Cill-dara, died.

M1046.3

Muireadhach, son of Flaithbheartach Ua Neill, royal heir of Oileach, and Aiteidh Ua hAiteidh, lord of Ui-Eathach-Uladh, were burned in a house set on fire by Cu-Uladh, son of Conghalach, lord of Uachtar-thire.

M1046.4

Art Ua Ruairc, King of Connaught, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill, in the second year after his having plundered Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1046.5

Ua Finnguine, lord of Eoganacht-Caille-na-manach, was killed.

M1046.6

Conchobhar Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was slain by the son of Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, in Leinster (i.e. in Ui-Buidhe), in violation of the guarantee of Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, and of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo.

M1046.7

Gormfhlaith, daughter of Maelseachlainn, and Maelruanaidh Gott, died.

M1046.8

The son of Aralt was expelled by the foreigners, and the son of Raghnall was elected king.

M1046.9

Fearghal Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was slain by Ua Flannagain, lord of Teathbha.

Annal M1047.

M1047.0

The Age of Christ, 1047.

M1047.1

Cethernach, bishop from Teach-Collain, died at Hi, on pilgrimage.

M1047.2

Gillamolaissi, lector of Lughmhadh;

M1047.3

Maelmoicheirghe, lector of Cluain-Iraird;

M1047.4

and Cuduiligh, son of Gaithine Fosairchinneach of Ceanannus, died.

M1047.5

Ciarcaille, son of Foghlaidh, steward of Sil-Aedha Slaine, died.


p.853

M1047.6

Lann, daughter of Mac Sealbhachain, successor of Brighid;

M1047.7

and Ua Baillen, lector of Ros-Cre, died.

M1047.8

Muircheartach, son of Mac Madadhain, lord of Ui-Breasail, was slain.

M1047.9

Niall Ua Ruairc was slain in Corann, by Ua Conchobhair.

M1047.10

An army was led by Niall, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Cinel-Eoghain and Airghialla, into Breagha, where they slew Madadhan Ua hIffernain, chief of Clann-Creccain.

M1047.11

A great famine came upon the Ulidians, so that they left their territory, and proceeded into Leinster. It was on account of the violation of a covenant this famine came on, namely, a treachery was committed on the two sons of Maelmordha, i.e. Murchadh and Ceallach, by the son of Eochaidh and the chiefs of Ulidia, after they had been placed under their protection; and it was to annoy the son of Mael-na-mbo that the Ulidians committed this act of treachery.

M1047.12

Great snow in this year (the like of which was never seen), from the festival of Mary until the festival of Patrick, so that it caused the destruction of cattle and wild animals, and the birds of the air, and the animals of the sea in general. Of this snow was said:

    1. Seven years and forty fair, and a thousand of fine prosperity,
      From the birth of Christ, of fame unlimited, to the year of the great snow.

M1048.13

The son of Donnchadh Gott, royal heir of Teamhair,

M1048.14

and Ua hEidhin, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, died.

Annal M1048.

M1048.0

The Age of Christ, 1048.

M1048.1

Cele, Bishop of Ardachadh of Bishop Mel, died.

M1048.2

Aedh, son of Maelan Ua Nuadhait, airchinneach of Sord, was killed on the night of the Friday of protection before Easter, in the middle of Sord.

M1048.3

Cloithnia, successor of Ailbhe of Imleach, died.

M1048.4

Feardomhnach Ua Innascaigh, successor of Finnen, was killed by the son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh.

M1048.5

Dunchadh Ua Ceileachair, successor of Ciaran of Saighir, died.

M1048.6

Gillacoluim Ua hEignigh, lord of Airghialla, died, and was interred at Dun-da-leathghlas.

M1048.7

Dunlaing, son of Dunghal, lord of Ui-Briuin-Cualann, the glory of the east of Ireland, was killed by his brethren.

M1048.8

Maelfabhaill Ua hEidhin, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, died.

M1048.9

Fearghal Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, died.

M1048.10

Ceannfaeladh Ua Cuill, chief poet of Munster;

M1048.11

the son of Cumara, grandson


p.855

of Mac Liag, was killed by the son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh.

M1048.12

Gairbhith Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Breagha, was taken prisoner by Conchobhar Ua Maelseachlainn; and he Ua Cathasaigh left seven hostages with him in lieu of himself.

M1048.13

A predatory excursion was made by the son of Mael-na-mbo into the Deisi, whence he carried off prisoners and cattle.

M1048.14

A predatory excursion was made by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn over Magh-Liphi, and he carried off great spoils.

M1048.15

A predatory excursion was made by the Ui-Faelain over Cluain-Iraird, in revenge of the latter depredation.

M1048.16

An army was led by the son of Eochaidh and the son of Mael-na-mbo into Meath, and they burned the churches of Meath, except a few.

M1048.17

A predatory excursion was made by the royal heirs or chieftains of Ui-Maine into Dealbhna, where the royal chieftains were all slain, namely, Ua Maelruanaidh, Ua Flannagain, the Cleireach Ua Taidhg, and Mac Buadhachain, royal heir of Dealbhna Nuadhat.

Annal M1049.

M1049.0

The Age of Christ, 1049.

M1049.1

Maelcainnigh Ua Taichligh, comharba of Daimhinis, died.

M1049.2

Tuathal Ua hUail, airchinneach of Both-Chonais;

M1048.3

Tuathal Ua Muirgheasac, lector of Tuaim-Finnlocha, died.

M1049.4

Flaithbheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, was slain by the son of Conchobhar O'Loingsigh.

M1049.5

Muircheartach Ua Maelseachlainn was slain by Conchobhar Ua Maelseachlainn, by treachery.

M1049.6

Conchobhar Ua Cinnfhaelaidh, lord of Ui-Conaill Gabhra, was slain by the lord of Eoghanacht-Locha-Lein.

M1049.7

Imhar Ua Beice, lord of Ui-Meith, was killed.

M1049.8

Anaessles, son of Domhnall, lord of Corcha-Bhaiscinn, was killed by the son of Assith, son of Domhnall, i.e. his brother's son.

M1049.9

An army was led by the Ulidians, Leinstermen, and foreigners, into Meath, to demand the hostages


p.857

of the men of Breagha. Their hostages were put to death by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, together with Toirdhealbhach Ua Cathasaigh; after which the forces burned the country, both churches and fortresses.

M1049.10

An army was led by the son of Brian to Magh-nAirbh, and he obtained the hostages of Leinster and Osraighe.

M1049.11

Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, and Dubhdalethe, son of Maelmuire, son of Eochaidh, was raised to his place from the lectorship on the day of Amhalghaidh's decease; and Aedh Ua Forreth assumed the lectorship.

Annal M1050.

M1050.0

The Age of Christ, 1050.

M1050.1

Cleirchen Ua Muineoc, noble bishop of Leithghlinn, and head of the piety of Osraighe;

M1050.2

Diarmaid Ua Rodachain, Bishop of Fearna;

M1050.3

Conall, airchinneach of Cill-Mocheallog, and its lector previously;

M1050.4

Dubhthach, son of Milidh, successor of Cainneach;

M1050.5

Guaire Ua Manchain, priest of Gleann-da-locha;

M1050.6

Diarmaid Ua Cele, airchinneach of Tealach-Foirtcheirn and Achadh-abhall, died.

M1050.7

Diarmaid Ua Lachan, lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1050.8

Ua Scula, airchinneach of Inis-Cathaigh;

M1050.9

Maelan, lector of Ceanannus, who was a distinguished sage;

M1050.10

and Maelduin Ua hEigceartaigh, airchinneach of Lothra, died.

M1050.11

Maelseachlainn, son of Ceannfaeladh, died.

M1050.12

Donnchadh, i.e. the Cossalach, son of Gillafhaelain, grandson of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain by Conghalach, grandson of Brogarbhan, son of Conchobhar.

M1050.13

Maelruanaidh, son of Cucoirne, lord of Eile, was killed by his own people.

M1050.14

A conflict between the men of Magh-Itha and the Airghialla, in which Eochaidh Ua hOissene was slain.

M1050.15

Dubhdalethe, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Cinel-Eoghain,


p.859

and brought three hundred cows from them.

M1050.16

Much inclement weather happened in the land of Ireland, which carried away corn, milk, fruit, and fish, from the people, so that there grew up dishonesty among all, that no protection was extended to church or fortress, gossipred or mutual oath, until the clergy and laity of Munster assembled, with their chieftains, under Donnchadh, son of Brian, i.e. the son of the King of Ireland, at Cill-Dalua, where they enacted a law and a restraint upon every injustice, from small to great. God gave peace and favourable weather in consequence of this law.

M1050.17

Cill-dara with its Daimhliag great stone church was burned.

M1050.18

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered thrice in one quarter of a year,—once by the Sil-Anmchadha, and twice by the Calraighi an Chala and the Sinnacha.

M1050.19

Lann-Leire was burned and plundered.

M1050.20

Doire-Caelainne and the Cloictheach of Ros-Comain were burned by the men of Breifne.

M1050.21

Daimhliag Chianain was burned.

M1050.22

Inis-Clothrann in Loch Ribh was plundered.

M1050.23

Dubhdalethe made a visitation of Cinel-Eoghain, and brought three hundred cows from thence.

Annal M1051.

M1051.0

The Age of Christ, 1051.

M1051.1

Mac Sluaghadhaigh, noble priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1051.2

Muircheartach, son of Breac, lord of the Deisi, was burned by the Ua Faelains.

M1051.3

Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, namely, Conghalach, son of Donnsleibhe, son of Brogarbhan, was killed by his own people.

M1051.4

A battle was gained by Ua Maeldoraidh over the Connaughtmen, wherein many of the Conmhaicni were slain.

M1051.5

Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, son of Brian, was killed by Murchadh, son of Brian, through treachery.

M1051.6

Mac Lachlainn was expelled from the lordship of Tulach-Og; and Aedh Ua Fearghail took his place.

M1051.7

The son of Faelan, son of Breac, was slain by Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh, son of Faelan, son of Breac.

M1051.8

Amhalgaidh, son of Cathal, lord of West Connaught, was blinded by Aedh Ua Conchobhair, lord of East Connaught, after he had been held in captivity for the space of one year and upwards; after which he O'Conchobhair fixed his residence in West Connaught.

M1051.9

Cathal, son of


p.861

Tighearnain, lord of Breifne, went upon a predatory excursion into Eabha, and demolished Dun-Feich, where fifty persons were slain, and whence seven hundred cows were carried off.

M1051.10

A victory was gained over the Conmhaicni of Sliabh-Formaeile by Aedh Ua Conchobhair, where a slaughter was made of the Conmhaicni.

M1051.11

Laidhcenn, son of Maelan Ua Leocain, lord of Gaileanga, and his wife, the daughter of the Gott O'Maeleachlainn, went on their pilgrimage to Rome; and they died in the east, on their return from Rome.

M1051.12

Domhnall Ban Ua Briain was slain by the King of Connaught.

M1051.13

The Tree of Magh-Adhair was prostrated by Aedh Ua Conchobhair.

M1051.14

Faelan, son of Bradan, son of Breac, was killed in the Daimhliag of Lis-mor-Mochuda, by Maelseachlainn, son of Muircheartach, son of Breac.

Annal M1052.

M1052.0

The Age of Christ, 1052.

M1052.1

Arthur, son of Muireadhach of Cluain-Maedhog, the glory of Leinster, died.

M1052.2

Echthighern Ua Eaghrain, successor of Ciaran of Cluain-mic-Nois and of Comman, died on his pilgrimage at Cluain-Iraird.

M1052.3

Muireadhach Ua Sinnachain, Patrick's steward in Munster;

M1052.4

Muireadhach, son of Diarmaid, successor of Cronan of Ros-Cre;

M1052.5

and Cleireach Ruadh Ua Lathachain, died.

M1052.6

Gillaphadraig, son of Domhnall, Prior of Ard-Macha, died.

M1052.7

Macraith, grandson of Donnchadh, lord of Eoghanacht-Chaisil, and royal heir of Munster, died.

M1052.8

A predatory excursion was made into Fine-Gall by the son of Mael-na-mbo, and he burned the country from Ath-cliath to Albene; but he did not seize cows until they had great skirmishes around the fortress, where many fell on both sides, so that the lord of the foreigners, Eachmarcach, son of Raghnall, went over seas, and the son of Mael-na-mbo assumed the kingship of


p.863

the foreigners after him.

M1052.9

A predatory excursion was made by Ua Conchobhair over Conmhaicne, so that he plundered extensively.

M1052.10

A slaughter was made of the Calraighi, together with their lord, i.e. Mac-Aireachtaigh, by the Conmhaicni, through the miracle of Ciaran.

M1052.11

Dubheassa, daughter of Brian, died.

M1052.12

Domhnall, son of Gillachrist, son of Cucuailgne, was slain by the lord of Feara-Rois.

M1052.13

Braen, son of Maelmordha, i.e. King of Leinster, died at Cologne.

M1053.0

The Age of Christ, 1053.

M1053.1

Doilgen, noble priest of Ard-Macha;

M1053.2

Domhnall Ua Cele, airchinneach of Slaine;

M1053.3

Cormac Ua Ruadhrach, airchinneach of Tearmann-Feichin;

M1053.4

and Murchadh Ua Beollain, airchinneach of Druim-cliabh, died.

M1053.5

Flaithbheartach Ua Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, died.

M1053.6

Niall Ua h-Eignigh, lord of Feara-Manach, and his brother, Gillachrist, were slain by the Feara-Luirg, through treachery.

M1053.7

Donnchadh Ua Ceallachain, royal heir of Caiseal, was slain by the Osraighi.

M1053.8

Maelcron, son of Cathal, lord of South Breagha, was slain on Easter Monday night, by Ua Riagain, who committed depredations upon the foreigners.

M1053.9

A depredation was committed by Mac Lochlainn and the men of Magh-Itha upon the Cinel-Binnigh, of Loch-Drochait; and they carried off three hundred cows.

M1053.10

Cochlan, lord of Dealbhna, was


p.865

treacherously killed.

M1053.11

Curian Ua Maelduin, lord of Feara-Luirg, was treacherously killed by Mac-na-haidhche Ua Ruairc, at his own meeting. Mac-nahaidhche Ua Ruairc was killed by the Conmhaicni immediately after.

M1053.12

An army was led by the son of Brian, i.e. Donnchadh, and Conchobhar Ua Maelseachlainn, into Fine-Gall; and the men of Teathbha, i.e. the Sinnaigh the Foxes, took many prisoners from the Daimhliag great stone church of Lusca; and they carried off hostages from the son of Mael-na-mbo, together with Mor, daughter of Conghalach O'Conchobhair.Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, and Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighi, went into Meath, whence they carried off captives and very great spoils, in revenge of the going of Mor, daughter of Conghalach Ua Conchobhair, to Conghalach Ua Maeleachlainn, in violation of Gillaphadraig; and in revenge also of the cattle spoils which O'Maeleachlainn had carried off from Meath.

M1053.13

An army was led by the son of Mael-na-mbo into Breagha and Meath, and he burned from the Slaine to West Meath, both churches and territories.

M1053.14

A predatory excursion was made by Leathlobhar, son of Laidhgnen, lord of Oirghialla, against the Gaileanga and the fugitives of the men of Meath and Breagha, and he carried off many cows and prisoners; but Conghalach, son of Seanan, lord of Gaileanga, went in pursuit of them, and overtook the cattle spoil of the Feara-Manach; but the Fir-Manach, with their lord, Domhnall, son of Maelruanaidh, resisted, and slew Conghalach, son of Seanan, lord of Gaileanga, with many others besides him.

M1053.15

Amhlaeibh Ua Machainen, lord of Mughdhorna, died.

Annal M1054.

M1054.0

The Age of Christ, 1054.

M1054.1

Ua Gearruidhir, Bishop of Cill-Dalua;

M1054.2

Maelcoluim Ua Collbrainn priest

M1054.3

Guaire Ua Lachtnain, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1054.4

and Cuileannan Claen, lector of Leithghlinn and Disert-Diarmada, died.

M1054.5

Aedh, grandson of Fearghal, son of Conaing, son of Niall, royal heir of Oileach, and lord of Cinel-Eoghain of Tealach-Og, was slain by Leathlobhar, son of Laidhgnen, lord of Airghialla, and by the Feara-Manach.

M1054.6

Dubhghall Ua hAedhagain, lord of Ui-Niallain, was slain by Ua Laithen.

M1054.7

The battle of Finnmhagh was gained over the Ui-Meith and the people of Uachtar-thire in Ui-Eathach-Uladh, where Croibhdhearg the Redhanded, Tanist of Uachtar-thire, was slain.

M1054.8

Aedh, son of Ceinneidigh, son of Donnchuan, the love and glory of Dal-gCais, died.


p.867

M1054.9

Mac Ualghairg, lord of Cairbre, was killed by treachery.

M1054.10

A steeple of fire was seen in the air over Ros-Deala, on the Sunday of the festival of George, for the space of five hours; innumerable black birds passing into and out of it, and one large bird in the middle of them; and the little birds went under his wings, when they went into the steeple. They came out, and raised up a greyhound, that was in the middle of the town, aloft in the air, and let it drop down again, so that it died immediately; and they took up three cloaks and two shirts, and let them drop down in the same manner. The wood on which these birds perched fell under them; and the oak tree upon which they perched shook with its roots in the earth.

M1054.11

Loch Suidhe-Odhrain in Sliabh-Guaire migrated in the end of the night of the festival of Michael, and went into the Feabhaill, which was a great wonder to all.

M1054.12

A predatory excursion was made by Aedh Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, into Corca-Bhaiscinn and Tradraighe, where he seized innumerable spoils.

M1054.13

Two of the Mac Carthaighs were killed by the son of O'Donnchadha.

M1054.14

An army was led by the son of Mael-na-mbo, by Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe, and by the foreigners, into Munster, until they arrived at Imleach-Ibhair, and burned Dun-tri-liag; and the son of Brian did not overtake them, for he was in the south of Ireland.

M1054.15

Toirdhealbhach O'Briain, accompanied by the Connaughtmen, went into Thomond, where he committed great depredations, and slew Aedh, son of Ceinneidigh, and plundered Tuaim-Finnlocha.


p.869

Annal M1055.

M1055.0

The Age of Christ, 1055.

M1055.1

Maelduin, son of Gilla-Andreas, Bishop of Alba, and the glory of the clergy of the Gaeidhil, died.

M1055.2

Tuathal Ua Follamhain, successor of Finnen of Cluain-Irard;

M1055.3

Maelmartan, son of Assidh, successor of Comhghall;

M1055.4

Maelbrighde Ua Maelruain, airchinnech of Slebhte;

M1055.5

Maelbrighde, son of Baedan, lector of Ard-Breacain;

M1055.6

Colum Ua Cathail, airchinneach of Rossailithir;

M1055.7

and Odhar Ua Muireadhaigh, airchinneach of Lusca, and chief of Ui-Colgain, died.

M1055.8

Fiachra Ua Corcrain;

M1055.9

Ua Ruarcain, airchinneach of Airdne-Caemhain;

M1055.10

and Gorman Anmchara, died.

M1055.11

Domhnall Ruadh Ua Briain was slain by Ua h-Eidhin, lord of Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne.

M1055.12

Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe.

M1055.13

The May prey was made by the King of Connaught, Aedh Ua Conchobhair, in West Meath, whence he carried great spoils and many prisoners.

M1055.14

A predatory excursion was made by the Dal-gCais, under the conduct of Murchadh Ua Brian, over Corca-Modhruadh, where they took great spoils; but one party of them was overtaken, and a large number killed.

M1055.15

Ceannfaeladh Ua Muireadhaigh, lord of the one division of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was killed by the grandson of Conchobhar, son of Muireadhach, lord of the other division, and many others along with him.

M1055.16

A battle was gained by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain over Murchadh Ua Briain, i.e. Murchadh of the Short Shield, wherein were slain four hundred men and fifteen chieftains.

M1055.17

Ua Sibhliain, lord of Ui-Failghe, was killed.

Annal M1056.

M1056.0

The Age of Christ, 1056.

M1056.1

Aedh Ua Foirreidh, chief lector and distinguished


p.871

Bishop of Ard-Macha, died on the 14th of the Calends of July, in the seventy-fifth year of his age, as is said:
    1. Of brilliant fame while he lived was
      Aedh O'Foirreidh the aged sage;
      On the fourteenth of the Calends of July,
      This mild bishop passed to heaven.

M1056.2

Cetfaidh, head of the piety of Munster, a wise and learned saint, died on his pilgrimage at Lis-mor.

M1056.3

Flann Mainistreach, lector of Mainistir-Buithe, the paragon of the Gaeidhil in wisdom, literature, history, poetry, and science, died on the fourteenth of the Calends of December, as is said:

    1. Flann of the chief church of melodious Buithi,
      Slow the bright eye of his fine head;
      Contemplative sage is he who sits with us,
      Last sage of the three lands is fair Flann.

M1056.4

Daighre Ua Dubhatan, anmchara of Cluain, died at Gleann-da-locha.

M1056.5

Suibhne Ua n-Eoghain, airchinneach of Tearmann-Feichin;

M1056.6

Cathasach, son of Gearrgarbhan, successor of Cainneach in Cianachta;

M1056.7

and Maelfinnen Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht, the father of Cormac, successor of Ciaran, died, i.e. Maelfinnen, son of Conn, son of Joseph, son of Donnchadh, son of Dunadhach, son of Egertach, son of Luachan, son of Eoghan, son of Aedhagan, son of Torbach, son of Gorman, of the Ui-Ceallaigh-Breagh.

M1056.8

Etru, son of Labhraidh, chief of Monach, pillar of the glory of Ulidia, died, after a good life.

M1056.9

Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, lord of Leinster, made a treacherous depredation upon the Ui-Laeghaire of Teamhair; but the lord of Laeghaire overtook him, and made a slaughter of his people.

M1056.10

Domhnall Ua Cearnachain, son of the Gott, was slain by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1056.11

A predatory incursion was made by Niall, son of Maeleachlainn, upon the Dal-Araidhe; and he carried off two thousand cows


p.873

and sixty persons as prisoners.

M1056.12

Eochaidh Ua Flaithen, going upon a predatory excursion into Magh-Itha on Christmas night, carried off five hundred cows to the river of Magh-Uatha; and he left the cows at the river, where forty-eight persons were drowned, together with Cuilennan, son of Deargan.

M1056.13

Tadhg, son of the Cleric Ua Conchobhair, was slain by the Ui-Maine.

M1056.14

Ruaidhri Ua Gadhra, Tanist of Luigne, was slain.

M1056.15

A plundering expedition was made by Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, into Munster; and he burned Dun-mic-Ninguir, Oenach-Tete, and Dun-Furudhrain.

M1056.16

Gillachaeimhghin, son of Gillachomhghaill, and Maelmordha, grandson of Faelan, were slain by Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, through treachery and guile.

M1056.17

Odhar, son of Flann, lord of Calraighe, died.

Annal M1057.

M1057.0

The Age of Christ, 1057.

M1057.1

Mughron Ua Mutain, successor of Bairre, noble bishop and lector, was killed by robbers of the Corca-Laighdhe, after his return from vespers.

M1057.2

Robhartach, son of Feardomhnach, successor of Colum Cille and Adamnan,

M1057.3

and Dubhdalethe Ua Cinaedha, airchinneach of Corcach, died.

M1057.4

Niall Ua hEigneachain, lord of Cinel-Enda, was killed by his own tribe.

M1057.5

Maelruanaidh Ua Fogarta,lord of South Eile, was slain by Donnchadh, son of


p.875

Brian.

M1057.6

Dunghal, son of Macraith Ua Dunchadha, lord of Eoghanacht, was slain, with a party of others along with him.

M1057.7

A battle between Domhnall Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Feara-Manach, and Domhnall Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, wherein O'Ruairc fell, and many of his people along with him.

M1057.8

A great plundering of Luighne was made by Aedh Ua Conchobhair.

M1057.9

A slaughter was made of the Ui-Briuin by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, as they were bringing a prey from South Leinster by him i.e. through his territory.

M1057.10

Dunchadh Ua Donnchadha, lord of Caiseal, was killed.

Annal M1058.

M1058.0

The Age of Christ, 1058.

M1058.1

Colman Ua h-Aireachtaigh, successor of Comhghall of Beannchair;

M1058.2

Maelfinnen Ua Guaire, anchorite of Daimhinis;

M1058.3

and Maelisa Ua Flainnchua, a learned senior of Imleach-Ibhair, died.

M1058.4

Imleach-Ibhair was totally burned, both Daimhliag and Cloictheach.

M1058.5

After the burning of Luimneach, the battle of Sliabh-Crot was gained by Diarmaid Mac Mael-na-mbo over Donnchadh, son of Brian, wherein fell Cairbre Ua Lighda, airchinneach of Imleach-Ibhair; Righbhardan, son of Cucoirne, lord of Eile; and a great number of others besides them.

M1058.6

Gallbrat Ua Cearbhaill, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, by treachery. The sword of Carlus and many other precious things were obtained by the son of Mael-na-mbo for him, for he was the security for him.

M1058.7

Ceallach, son of Muireagan, lord of Ui-Mic-Uais-Breagh, died.

M1058.8

Scrin-Choluim-Chille was plundered by the men of Teathbha; and the men of Meath made a slaughter of the men of Teathbha and Cairbre, in revenge thereof.

Annal M1059.

M1059.0

The Age of Christ, 1059.

M1059.1

Ua Lorcain, Abbot of Cill-achaidh, died.

M1059.2

Domhnall Deiseach, wise man and anchorite, died.

M1059.3

Domhnall, son of Eodhas,


p.877

airchinneach of Mainistir-Buithi;

M1059.4

Aneslis, son of Odhar, airchinneach of Lusca;

M1059.5

Eochaidh Ua Cinaedh, airchinneach of Ath-Truim;

M1059.6

Conaing Ua Faircheallaigh, airchinneach of Druim-leathan, successor of Maedhog in Connaught and Leinster, died.

M1059.7

Conn-na-mBocht, the glory and dignity of Cluain-mic-Nois, died at an advanced age.

M1059.8

Niall Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died after a good life, and after penance for his transgressions and sins.

M1059.9

Aedhvar Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha, was slain by his own tribe.

M1059.10

Cathal, son of Tighearnan, son of Niall, son of Aedh, lord of East Connaught, was slain by Aedh Ua Ruairc.

M1059.11

Duarcan Ua hEaghra, lord of the Three Tribes of Luighne, was killed.

M1059.12

Tomaltach Ua Maelbhrenainn, lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh

M1059.13

and Maelseachlainn Ua Bric, lord of the Deisi, were smothered in a cave by Maelseachlainn, son of Gillabrighde, son of Faelan.

M1059.14

Conghalach Ua Riagain, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by Murchadh, son of Diarmaid.

M1059.15

Gillacaeimhghin, son of Gillacomhgaill, royal heir of Leinster, and Maelmordha, grandson of Faelan, were slain by Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, by treachery and guile.

M1059.16

Ruaidhri Ua Gadhra, heir to the lordship of Luighne, died.

M1059.17

A predatory excursion was made by Maelseachlainn Ua Madadhain into Airtheara Oriors; and he carried off three hundred cows, and slew Gillamuire Mac Aireachtaigh, lord of Clann-Sinaich.

M1059.18

A predatory excursion was made by Ardghar Mac Lachlainn, one of the Cinel-Eoghain, into Dal-Araidhe; and he carried off a great cattle spoil, and killed or captured two hundred persons.

M1059.19

The son of Brian Borumha went into the house of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, and tendered his submission to him.

M1059.20

A victory was gained by Conchobhair Ua Maeleachlainn, lord of Meath,


p.879

over Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, lord of the foreigners, wherein many were slain; and the Leinstermen were defeated on the same day at Dearmhach-Choluim-Chille, through the miracles of God and Colum-Cille.

M1059.21

Great fruit throughout Ireland in this year.

M1059.22

A great war between the Leinstermen and Meathmen, during which many of the Leinstermen were slain, together with Muircheartach, son of Dalbhach, son of Maelruanaidh.

Annal M1060.

M1060.0

The Age of Christ, 1060.

M1060.1

Maelchiarain Ua Robhachain, airchinneach of Sord-Choluim-Chille;

M1060.2

and Ailill Ua Maelchiarain, airchinneach of Eaglais-Beg at Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1060.3

Ceanannus was all burned, both houses and churches.

M1060.4

Leithghlinn was all burned, except the oratory.

M1060.5

The Eli and Ui-Forgga came upon a predatory excursion to Cluain-mic-Nois; and they took prisoners from Cros-na-screaptra, and killed two persons, i.e. a student and a layman. God and Ciaran incited the Dealbhna, with their lord, i.e. Aedh Ua Ruairc, to go in pursuit of them; and they defeated and slaughtered them, killing, among others, the Tanist of Ui-Forgga, who had slain the student. The Dealbhna arrived at rising-time on the following morning, bringing the prisoners to the place whence they had been taken.

M1060.6

Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, went to Manann, and carried tribute from thence, and defeated the son of Raghnall.

M1060.7

Flaithbheartach Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha, died on his pilgrimage.

M1060.8

Annadh Ua Lochlainn, lord of Corcumdhruadh, died.

Annal M1061.

M1061.0

The Age of Christ, 1061.

M1061.1

Muireadhach Ua Maelcoluim, airchinneach of Doire;

M1061.2

Maelcoluim Ua Loingsigh, a learned man and priest of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1061.3

Ciaran, lector of Ceanannus, a distinguished sage;

M1061.4

Tighearnach Boircheach,


p.881

chief anmchara of Ireland, anchorite, and successor of Finnen; and

M1061.5

Maelbrighde Mac-an-Ghobhann, died of the plague.

M1061.6

Ogan Ua Cormacain, airchinneach of Inis-Cumscraigh;

M1061.7

and Conaing, fossairchinneach of Ard-Macha, died.

M1061.8

Domhnall Ua Maeldoraidh was slain by Ruaidhri Ua Canannain in a battle.

M1061.9

Cu-Uladh, son of Conghalach, lord of Uachtar-thire, died after a good life.

M1061.10

Niall, son of Maelseachlainn, lord of Oileach, died.

M1061.11

An army was led by Aedh an Gha-bhearnaigh Ua Conchobhair to Ceann-coradh Kincora; and he demolished the fortress, and destroyed the enclosing wall of the well, and eat its two salmons, and also burned Cill-Dalua.

M1061.12

The Muintir-Murchadha invaded Loch Oirbsean, and deposed Aedh Ua Conchobhair.

M1061.13

The victory of Gleann-Phadraig was gained by Aedh Ua Conchobhair over the people of West Connaught, where many were slain, together with Ruaidhri. O'Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught, was beheaded, and his head was carried to Cruachain in Connaught, after the son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, had been defeated.

M1061.14

Gleann-da-locha was burned, with its churches.

M1061.15

Flann Ua Ceallaigh, heir to the lordships of Breagha, was slain by the Saithni.

M1061.16

Gairbhith Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Breagha, died.

M1061.17

The son of Mac Dunghail, lord of Ui-Briuin-Chualann, died.

M1061.18

The son of Mael-na-mbo, lord of Leinster and of the foreigners, proceeded into Munster about Allhallowtide, and made a bloody slaughter of the Munstermen at Cnamh-choill, and burned the plain of Munster, both houses and corn.

Annal M1062.

M1062.0

The Age of Christ, 1062.

M1062.1

Gillachrist Ua Maeldoraidh, successor of Colum-Cille both in Ireland and Alba;

M1062.2

Maelruanaidh Ua Daighre, chief anmchara of the north of Ireland;

M1062.3

and Murchadh Ua Laidhgnen, airchinneach of Fearna,


p.883

died.

M1062.4

A battle was gained by Aedh an Gha-bhearnaigh Ua Conchobhair over the son of Ruaidhri, wherein eighty of the Clann-Choscraigh were slain.

M1062.5

Tadhg, son of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, was slain by the son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, and the people of West Connaught.

M1062.6

A plundering excursion was made by Ardghar Mac Lochlainn into the province of Connaught, whence he carried off six thousand cows and one thousand prisoners.

M1062.7

Donncuan was slain by Gillachiarain Ua Machainen, lord of Mughdhorna.

M1062.8

Ruaidhri, son of Cucairrge, Tanist of Fearnmhagh, was slain by the son of Niall Ua Ruairc.

M1062.9

Diarmaid, son of Murchadh, with the Leinstermen, proceeded into Munster, and burned Luimneach and Dun-na-Trapcharla; of which was said:

    1. The Leinstermen came to Luimneach,
      The good men of Druim-dairbhreach;
      The stately host left Luimneach
      One heap of sand-like coal.

M1062.10

Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, and his son, Eochaidh, son of Neill, son of Eochaidh, royal heir of the province, died on Thursday, the Ides of September.

M1063.0

The Age of Christ, 1063.

M1063.1

Cinaedh, son of Aicher, airchinneach of Lismor-Mochuda;

M1063.2

Eochaidh Ua Dallain, airchinneach of Coindere;

M1063.3

and Madudhan Ua Ceileachain, Prior of Ard-Macha, died.

M1063.4

Ceallach Ua Caeimh, wise man and anchorite, died.

M1063.5

Ua Miadhachain, lector of the family of Cluain-mic-Nois,

M1063.6

and Mac Donghail, lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1063.7

Conaing Ua hEaghra, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1063.8

Gormlaith, daughter of Cathal, son of


p.885

Ruaidhri, died on her pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1063.9

Cathal, son of Donnchadh, lord of Ui-Eathach-Mumhan, i.e. lord of Raithlinn, was killed by his own son, i.e. the Finnshuileach.

M1063.10

Cuduiligh Ua Taidhg, lord of Feara-Li, died.

M1063.11

Maelseachlainn Ua Madudhain, royal heir of Oileach, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill.

M1063.12

Gillaerraith Ua Maelmithigh,a young lord the most promising of the Gaeidhil, died.

M1063.13

A great army was led by Ardgar, i.e. Mac Lochlainn, from Gleann-Suilighe westwards to the west of Luighne, and to the River Muaidh of Ui-Amhalghaidh; and all the lords of Connaught came into his house with Aedh Ua Conchobhair, with Aedh, son of Niall Ua Ruairc, and the son of Art Ua Ruairc.

M1063.14

The cave of Alla Gerc, in Ceara, was demolished by the Conmhaicni, against the people of Ua Conchobhair (Aedh), and eight score persons and the jewels of Connaught were carried off from thence.

M1063.15

Luimneach was burned by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, and Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo.

M1063.16

The cholic and lumps prevailed in Leinster, and also spread throughout Ireland.

M1063.17

Great scarcity of provisions for cattle in this year, and scarcity of corn and obsonia.

M1063.18

Eochaidh Ua hEochadha, King of Uladh, died.

M1063.19

A great army was led by Diarmaid the son of Mael-na-mbo, into Munster; and the chiefs of the Plain of Munster came into his house, and left hostages with him.

M1063.20

The son of Brian, and Murchadh of the Short Shield, his son, came to Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, to attack him after the departure of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo; and Toirdhealbhach defeated Murchadh, and slaughtered his people.

M1063.21

Diarmaid afterwards proceeded into Munster, and took the hostages of Munster from the Water southwards to Cnoc Brenainn, and delivered these hostages into the hands of Toirdhealbhach, who was his foster-son.

M1063.22

Laeighseach, son of Faelan Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, was slain.


p.887

Annal M1064.

M1064.0

The Age of Christ, 1064.

M1064.1

Doilghen Ua Sona, airchinneach of Ard-sratha;

M1064.2

Cormac, airchinneach of Ard-Breacain;

M1064.3

Eochaidh Ua Doireidh, airchinneach of Domhnach-mor of Magh-Ithe;

M1064.4

the blind Ua Lonain, chief poet and chief historian of Munster;

M1064.5

and Gilla huasaille Ua Maelmithigh, died.

M1064.6

Donnchadh, son of Brian, chief king of Munster, was deposed; and he afterwards went to Rome, where he died, under the victory of penance, in the monastery of Stephen the martyr.

M1064.7

Muircheartach Ua Neill, lord of Tealach-Og, was slain by Ui-Cremhthainn.

M1064.8

Ardghal Mac Lochlainn, lord of Oileach, died at Tealach-Og, and was buried at Ard-Macha, with honour and veneration, in the tomb of the kings.

M1064.9

Diarmaid Ua Lorcain, royal heir of Leinster, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M1064.10

Murchadh Ua Fallamhain, Tanist of Meath, and his brother, were treacherously slain.

M1064.11

Dubhdalethe, son of Maelmuire, successor of Patrick, died, after praiseworthy penance, on the first of September; and Maelisa, son of Amhalghaidh, assumed the abbacy.

Annal M1065.

M1065.0

The Age of Christ, 1065.

M1065.1

Maelbrighde Ua Mannaigh, a bishop;

M1065.2

Dubhthach Albanach, chief anmchara of Ireland and Alba, died at Ard-Macha. Of Dubhthach was said:

    1. Dubhthach, a strict, austere man,
      Who made the roomy, cheap abode,
      The friend of souls, thou seest, has obtained heaven,
      In exchange for his fair, thin-boarded domicile.

M1065.3

Domhnall, airchinneach of Lughmhadh, died.

M1065.4

Donnchadh Ua Mathghamhna, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Ulidians themselves, in the Daimhliag


p.889

stone church of Beannchair.

M1065.5

Brodar, the enemy of Comhghall (it was by him the king was killed at Beannchair), was slain by the lord of Dal-Araidhe.

M1065.6

Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, and Muircheartach Ua Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, were slain by the Ui-Meith.

M1065.7

Echmhilidh Ua hAiteidh, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M1065.8

Leochan, i.e. the son of Laidhgnen, lord of Gaileanga, was slain by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1065.9

The plundering of Cluain-mic-Nois by the Conmhaicni and Ui-Maine. Cluain-fearta was plundered by them on the day following. The chiefs who were there were Aedh, son of Niall Ua Ruairc, and Diarmaid, son of Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui-Maine. Ua Conchobhair (Aedh) came against them, and defeated them, through the miracles of God, Ciaran, and Brenainn, whose churches they had plundered; and a bloody slaughter was made of them by Aedh; and they left their boats with him, together with the ship which they had carried from the sea eastwards, through the middle of Connaught, to the Shannon. Aedh Ua Ruairc escaped from this conflict, but he died without delay afterwards, through the miracles of Ciaran. Diarmaid, son of Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh, and his son, Conchobhar, were slain by the King of Connaught, Aedh Ua Conchobhair, before the end of a year.

M1065.10

Duarcan, son of Maelmhiadhaigh Ua hEolusa, chief of Muintir-Eoluis, was slain by Ua Conchobhair, i.e. Aedh.

M1065.11

There was such abundance of nuts this year, that the course of brooks and streamlets was impeded.

M1065.12

Culen O'Domhnallain, chief brehon of Ui-Failghe, was slain by the Ui-Crimhthannain.

Annal M1066.

M1066.0

The Age of Christ, 1066.

M1066.1

Dunchadh Ua Daimhene, comharba of Doire;

M1066.2

Coemhoran, successor of Cainneach i.e. Abbot of Aghaboe;

M1066.3

Fiacha Ua Riagain, airchinneach of Cluain-Boireann, died.

M1066.4

Fogartach, noble priest of Achadh-bo, died at a good old age.

M1066.5

Fogartach Finn, one of the Ulidians, a wise man and anchorite, died at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1066.6

Gillabraide, lord of Breifne, was slain by the Ui-Beccon; and Orlaidh, his wife, the daughter of Conchobhar


p.891

Ua Maeleachlainn, died. This Gillabraide was the son of Domhnall, son of Tighearnan, son of Ualgharg, son of Niall.

M1066.7

Ceallach, son of Muircheartach Ua Ceallaigh, was killed.

M1066.8

Mac Seanain, lord of Gaileanga, was killed.

M1066.9

Gillamoninne, son of Aedh, son of Ualgharg, was killed.

M1066.10

Cinaedh, son of Odharmhac, lord of Conaille, died after penance.

M1066.11

A star appeared on the seventh of the Calends of May, on Tuesday after Little Easter, than whose light the brilliance or light of the moon was not greater; and it was visible to all in this manner till the end of four nights afterwards.

M1066.12

The son of Conaing Ua Muireagain, heir to the lordship of Teathbha, was slain by Aedh Ua Conchobhair and Tadhg Ua Muiregain.

M1066.13

Aeibheann, daughter of Ua Conchobhair, the wife of Ua Muireagain, died.

M1066.14

William the Conqueror took the kingdom of England on the 14th of October.

Annal M1067.

M1067.0

The Age of Christ, 1067.

M1067.1

Celechar Mughdhornach, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois, died; he was of the tribe of the Ui-Ceallaigh of Breagha.

M1067.2

Scolaighe, son of Innreachtach, airchinneach of Mucnamh, and the airchinneach of Dun-Leathghlaise, died.

M1067.3

Echthighern, son of Flann Mainistreach, airchinneach of Mainistir-Buithe, died.

M1067.4

The great army of Leath-chuinn was led by Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, King of Leinster; by Murchadh, and Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, into Connaught; and Aedh Ua Conchobhair set an ambuscade for them, so that Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra,


p.893

and many persons along with him, were killed.

M1067.5

The battle of Turlach Adhnaigh, between Aedh of the Broken Spear Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, and Aedh, the son of Art Uallach Ua Ruairc, and the men of Breifne along with him; where fell Aedh Ua Conchobhair, King of the province of Connaught, the helmsman of the valour of Leath-Chuinn; and the chiefs of Connaught fell along with him, and, among the rest, Aedh Ua Concheanainn, lord of Ui-Diarmada, and many others. It was to commemorate the death of Aedh Ua Conchobhair this quatrain was composed:

    1. Seven years, seventy, not a short period,
      And a thousand, great the victory,
      From the birth of Christ, not false the jurisdiction,
      Till the fall of Aedh, King of Connaught.

M1067.6

Muireadhach Ua Carthaigh was drowned in Loch Calgaich; he was the chief poet and chief ollamh of Connaught.

M1067.7

Tadhg Ua Muireagain, lord of


p.895

Teathbha, was killed by Muintir-Tlamain, in Maenmhagh.

M1067.8

Donnsleibhe Ua Gadhra was killed by Brian Ua hEaghra.

M1067.9

Maelseachlainn, son of Gillabrighde, lord of the Deisi, was taken prisoner by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, and he was delivered into the hands of Ua Bric, who blinded him.

Annal M1068.

M1068.0

The Age of Christ, 1068.

M1068.1

Cinaedh, son of Muireadhach, successor of Caeimhghin;

M1068.2

Anghene Mac-an-Bheaganaigh, successor of Mocholmog and Comhghall;

M1068.3

Domhnall Ua Cathasaigh, airchinneach of Dun;

M1068.4

and Colman Ua Crichain, lector of Ard-Macha, died.

M1068.5

Murchadh, i.e. of the Short Shield, Ua Briain, son of Donnchadh, son of Brian Borumha, royal heir of Munster, was slain by the men of Teathbha, in revenge of their having been plundered and preyed; and his head was taken to Cluain -mic-Nois, and his body to Dearmhach.

M1068.6

Domhnall, grandson of Maeleachlainn, i.e. the son of Niall, son of Maeleachlainn, lord of Oileach, was killed in the battle of Sithbhe, by his brother, Aedh, son of Niall, son of Maeleachlainn; and this Domhnall was usually called Domhnall of the Poor, and it is said that he was the most pious that was in Ireland in his reign.

M1068.7

Flaithbheartach Ua Fearghail, lord of Tealach Og, was mortally wounded by the Cinel-Binnigh.

M1068.8

Maelisa, son of Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Munster, for the first time; and he obtained a full visitation tribute, both in screaballs and offerings.

Annal M1069.

M1069.0

The Age of Christ, 1069.

M1069.1

Cobhthach, priest of Cill-dara, head of the glory and dignity of Leinster, died.

M1069.2

Aedh, son of Dubhghall, Vice-abbot of Cluain-Fiachna, died.

M1069.3

Flannagan, son of Aedh, fos-airchinneach of Ard-Macha, died after a good life.

M1069.4

Dun-da-leathghlas, Ard-sratha, Lusca, and Sord-Choluim-Chille, were burned.

M1069.5

Ua hAedha, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Arda-sratha, died.

M1069.6

The grandson of Gadhra Ua Dunadhaigh, i.e. lord of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by


p.897

Ua Madadhain.

M1069.7

An army was led by Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, into Meath, where he burned territories and churches, namely, Granard, Fobhar-Feichin, and Ardbreacain; but Feichin slew him, face to face, and a great destruction was made among the foreigners and Leinstermen by various distempers.

M1069.8

Maciairn, son of Dubhthach, lord of the Comanns, died.

M1069.9

Faelan, i.e. the Blind, Ua Mordha, died at Achadh-bo.

M1069.10

Gillamolua Ua Bru-aideadha, lord of Rath-Tamhnaighe, died.

M1069.11

Gillamaire, son of Dubh, chief of Crimhthannan, was slain by Macraith Ua Mordha, in the doorway of the oratory of Teach-Mochua, they having previously mutually sworn upon the Caimmin, which was in the possession of the son of Dubh, that the blood of the son of Dubh is now and ever will remain upon the Caimmin. Macraith Ua Mordha was afterwards killed at Muilleann-na-Crossan, in the vicinity of Achadh-bo, having the Caimmin with him, in revenge of Finntan, Mochua, and Colman.

Annal M1070.

M1070.0

The Age of Christ, 1070.

M1070.1

Ailill Ua hAirretaich, chief successor of Ciaran of Cluain-mic-Nois, died on his pilgrimage at Cluain-Iraird. Ailill was of the tribe of Corca-Raidhe.

M1070.2

Donnghal, son of Gorman, chief lector of Leath-Chuinn, and Tanist-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1070.3

and Cathasach, son of Cairbre, Abbot of Mungairit, head of the clergy of Munster, died.

M1070.4

Fearghal Ua Laidhgnen, Abbot of Othain;

M1070.5

and Maelbrighde, son of Cathasaigh, fosairchinneach of Ard-Macha, died.

M1070.6

Mac Baeithine, Abbot of Ia, was killed.

M1070.7

Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, lord of the foreigners and of Leinster, under his father, died at Ath-cliath, precisely on Sunday, the festival of Mary, in winter. It was in lamentation of him the poet composed these quatrains:


p.899

    1. There is grief for a chief king at Ath-cliath,
      Which will not be exceeded till the terrible Judgment Day;
      Empty is the fortress without the descendant of Duach,
      Quickly was the vigour of its heroes cut down.
      Sorrowful every party in the fortress
      For their chief, against whom no army prevailed;
      Since the body of the king was hidden from all,
      Every evil has showered ever constant.
      For Murchadh, son of Diarmaid the impetuous,
      Many a fervent prayer is offered;
      In sorrow for the death of the chief is every host
      That was wont to defeat in the battle,
      Great the sorrow that he was not everlasting;
      Pity that death hath attacked him.
      Too early it was that he removed from him his complexion,
      That he removed one like him from his body.
      Liberal of wealth was the grandson of Mael-na-mbo;
      He bestowed horses, and he distributed cows,
      For the sake of his going to God.
      Who is it to whom 'tis best to give fleeting wealth?

M1070.8

Gluniarn, son of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, was killed by the men of Meath; and he was buried at Daimhliag-Chianain.

M1070.9

Conchobhar, son of Cleireach Ua Conchobhair, was treacherously killed by the Conmhaicni.

M1070.10

Murchadh Liathanach, son of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was treacherously killed by Muintir-Follamhain.

M1070.11

A battle was gained by Donnchadh Ua Ruairc and the Ui-Briuin over the men of Teathbha, in which Conn, grandson of Conn, with others, was slain.

M1070.12

Aedh-na-Dearbha Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was treacherously slain.

M1070.13

Muircheartach Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, was blinded by his brother, Conchobhar.

M1070.14

The causeway from the Cross of


p.901

Bishop Etchen to Irdom-Chiarain was made at Cluain-mic-Nois, by Maelchiarain Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht; and the causeway from Cros-Chomhghaill to Uluidh-na-dTri-gCross, and thence westwards to the entrance of the street.

Annal M1071.

M1071.0

The Age of Christ, 1071.

M1071.1

Gillachrist Ua Clothocan, lector of Ard-Macha, and chief doctor of the Gaedhil, died after penance.

M1071.2

Donghal Ua Coibhdheanaigh, noble priest of Cluain-eidhneach, died.

M1071.3

Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by Aenghus Ua Maeldoraidh.

M1071.4

Aeghredan Ua Muireagain, lord of Teathbha, was killed by the Conmhaicni.

M1071.5

The son of Righbhardan, son of Cucoirne, lord of Eile, was slain in a battle, with others along with him, by Donnchadh, lord of Ui-Maine.

M1071.6

The King of Ulidia, i.e. Cu-Uladh Ua Flaithri, was deposed, and expelled into Leinster, by Ua Maelruanaidh and the Ulidians; and this Ua Maelruanaidh was slain in battle immediately after, by Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha.

M1071.7

The son of Gillabrighde Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara Ceall, died.

M1071.8

Donnchadh Got, royal heir of Teamhair, was killed by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1071.9

Hua Sibhlen, i.e. Gillaphadraig, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain in battle by Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair, where Mathghamhain, Ua-hUathmharan; Lorcan, son of Flaithniadh Ua Duibh, lord of Creamhthannain, with many others, were also slain.

M1071.10

Ceall-dara, Gleann-da-locha, and Cluain-Dolcain, were burned.

M1071.11

Finnachta, son of Eigneachan Ua Cuinn, and Donn, son of Fogartach Ua Cuinn, were treacherously killed by the Connaughtmen.

M1071.12

A battle between Domhnall, son of Murchadh, and Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Reamhar, wherein Tadhg Ua Riain was slain.

Annal M1072.

M1072.0

The Age of Christ, 1072.

M1072.1

Maelmuire Ua Muireagain, airchinneach of Tuidhnidha,

M1072.2

and Dubhdil, successor of Brighid, died.

M1072.3

Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, King of Leinster, of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and of Leath-Mogha-Nuadhat,


p.903

was slain and beheaded in the battle of Odhbha, on Tuesday, the seventh of the Ides of February, the battle having been gained over him by Conchobhar O'Maeleachlainn, King of Meath. There were also slain many hundreds of the foreigners and Leinstermen, along with Diarmaid, in that battle. In it was killed Gillaphadraig O'Fearghaile, lord of the Fortuatha, &c. Of the death of Diarmaid was said:
    1. Two, seven times ten above one thousand,
      From the birth of Christ is reckoned,
      To this year, in which Diarmaid,
      First man in Leinster, fell.
      Diarmaid, of the ruddy-coloured aspect,
      A king who maintained the standard of war,
      Whose death brought scarcity of peace,
      The loss of the heroes of Ladhrann, with their ships.
      Comely youths were cut down there,
      Together with the head of Claire and Cualann.
      It caused in the breeze a noise not pleasant,
      The loss of the King of Riada of great valour.
      Until at Muillenn-Chul was slain
      A brave chieftain of a strong fortress,
      Until the furious fire-brand fell by treachery,
      They found no hero who dared with him contend.
      It is a red wound through my firm heart;
      For the host from Caindruim it was not just
      To destroy our noble chief they had no right,
      It has quenched their spirit greatly,
      Diarmaid of the laughing teeth under violent sorrow;
      There is not on account of his death banquet or feast;
      There will not be peace, there will not be armistice.


p.905

M1072.4

Cuuladh Ua Flathrai, King of Ulidia, and Mac Asidha, i.e. Gabhadhan, lord of Ui-Gabhla, were burned by the men of Meath, in an ignited house, and a great number of other persons along with them.

M1072.5

A forcible refection was taken by Murchadh, son of Conchobhar O'Maeleachlainn, at Iseal-Chiarain, and from Ceili-De, so that the superintendent of the poor was killed there, for which Magh-Nura was given to the poor.

M1072.6

Ua Fogarta, lord of Eile, was killed by Ua Briain.

M1073.0

The Age of Christ, 1073.

M1073.1

Maelmordha, Abbot of Imleach-Ibhair;

M1073.2

Cormaic Ua Maelduin, chief lector and most learned senior of Ireland;

M1073.3

and Gillacaissi Osraigheach, successor of Fidh-duin, died.

M1073.4

Conchobhar Ua Maelseachlainn, King of Meath, was killed, in violation of the Bachall-Isa, through treachery and guile, by the son of his brother, Murchadh, son of Flann; and Meath was afterwards desolated between Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, and this Murchadh, son of Flann.

M1073.5

Cluain-Iraird and Ceanannus, with their churches, were all burned in one month.

M1073.6

The head of Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn was forcibly carried off by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, on the night of Good Friday; but it was brought back from the South again, with two rings of gold along with it, through the miracles of God and Ciaran. A great disease


p.907

seized the king, Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, which caused his hair and beard to fall off, through the miracles of God and Ciaran, for when the head of Conchobhar was brought in his presence, a mouse issued from it, and went under Toirdhealbhach's garment, which was the cause of his disease.

M1073.7

Bebhinn, daughter of Brian, died on her pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1073.8

Domhnall, son of Ualgharg, chief of Ui-Duibhinnreacht; and Cuchaille Ua Finn, lord of Feara-Rois, died.

M1073.9

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach into Leath-Chuinn; and he took countless preys from the Gaileanga, and slew Maelmordha Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Breagha.

Annal M1074.

M1074.0

The Age of Christ, 1074.

M1074.1

Dunan, Archbishop of Ath-cliath;

M1074.2

Diarmaid, son of Maelbrenainn, successor of Brenainn;

M1074.3

Maelmordha, successor of Ailbhe;

M1074.4

Cobhthach, Abbot of Disert-Diarmada;

M1074.5

Cucairrge Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Mura, died.

M1074.6

Ard-Macha was burned on the Tuesday after May-day, with all its churches and bells, both Rath and Trian.

M1074.7

Cumascach Ua hEradhain, head of the poor of Ireland, died after good penance and repentance.

M1074.8

Raghnall Ua Madadhain, Tanist of Aileach, died.

M1074.9

Donnchadh Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui-Maine, was killed by his brother, Tadhg, grandson of Conchobhar Ua Ceallaigh, on the island of Loch-Caelain.

M1074.10

Aedh Meranach, King of Ulidia, was drowned at Luimneach, or in Loch-Eathach.

Annal M1075.

M1075.0

The Age of Christ, 1075.

M1075.1

Cumasgach Ua Erodhan, Abbot of Ard-Macha, died.

M1075.2

Donnchadh Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was killed.

M1075.3

Amhalghaidh, son of Cathal, lord of West Connaught, died.

M1075.4

Lughmhadh, with its church, was burned.

M1075.5

Cluain-Iraird, with its oratory, was burned.

M1075.6

Domhnall, son of Murchadh, King of Ath-cliath, died of three nights' disease.

M1075.7

Cinaeth Ua Conbeathadh, chief of Cinel-Binnigh, died.

M1075.8

Domhnall Ua Caindhealbhain was slain by the Airghialla.

M1075.9

The two sons of Augaire Ua Lorcain, namely, Donnchadh and Gillacaeimhghin, were killed by the grandson of Gillachomhghaill


p.909

Ua Tuathal, in contesting the chieftainship of Ui-Murchadha for their father.

M1075.10

A hosting of the Meathmen, Connaughtmen, the foreigners, the Leinstermen, the Osraighi, and the Munstermen, was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain; and they marched to Ath-Fhirdia, to demand hostages from the Oirghialla and the Ulidians. The chiefs of the province came to oppose them, and when they were face to face, a battle was fought at Ard-Monann between the Airghialla and Muircheartach Ua Briain, i.e. the royal heir of Munster, where Muircheartach and his forces were defeated, and a bloody slaughter made of his people; and his chiefs returned to their houses without hostage or pledge on that occasion.

M1075.11

Ath-cliath was taken by Muircheartach Ua Briain.

Annal M1076.

M1076.0

The Age of Christ, 1076.

M1076.1

Cele, son of Donnagan, chief senior of the Gaeidhil, and bishop of Leinster, died at Gleann-da-locha, after a good life.

M1076.2

Murchadh, son of Flann Ua Maeleachlainn, at the expiration of three days and three nights after his having assumed the supremacy of Teamhair, was treacherously killed in the Cloictheach of Ceanannus, by the lord of Gaileanga, i.e. Amhlaeibh, the grandson of Maelan; and the latter was himself immediately slain in revenge, through the miracles of God and Colum-Cille, by Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar.

M1076.3

Gairbheith Ua hInnreachtaigh, lord of Ui-Meith, was slain by the men of Meath.

M1076.4

Gillachrist Ua Duibhdara, lord of Feara-Manach, was slain by the Feara-Manach themselves, on the island of Daimhinis.

M1076.5

Domhnall Ua Crichain,chief of Ui-Fiachrach Arda-sratha, was slain, with a slaughter about him, by the Ui-Tuirtri and the Cinel-Binnigh of the valley.

M1076.6

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain into Connaught; and Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, came into his house.

M1076.7

The battle of Belaith was gained by Aedh Ua Maelseachlainn and the men of Magh-Itha over the Cianachta, of


p.911

whom a slaughter was therein made.

M1076.8

There was scarcity of provisions in this year.

M1076.9

An army was led by the clergy of Leath-Mhogha, with the son of Maeldalua, to Cluain-Dolcain, to expel Ua Ronain from Cluain-Dolcain, after he had assumed the abbacy, in violation of the right of the son of Maeldalua. It was on this occasion that a church, with its land, at Cluain-Dolcain, was given to Culdees for ever, together with twelve score cows, which were given as mulct to the son of Maeldalua.

M1076.10

A slaughter was made of the people of the son of Gillachomhghaill by Ua Lorcain; and he carried three score and three heads to the hill south of Disert-Diarmada.

M1076.11

Gillachrist, son of Cathalan, chief of Ui-nOcra, was slain by the son of Mac Tuathail.

Annal M1077.

M1077.0

The Age of Christ, 1077.

M1077.1

Muireadhach Ua Nuadhat, learned senior of Dearmhach;

M1077.2

Maelmartan Macua Cearta, learned senior of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1077.3

Loingseach Ua Conaire, learned senior of Munster, died.

M1077.4

Feardachrich Ua Coibhdheanaigh, a learned man and a priest, died.

M1077.5

Colcu Ua hErodhan, head of the poor of Ard-Macha;

M1077.6

Ailbhe, wife of the lord of the Airtheara Oriors, and successor of Moninne, died.

M1077.7

Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was slain by the Dal-Araidhe themselves.

M1077.8

Gillaphadraig Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, died.

M1077.9

Ua Celechain, Tanist of the Airtheara; and Ruarc Ua Cathasaigh, were slain.

M1077.10

Murchadh, son of Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Meath, was slain by the men of Teathbha and Catharnach Sinnach, through envy and


p.913

malice.

M1077.11

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and he fettered the son of Domhnall Reamhar, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M1077.12

Gormlaith, daughter of Ua Fogarta, wife of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, died; and she had distributed much wealth among cells and churches, and the poor of the Lord, for the welfare of her soul.

M1077.13

There was great scarcity in this year also, and persecution of churches.

M1077.14

Cluain-mic-Nois was all burned, except the churches.

M1077.15

Gleann-Uisean, with its yews, was burned.

Annal M1078.

M1078.0

The Age of Christ, 1078.

M1078.1

Cormac Ua Beain, successor of Cronan of Tuaim-Greine, died;

M1078.2

and Coibhdheanach, i.e. the Ulidian, anmchara of Imleach-Ibhair, died. He was head of the piety of Ireland.

M1078.3

Conchobhar Ua Briain, lord of Cinel-Eoghain and Tealach-Og, was slain by the Cinel-mBinnigh of the valley.

M1078.4

Leathlobhar Ua Laidhgnen, lord of Airghialla, was slain by Ruaidhri Ua Ruadhacain.

M1078.5

Cathal, son of Domhnall, lord of Cinel-Enda, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain of the island.

M1078.6

Domhnall, son of Mac Tighearnain, lord of Conmhaicne, died.

M1078.7

A victory was gained over the Ui-Creamhthainn, by the men of Fearnmhagh, at Sliabh Fuaid, where Goll Claraigh and others along with him, were slain.

M1078.8

A slaughter was made of the Conailli by the Ui-Meith, in which the son of Ua Treodain, lord of Conaille, was slain.

M1078.9

Lorcan Ua Briain, died.

M1078.10

Conchobhar Ua Donnchadha, royal heir of Caiseal, died.

M1078.11

Ceannfaeladh Ua Dunghalaigh, lord of Muscraighe-thire, the glory and ornament of Munster, died.

M1078.12

Ceinneidigh Ua Briain assumed the lordship of Gaileanga.

Annal M1079.

M1079.0

The Age of Christ, 1079.

M1079.1

Maelchiarain Mac Cuinn na mBocht, successor of Ciaran, died. He was the glory and veneration of Cluain mic-Nois in his time.

M1079.2

Ceallach Reamhar, successor of Brenainn of Birra, and of Ciaran of Saighir;

M1079.3

Mac Gilladhidhe Ua Lorcain, lord of Fearnmhagh, died.

M1079.4

Ceallach Ua Ruanadha, chief poet of Ireland in his time, died.

M1079.5

Cumidhe, son of Lorcan, lord of Fearnmhagh, died.

M1079.6

The men of Teathbha and Cairbre set out upon


p.915

plundering excursions into Ui-Failghe, and took many cows; but the Ui-Failghe came up with them at Cluain-fearta-Molua, where a slaughter was made of the men of Teathbha and Cairbre, with their king, i.e. Mac Congeimhle.

M1079.7

The fair of Carman was celebrated by Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair Failghe.

M1079.8

Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught, was slain by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair.

M1079.9

Gillaceannlas, son of Iarnan, one of the Conmhaicni, was slain, and he was buried at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1079.10

A great army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, and he expelled Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair from the kingdom of Connaught.

M1079.11

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain went upon Loch-Beannchair and Innsi-Modh, and plundered the Cruach.

Annal M1080.

M1080.0

The Age of Christ, 1080.

M1080.1

Muireadhach Ua Mughroin, lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1080.2

Donn Ua Leathlobair, lord of Fearnmhagh, was killed by the Ui-Laithen at Sliabh Fuaid.

M1080.3

Dearbhforghaill, daughter of the son of Brian, and wife of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo, died.

M1080.4

Eochaidh Ua Merligh, lord of Fearnmhagh, died.

M1080.5

Donnsleibhe Ua h-Eochadha went into Munster, with the chiefs of Ulidia along with him, to serve for wages.

M1080.6

The battle of Ath-Erghail, by the site of Clochar, was gained over the Feara-Manach, by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn and the men of Magh-Itha, where fell the plunderers of Ard-Macha, namely, Sitric Ua Caemhain, and the son of Niall Ua Searraigh, and many other persons. To predict this battle was said:

    1. Ath-Ergail, people shall hereafter be there dispersed;
      Numbers shall be without affection, by the conflict of Ath-Erghail.

M1080.7

Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, came into Teathbha, where he made a great prey (called the Prey of Cuasan), both of cows and prisoners, which he carried off; and persons were killed through the miracles of Saint Ciaran, for the men of Teathbha had plundered Cluain-mic-Nois, with its oratory, that


p.917

year.

M1080.8

Numbers of the men of Teathbha, of Muintir-Gearadhain, and of the Cairbre-men, came upon a plundering excursion into Ui-Failghe; and they arrived at the Termon of Cill-achaidh. The Ui-Failghe overtook them, and slew Gillamuire Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, and Aedh, grandson of Dubhghall Mac Fhinnbhairr, chief of Muintir-Geradhain, and others of the nobility besides them.

M1080.9

Eochaidh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Uaithne-thire, died.

M1080.10

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Brien to Ath-cliath; and the men of Maelseachlainn came into his house with the staff of Jesus, and with the successor of Patrick, and the clergy of Munster.

Annal M1081.

M1081.0

The Age of Christ, 1081.

M1081.1

The son of Mac Condabhain, a noble priest of Ard-Macha;

M1081.2

Fothadh Ua h-Aille, chief anmchara of Cluain-mic-Nois and Leath-Chuinn;

M1081.3

Flann Ua Lorcain, noble priest of Lughmhadh;

M1081.4

Ua Robhartaigh, airchinneach of Lughmhadh;

M1081.5

Ceileachair Ua Ceinneidigh, successor of Colum, son of Crimhthann;

M1081.6

Coinneagan Ua Flainn, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta;

M1081.7

and Ua Bruic, successor of Seanan of Inis-Cathaigh, died.

M1081.8

Corcach-mor in Munster was burned, both houses and churches.

M1081.9

Cill-Dalua was burned.

M1081.10

Mac Angheirrce, lord of Conaille, was slain by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1081.11

Magrath Ua h-Ogain, lord of Cinel-Feargusa, was slain.

M1081.12

Maelmithidh Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Ui-Tuirtre, was slain by the Cinel-Binnigh of the valley.

M1081.13

Gillasiadnata, son of Amhalghaidh, son of Flann, lord of Calraighe, was slain by Maelseachnaill, through the miracles of Ciaran, for he had plundered the oratory of Cluain-mic-Nois in that year.

M1081.14

Ara was plundered by the foreigners.


p.919

M1081.15

The son of Amhalghaidh, son of Flann, lord of Calraighe, was slain by Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar.

M1081.16

Cucatha Ua Colmain died.

Annal M1082.

M1082.0

The Age of Christ, 1082.

M1082.1

Cinaedh Ua Ruaidhin, Tanist-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, a senior and head of counsel;

M1082.2

Conchobhar Ua Uathghaile, lector of Gleann-Uissean;

M1082.3

Dunchadh Ua Cetfadha, two learned seniors of the west of Leinster, died.

M1082.4

Gillachrist Ua Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe;

M1082.5

Finnchadh Mac Amhalghadha, chief of Clann-Breasail;

M1082.6

Flaithbheartach Ua Maelduin, lord of Lurg;

M1082.7

Uidhrin Ua Maelmuire, chief of Cinel-Fearadhaigh, died.

M1082.8

Domhnall, son of Tadhg Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was slain by his father's brother, Cathal, son of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, without any reason known to men, except envy and malice.

M1082.9

Cathal Ua Conchobhair was killed by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair in a battle, and a great number along with him.

M1082.10

A great number of the people of West Meath, Dealbhna, and Cuircne, was slain on Loch-Ribh by Domhnall, son of Flann Ua Maeleachlainn; and the battle in which they were defeated was called the "Breach of the Boats."

M1082.11

The cemetery of the Nuns of Cluain-mic-Nois was burned, with its stone church, and with the eastern third of all the establishment.

M1082.12

Domhnall, son of Conchobhar Ua Briain, was killed.

M1083.0

The Age of Christ, 1083.

M1083.1

Muircheartach Ua Carill, airchinneach of Dun, the most learned judge and historian of Ireland;

M1083.2

Gillamoninne, airchinneach of Lughmhadh;

M1083.3

Macraith Ua Baillen, successor of Cronan of Ros-Cre;

M1083.4

and Tadhg Ua Taidhg, successor of Flannan of Cill-Dalua, died.

M1083.5

Domhnall


p.921

Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill themselves.

M1083.6

Domhnall Ua Lochlainn assumed the kingship of the Cinel-Eoghain, and made a royal hosting into Conaille Muirtheimhne, whence he carried off a great spoil of cattle. He took the men of Fearnmhagh into his pay on this expedition.

M1083.7

Aedh Ua Maeleachlainn, lord of Aileach, died.

M1083.8

Conghalach Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was slain by the Conmhaicni, and many others along with him.

M1083.9

Dunlaing Ua Lorcain, Tanist of Leinster, was killed.

M1083.10

Somhairle, son of Gillabrighde, King of Innsi-Gall, died.

Annal M1084.

M1084.0

The Age of Christ, 1084.

M1084.1

Gillaphadraig, Bishop of Ath-cliath, was drowned.

M1084.2

Muireadhach Ua Ceithnen, airchinneach of Cluain-Eois, died.

M1084.3

Niall Ua Seasnain, learned senior of Munster, died.

M1084.4

Ceall-Dalua, Tuaim-Greine, and Magh-neo-Norbhraighe, were burned by the Conmaicni.

M1084.5

Gleann-da-locha was burned, with its churches.

M1084.6

The monastery of Fuinche, i.e. Ross-airthir, was founded.

M1084.7

An army was led by Donnsleibhe, King of Ulidia, to Droicheatata, and gave wages to Donnchadh, the son of the Caileach Ua Ruairc. A predatory excursion was made in his Donnsleibhe's absence into Ulidia, by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, whence he carried off prisoners and a great spoil of cattle.

M1084.8

An army was led by the men of Munster into Meath; and it was on that expedition Conchobhar Ua Cetfadha, the dignity and glory of Munster, died. In their absence i.e. while the men of Munster were absent from their own province on this expedition the Conmhaicni went into Thomond, and burned enclosures and fortresses, and carried off innumerable spoils.

M1084.9

Donnchadh, son of the Caileach Ua Ruairc, with the people of East Connaught, the Cairbri and Gaileanga, proceeded into Leinster, where the foreigners, the men of Leinster and Osraighi, and the Munstermen, under the conduct of Muircheartach Ua Briain, came up with them, and a fierce and bloody engagement took place between them at Moin-Cruinneoige, on the fourth of the Calends of November, where many fell on both sides. There fell there Donnchadh Ua Ruairc, Ceinneidigh


p.923

Ua Briain and his son, Tadhg, and the son of Ua Conchobhoir Failghe, and a great many others of the nobles and plebeians not enumerated. Four thousand was the whole number slain; and the head of Donnchadh Ua Ruairc was carried to Luimneach.

M1084.10

Domhnall Ua Gairmleaghaidh was killed by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn.

Annal M1085.

M1085.0

The Age of Christ, 1085.

M1085.1

Aedh Ua hOisin, successor of Iarlath, and Archbishop of Tuam, died.

M1085.2

Finn, son of Gussan, son of Gorman, Bishop of Cill-dara, died at Cill-achaidh.

M1085.3

Gilla-na-naemh Laighen, noble Bishop of Gleann-da-locha, and afterwards head of the monks of Wirzburg, died on the seventh of the Ides of April.

M1085.4

Ugaire Ua Laidhgnen, airchinneach of Fearna;

M1085.5

Gormghal Loighseach, comharba of Regles-Bhrighde at Ard-Macha, a paragon of wisdom and piety;

M1085.6

Neachtain Mac Neachtain, distinguished Bishop of Rosailithre;

M1085.7

Mac Soilligh, airchinneach of Inis-caein-Deagha, died.

M1085.8

Clereach Ua Sealbhaigh, chief successor of Bairre, the glory and wisdom of Desmond, completed his life in this world;

M1085.9

and Gillachrist Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht, the best ecclesiastical student that was in Ireland in his time, the glory and orna-ment of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1085.10

Ceall-Cainnigh was for the most part burned.

M1085.11

Murchadh Ua Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel-Conaill, pillar of the dignity, hospitality, and bravery of the North, died.

M1085.12

Ualgharg Ua Ruairc, royal heir of Connaught, died.

M1085.13

Aenghus Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Laeghaire, died.

M1085.14

The blind Ua Faelain, i.e. Gillabhrighde, lord of the Deisi, died.

M1085.15

Muireadhach, son of Dubh, chief of all Muintir-Eolais, was taken prisoner by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain; and all Muintir-Eolais was plundered by him.

M1085.16

A plundering excursion was made by the Conmhaicni over Sil-Anmchadha, and they killed


p.925

Coningin Finn Mac Uallachtain, and carried off many cows.

M1085.17

There was destruction of men and cattle in this year, to such an extent that certain rich people were made husbandmen in it.

M1085.18

Oenghus Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Laeghaire, was slain at Cluain-Iraird, after he had entered into religion, by the grandson of Coirten Ua Maelruain, lord of Dealbhna-mor.

Annal M1086.

M1086.0

The Age of Christ, 1086.

M1086.1

Maelcaimhghin, noble Bishop of Uladh;

M1086.2

Erchadh Ua Maelfoghmhair, Archbishop of Connaught;

M1086.3

Maelisa Ua Brolchain, learned senior of Ireland, a paragon of wisdom and piety, as well as in poetry and both languages. His wisdom and learning were so great, that he himself wrote books replete with genius and intellect. He resigned his spirit to heaven on the seventh of the Calends of February, as is stated in this quatrain:

    1. On the seventeenth of the Calends of February,
      The night of fair Fursa's festival,
      Died Maelisa Ua Brolchain,
      But, however, not of a heavy severe fit.

M1086.4

Fiachna Ua Ronain, airchinneach of Cluain-Dolcain, died.

M1086.5

Maelseachlainn Ua Faelain, a distinguished old hero, died.

M1086.6

A battle was gained by the Airtheara over the Ui-Eathach, wherein Domhnall Ua hAiteidh was slain, with


p.927

some others.

M1086.7

The battle of Eochaill was gained by the Ulidians over the Airghialla and Ua Ruadhagain, where Cumasgach Ua Laithen, lord of Sil-Duibhthire, and Gillamoninne Ua hEochadha, lord of Clann-Sinaigh, and many others along with them, were slain.

M1086.8

Amhalghaidh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Ruadagain, was killed by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1086.9

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Ireland with opposition, after having suffered from long illness (for he was not well since the head of Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn had been brought from Cluain-mic-Nois till this time), died at Ceann-coradh, in the thirty-second year of his reign, and in the seventy-seventh of his age, on the day before the Ides of July precisely, after long suffering, after intense penance for his sins, and after taking the body of Christ and his blood; and Tadhg Ua Briain and his son died in the same month. In commemoration of the death of Toirdhealbhach was said:

    1. Eighty years without falsehood,
      And a thousand of great extent,
      And six years, from the birth of the dear Son of God,
      To the death of the modest Toirdhealbhach.
      The night of Tuesday, on the pridie of the Ides of July,
      Before the festival of Jacob of pure mind,
      On the twenty-second, died the
      Mighty supreme King Toirdhealbhach.

M1086.10

Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, went to Ath-cliath, and was defeated by the foreigners and the Leinstermen in a battle called "The Breach of Crinach," in which were slain Maelchiarain Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne and Tuath-Luighne; Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall; and many others besides them.

M1086.11

The Sinnach Finn, i.e. Tadhg Ua Catharnaigh, lord of Teathbha, and Cinaedh, his son, and Ua Muireadhaigh, chief of Muintir-Tlamain, were treacherously slain by Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, at Loch Maighe Uatha, in revenge of Murchadh, son of Conchobhar, having been slain by Ua Catharnaigh


p.929

Sinnach.

M1086.12

Ua Baigheallain, lord of Airghialla, fell by the Conailli.

M1086.13

Mac Beathadh Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe, was killed, or died.

Annal M1087.

M1087.0

The Age of Christ, 1087.

M1087.1

Maelseachlainn, son of Conchobhar, King of Teamhair, was killed by Cathal Mac Muirigen and the men of Teathbha, at Ard-achadh-Epscoip-Mel, through treachery and guile.

M1087.2

Domhnall Mac Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe, died after long illness.

M1087.3

Cathal Ua Ceatfadha was killed by the Leinstermen.

M1087.4

Cusleibhe Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was killed.

M1087.5

Domhnall Ua Laithen was killed by Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn.

M1087.6

Maelruanaidh Ua hAirt, i.e. of the Clann-Diarmada, lord of Teathbha, died.

M1087.7

A battle was fought between Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, and Aedh, son of Art Ua Ruairc, lord of Conmhaicne and Breifne, at Conachail, in Corann, where Ua Ruairc was defeated and killed. There were also slain in this battle of Corann, by Ruaidhri, Muireadhach Mac Duibh, chief of Muintir-Eolais; the son of Godfrey Ua Siridein; the son of Cusleibhe O'Fearghail; and distinguished men of the Conmhaicni, both noble and plebeian. In commemoration of this battle was said:

    1. Seven years and eighty full,
      And a thousand, fair, complete,
      Since Christ was born without a stain,
      Till the battle of Conachail in Corann.

M1087.8

The battle of Rath-Edair, between the men of Leinster and Munster, where Muircheartach Ua Briain and the men of Munster defeated the Leinstermen


p.931

and Domhnall, son of Mael-na-mbo, and Diarmaid Ua Briain, and Enda, son of Diarmaid; and where a great slaughter was made of the Leinstermen, together with the son of Murchadh Ua Domhnaill, lord of Ui-Drona, and Conall Ua Ciarmhaic, and Ua Neill of Magh-da-chon, &c.

M1087.9

A hosting by Mac Lochlainn, and he burned Tuaith-inbhir in Breagha, but his people were slaughtered.

M1087.10

Niall Ua Ceatfadha died.

M1087.11

Cathal Ua Ceatfadha was killed by the Leinstermen.

M1087.12

Great abundance of nuts and fruit, murrain of cows, and dearth, in this year, and a great wind which destroyed houses and churches.

M1087.13

William Rufus assumed the kingdom of England on the 9th of September.

Annal M1088.

M1088.0

The Age of Christ, 1088.

M1088.1

Cormac Ua Finn, chief lector of Dal-gCais, died.

M1088.2

Cathalan Ua Forreidh, a paragon of wisdom and piety, died on Shrovetide Sunday, the third of the Nones of March, at Imleach-Ibhair; of whom was said:

    1. Cathalan of true piety
      Was the sage of a congregation, was senior;
      To heaven into the bright palace he passed,
      On the festival of Ciaran of Saighir.

M1088.3

Tighearnach Ua Braein, chief successor of Ciaran and Coman, died at Imdhaidh Chiarain; he was a paragon of learning and history.

M1088.4

Maelisa


p.933

Ua Maelgiric, chief poet and chief Ollamh, died.

M1088.5

Dubhchabhlaigh, daughter of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, i.e of Aedh of the Broken Spear, and wife of the King of Munster, died.

M1088.6

Mor, daughter of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, and wife of the King of Connaught, died. Of these Muircheartach Ua Briain said:

    1. Mor, daughter of the son of Tadhg from the North,
      Reached the unvictorious house of the dead;
      Dubhchobhlaidh went to Cluain
      On a cold autumnal morning.

M1088.7

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, with the men of Connaught, took Inis-Adharcach before the men of Munster, to prevent their fleet from advancing further up; and Muircheartach was defeated, and a slaughter was made of his people there. The crews of the same man's fleet were slaughtered, after they had sailed round westwards on the sea to plunder Connaught.

M1088.8

Corco-Modhruadh was then plundered thrice by Ruaidhri, and it is wonderful if he left any cattle or people without destroying on these occasions; and three of the chieftains of Connaught, being left in danger, were slain, namely, Gillacoirpthe, son of Cathal Ua Mughron, chief of Clann-Cathail, and Cusinna, son of Murchadh Odhar, chief of Clann-Tomaltaigh, and the son of Gillachrist, son of Echthighern, chief of Corca-Achlann.

M1088.9

A great slaughter was made of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, Loch-Garman, and Port-Lairge, by the Ui-Eathach-Mumhan, on the day that they jointly attempted to plunder Corcach-Mumhan.

M1088.10

An army was led by Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, King of Ireland, and the people of the north of Ireland with him, into Connaught; and Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, gave him the hostages of all Connaught. Both proceeded with their forces into Munster; and they burned Luimneach, and plundered


p.935

the plain of Munster, i.e. as far as Imleach-Ibhair, Loch-Gair, Brugh-Righ, Dun-Aiched, and Druim-Ui-Cleirchein; and they carried off the head of the son of Caileach Ua Ruairc from the hills of Saingeal; and they broke down and demolished Ceann-coradh; and they obtained eight score heroes, both foreigners and Irish, as hostages and pledges, and then returned to their houses. The chief of these hostages were the son of Madadhan Ua Ceinneidigh; the son of Conghalach Ua hOgain; and the son of Eochaidh Ua Loingsigh. Cows, horses, gold, silver, and flesh-meat, were afterwards given in ransom of them by Muircheartach Ua Briain.

M1088.11

Dearbhail, daughter of Ua Maelseachnaill, died.

Annal M1089.

M1089.0

The Age of Christ, 1089.

M1089.1

Gillaphadraig Ua Celechain, Secnab (i.e.Prior) of Ard-Macha;

M1089.2

Conchobhar, son of Fogartach Ua Maelduin, Secnab of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1089.3

and Fearghal Ua Meisdeadhaigh, lector of Imleach-Ibhair, died.

M1089.4

A battle was gained by the Ui-Eathach-Uladh over the men of Fearnmhagh, wherein fell the son of Aedh Ua Crichain, lord of Fearnmhagh, and twelve Tanists of the nobility, with numbers of others.

M1089.5

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Reamhar, lord of Leinster (or of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh), was slain by Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair Failghe, by unfair advantage. He was the most illustrious hero that lived in his time, a prop of battle for bravery.

M1089.6

Donnchadh, grandson


p.937

of Gillaphadraig (i.e.the son of Domhnall), was killed by the grandsons of Domhnall Breac.

M1089.7

Gillacainnigh Ua Flaithfhileadh, lord of Dealbhna-Beathra, was slain by his brother, Aedh, son of Cochlan Ua Flaithfhileadh.

M1089.8

The fleet of the men of Munster, under the conduct of Muircheartach Ua Briain, arrived on the Sinainn, and upon Loch Ribh; and they plundered the churches of the lake, namely, Inis-Clothrann, Inis-bo-finne, Inis-Ainggin, and Cluain-Eamhain. But Aidhirceach and Rechraith were blocked up, after their passage, by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught. They afterwards came down to Cluain, but they were repulsed back to Ath-Luain, where Ua Maeleachlainn, i.e. Domhnall, son of Flann, King of Teamhair, was in readiness to attack them; and they left all their ships and vessels to O'Maeleachlainn there, and placed themselves under his protection, and they were afterwards conveyed home in safety to Munster.

M1089.9

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn went in ships and boats, and plundered Munster as far as Cluain-caein-Modimog, so that they scarcely left a single head of cattle so far as they penetrated, and besides carried off captives.

M1089.10

A great predatory excursion was made by Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, until he reached Ibhar-Chinn-trachta; and he plundered the men of Fearnmhagh, Conaille, Mughdhorna, and Ui-Meith, and burned all Conaille.

M1089.11

Iseal-Chiarain was purchased for ever by Cormac Mac Cuinn na mBocht from Ua Flaithen, and from Domhnall, son of Flann Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath.

M1089.12

Corcach, Imleach-Ibhair, Ard-fearta, and Cill-dara, were burned.

M1089.13

Lusca was burned by the men of Munster, and nine score persons were burned in its Daimhliag stone-church.


p.939

Annal M1090.

M1090.0

The Age of Christ, 1090.

M1090.1

Maelduin, successor of Mochuda,

M1090.2

and Cian Ua Buachalla, successor of Cainneach in Cianachta, died.

M1090.3

Ingnadan, lector of Cluain-Iraird, was killed.

M1090.4

Maelruanaidh Ua Caireallain, lord of Clann-Diarmada, and Gillachrist Ua Luinigh, lord of Cinel-Moen, were killed one day by Domhnall O'Lochlainn.

M1090.5

A great meeting took place between Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, King of Aileach; and Muircheartach Ua Briain, King of Caiseal; and Domhnall, son of Flann Ua Maeleachlainn, lord of Meath; and Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught; and they all delivered hostages to the King of Aileach, and they parted in peace and tranquillity.

M1090.6

Muircheartach Ua Briain afterwards went into Meath upon a predatory excursion; and a battle was fought between Domhnall, King of Meath, and Muircheartach, with their forces, at Magh-Lena.

M1090.7

The Munstermen were defeated and slaughtered, with Maelseachlainn Ua Dunghalaigh, Mac-Conin Ua Duibhgin, and Maelmordha Ua Domhnaill, son of the King of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh. A plundering army was led by Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn into Munster, and he burned Dun-na-Sgiath. Another predatory excursion was made by the same Domhnall, on which he plundered all Ormond.

M1090.8

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair burned Dun-Aichet.

M1090.9

Muircheartach Ua Bric, lord of the Deisi, was killed.

M1090.10

Muircheartach Ua Briain went upon Loch-Riach, by taking an unfair advantage.

M1090.11

A hosting was made by Muircheartach Ua Briain, the men of Munster,


p.941

and the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and they plundered a district of Leinster, and the men of Breagh, as far as Ath-buidhe; and they delivered two hostages to O'Lochlainn, i.e. Domhnall, for protecting them thence to the west.

Annal M1091.

M1091.0

The Age of Christ, 1091.

M1091.1

Ceannfaeladh Ua hOgain, successor of Brenainn, died.

M1091.2

Murchadh, grandson of Domhnall Reamhar, was treacherously killed by Enda, son of Diarmaid.

M1091.3

The grandson of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught, died.

M1091.4

Cinaeth Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, and the son of Maelruanaidh, son of Cucoirne, mutually fell by each other in the house of Ua Briain, at Caiseal.

M1091.5

Cearbhall, grandson of Aedh, senior of the Clann-Colmain, died.

M1091.6

Laighgnen, i.e. the Buidheanach Ua Duinncothaigh, lord of Gaileanga, was slain by the Ui-Briuin.

M1091.7

An army was lead by Muircheartach Ua Briain, and he plundered West Meath.

M1091.8

A hosting was made by the Connaughtmen, and they burned a great part of Munster.

M1091.9

Bran Ua Caindealbhain was slain by the son of Mac Coirten.

M1091.10

The prey of the fire-brands made, on Great Christmas night, by Muircheartach Ua Briain, upon the Ui-Failghe and the grandsons of Bran Breac.A peace was made between Muircheartach Ua Briain and the sons of Tadhg Ua Briain; and the men of Thomond returned to their homes, but the sons of Tadhg acted treacherously towards them, and they were plundered by the Connaughtmen.

M1091.11

Muircheartach Ua Bric, lord of the Deisi, was killed.

M1091.12

The western half of the fort of Ard-Macha was burned.

M1091.13

Maelisa,successor of Patrick, died, after penance, on the


p.943

20th of December; and Domhnall, son of Amhalghaidh, was immediately installed in his place in the abbacy.

M1091.14

Sitric, son of Gillabruide, was treacherously killed.

Annal M1092.

M1092.0

The Age of Christ, 1092.

M1092.1

Connmhach Ua Cairill, a bishop, and an excellent moderator;

M1092.2

Cormac, Abbot of Mainistir Buithe, a learned and holy senior, head of the wisdom and piety of the Gaeidhil;

M1092.3

Muircheartach, son of Loingseach, successor of Finnen of Cluain-Iraird;

M1092.4

and Maelisa Ua hArrachtain, successor of Ailbhe of Imleach, died.

M1092.5

The Devotee, i.e. Fiachra Ua Follamhain, a priest of the Connaughtmen, was drowned in Loch Cairrgin.

M1092.6

The fort of Ard-Macha, with its churches, were burned on the fourth of the Calends of September, and a street of Trian-Mor, and a street of Trian-Saxon.

M1092.7

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, i.e. Ruaidhri na Soidhe Buidhe, supreme King of Connaught, was blinded by Ua Flaithbheartaigh, i.e. Flaithtbheartach, and Foghartach O'Foghartaigh, through treachery and guile. Ruaidhri was seven times a gossip to Ua Flaithbheartaigh.

M1092.8

Donnchadh Mac Carthaigh, lord of Eoghanacht-Chaisil, was killed by Ceallachan-Caisil.

M1092.9

Enda, son of Diarmada, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, was killed by the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh themselves.

M1092.10

A great predatory excursion was made by the Connmhaicni over Sil-Muireadhaigh, so that Magh-Aei was left without cattle.

M1092.11

Donnchadh, son of Ua Conchobhar Failghe, was killed by his own brothers.

M1092.12

Great frost and ice in this year, and the lakes and rivers of Ireland were frozen over, so that men and horses were wont to pass with dry feet over the lakes; and great snow fell afterwards.

M1092.13

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain into Connaught, and he carried hostages from them.

M1092.14

Diarmaid Ua Briain was expelled into Ulster.

M1092.15

Muireadhach Mac Carthaigh, lord of Eoghanacht, died.

M1092.16

Domhnall, son of Amhalghaidh,


p.945

successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Cinel-Eoghain, and obtained his demand.

M1092.17

Aedh, son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, was taken prisoner by Brian; and the chieftainship of Sil-Muireadhaigh was given to Gilla-na-naemh Ua Conchobhair.

M1092.18

The fleet of the men of Munster plundered Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1093.0

The Age of Christ, 1093.

M1093.1

The Bishop Ua Brighten died.

M1093.2

Ailill Ua Niallain, Tanist-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, died. The successor of Cronan of Tuaim-Greine; and the successor of Colman of Cill-Mic-Duach;

M1093.3

Aedh, airchinneach of Daimhliag-Chianain;

M1093.4

Ua Scoptha, successor of Comman;

M1093.5

and Aedh Ua Conghaile, airchinneach of the Teach-aeidheadh of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1093.6

Aedh Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was blinded by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, King of Aileach.

M1093.7

Aedh Ua Baigheallain, lord of Oirghialla, was slain by the Conailli-Muirtheimhne.

M1093.8

Aedh, son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh, was killed in Munster, while in fetters, by Fogartach Ua Fogartaigh, through treachery and guile.

M1093.9

The Aithchleircach, i.e. Niall, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, was killed by the Conmhaicni.

M1093.10

Dubhdara, the grandson of Aighennain, lord of Luighne, died.

M1093.11

Trenfhear Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha, was killed by Ua Duibhidhir in Daimhliag-Chianain.

M1093.12

Muircheartach Ua Briain plundered the Ui-Muireadhaigh, and expelled them into Tir-Eoghain, after having made a prisoner of their lord, Gilla-na-naemh Ua Conchobhair, and of Ua Conceanainn, the son of Tadhg, lord of Ui-Diarmada.

M1093.13

The Sil-Muireadhaigh returned again to Connaught without permission.

M1093.14

Great snow and frost in this year, so that the lakes of Ireland were frozen.

M1093.15

Ard-Macha was burned, with its churches.

Annal M1094.

M1094.0

The Age of Christ, 1094.

M1094.1

Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, was slain by the King of Aileach, i.e. Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, in


p.947

the battle of Bealach-Guirt-an-iubhair.

M1094.2

The men of Ireland collected to Dublin, namely, Muircheartach Ua Briain, with Munstermen, the Osraighi, and the Leinstermen; Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, King of Oileach, with the Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain; Domhnall, son of Flann, King of Teamhair, with the men of Meath; Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, with the Ulidians; and Godfrey, lord of the foreigners and of Ath-cliath, with ninety ships. These proceeded from the East to Magh-Laighean, and they burned Uachtar-ard, and routed the men of Munster, Leinster, and Osraighe, who fled, without spilling blood. After this the Ulstermen returned home, for they did not wish to plunder Leinster. The men of Munster after this went eastwards again, and expelled Godfrey from Ath-cliath, and deposed the King of Teamhair, i.e. Domhnall Ua Maelseachlainn, and banished him into Oirghialla, the men of Meath having turned against him. After this Ua Maelseachlainn set out with a small party from the North, and seized the cows of Luighne and of all East Meath; but the people of Luighne and East Meath, and the soldiers of the King of Munster, overtook him at Loch Lebhinn, and got between the cows and the troop; and he was unfairly overwhelmed in battle by his own people, i.e. the son of Mac Aighennain and his troop; and their own king was slain by them, i.e. Domhnall, son of Flann, and also Gilla-Enain, son of Lughaidh, on the hill over Fobhar-Feichin.

M1094.3

Flaithbheartach Ua hAidith, lord of Ui-Eathach-Uladh, was blinded by Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia.

M1094.4

A slaughter was made of the Airtheara Oriors by the Ulidians, where a great number of the nobility fell, together with Ua Fedacain and Mac Aenghusa.

M1094.5

Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair, lord of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, died after a good life.

M1094.6

Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, was taken prisoner by Muircheartach Ua Briain, King of Munster.

M1094.7

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, into Connaught, but he returned back without hostages.

M1094.8

Another army was led by lake and land, by the same people,


p.949

to Dun-Tais; and they divided Meath between two, i.e. between Donnchadh, son of Murchadh, son of Flann, and Conchobhar, son of Maelseachlainn.

M1094.9

Ruaidhri Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh, died.

M1094.10

A battle was gained by Tadhg, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and the Sil-Muireadhaigh, over the people of Thomond and West Connaught, in which three hundred were slain; and they plundered all West Connaught. This was called the battle of Fidhnacha. Of the chieftains who were slain in this battle were Amhlaeibh Ua hAichir, Donnsleibhe Ua Cinnfhaelaidh, and the son of Gillafursa Ua Maelmhuaidh.

M1094.11

Imhar Mac Gilla-Ultain, chief of Muintir-Maeilsinna, was slain by the men of Meath.

M1094.12

Domhnall, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Munster for the first time; and he obtained his full tribute of screballs scrupuli, besides offerings from the inhabitants.

M1094.13

Gilla-na-ninghean, son of Ua Cobhthaigh, lord of Umhall, died.

M1094.14

The airchinneach of Achadh-fabhair was killed by the men of Ceara.

Annal M1095.

M1095.0

The Age of Christ, 1095.

M1095.1

The Bishop Ua Corcrain, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta, died.

M1095.2

The Senior Mac Maeldalua, chief anmchara of all Ireland, died at an advanced age, and after a good life.

M1095.3

There was a great pestilence over all Europe in general in this year, and some say that the fourth part of the men of Ireland died of the malady. The following were some of the distinguished persons, ecclesiastical and lay, who died of it: Donnghus, Bishop of Ath-cliath; Ua Manchain, i.e. the Brehon judge, successor of Caeimhghin; Mac Maras Ua Caemhain, successor of Oenna, of the tribe of


p.951

Dealbhna-Beag; Cairbre, i.e. the Bishop Ua Ceithearnaigh, successor of Maedhog; Ua Rinnanaigh, lector of Leithghlinn; Eochaidh Ua Coisi, Vice-abbot of Achadh-bo; Scannlan Ua Cnaimhsighe, anmchara of Lismore; Buadhach Ua Cearruidhir, priest of Cill-Dalua; Dubhshlatach Ua Muireadhaigh; Aedh, son of Maelisa Ua Brolchain, a chief lector; and Augustin Ua Cuinn, chief Brehon judge of Leinster.

M1095.4

Of the same pestilence died also Godfrey Mearanach, lord of the foreigners of Ath-cliath and the islands; Domhnall Dubh Ua Fearghaile, lord of Fortuatha-Laighean; Mathghamhain Ua Seaghdha, lord of Corca-Dhuibhne; Ua Maelcraeibhe, one of the people of Imleach-Ibhair;

M1095.5

O'hAinbhidh, lord of Oirghialla; and Ua Conchobhair, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin[gt ]

M1095.6

Ua hEignigh, lord of Feara-Manach, was slain.

M1095.7

Gillachiarain, the son of Mac-Ualghairg, lord of Ui-Duibhinnreacht, was slain.

M1095.8

A great victory was gained at Ard-achad, by the Dal-Araidhe, over the Ulidians, wherein were slain Lochlainn Ua Cairill, royal heir of Ulidia; and Gillachomhghaill Ua Cairill; and a great host along with them.

M1095.9

Domhnall Ua Muireagain lord of all Teathbha, and Amhlaeibh, the son of Mac Conmeadha, son of the chief of Sil-Ronain, were treacherously slain, while in fetters, in Munster.

M1095.10

Taillti, daughter of Domhnall Gott, died.

M1095.11

Tadhg, son of Cathal Ua Concho-bhair, was killed by the men of Munster.

M1095.12

Taichleach Ua hEaghra, lord of Luighne, was slain, with a slaughter of the Luighne about him, by the three Conmhaicni, i.e. the Cinel-Cais, the Cinel-Dubhain, and the Cinel-Lughna.

M1095.13

Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe, was killed by his brother.

M1095.14

Cucoigcriche Ua hAinbhidh, lord of Feara-Bile, was killed by Donnchadh Ua Maelseachlainn.

M1095.15

Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of the lord of Osraighe, and the lady of Osraighe,


p.953

died.

M1095.16

Darmhaigh, Ceanannus, Cluain-Iraird, Gleann-da-locha, Fobhar, Lis-mor, Cluain-Bronaigh, and Cluain-Eois, were all burned.

M1095.17

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered.

M1095.18

Domhnall Ua Madadhain, lord of Ui-Eathach, died.

Annal M1096.

M1096.0

The Age of Christ, 1096.

M1096.1

Ua Cochlain, a learned bishop, and successor of Bairri, died.

M1096.2

Eoghan Ua Cearnaigh, airchinneach of Doire, died on the eighteenth of the Calends of January.

M1096.3

Colum Ua hAnradhain, airchinneach of Ross-ailithir;

M1096.4

Flann Ua Muireagain, airchinneach of Aentrobh;

M1096.5

Learghus Ua Cruimhthir, successor of Comhghall;

M1096.6

Mac Neachtain Ua hUaithnigh, a lector and noble priest, died.

M1096.7

Ua Mailcain, chief poet of Dal-gCais, died.

M1096.8

Amhlaeibh, son of Tadhg Ua Briain, was killed in Manainn.

M1096.9

The festival of John fell on Friday this year; the men of Ireland were seized with great fear in consequence, and the resolution adopted by the clergy of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick at their head, to protect them against the pestilence which had been predicted to them at a remote period, was, to command all in general to observe abstinence, from Wednesday till Sunday, every month, and to fast on one meal every day till the end of a year, except on Sundays, solemnities, and great festivals; and they also made alms and many offerings to God; and many lands were granted to churches and clergymen by kings and chieftains; and the men of Ireland were saved for that time from the fire of vengeance.

M1096.10

Ceanncoradh was re-edified by Muircheartach Ua Briain, it having been demolished some time before by the people of Leath-Chuinn.

M1096.11

Flann Ua hAinbhidh, lord of South Airghialla, died.

M1096.12

Conchobhar Ua hAinniarraidh, lord of Cianachta, and Ua Cein, lord of Ui-Mic-Cairthinn, fell by each other in a combat.

M1096.13

Cu-Uladh Ua Celeachain, Tanist of Airghialla, was slain by the province of Ireland, i.e. the province of Uladh.

M1096.14

Mathghamhain Ua Seaghdha, lord of Corca-Dhuibhne, died.

M1096.15

Muircheartach, i.e. the Boar, O'Dubhda, lord of the


p.955

Ui-Amhalghadha, was slain by his own tribe.

M1096.16

Madadhan Ua Madadhain, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

M1096.17

Gilla-Oissen Mac Coirten, lord of Dealbhna-mor, was killed by the Ui-Laeghaire, he having been delivered up to them by Muircheartach Ua Briain, after he had obtained thirty ounces of gold, one hundred cows, and eight hostages.

M1096.18

Donnchadh, son of the Gott Ua Maeleachlainn, was slain by the Calraigh.

M1096.19

Sithfruich, son of Mac Sealbhaigh, lord of Feara-Rois, was slain by the Mughdhorna Maighen.

M1096.20

Maelpadraig Mac Airmheadhaigh, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M1097.

M1097.0

The Age of Christ, 1097.

M1097.1

Flannagan Ruadh Ua Dubhthaigh, successor of Comman, and lector of Tuaim-da-ghualann;

M1097.2

Maelan Ua Cuinn, airchinneach of Eaglais-Beag at Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1097.3

Maelbrighde Mac-an-tsaeir Ua Brolchain, a learned doctor, and Bishop of Cill-dara and of Leinster, died.

M1097.4

Tadhg, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair (i.e. the brother of Toirdhealbhach Mor), lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh, and defender of the province in general, was treacherously killed by the Clann-Conchobhair and his own servant of trust, i.e. by the son of Culuachra Ua Maelbhrenainn, in the twenty-fourth year of his age.

M1097.5

Aimhirgin Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, died.

M1097.6

An army was led by Muircheartach


p.957

Ua Briain, with the people of Leath-Mhogha, the men of Meath, and some of the Connaughtmen, in the direction of the North; and they arrived in Magh-Conaille, but they afterwards returned without spoils or hostages, for Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, with the mustered forces of the North, came to Fidh-Conaille, to give battle to Muircheartach and his forces; but God and the successor of Patrick made peace between them.

M1097.7

Lochlainn Ua Dubhdara, lord of Fearnmhagh, was slain by the Ui-Briuin-Breifne.

M1097.8

The Druid Ua Carthaigh, chief poet of Connaught, was killed by the Connaughtmen themselves.

M1097.9

Great abundance of nuts throughout Ireland in general this year, so that the swine of Ireland were fatted; and some of these nuts lasted to the end of two years afterwards. It was usually called the year of the white nuts, and a seiseadhach of nuts was got for one penny.

M1097.10

The cloictheach of Mainistir (i.e. of Mainistir-Buithe), with its books and many treasures, were burned.

M1097.11

Flaithbheartach Ua Flaithbheartaigh returned into his patrimony to Aedh Ua Conchobhair (i.e. Aedh of the Broken Spear), and he assumed the chieftainship of the Sil-Muireadhaigh again.

Annal M1098.

M1098.0

The Age of Christ, 1098.

M1098.1

Domhnall Ua hEnni, one of the Dal-gCais, chief anmchara and noble bishop, head of the wisdom and piety of the Gaeidhil, fountain of the charity of the west of Europe, a doctor of both orders, Roman and Irish, completed his life on the Calends of December. Seventy-six years was his age when he resigned his spirit.

M1098.2

Domhnall Ua Robhartaigh, successor of Colum Cille;

M1098.3

Maelisa Ua Stuir, scribe and philosopher of Munster, and of


p.959

Ireland in general;

M1098.4

Eochaidh, successor of Cianan;

M1098.5

Ronan Ua Daimhin, who was at first successor of Feichin, and afterwards a distinguished moderator;

M1098.6

Maelmartin Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Mura Othna;

M1098.7

and Learghus, died on the same day.

M1098.8

Flaithbheartach, son of Tighearnach Bairrceach, successor of Finnen of Magh-bile, died on his pilgrimage.

M1098.9

Mac Maras Cairbreach, a noble priest, a doctor and learned senior of Ireland, died at Gleann-da-locha.

M1098.10

Three of the ships of the foreigners were captured, and their crews slain, by the Ulidians; one hundred and twenty was their number.

M1098.11

The battle of Fearsat-Suilighe was gained over the Cinel-Conaill by the Cinel-Eoghain, in which Ua Taircheirt, i.e. Eigceartach, was slain, with a number of others.

M1098.12

The plundering and wasting of Magh-Dairbhre, by Muircheartach Ua Briain, against the men of Teathbha.

M1098.13

An army was led by the Munstermen to Sliabh-Fuaid, to oppose Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn; but they obtained neither hostages nor pledges.

M1098.14

Meath was laid waste during the contests between Donnchadh, son of Murchadh, and Conchobhar, son of Maeleachlainn.

M1098.15

Flaithbheartach Ua Flaithbheartaigh, lord of Sil-Muireadhaigh and West Connaught, was slain by Madadhan Ua Cuanna, in revenge of the blinding of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, i.e. Ruaidhri na Soigh buidhe, King of Connaught. Of the year of the death of Flaithbheartach was said:

    1. Eight years and ninety above a thousand,
      From the birth of the Son of God all-strengthening,
      It is no vain story, but it is absolutely certain,
      To the death of the faithful Flaithbheartach.

M1098.16

Diarmaid, son of Enna, son of Diarmaid, King of Leinster, was killed by the sons of Murchadh, son of Diarmaid.

M1098.17

Catharnach, son of the Sinnach Odhar, lord of Teathbha, was treacherously slain by Ua hAirt, of East Teathbha.

M1098.18

Maccraith Ua Flaithen was plundered by Muintir-Tlamain, at Magh-Elli.


p.961

M1098.19

The son of Macraith, poet, chief poet of Munster, died.

M1098.20

The son of Gaeithin Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, was killed by his own people.

M1098.21

Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of Diarmaid, son of Tadhg, and wife of Muircheartach Ua Briain, died.

M1098.22

Dearbhforgaill, daughter of Tadhg Mac Gillaphadraig, and the mother of Muircheartach and Tadhg Ua Briain, died at Gleann-da-locha.

M1098.23

Corcach-Mumhan was burned for the most part.

M1098.24

The oratory of Cluain-mic-Nois was burned bv Muintir-Tlamain, i.e. by Cucaille Mac Aedha.

M1098.25

Mac-Gillachoinnigh Ui-Uradhain, foster-brother of Murchadh Ua Briain, was slain by the Clann-Choscraigh and the Eoghanacht of the north of Cliach; and thirty persons, both women and men, were killed in revenge of him.

Annal M1099.

M1099.0

The Age of Christ, 1099.

M1099.1

Donnchadh, grandson of Maenach, Abbot of Ia, died.

M1099.2

Diarmaid Ua Maelaithghein, airchinneach of Dun, died on Easter Night.

M1099.3

Uamnachan Ua Mictire, successor of Colman, son of Lenin; and

M1099.4

Annudh Ua Longargain, successor of Colum, son of Cremhthann, Abbot of Tir-da-ghlas, died.

M1099.5

Caenchomhrac Ua Baeighill assumed the bishopric of Ard-Macha on Whitsunday.

M1099.6

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain and the people of Leath-Mhogha to Sliabh-Fuaid, to obtain the hostages of Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, and Domhnall was in readiness to meet them; but the successor of Patrick made a year's peace between the north of Ireland and Leath-Mhogha, and so they separated for that time.

M1099.7

An army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn and the Clanna-Neill of the North across Tuaim, into Ulidia.


p.963

The Ulidians were encamped before them at Craebh-Tulcha. On coming together, the hosts press the battle on each other. Both the cavalries engage. The Ulidian cavalry was routed, and Ua hAmhrain slain in the conflict. After this the Ulidians left the camp, and the Clanna-Neill burned it, and cut down the tree called Craebh-Tulcha. After this two hostages were given up to them, and the successor of Comhghall as security for two hostages more. Of this was said:
    1. The hostages of Ulidia were brought by force,
      As witnesses distinctly relate,
      By Domhnall of the lion fury,
      Chief of the generous race of Eoghan.
      Two brave hostages were given
      Of the heroes of Ulidia on the spot,
      The third without reproach, the Abbot of Comhghall,
      To acknowledge Domhnall Ua Neill as king.
      The ninth year above ninety,
      And a thousand years of fame,
      From the birth of Christ, certain without decay,
      Was that in which these things were accomplished.
      From the year in which cook-houses were few,
      The third was that in which,
      With vigour, after difficulty unspeakable,
      After cutting down Craebh-Tealcha, he brought them i.e.the hostages.

M1099.8

Ruaidhri Ua Ruadhagain, lord of the east of Oirghialla, and the most distinguished of the dynasts of Ireland, died in the fortieth year of his chieftainship, and on the tenth of the Calends of December.

M1099.9

Ceanannus and Cill-dara were burned in the spring of this year.

M1099.10

The Daimhliag of Ard-sratha was burned.

M1099.11

A victory, i.e. the Breach of Lochan-geiridh, was gained by the people of West Teathbha, i.e. by Muintir-Tadhgain, over the people of the east of the same, wherein were slain of the Clann-Diarmada on that occasion, Muircheartach Ua hAirt, lord of Teathbha, and many others along with him, and among


p.965

the rest Ua Lachtnain.

M1099.12

Donnchadh Ua hAichir, lord of Magh-Adhair, died.

M1099.13

Mac Conmara, son of Domhnall, lord of Ui-Caisin, died.

Annal M1100.

M1100.0

The Age of Christ, 1100.

M1100.1

Aedh Ua hEremhoin, Bishop of Cill-dara;

M1100.2

Conn Mac Gillabhuidhe, Abbot of Mungairid, a distinguished wise man, and most learned senior of Munster, died.

M1100.3

Flann Ua Cinaetha, airchinneach of Ath-Truim, and chief poet of Meath died.

M1100.4

Macraith Ua Flaithen, successor of Ciaran, and Cronan of Tuaim-Greine, died on his pilgrimage at Achadh-bo; he was of the tribe of Ui-Fiachrach-Fella.

M1100.5

Cumeadha Ua Laeghachain, head chieftain of Sil-Ronain, the ornament and glory of the men of Teathbha, and of the southern Ui-Neill in general, died at an advanced age, and after long pilgrimage, in the house of Mac Cuinn na mBocht, at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1100.6

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the choice part of the men of Ireland about him, until they arrived at Eas Ruaidh. The Cinel-Conaill assembled to defend their country against them; and they compelled Muircheartach and his forces to return back without boody, without hostages, without pledges.

M1100.7

A plundering army was led by the grandson of Lochlainn; and he plundered and preyed the foreigners and the men of Breagha.

M1100.8

The great fleet of the foreigners was brought by the same Muircheartach Ua Brian, till he arrived at Doire; but they did not commit aggression or injure anything, but were cut off by the grandson of Lochlainn, both by killing and drowning.

M1100.9

Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and some of the chieftains of Ulidia along with him, were taken prisoners by Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, King of Oileach, on the


p.967

fifth of the Calends of June.

M1100.10

Gilla-na-naemh Ua hEidhin, lord of West Connaught, died, and was interred at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1100.11

The son of Gillacholuim Ua Domhnaill, lord of Cinel-Luighdheach, was killed by his own people.

M1100.12

Gillabhrighdhe Ua Cuirc, lord of Muscraighe-Breoghain, died.

M1100.13

Aissidh Ua hAmhradhain, lord of Dal-Fiatach, died.

M1100.14

Echri Ua Maelmuire, lord of Cianachta, was killed by Ua Conchobhair of Cianachta-Glinne -Geimhin.

M1100.15

The first King Henry assumed the kingdom of England in August.

M1100.16

A great army was led by the Leinstermen till they arrived at Sliabh Fuaid; and they burned Airghialla, Ui-Meith, and Fir-Rois.

Annal M1101.

M1101.0

The Age of Christ, 1101.

M1101.1

Feardomhnach, Bishop of Cill-dara;

M1101.2

Cormac Ua Mail, Bishop of Gleann-da-locha;

M1101.3

Maelchiarain Ua Donnghusa, learned senior of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1101.4

Muirgheas Ua Muireadhaigh, airchinneach of Cluain-Conmhaicne, died on his pilgrimage.

M1101.5

A meeting of Leath-Mogha was held at Caiseal by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the chiefs of the laity, and Ua Dunain, noble bishop and chief senior, with the chiefs of the clergy; and on this occasion Muircheartach Ua Briain made a grant such as no king had ever made before, namely, he granted Caiseal of the kings to religious, without any claim of layman or clergyman upon it, but the religious of Ireland in general.

M1101.6

A great army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, King of Munster, with the men of Munster, Leinster, Osraighe, Meath, and Connaught, across Eas-Ruaidh, into Inis-Eoghain; and he plundered Inis-Eoghain, and burned many churches and many forts about Fathan-Mura, and about Ard-sratha; and he demolished


p.969

Grianan-Oiligh, in revenge of Ceann-coradh, which had been razed and demolished by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn some time before; and Muircheartach commanded his army to carry with them, from Oileach to Luimneach, a stone of the demolished building for every sack of provisions which they had. In commemoration of which was said:
    1. I never heard of the billeting of grit stones,
      Though I heard of the billeting of companies,
      Until the stones of Oileach were billeted
      On the horses of the king of the West.
Muircheartach after this went over Feartas-Camsa into Ulidia, and carried off the hostages of Ulidia; and he went the round of all Ireland in the space of a fortnight and a month, without battle, without attack, and he returned to his house by Slighe-Midhluachra. The expedition was called "The circuitous hosting."

M1101.7

Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, lord of Meath, set out upon a predatory excursion into Fearnmhagh, and into Conaille, and took immense spoils of cows; but Cucaisill Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Fearnmhagh and Oirghialla, overtook one of the spoils at Airgedgleann, and slew the host which he overtook, except very few; among the slain were Echthighern Ua Braein, lord of Breaghmhaine; the grandson of Cairthen Ua Mailruain; Ua Indreadhain, chief of Ua Maeleachlainn's household, and two hundred men along with them.

M1101.8

Donnchadh, son of Art Ua Ruairc, lord of Conmhaicne, and royal heir of Connaught, was killed by Gillasronmhaoil Ua Ruairc.

M1101.9

Cathal Ua Muireagain, lord of Teathbha, was killed by the people of the east of Teathbha.

M1101.10

Dearbhail, daughter of Ua Maeleachlainn, died.

M1101.11

Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, was liberated from fetters by Domhnall, the grandson of Lochlainn, in exchange for his son and his foster-brother, in the daimhliag of Ard-Macha, through the intercession of the successor of Patrick, and all his congregation, after they had mutually


p.971

sworn on the Bachall-Isa and the relics of the Church, on the eleventh of the Calends of January.

M1101.12

Maghnus, King of Lochlann, came to invade Ireland, as this quatrain testifies:

    1. A year above one hundred and a thousand,
      Without any danger of miscalculation,
      From the birth of Christ of the pure religion,
      Till the coming of Maghnus to Ireland.

M1101.13

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Dunabhra, chief poet of Connaught, died.

Annal M1102.

M1102.0

The Age of Christ, 1102.

M1102.1

Muireadhach Ua Ciordhubhain, airchinneach of Lughmhadh.

M1102.2

Mughron Ua Morgair, chief lector of Ard-Macha, and of all the west of Europe, died on the third of the Nones of October, at Mungairit, in Munster.

M1102.3

Maelmuire Midheach, a learned priest of Cluain-Iraird, died.

M1102.4

Cumhaighe Ua Cairill, airchinneach of Dun Padraig, died.

M1102.5

Donnchadh, son of


p.973

Echri Ua Aiteidh, Tanist of Ui-Eathach, was killed by the Ulidians.

M1102.6

Domhnall, son of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne and Conmhaicni, and of all Connaught for a time, was slain by the Conmhaicni themselves.

M1102.7

Flaithbheartach Mac Fothaidh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha, was slain by the men of Lurg.

M1102.8

An army was led by the Cinel-Eoghain to Magh-Cobha. The Ulidians entered their camp at night, and killed Sitrick Ua Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, and Sitric, son of Curoi, son of Eoghan.

M1102.9

The hostages of the men of Ireland in the hands of Domhnall, son of Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, for a year's peace between Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, and Muircheartach Ua Briain.

M1102.10

Mac-na-hErlaimhe Ua Donnchadha was slain by the Corca-Laighdhe.

M1102.11

A hosting of the men of Ireland to Ath-cliath, to oppose Maghnus and the foreigners of Lochlann, who had come to plunder Ireland; but they made peace for one year with the men of Ireland; and Muircheartach gave his daughter to Sichraidh, son of Maghnus, and gave him many jewels and gifts.

M1102.12

Muircheartach Ua Conchobhair Failghe, died.

M1102.13

Sitric, son of Cumeadha Ua Laeghachain, chief of Sil-Ronain, died.

M1102.14

Muircheartach Ua Maelseachlainn was deposed, and the kingship of Meath was assumed by Murchadh after him.

M1102.15

Niall, son of Niall Ua Ruairc, royal heir of Breifne, was slain by the men of Lurg.

M1103.0

The Age of Christ, 1103.

M1103.1

Murchadh Ua Flaithecan, airchinneach of Ardbo, a paragon of wisdom and instruction, died on his pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1103.2

Cormac Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht, Tanist-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois, and a prosperous and affluent man, died.

M1103.3

The Lector Ua Connmhaigh, of the family of Inis-mor;

M1103.4

Ua Cingeadh, lector of Dearmhach;

M1103.5

the son of Mac Branan, priest of Cill-dara;

M1103.6

and Maelisa Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht, died.

M1103.7

Ua Canannain was driven from the lordship of Tir-Conaill by Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn.

M1103.8

Murchadh Donn Ua Ruadhacan was slain on a predatory excursion in Magh-Cobha, and his host had slain Gillagott Ua Cormaic the same day.

M1103.9

Raghnall Ua hOcain; lawgiver of Telach Og, was slain by the men of Magh-Itha.

M1103.10

A great war broke out between the Cinel-Eoghain and the Ulidians; and Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, Leinster, and Osraighe, and with the chiefs of Connaught, and the men of Meath, with their kings, proceeded


p.975

to Magh-Cobha, to relieve the Ulidians. Both parties went all into Machaire-Arda-Macha, i.e. to Cill-na-gCornaire, and were for a week laying siege to, Ard-Macha. Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, with the people of the north of Ireland, was during this time in Ui-Breasail-Macha, confronting, them face to face, so that he prevented the people of the four provinces of Ireland from committing depredation or aggression any further in the province. When the men of Munster were wearied, Muircheartach proceeded to Aenach-Macha, to Eamhain, and round to Ard-Macha, and left eight ounces of gold upon the altar, and promised eight score cows, and returned to Magh-Cobha, and left the people of the province of Leinster and numbers of the men of Munster there. He himself afterwards set out on a predatory excursion into Dal-Araidhe, with the King of Meath and the King of Connaught; and Donnchadh, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, was slain on this expedition, as were the son of Ua Conchobhair Ciarraighe, Peatadeamhain Ua Beoain, Donncuan Ua Duibhcinn, and a great many others of the nobility along with them. Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, with the Clanna-Neill of the North, proceeded to Magh-Cobha, to attack the camp of the Leinstermen; and the Leinstermen, the Osraighi, and the Munstermen, assembled together all the forces they had, and fought a spirited battle in Magh-Cobha, on Tuesday, the Nones of August, on the eight day after their coming into that plain. The people of Leath-Mhogha were, however, defeated, and slaughter made of them, viz. the slaughter of the Leinstermen, with Muircheartach Mac Gillamocholmog, King of Leinster, with the two Ua Lorcains, i.e. Murchadh, King of Ui-Muireadhaigh, and his brother, and with Muircheartach Mac Gormain, with a great number of others besides them; the slaughter of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, together with the two sons of Maelmordha, and Rian, lord of Ui-Drona, and many others also; the slaughter of the Osraighi in general, with Gillaphadraig Ruadh and the chieftains of Osraighe; the slaughter of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, with Thorstan, son of Eric, with Pol, son of Amann, and Beollan, son of Armunn, with a countless number of others; the slaughter of the men of Munster, with the two Ua Brics, i.e. two tanists of the Deisi; and with Ua Failbhe, Tanist of Corca-Dhuibhne and Erri of Leinster; with Ua Muireadhaigh, lord of Ciarraighe,

p.977

with his son, and many others of the nobility, which it would be tediousto enumerate. The Clanna-Neill of the North, namely, the Cinel-Eoghain and Cinel-Conaill, returned to their forts victoriously ancl triumphantly, with valuable jewels and much wealth, together with the royal tent, the standard, and many other precious jewels.

M1103.11

Maghnus, King of Lochlann and the Islands, and a man who had contemplated the invasion of all Ireland, was slain by the Ulidians, with a slaughter of his people about him, on a predatory excursion.

M1103.12

A woman brought forth two children together in this year, having but one body from the breast to the navel, and all their members perfect, with that exception, and their faces turned to each other; and these were two girls.

M1103.13

Cathalan, Mac Seanain, was killed by the Cairbri-Gabhra.

M1103.14

Donnchadh, son of Enna, was blinded by the son of Dunlaing Ua Caellaighi.

M1103.15

Amhalghaidh, grandson of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, one of the Clann-Choscraigh, was killed by his own father and brother, in revenge of their alumnus, i.e. Conchobhar, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, who had been killed by him some time before.

M1103.16

The battle of Ath-Calgain between the people of the east of Teathbha and those of the west of the same territory, in which Cinaedh, son of Mac Amhalghadha, lord of Callraighe-an-Chalaidh, died.

Annal M1104.

M1104.0

The Age of Christ, 1104.

M1104.1

Gillachrist Ua Echthighern, Bishop of Cluain-mic-Nois, and airchinneach of Ardachaidh-Epscoip-Mel, died.

M1104.2

Flaitheamh Ua Duibhidhir, Bishop of East Leinster;

M1104.3

Feidhlimidh, son of Flann Mainistreach,


p.979

a faithful soldier of Christ, who was a chief senior and learned historian;

M1104.4

and Cosgrach Ua Cruaidhin, lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1104.5

A battle was gained by the Ulidians over the Dal-Araidhe, wherein Duibhceann Ua Daimhin was slain in the heat of the conflict.

M1104.6

Ua Conchobhair of Corcamdhruaidh, i.e. Conchobhar, son of Maeleachlainn, died.

M1104.7

Mac-na-haidhche Ua Ruairc was killed by his brethren.

M1104.8

Dunchadh Ua Conchobhair, lord of Cianachta-an-Ghleinne, was killed by his own people.

M1104.9

Fiachra Ua Floinn, chief of Sil-Maelruain, was killed by the Conmhaicni.

M1104.10

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain to Magh-Muirtheimhne, and they destroyed the tillage and corn of the plain; and on this expedition Cu-uladh Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Loeghaire, was thrown from his horse at Dun-Dealgan, of the effects of which he died a month afterwards.

M1104.11

An army was led by Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, to Magh-Cobha, and he obtained the hostages of Ulidia; and he afterwards proceeded to Teamhair, and burned the whole of a great part of Ui-Laeghaire, except some of his friends, to whom he afforded protection.

M1104.12

The shingles of one-half the Damhliagh of Cluain-mic-Nois were finished by Flaithbheartach Ua Loingsigh, it having been commenced by Cormac Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht.

Annal M1105.

M1105.0

The Age of Christ, 1105.

M1105.1

Aedh Ua Ruadhain, priest of Achadh-bo;

M1105.2

Muircheartach Ua Catharnaigh, a distinguished senior of the family of Cluain-mic-nois;

M1105.3

and Ailillan Ua Spealain, priest of Achadh-bo, died.

M1105.4

Cathal, son of Gillabraite, son of Tighearnan, lord of Ui-Briuin-Breifne and Gailenga, was killed by the sons of his own mother, i.e. by the sons of Donnchadh, son of Caileach Ua Ruairc.

M1105.5

Conchobhar, son of Maeseachlainn, lord of Teamhair, and of all Breagha, and of half Meath, was killed by the Ui-Briuin-Breifne, who took an unfair advantage of him.

M1105.6

Muirgheas Ua Conceannainn, lord of Ui-Diarmada, died.

M1105.7

Domhnall, son of the Gott O'Maeleachlainn, was killed by the Cinel-Fhiachach.

M1105.8

Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn was deposed by Muircheartach


p.981

Ua Briain; and he proceeded into Airghialla, and plundered the greater part of East Meath from that country. Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the greater part of the men of Ireland, went in pursuit of Donnchadh to Magh-Conaille, but he effected nothing but the burning of the corn; and he afterwards divided Meath between the sons of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, he and Donnchadh having refused to come on terms of peace with each other.

M1105.9

Muireadhach Ua Cana, and

M1105.10

Maelruanaidh Ua Bilraighe, lord of Ui-Cairbri, and the tutor of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, died.

M1105.11

Maelseachlainn Ua Conaing died.

M1105.12

Niall Odhar Ua Conchobhair was killed.

M1105.13

Niall, son of Mac Riabhaigh, lord of Callraighe, died.

M1105.14

Domhnall, son of Amhalghaidh, chief successor of Patrick, went to Ath-cliath, to make peace between Domhnall Ua Lochlainn and Muircheartach Ua Briain, where he took his death's sickness; and he was carried in his sickness to Domhnach-airthir-Eamhna, and he was anointed there. He was afterwards removed to the Daimhliag of Ard-Macha, where he died on the 12th of August, being the festival of Laisren of Inis-Muireadhaigh; and he was buried with honour at Ard-Macha.

M1105.15

Ceallach, son of Aedh, son of Maelisa, was appointed to the successorship of Patrick by the election of the men of Ireland; and he received orders on the day of Adamnan's festival.

Annal M1106.

M1106.0

The Age of Christ, 1106.

M1106.1

Tuathal Ua Cathail, successor of Caeimhghin;

M1106.2

Mac Beathadh Ua hAilgheanain, successor of Bairre;

M1106.3

Muireadhach Ua Maelduin,


p.983

Vice-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1106.4

Cormac Ua Cillin, airchinneach of the Teach-aeidheadh of Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1106.5

Maelmuire Ua Scolaighe, successor of Ruadhan of Lothra, died.

M1106.6

Muircheartach Ua Cearnaigh, chief lector of the Irish, died at Cluain-mic-Nois, after a good life, at an advanced age; he was of the tribe of Luighne-Chonnacht.

M1106.7

Maelmuire, son of Mac Cuinn-na-mBocht, was killed in the middle of the Daimhliag of Cluain-mic-Nois by plunderers.

M1106.8

Cathbharr O'Domhnaill, pillar of the defence and warfare, of the glory and hospitality, of the Cinel-Luigdheach, died, after having gained the victory over the world and the devil.

M1106.9

Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, i.e. the son of Murchadh, son of Flann, King of Meath, was killed by the Ui-Minnegain, i.e. some of the Ui-Mic-Uais of Meath.

M1106.10

Domhnall, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, was deposed by Muircheartach Ua Briain; and his brother, i.e. Toirdhealbhach, was inaugurated at Ath-an-tearmoinn, as king over the Sil-Muireadhaigh after Domhnall.

M1106.11

Sitric, son of Cumeadha Ua Laeghachain, chief of Sil-Ronain, the strength of the chiefs of Teathbha, died.

M1106.12

Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn was deposed, and the kingdom of Meath was assumed by Murchadh after him.

M1106.13

Niall, son of Domhnall Ua Ruairc, Tanist of Breifne, was killed by the men of Lurg, and many others of the nobility along with him.

M1106.14

The son of Gillamantach Ua Ruairc was killed by Domhnall, son of Domhnall Ua Ruairc.

M1106.15

Raghnall Ua Deadhaidhg died.

M1106.16

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Ulster for the first time; and he obtained his full demand, namely, a cow from every six persons, or an in-calf heifer from every three persons, besides many other offerings.

M1106.17

Ceallach made a visitation of Munster


p.985

for the first time; and he obtained a full tribute, namely, seven cows and seven sheep, and half an ounce of silver, from every cantred in Munster, beside many jewels; and Ceallach conferred the dignity of Noble on this occasion, at the request of the men of Ireland.

M1106.18

Caenchomhrac Ua Baeighill, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died.

Annal M1107.

M1107.0

The Age of Christ, 1107.

M1107.1

Mungairit was plundered by Muircheartach Ua Briain.

M1107.2

Ceann-coradh and Caiseal were burned by lightning, between the two Easters, with sixty puncheons of mead and beer.

M1107.3

Cuilen Ua Cathalan, lord of Uaithne-Cliach, died.

M1107.4

Conchobhar (i.e. Conchobhar Cisenanch), son of Donnsleibhe, royal heir of Ulidia, was killed by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1107.5

A battle was gained by the Ui-Breasail-Macha over the Ui-Meith, in which the latter were slaughtered, together with their lord, Aedh Ua hInnreachtaigh, and Fearghus, son of the lord of Conaille, and a great number of others, fell along with him.

M1107.6

Cathasach Ua Tuamain, lord of Ui-Briuin-Archaille, was wounded by the Ui-Cremhthainn, and he died in consequence; and Eoghan, the son of Mac Riabhaigh, was killed in revenge of him.

M1107.7

Domhnall Ua hAinbheith, lord of Ui-Meith, was killed by the Ui-Eathach-Uladh.

M1107.8

A battle was fought between the people of the east and those of the west of the Teathbha, in which Cinaedh, the son of Mac Amhalghadha, lord of Calraighe, and others along with him, were slain by Domhnall Mac Fiacla (or Ua Fiacla). The breach of Ath-Calgain was the name of this battle.

M1107.9

Domhnall, son of Tadhg Ua Briain, was fettered by Muircheartach Ua Briain, at Ath-cliath, but he was released immediately.

M1107.10

Great wind and lightning in this year, so that many men and cattle were killed, and houses and woods were destroyed.


p.987

Annal M1108.

M1108.0

The Age of Christ, 1108.

M1108.1

The Bishop Mac-mic-Donnghail, Bishop of Cilldara, died.

M1108.2

Maelfinnen, i.e. Archbishop of Leinster, successor of Colum Mac Crimhthainn; and

M1106.3

Eochaidh, son of the lector of Ua Fothadain, a noble priest, senior, and anmchara of Disert-Chaeimhghin, died.

M1108.4

Celech Ua Caemhorain, successor of Cainnech, died.

M1108.5

Cocrich, daughter of Ua Noenneanaigh, comharba of Cluain-Bronaigh;

M1108.6

Oenghus Ua Clercein, Patrick's steward in Munster;

M1108.7

and Aedh, son of Dubhdalethe, vice-airchinneach of Ard-Macha, and intended successor of Patrick, died.

M1108.8

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, went on his visitation of Munster the first time; and he obtained his full demand.

M1108.9

Etru Ua Duinncathaigh died.

M1108.10

A house was taken by Ua Mathghamhna and Ua Maelruanaidh upon Goll Garbhraighe, King of Ulidia, i.e. Eochaidh, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha; and he was beheaded by them.

M1108.11

Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Eoghanacht-Locha-Lein, was killed by his own brethren.

M1108.12

Domhnall, son of Donnchadh Ua Ruairc, lord of Ui-Briuin-Breifne, was killed by the Cairbri-Gabhra.

M1108.13

A predatory excursion was made by Niall, son of Domhnall, Tanist of Oileach, into Corann; and he carried off many cows and prisoners.

M1108.14

A predatory excursion was made by the Ulidians into Ui-Meith; and they plundered it all, except a small portion.

M1108.15

Inis-Labhradha was demolished by the Feara-Manach.

M1108.16

All Luimneach was burned on the night of the festival of Patrick.

M1108.17

Two persons were burned by lightning at Termonn-Caellainne.

M1108.18

This year was a prosperous one, with abundance of nuts and fruit.

Annal M1109.

M1109.0

The Age of Christ, 1109.

M1109.1

Maelisa Ua Cuillen, noble bishop of the north of Ireland, died.

M1109.2

Oenghus Ua Domhnallain, chief anmchara and chief senior of the clergy of Colum-Cill, died at Ceanannus.

M1109.3

Flaithbheartach Ua Loingsigh, successor of Ciaran, and great priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1109.4

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, Meath, and Connaught, into Tir-Briuin-Breifne, to aid Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, whence


p.989

they carried off many cows and prisoners; and they entered on the islands of Loch Uachtair, and took prisoners out of them. After this Ua Ruairc came, and Ua Maeleachlainn gave up his camp to them; and they killed Mac Gillafhulartaigh, and numbers along with him.

M1109.5

An army was led by Domhnall Mac Lochlainn, with the people of the north of Ireland, to Sliabh-Fuaid; but Ceallach, successor of Patrick, made a year's peace between Mac Lochlainn and Ua Briain; after which the people of the north of Ireland, with the Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, proceeded to Magh-hUa-Breasail, to attack the Ulidians who were in Magh-Cobha; and the Ulidians gave them the three hostages which they themselves selected.

M1109.6

A predatory excursion was made by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair, on which he plundered the Feara-Rois, and slew Ua Finn, lord of Feara-Rois, in violation of the Staff of Jesus and the successor of Patrick; but God took vengeance of him for this.

M1109.7

Aedh Ua Ruairc came into the camp of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn twice, and slaughtered his people, through the curse of the clergy of Patrick.

M1109.8

Ard-Breacain was burned, with its churches, by the Ui-Briuin, and many persons were killed there, and prisoners carried off from thence.

M1109.9

Domhnall, the son of Mac Gillaphadraig, was killed by another youth, at a game.

M1109.10

Mice eat up all the corn fields in certain territories in Ireland.

Annal M1110.

M1110.0

The Age of Christ, 1110.

M1110.1

Cearnach, son of Mac Ulcha, airchinneach of Culrathain, died in penance.

M1110.2

Flann Ua hAedha, successor of Einne of Ara;

M1110.3

Gillaphadraig Ua Duibhratha, lector of Cill-Dalua, and paragon of Munster;

M1110.4

Feardomhnach, the most distinguished of the senior jurisconsults, and lector of Cill-dara;

M1110.5

and Bran Ua Bruic, senior of West Munster, died.

M1110.6

Echthighern Ua Fearghail, a distinguished old champion, died.

M1110.7

Gillacoluim Ua Maelmhuaidh,


p.991

lord of Feara-Ceall, and his wife, were killed by the beggar, Ua Aillen.

M1110.8

Murchadh, son of Tadhg Ua Briain, royal heir of Munster, died.

M1110.9

A predatory excursion was made by Domhnall Mac Lochlainn into Connaught, whence he carried off three thousand prisoners and many thousand cattle.

M1110.10

The battle of Ros in Magh-Aei, opposite Cruachain, was gained by the Sil-Muireadhaigh, under the conduct of Toirdhealbhach, over the Conmhaicni, where fell three of the Ui-Fearghaile, together with Gilla-na-naemh and Mac-Conchaille, and many other chieftains, together with Duarcan, son of Dubhdara Ua hEolusa.

M1110.11

Maelruanaidh Ua Machainen, lord of Mughdhorna;

M1110.12

Bebhinn, daughter of Ceinneide Ua Briain, and wife of Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, King of Oileach, died.

M1110.13

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, went on his visitation in Meath for the first time; and he obtained his demand.

M1110.14

A battle was gained by the Conmhaicni over the Sil-Muireadhaigh, i.e. the battle of Magh-Breanghair, where many were slain, together with Meanman Ua Muireadhaigh, and Ruaidhri Ua Muireadhaigh.

Annal M1111.

M1111.0

The Age of Christ, 1111.

M1111.1

Cathasach Ua Laedha, one of the clergy of Patrick, noble senior of Ireland, died.

M1111.2

Dun-da-leathghlas was burned, both fort and trian i.e.third part by lightning.

M1111.3

Ceanannus, Port-Lairge, and Lughmhadh, were burned.

M1111.4

An army was led by the Ulidians to Tealach-Og, and they cut down its old trees: a predatory excursion was made by Niall Ua Lochlainn, and he carried off three thousand cows, in revenge of it.

M1111.5

A synod was convened at Fiadh mic-Aenghusa by the chiefs of Ireland, with Ceallach, successor of


p.993

Patrick; Maelmuire Ua Dunain, noble senior of Ireland; with fifty bishops, three hundred priests, and three thousand students, together with Muircheartach Ua Briain and the chiefs of Leath-Mhogha, to prescribe rules and good morals for all, both laity and clergy.

M1111.6

Donnchadh Ua hAnluain, lord of Ui-Niallain, was treacherously killed by his brothers; and these brothers were killed by the Ui-Niallain, before the end of twenty nights, in revenge of him.

M1111.7

A meeting between Domhnall Mac Lochlainn and Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, and they made peace and friendship with each other; and the Ulidians delivered hostages to Domhnall, for paying him his own demand.

M1111.8

Cathal, son of Cathal Ua Mughroin, chief of Clann-Cathail, died.

M1111.9

Cluain-mic-Nois was plundered by the Dal-gCais, at the instance of Muircheartach Ua Briain.

M1111.10

A predatory excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and he plundered Tearmann-Dabheog.

M1111.11

Another predatory excursion was made by him; and he plundered as far as Beann-Eachlabhra, Sliabh-Ruisen, and Loch-Eirne.

Annal M1112.

M1112.0

The Age of Christ, 1112.

M1112.1

Conghalach, the son of Mac Conchaille, airchinneach of Doire, died, after good penance, in the ninety-fourth year of his age.

M1112.2

Gormlaith, daughter of Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, successor of Brighit, died after penance.

M1112.3

The fort of Ard-Macha, with its church, was burned on the


p.995

tenth of the Calends of April, and two streets of Trian-Masan, and the third street of Trian-mor.

M1112.4

A predatory excursion was made by Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, across Fine-Gall, i.e. as far as Droichet-Dubhghaill; and he carried off a great spoil of cattle and many prisoners.

M1112.5

Ughaire Ua Lorcain, lord of Ui-Muireadhaigh, died after penance.

M1112.6

Tir-da-ghlas and Fabhar were burned.

M1113.0

The Age of Christ, 1113.

M1113.1

The Order of St. Bernard was commenced.

M1113.2

Flannagan, son of Maelisa, intended Abbot of Ard-Macha, died after unction and good penance.

M1113.3

Connla Ua Floinn, successor of Molaisi of Leithghlinn;

M1113.4

Diarmaid Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Ua Suanaigh, died.

M1113.5

Diarmaid Ua Longain, steward of Munster, died on the night of Patrick's festival.

M1113.6

Finnchas Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe;

M1113.7

and Maelseachlainn Ua Conchobhair, lord of Corcmodhruadh, died after penance.

M1113.8

Donnchadh O'Taircheirt, chief of Clan-nSnedhghaile, was killed by Niall Ua Lochlainn.

M1113.9

An army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, with the chiefs of Cinel-Eoghain, Cinel-Conaill, and Airghialla, to Gleann-Righe; and they banished Donnchadh from the kingdom of Ulidia, and they divided Ulidia between Ua Mathghamhna and the son of Ua Duinnsleibhe, he himself retaining Dal-Araidhe and Ui-Eathach.

M1113.10

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, Leinster, and Connaught, to Magh-Cobha, to aid Donnchadh. Another army, composed of the forces before mentioned, was marched by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn to Magh-Cobha, to relieve the Ulidians; and there was a challenge of battle between them, but the successor of Patrick separated them, under the semblance of


p.997

peace and tranquillity. Donnchadh Ua hEochadha was blinded by Eochaidh Ua Mathghamhna and the Ulidians. An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain and the people of Leath-Mhogha, both laity and clergy, to Greanog. Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, with the chiefs of the north of Ireland, proceeded to Cluain-caein, in Feara-Rois; and both armies remained for the space of a month in readiness, confronting each other, until the successor of Patrick, with the Staff of Jesus, made a year's peace between them.

M1113.11

A spirited conflict took place between two parties of the men of Fearnmhagh themselves, in which fell the two royal heirs of Fearnmhagh, namely, Ua Cric hain and Ua Donnagain.

M1113.12

A salmon was caught at Cluain-mic-Nois this year, which was twelve feet in length, twelve hands in breadth without being split, and three hands and two fingers was the length of the fin of its neck.

Annal M1114.

M1114.0

The Age of Christ, 1114.

M1114.1

Diarmaid Ua Floinn, successor of Ailbhe of Imleach-Iubhair, a noble bishop and a lector, who bestowed jewels, food, and alms;

M1114.2

Flann Mac Flannchadha, successor of Molaise of Daimhinis;

M1114.3

Maelcoluim Ua Cormacain, successor of Ende of Ara;

M1114.4

and Feardomhnach Ua Clucain, comharba of Ceanannus, died.

M1114.5

Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, royal heir of Cinel-Conaill, was killed by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M1114.6

Aedh, son of Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, royal heir of Ulidia, died.

M1114.7

Donnchadh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe,

M1114.8

and Muircheartach, son of Mac Lochlainn, royal heir of Oileach, died.

M1114.9

A great fit of sickness attacked Muircheartach Ua Briain, so that he became a living skeleton, and resigned his kingdom; and Diarmaid assumed the kingdom of Munster after him, without permission.

M1114.10

An army was led by Domhnall


p.999

Ua Lochlainn to Rath-Ceannaigh, where Eochaidh Ua Mathghamhna, with the Ulidians, went into his house, as did Donnchadh Ua Loingsigh, with the Dal-Araidhe; Aedh Ua Ruairc, with the men of Breifne; and Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, with the men of Meath. They all afterwards proceeded across Ath-Luain to Dun-Leodha, where Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, with the Connaughtmen, and Niall, son of Domhnall Mac Lochlainn, his own son, with the chieftains of Cinel-Conaill, came to join his assembly. They all afterwards proceeded to Tealach-Deadhaidh, in Dal-gCais; and they made a year's peace with the men of Munster. Domhnall Ua Lochlainn then went through Connaught, for home.

M1114.11

Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair banished Domhnall Ua Conchobhair, his brother, into Munster; and Domhnall was afterwards taken by the Ui-Maine, who delivered him into the hands of Toirdhealbhach.

M1114.12

Fobhar-Feichin, Cluain-Iraird, Cill-Beneoin, Cunga, Cill-Chuilinn, Cill-Cainnigh, and Ard-Padraig, were all burned this year.

Annal M1115.

M1115.0

The Age of Christ, 1115.

M1115.1

Diarmaid Ua Briain, King of Munster, was taken prisoner by Muircheartach Ua Briain; and Muircheartach Ua Briain assumed his kingdom again, and set out with an army into Leinster and Breagha.

M1115.2

Muircheartach Ua Ciarmhaic, lord of Aine; Domhnall Ua Conchobhair Ciarraighe; Murchadh Ua Flainn; the son of Flannchadha, lord of Muscraighe, were slain.

M1115.3

The Daimhliag great stone church of Ard-Breacain, with its full of people, was burned by the men of Munster, and also many other churches in the country of the Feara-Breagh.

M1115.4

A great predatory excursion was made


p.1001

by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and the Connaughtmen; and they plundered Thomond as far as Luimneach, and carried off countless spoils and many prisoners.

M1115.5

A battle was gained by Domhnall Ua Briain and the foreigners of Ath-cliath over the Leinstermen, wherein fell Donnchadh Ua Mael-na-mbo, lord of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and Conchobhair Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, with his sons, and many others besides them.

M1115.6

Domhnall Ua Briain, i.e. the son of Tadhg, royal heir of Munster, was killed by the Connaughtmen.

M1115.7

An onset was made at Ath-bo by the sons of Maeleachlainn, son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, upon Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught; and they wounded him, so that he was lying in the agonies of death.

M1115.8

Maelruanaidh Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, died.

M1115.9

Maelseachlainn Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Teamhair, was killed.

M1115.10

Boisterous weather, frost, and snow, from the fifteenth of the Calends of January to the fifteenth of the Calends of March, or longer, which caused great destruction of cattle, birds, and men; whence grew a great dearth throughout all Ireland, and in Leinster particularly.

M1115.11

A fleet was brought by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught; and he plundered Domhnall, son of Cusleibhe Ua Fearghail, and Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn came into his house; and he fortified Buidhi-an-bheithe. He made an offering of three jewels to St. Ciaran, i.e. a drinking-horn with gold, a cup with gold, and a mullog of copper with gold. He afterwards divided Meath between the two sons of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, namely, Maelseachlainn and Murchadh, but Maelseachlainn fell by Murchadh immedately after.

Annal M1116.

M1116.0

The Age of Christ, 1116.

M1116.1

Conghalach, son of Gillachiarain, airchinneach of Lis-aeidheadh at Cluain-mic-Nois, died after penance and good repentance.

M1116.2

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Connaught the second time,


p.1003

and he obtained a full tribute.

M1116.3

Cill-Dalua, with its church, was burned.

M1116.4

Corcach-mor-Mumhan, Imleach-Iubhair, the oratory of Maelisa Ua Brolchain, Achadh-bo-Chainnigh, Cluain-Iraird, the great house of the abbots at Ard-Macha, with twenty houses about it, and a great portion of Lis-mor-Mochuda, were burned in the beginning of the Lent of this year.

M1116.5

A great plague and famine this year in Munster and Leinster, so that churches and fortresses, territories and tribes, were desolated; and they also spread throughout Ireland and beyond seas afterwards.

M1116.6

Dearbhail, daughter of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, died.

M1116.7

A predatory excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair; and he burned and demolished Boromha and Ceann-coradh, and killed many persons. He took many cows and prisoners, but he restored the prisoners to God and to Flannan.

M1116.8

An army was led by Diarmaid Ua Briain and the men of Munster into Connaught; and he slaughtered the inhabitants at Ruaidh-Bheitheach, where they left behind their provisions, their horses, their arms, and their armour.

Annal M1117.

M1117.0

The Age of Christ, 1117.

M1117.1

Maelmuire, Bishop of Dun-da-leathghlas;

M1117.2

Flann Ua Scula, Bishop of Condere;

M1117.3

Gillamochuda Mac Camchuarta, Bishop of Daimhliag;

M1117.4

Ceallach Ua Colmain, Bishop of Fearna;

M1117.5

Cathasach Ua Conaill, noble Bishop of Connaught;

M1117.6

Anmcha O'hAnmchadha, Bishop of Ard-fearta-Brenainn;

M1117.7

Muireadhach Ua hEnlaingi, Bishop of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, died.

M1117.8

Maelmuire Ua Dunain, Archbishop of Munster, head of the clergy of Ireland,


p.1005

and lord of the almsdeeds of the west of Europe, died in the seventy-seventh year of his age, on the ninth of the Calends of January.

M1117.9

Maelruanaidh Ua Cibhleachain, successor of Feichin of Fobhar, died.

M1117.10

Conchobhar Ua Follamhain, comharba of Cluain-Iraird;

M1117.11

and Eoghan Mac Echthighern, successor of Buithe, died.

M1117.12

Maelbrighde Mac Ronain, comharba of Ceanannus, was killed, and the people of Ceanannus slaughtered along with him, by Aedh Ua Ruairc and the Ui-Briuin, on the night of Domhnach Chroim Duibh.

M1117.13

Diarmaid, son of Enda, King of Leinster, died at Ath-cliath.

M1117.14

Conchobhar Ua Caireallain was killed by the Feara-Manach.

M1117.15

The battle of Leacain was given by Briain, son of Murchadh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, and the son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, who had the Connaughtmen along with them, to Toirdhealbhach, son of Diarmaid, and the Dal-gCais, and made a slaughter of them in that battle.

M1117.16

A battle was gained over the Cinel-Eoghain of the Island i.e. of Inis-Eoghain, by the Cinel-Conaill, in which the Cinel-Eoghain were slaughtered, and many of their chieftains slain.

M1117.17

Diarmaid Ua Briain and the men of Munster plundered Tir-Fiachrach and Tir-Briuin. The Connaughtmen dispatched a battalion southwards, in pursuit of them, under the conduct of Cathal, grandson of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, and Brian, son of Murchadh; and they plundered all before them, as far as the mountain, and committed acts of conflagration and slaughter. The Munstermen sent a host to oppose them; and a battle was fought between them at Leitreacha-Odhrain, and the southerns were routed, and two of the Ui-Ceinneidigh and many others were slain on that occasion.

Annal M1118.

M1118.0

The age of Christ, 1118.

M1118.1

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, i.e. Ruaidhri na Soighe Buidhe, King of Connaught for a long time, died on his pilgrimage at


p.1007

Cluain-mic-Nois, the twenty-sixth year after his having been blinded by Ua Flaithbheartaigh.

M1118.2

Diarmaid Ua Briain, King of Munster and of all Leath-Mhogha, died at Corcach-mor-Mumhan, after unction and penance.

M1118.3

Domhnall, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, died.

M1118.4

Laidhgnen Ua Duibhdara, lord of Feara-Manach, was slain by the Ui-Fiachrach of Ardsratha, and the men of Craebh.

M1118.5

Brian, son of Murchadh Ua Briain, was slain by Tadhg Mac Carthaigh and the people of Desmond.

M1118.6

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, who was joined by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair, and by Aedh Ua Ruairc, as far as Gleann-Maghair in Munster; and he gave Desmond to Carthaigh, and Thomond to the sons of Diarmaid Ua Briain, and carried off the hostages of both. Another army was led by him to Athcliath; and he carried away the son of the King of Teamhair, i.e. Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, who was in the hands of the foreigners, and the hostages of the foreigners themselves, as well as those of Osraighe and Leinster. He was thirty years of age at this time.

M1118.7

The battle of Ceann-dara was gained over the Ui-Eathach-Uladh, by Murchadh Ua Ruadhacan, who made a slaughter of them.

M1118.8

A mermaid was taken by the fishermen of the weir of Lis-Arglinn, in Osraighe, and another at Port-Lairge.

M1118.9

The great army of Connaught, under Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, marched to Ceann-coradh, and hurled it into the Sinainn, both stone and wood.

M1118.10

O'Baoigheallain, chief poet of Ireland, was killed by Spailleach Ua Flannagain, after he O'Flannagain had forcibly taken the house in which he was.


p.1119

Annal M1119.

M1119.0

The Age of Christ, 1119.

M1119.1

Ruaidhri, airchinneach of Othain-mor;

M1119.2

Fearghal of the island of Loch-Cre, a venerable senior, and a select soldier of Christ;

M1119.3

and Diarmaid Ua Leanna, successor of Seanan of Inis-Cathaigh, a paragon of penance, died.

M1119.4

Muircheartach Ua Briain, King of Ireland, prop of the glory and magnificence of the west of the world, died, after the victory of reign and penance, on the festival of Machaemhog of Liath, on the sixth rectè fourth of the Ides of March, and was interred in the church of Cill-Dalua, after penance, in the sixth year of his illness.

M1119.5

Niall, son of Domhnall Mac Lochlainn, royal heir of Aileach and of Ireland, and who was also the paragon of Ireland for personal form, sense, hospitality, and learning, fell by the Cinel-Moain, in the twenty-eighth year of his age.

M1119.6

Domhnall Ua hAideith, lord of Ui-Eathach, was killed by Echri, son of Flaithbheartach.

M1119.7

Conchobhar Ua Goirmleadhaigh, chief of Cinel-Moain, was slain by the Ui-Dubhda and the Clann-Flaithbheartaigh.

M1119.8

Flaithbheartach Ua Laidhgnen, lord of Fearnmhagh for a time, died.

M1119.9

The son of Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig, royal heir of Osraighe, was slain by the Osraighi themselves.

M1119.10

Cucollchoille Ua Baigheallain, chief ollamh of Ireland in poetry, a man distinguished for charity, hospitality, and universal benevolence towards the needy and the mighty, was killed by the men of Lurg and Tuath-ratha, with his wife and two very good sons, and also five-and-thirty other persons, consisting both of his family and guests, in one house, on the Saturday before Little Easter, being the festival of Becan, son of Cula.

M1119.11

Aedh


p.1011

Ua Brain, lord of East Leinster, died.

M1119.12

Ua Tuathail, lord of Ui-Muireadhaigh, was slain.

M1119.13

Aedh Ua Conceannainn, lord of Ui-Diarmada, died.

M1119.14

A great fleet by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland, before the Sinainn was cleared by him, with the King of Leinster, i.e. Enna Mac Murchadha, and with the King of Osraighe, i.e. Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig, and the chiefs of the foreigners of Ath-cliath along with him, until he arrived at Cill-Dalua; and they remained for some time consuming the provisions of Munster.

Annal M1120.

M1120.0

The Age of Christ, 1120.

M1120.1

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Meath, and he expelled Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn into the North; and he carried off hostages, under the protection of the successor of Patrick and the Staff of Jesus.

M1120.2

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Munster the second time; and he obtained his full demand, and imparted his blessing.

M1120.3

An army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, to the relief of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, to Ath-Luain, against Connaught; and Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair made a false peace with them.

M1120.4

Eachmarcach Mac Uidhrin, chief of Cinel-Fearadhaigh, was slain by the Feara-Manach.

M1120.5

The battle of the plain of Cill-mor Ua-Niallain was gained by Raghnall, son of Mac Riabhaigh, over the Ui-Eathach, in which the latter were slaughtered.

M1120.6

Branan, son of Gillachrist, chief of Corcachlann, died.

M1120.7

The bridge of Ath-Luain, the bridge of Ath-Croich on the Sinainn, and the bridge of Dun-Leodha on the Suca, were made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1120.8

The fair of Tailltin was celebrated by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

Annal M1121.

M1121.0

The Age of Christ, 1121.

M1121.1

Samuel Ua hAingli, Bishop of Ath-cliath, died; and Ceallach, successor of Patrick, assumed the bishopric of Ath-cliath


p.1013

by the suffrages of the foreigners and Irish.

M1121.2

Domhnall, son of Ardghar Mac Lochlainn, King of Ireland, the most distinguished of the Irish for personal form, family, sense, prowess, prosperity and happiness, for bestowing of jewels and food upon the mighty and the needy, died at Doire-Choluim-Chille, after having been twenty-seven years in sovereignty over Ireland, and eleven years in the kingdom of Aileach, in the seventy-third year of his age, on the night of Wednesday, the fourth of the Ides of February, being the festival of Mochuarog.

M1121.3

Gilla-Easbuig Eoghain Ua hAinniarraidh, lord of Cianachta-Glinne-Geimhin, was killed by his brothers.

M1121.4

Cumaighe, son of Deoraidh Ua Floinn, lord of Durlas, was drowned in Loch-Eathach, after the island of Inis-Draicrenn had been taken upon him by the Ui-Eathach, where forty-four persons were slain.

M1121.5

Maelseachlainn Ua Ceallachain, lord of Ui-Eathach-Mumhan, the splendour of the south of Munster, died.

M1121.6

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and the people of the province of Connaught into Desmond, by which they plundered from Magh-Femhin to Traigh-Li, both territories and churches.

M1121.7

A plundering excursion was, moreover, made by Toirdhealbhach, and he arrived at the Termon of Lis-mor, and he obtained countless cattle spoils; and he lost on that occasion Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught; Aedh Ua hEidhin, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne; Muirgheas Ua Lorcain; and many others.

M1121.8

Cugaileang Mac Gillaseachnaill, lord of South Breagha, was slain by the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M1121.9

Two streets of Trian-Masain, from the door of the fort to Cros-Brighde, were burned in Ard-Macha.

M1121.10

A great wind-storm happened in the December of this year, which knocked off the conical cap of the cloictheach of Ard-Macha, and caused great destruction of woods throughout Ireland.

M1121.11

The cloictheach of Tealach-nInmainne, in Osraighe, was split by


p.1015

a thunderbolt, and a stone flew from the cloictheach, which killed a student in the church.

M1121.12

Righbhardan, son of Cucoirne, lord of Eile, died.

M1121.13

Conchobhar Ua Fogarta, lord of South Eile, was killed.

Annal M1122.

M1122.0

The Age of Christ, 1122.

M1122.1

The shrine of Colman, son of Luachan, was found in the tomb of Lann, a man's cubit in the earth: on Spy Wednesday precisely it was found.

M1122.2

Feargna Mac Echthigheirn, successor of Buithe, a wise priest;

M1122.3

Annadh, son of Mac Ulca, airchinneach of Cuil-rathain;

M1122.4

and Conchobhar Ua Lighda, successor of Ailbhe, died.

M1122.5

Conghal, lector of Cluain-Iraird, died at Gleann-da-locha, on his pilgrimage.

M1122.6

Aedh Ua Duibhdhirma, chief of Breadach, head of the hospitality of the north of Ireland, and Domhnall, his brother, died.

M1122.7

Donnsleibhe Ua hOgain, chief of Cinel-Fearghusa, and lawgiver of Tealach-Og, died.

M1122.8

Maelseachlainn Ua Donnagain, lord of Aradh-thire, died.

M1122.9

Aedh Ua Ruairc, i.e. the son of Domhnall, lord of Conmhaicne, fell by the men of Meath, as he was carrying off a prey from them.

M1122.10

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair to Loch Saileach in Meath, where Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, came into his house.

M1122.11

A great predatory excursion was made by Conchobhar Mac Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, until they arrived at Cill-ruaidh, in Ulidia; and they carried off countless cattle spoils.


p.1017

M1122.12

Maelcoluim Ua Brolchain, Bishop of Ard-Macha, died at the Disert of Doire, after the victory of forbearance and penance.

M1123.0

The Age of Christ, 1123.

M1123.1

Aenghus Ua Gormain, successor of Comhghall, died on his pilgrimage at Lis-mor-Mochuda.

M1123.2

Flann Ua Duibhinsi, airchinneach of Lughmhadh;

M1123.3

Maelmaire Ua Condubhain, airchinneach of Doire-Lurain;

M1123.4

and Maelisa Ua hAirtri, steward of Connaught, died.

M1123.5

Conghalach Ua Flaithbheartaigh, royal heir of Aileach, died.

M1123.6

Cucaisil Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Fearnmhagh, died.

M1123.7

Donnsleibhe Mac Cathalain, the prosperity and happiness of Ulidia, died.

M1123.8

Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig Ruaidh, lord of Osraighe, fell by his own tribe.

M1123.9

A great army was led by Toirdhealbhach, son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, as far as Bealach-Eochaille, by which he took all the hostages of Desmond.

M1123.10

The Gaileanga took a house at Daimhliag-Chianain upon Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair; and they burned eighty houses around it, and killed many of his people, on that occasion. Ua Maeleachlainn escaped being killed or burned, by the protection of Cianan.

M1123.11

Domhnall, son of Donnchadh, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by the Gaileanga.

M1123.12

An unusual attack was made upon the successor of Ailbhe, i.e. Maelmordha, son of Cloithnia. A house was forcibly taken from him, and the son of Cearbhall Ua Ciarmhaic, lord of Aine-Cliach, in the very middle of Imleach, and seven persons were therein killed; but the chiefs escaped through the miracle of God, Ailbhe, and the Church. The Bearnan-Ailbhe was burned on this occasion. The


p.1019

person who had taken the house, i.e. Gillacaech Ua Ciarmhaic (who was after being named a deacon), was killed before the end of a month; and his head was cut off, in revenge of the violation of the laws of God and Ailbhe.

M1123.13

Donnchadh, son of Tadhg Mac Carthaigh, lord of Desmond, died; and Cormac, his brother, assumed his place.

M1123.14

Tadhg Ua Maille, lord of Umhall, was drowned with his ship at Ara.

Annal M1124.

M1124.0

The Age of Christ, 1124.

M1124.1

St. Maelmaedhog O'Morgair sat in the bishopric of Conneire.

M1124.2

Maelcoluim, son of Maelmaith Ua Connagain, noble priest, and the paragon of wisdom and piety of the east of Ireland, died at Inis-Padraig, on the twenty-third day of December.

M1124.3

The finishing of the cloictheach of Cluain-mic-Nois by Ua Maeleoin, successor of Ciaran.

M1124.4

Tadhg Mac Carthaigh, lord of Desmond, the ornament of Munster, died, after penance, at Caiseal.

M1124.5

Muireadhach Mac Gormain, lord of Ui-Bairrche, who was the ornament and glory, and the chief old hero of Leinster, died.

M1124.6

Ardghar, son of Aedh, royal heir of Aileach, was killed by the people of Doire, in revenge of Colum-Cille.

M1124.7

Maelseachlainn, son of Tadhg, son of Maelruanaidh, lord of Magh-Luirg, was slain by the men of Breifne and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc.

M1124.8

Gillabroide, son of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, was slain by the Connaughtmen, on Loch En, and many others along with him.

M1124.9

Muireadhach (i.e. lord of Clann-Coscraigh), the son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri O'Flaithbheartaigh, died an ecclesiastic.

M1124.10

Lochlainn Ua Follamhain, lord of Crich na gCedach, and his son, were killed by the son of his brother.

M1124.11

Gluniairn, son of Bran, lord of the east of Ui-Faelain, was


p.1021

killed by Domhnall, son of Mac Fhaelain, royal heir of Leinster.

M1124.12

The two sons of Tadhg, son of Ua Lorcain, both Tanists of Ui-Muireadhaigh, were slain by another Ua Lorcain, by treachery.

M1124.13

Aedh Ua Mathghamhna, royal heir of Ulidia, fell by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1124.14

The great fleet of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair on Loch Deirgdheirc, and he conveyed it over Eas-Danainne; and he plundered Ui-Conaill at Faing, and the fleet of Desmond was left to him; he had also a great camp at Ath-caille from the festival of Martin till May.

M1124.15

Three castles were erected by the Connaughtmen, the castle of Dun-Leodhar, the castle of the Gaillimh, and the castle of Cuil-maeile.

M1124.16

A plundering army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair; and he plundered the Conmhaicne in Magh-Cairbre, and he also plundered Magh-Luighne. The Conmhaicne and the men of Meath flocked to oppose him, and made an attack upon him at Craebh-Rois-da-charn, and slew some of his forces. He Toirdhealbhach turned upon them, and defeated the men of Meath, and many of their nobles and plebeians were slain by him.

M1124.17

The hostages of Desmond, among whom was the son of Cormac, son of Mac Carthy, were put to death by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

Annal M1125.

M1125.0

The Age of Christ, 1125.

M1125.1

Maeleoin Ua Dunagain, a paragon of wisdom, and Bishop of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh;

M1125.2

Maeltrena, a noble priest and learned senior of Cro-Caeimhghin, the bosom fosterling of Ua Dunain, noble senior of Ireland,


p.1023

died, as became an ecclesiastic, after a good life.

M1125.3

Mac Maeilesuthain, chief lector of the west of Ireland, died at Tamhlacht.

M1125.4

Cineidigh Ua Conaing, airchinneach of Cill-Dalua, died.

M1125.5

On the fifth of the Ides of January, which fell on Friday, the roof was raised on the great daimhliag of Ard-Macha, after having been fully covered with shingles by Ceallach, successor of Patrick, one hundred and thirty years since it had a complete roof before.

M1125.6

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Meath; and they deposed Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and placed three lords over Meath. Maelseachlainn, son of Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, the third lord of these, was slain by Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1125.7

On one occasion, as Muircheartach Ua Cearbhaill, lord of the south of Fearnmhagh, went upon a predatory excursion into the territory of the men of Breagha, Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, with the men of Meath and Breagha, opposed him; and Muircheartach was slain by him, and a party of the gentlemen of Fearnmhagh, with many others.

M1125.8

The two sons of Aineislis Ua hEidhin were slain in treachery at Bun-Gaillimhe.

M1125.9

The bridge of Ath-Luain and the bridge of Ath-Croich were destroyed by the men of Meath.

M1125.10

Flann and Gillariabhach, the two sons of Aineislis Ua hEidhin, were slain by Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh.

Annal M1126.

M1126.0

The Age of Christ, 1126.

M1126.1

Aedh Ua Modain, Bishop of Gleann-da-locha, died.

M1126.2

Finn Ua Conaingen, airchinneach of Doire for a time, died.

M1126.3

Muireadhach Ua Cuillein, airchinneach of Clochar, was killed by the Feara-Manach.

M1126.4

Conchobhar Ua Cleirigh, lector of Cill-dara, died.

M1126.5

Gillafinain, successor of Feichin.

M1125.6

and Maelisa Ua Coinne, the most learned of the Irish in history, in judicature, and in the Ord-Padraig, died after good penance.

M1126.7

The church called the Regles of Paul and Peter, at Ard-Macha, which had been


p.1025

erected by Imhar Ua hAedhagain, was consecrated by Ceallach, successor of Patrick, on the 12th of the Calends of November.

M1126.8

Corcach-mor of Munster, with its church, was burned.

M1126.9

Enda, the son of Mac Murchadha (i.e. the son of Donnchadh), King of Leinster, died.

M1126.10

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and he gave the kingdom of Ath-cliath and Leinster to his own son, Conchobhar; he afterwards proceeded to the South, and defeated Cormac Mac Carthaigh, and burned his camp at Sliabh-an-Caithligh.

M1126.11

The same king had a great encampment in Ormond, from Lammas till the festival of Brighit; and he plundered from that camp, on one occasion, Ui-Conaill, and on another as far as Moin-moi and to Gleann-Maghair, and another as far as the south of Osraighe; and he made a slaughter of the Osraighi, together with Ua Carog, and carried off the hostages of the Osraighi on that occasion.

M1126.12

Domhnall Finn Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha, was drowned, after he had plundered Tir-Conaill.

M1126.13

A great storm of war throughout Ireland in general, so that Ceallach, successor of Patrick, was obliged to be for one month and a year absent from Ard-Macha, establishing peace among the men of Ireland, and promulgating rules and good customs in every district among the laity and the clergy.

M1126.14

A treacherous prey was made by Ruaidhri Ua Tuathchair, in Airtheara; and the men of Airtheara overtook and slaughtered his people, and Ruaidhri himself was beheaded by them.

Annal M1127.

M1127.0

The Age of Christ, 1127.

M1127.1

Gillachrist Ua Maeleoin, abbot, successor of Ciaran of Cluain-mic-Nois, fountain of the wisdom, the ornament, and magnificence of Leath-Chuinn, and head of the prosperity and affluence of Ireland, died.

M1127.2

Maelmaire Ua Godain, noble priest and learned senior of Ceanannus;


p.1027

M1127.3

Conghalach, successor of Cianan;

M1127.4

Gillachiarain Ua Roda, airchinneach of Cunga, died.

M1127.5

Gillachomhghaill Ua Tuathail, successor of Caeimhghin, was killed by the Fortuatha.

M1127.6

Maelbrighde Ua Forannain, airchinneach of Ard-sratha;

M1127.7

Maelbrighde Ua Cinaedha, airchinneach of Ard-Trea;

M1127.8

and Domhnall Dall Ua Murchadha, chief sage of Leinster, died.

M1127.9

Mac Conaenaigh Ua Maelguirm, airchinneach of Ros-Cre, was killed by the Eli.

M1127.10

The shrine of Colum-Cille was carried off into captivity by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and was restored again to its house at the end of a month.

M1127.11

Gillachrist Ua hEignigh, lord of Feara-Manach and Airghialla, died at Clochar-mac-Daimhine, after good penance.

M1127.12

Cearbhall Mac Faelain was killed by the Ui-Failghe, in the middle of Cill-dara, with some of his servants and chieftains along with him.

M1127.13

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, by sea and land, until he reached Corcach-mor, in Munster; and he drove Cormac to Lis-mor, and divided Munster into three parts, and he carried off thirty hostages from Munster.

M1127.14

Donnchadh, the son of Mac Carthaigh, was afterwards expelled into Connaught, with two thousand along with him, by Cormac Mac Carthaigh, after returning from his pilgrimage; and the men of Munster turned against Toirdhealbhach.

M1127.15

The great fleet of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, consisting of one hundred and ninety vessels, upon Loch Deirgdheirc; and he devastated the adjoining cantreds of Munster. The fight of two fleets at sea, namely, the Connaughtmen and the men of Munster; and the Connaughtmen gained the victory in that battle.

M1127.16

A battle between the Ulidians themselves, in which two kings of Ulidia were slain, namely, Aedh Ua Mathghamhna, and Niall, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha; and a slaughter was made of the Ulidians along


p.1029

with them.

M1127.17

Murchadh Ua Maelseachlainn was deposed, and Domhnall, his son, assumed his place. Domhnall was deposed at the end of a month, and Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn assumed his place.

Annal M1128.

M1128.0

The Age of Christ, 1128.

M1128.1

Muirgheas O'Nioc, successor of Iarlath of Tuaim-da-ghualann for a time, died on Inis-an-Ghoill.

M1128.2

Conaing Ua Begleighinn, Abbot of Ceanannus, died.

M1128.3

Gillaphadraig Ua Cathail, successor of Caemhghin, was killed at Gleann-da-locha, by the Leinstermen.

M1128.4

Gillacruimhthirfraeich Mac Scolaighe, successor of Bearach of Cluain-coirpthe;

M1128.5

Ua Banain, successor of Cronan of Ros-Cre;

M1128.6

Mac-Maras Ua Reabhachain, successor of Mochuda;

M1128.7

Gillachiarain, son of Gilladubh Ua Draeda, airchinneach of Cunga;

M1128.8

Ceinneidigh Ua Conghail, airchinneach of Lis-aeidheadh at Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1128.9

Gilla-an-choimhdheadh, son of Mac Cuinn, Tanist-abbot of Cluain-mic-Nois for a time;

M1128.10

and Fingart, anmchara of Corcumdhruadh, died.

M1128.11

Ceinneidigh, son of Aedh Mac Duinnsleibhe, King of Ulidia, was killed.

M1128.12

The men of Magh-Itha, with Domhnall Ua Goirmleaghaidh, forcibly entered a house upon Faelan Ua Duibhdara, lord of Feara-Manach; and slew him and a party of the chiefs of Feara-Manach along with him.

M1128.13

The battle of Ath-Fhirdhiadh was gained by the cavalry of Conchobhar, the son of Mac Lochlainn, over the cavalry of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, where Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre; Cathal Ua Raghailligh; Sitriuc Ua Maelbrighde; the son of Aedh Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha; and many others along with them, were slain, in revenge of the violation Patrick's protection.

M1128.14

A plundering army was led by Conchobhar, the son of Mac Lochlainn, lord of Cinel-Eoghain; by the Dal-Araidhe, and the Airghialla, into Magh-Cobha; and they carried off the hostages of the Ui-Eathach. They proceeded from thence to East Meath, and to the Feara-Breagh, and left some of their people there.

M1128.15

A plundering army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Leinster, which he plundered far and wide, for he went round Leinster along by the sea, until he arrived at Ath-cliath. On this expedition Ua Gadhra, lord of Luighne, was slain, and many others besides him.

M1128.16

A year's peace was made by Ceallach, successor of Patrick, between the Connaughtmen and the men


p.1031

of Munster.

M1128.17

Tailltin, daughter of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and wife of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, died.

M1128.18

Domhnall, son of Gillafinn, son of Mac Uallachain, chief of Muinntir-Chinaith, was slain by Ua Madadhain.

M1128.19

A great predatory excursion was committed by the Connaughtmen in Fearnmhagh, and they plundered the country and the monastery of Lughmhadh; and numbers of them were slain by Cochall, son of Mac Seanain, and the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1128.20

Maghnus, the son of Mac Lochlainn, lord of Cinel-Eoghain and of the North, was slain by the Cinel-Conaill and the Cinel-Moein.

Annal M1129.

M1129.0

The Age of Christ, 1129.

M1129.1

Maelbrighde Ua Flannain, anchorite of Lis-mor;

M1129.2

Gillacolmain Ua Ceallaigh, noble priest of Dearmhach-Choluim-Chille;

M1129.3

Mac Muirgheasa, lector of Fearna; and

M1129.4

Ua Diarmada, successor of Cronan of Ros-Cre, died.

M1129.5

The house of Colum-Cille at Cill-mic-Nenain was forcibly taken, by Ua Tairchert, from Aedh, son of Cathbharr Ua Domhnaill, and it was burned over him.

M1129.6

A change of lords by the Cinel-Eoghain, namely, Maghnus in the place of Conchobhar; but Maghnus was slain, before the expiration of three months, by the Cinel-Conaill, O'Goirmleadhaigh, and the Cinel-Moein; and Conchobhar was again set up as king.

M1129.7

Mathghamhain, son of Muircheartach Ua Briain, died.

M1129.8

Flann Ua Ceallaigh, lord of the men of Breagha, and Muircheartach Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Ui-Failghe, were killed by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1129.9

Niall Ua Crichain, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha, was killed by the Ui-Cenneidigh.

M1129.10

Gillachrist Ua hUidhrin, chief of Cinel-Fearadhaigh, was burned by treachery, in the house of his fosterage, in Tir


p.1033

Manach.

M1129.11

The castle of Ath-Luain and the bridge were erected by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair in the summer of this year, i.e. the summer of the drought.

M1129.12

The altar of the great church of Cluain-mic-Nois was robbed, and jewels were carried off from thence, namely, the carracan model of Solomon's Temple, which had been presented by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall; the Cudin Catinum of Donnchadh, son of Flann; and the three jewels which Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair had presented, i.e. a silver goblet, a silver cup with a gold cross over it, and a drinking-horn with gold; the drinking-horn of Ua Riada, King of Aradh; a silver chalice, with a burnishing of gold upon it, with an engraving by the daughter of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair; and the silver cup of Ceallach, successor of Patrick. But Ciaran, from whom they were stolen, afterwards revealed them.

M1129.13

Ceallach, successor of Patrick, a son of purity, and Archbishop of the west of Europe, the only head whom the foreigners and Irish of Ireland, both laity and clergy, obeyed; after having ordained bishops, priests, and persons of every degree; after having consecrated many churches and cemeteries; after having bestowed jewels and wealth; after having established rules and good morals among all, both laity and clergy; after having spent a life of fasting, prayer, and mass-celebration; after unction and good penance, resigned his spirit to heaven, at Ard-Padraig, in Munster, on


p.1035

the first day of April, on Monday precisely, in the fiftieth year of his age. His body was conveyed for interment, on the Wednesday following, to Lis-mor-Mochuda, in accordance with his own will; it was waked with psalms, hymns, and canticles, and interred with honour in the tomb of the bishops, on the Thursday following.

M1129.14

Muircheartach, son of Domhnall, was appointed to the successorship of Patrick afterwards.

Annal M1130.

M1130.0

The Age of Christ, 1130.

M1130.1

Sord-Choluim-Chille, with its churches and relics, was burned.

M1130.2

Lochlainn Ua Maelruanaidh, royal heir of Ulidia, was killed.

M1130.3

Cuaifne Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, died.

M1130.4

Gillacualann, grandson of Dunghaile, lord of Ui-Briuin-Cualann, was killed by his brethren.

M1130.5

Diarmaid Ua Follamhain, chief of Clann-Uadach; and Goll-Cluana, i.e. Gillaphadraig Ua hAireachtaigh, ollamh of West Meath in poetry, died.

M1130.6

The jewels of Cluain-mic-Nois were revealed against the foreigners of Luimneach, they having been stolen by Gillacomhgain. Gillacomhgain himself was hanged at the fort of Cluain-Bhriain, by the King of Munster, he having been delivered up by Conchobhar Ua Briain. This Gillacomhgain sought Corcach, Lis-mor, and Port-Lairge, to proceed over sea; but no ship into which he entered found a wind to sail, while all the other ships did get favourable wind. This was no wonder, indeed, for Ciaran used to stop every ship in which he attempted to escape; and he said in his confessions at his death, that he used to see Ciaran, with his crozier, stopping every ship into which he went. The name of God and Ciaran was magnified by this.

M1130.7

An army was led by Ua Lochlainn into Ulidia. The Ulidians assembled to give them battle. When they approached each other, a fierce battle was fought between them. The Ulidians were finally defeated and slaughtered, together with Aedh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe; Gillaphadraig Mac Searraigh, lord of Dal-Buinne; Dubhrailbhe Mac Artain;and


p.1037

many others besides them: and they plundered the country as far as the east of Ard, both lay and ecclesiastical property, and they carried off a thousand prisoners, and many thousand cows and horses. The chief men of Ulidia, with their lords, afterwards came to Ard-Macha, to meet Conchobhar; and they made peace, and took mutual oaths, and they left hostages with him.

M1130.8

Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair proceeded with a fleet as far as Torach, and plundered Ros-Guill.

M1130.9

He brought another fleet to Desmond, and plundered all Dairbhri and Inis-mor.

M1130.10

A battle was gained at Sliabh-Guaire by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc and the Ui-Briuin, over the men of Meath, wherein were slain Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair; Amhlaeibh, son of Mac Seanain, lord of Gaileanga; Oenghus Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Ui-Laeghaire; the son of Mac Gillafhulartaigh, lord of South Breagha, and others not enumerated.

M1130.11

Great fruit upon all trees, both nuts, acorns, and apples.

Annal M1131.

M1131.0

The Age of Christ, 1131.

M1131.1

Maelisa Ua Foghladha, Archbishop of Caiseal, died; and Muircheartach Ua hInnreachtaigh, successor of Comhghall, died at Ard-Macha on the third day of October.

M1131.2

Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of Ruaidhri na Soighe Buidhe Ua Conchobhair, lady of Luighne, died.

M1131.3

A plundering army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and the people of the province of Connaught, into Munster; and they plundered Ui-Conaill-Gabhra.

M1131.4

An army was led by Conchobhar Ua Briain and the men of Munster into Leinster, and took its hostages. They afterwards proceeded into Meath, and plundered the island of Loch-Semhdighdhe. Their cavalry engaged the cavalry of Connaught. The cavalry of Connaught were defeated, and the son of Cuchonnacht Ua Conchobhair, and Feardana Ua Carthaigh, chief poet of Connaught, fell in the engagement.

M1131.5

An army was led by Conchobhair, son of Domhnall


p.1039

Ua Lochlainn, by the people of the north of Ireland, and the Ulidians, into Connaught; and the Connaughtmen made an attack upon the rear of the army, in the vicinity of Seaghais (i.e. Coirrshliabh), and a battle was fought between them; and Conn Ua Maelgaeithe, Garbhanach Ua Baeighill, and a number of others, were there slain. They met, however, on the following day, at Loch-Ce, and made a year's peace.

M1131.6

In the absence of this army a predatory excursion was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and the men of Breifne, into Cuailgne; and they plundered Ui-Meith. The Ulidians and the South Airghialla, however, returned homewards across Ath-Luain, and fell in with the depredators in Magh-Conaille, where a battle was fought between them, in which Raghnall Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia; Cumidhe Ua Crichain, lord of Fearnmhagh, with his son; Donnsleibhe Ua hInnreachtaigh, lord of Ui-Meith; and many others besides them, were slain.

M1131.7

Thomond was plundered by Cormac, the son of Mac Carthaigh, and Conchobhar Ua Briain.

M1131.8

A battle was gained by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn over the Sil-Ronain, in which many were slain.

M1131.9

Conchobhar Ua Briain was severely wounded by his own servant of trust, so that he was lying in his death-sickness. Conchobhar Ua Longargain was the name of the person who wounded him, and he was immediately killed in revenge of it.

M1131.10

Domhnall Ua Fuirg, lord of Ui-Furgo, fell by the Sil-Anmchadha in a conflict.

M1131.11

Maelseachlainn, son of Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn, was killed by the Feara-Ceall.

M1131.12

Cluain-Iraird was twice plundered by the Cairbri and the men of Teathbha. A slaughter was made of the men of Teathbha, by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, at the place where they divided the cows of Cluain-Iraird.

M1131.13

The battle of Caill-Cobhthaigh was gained over the Sil-Muireadhaigh


p.1041

by the people of Upper Connaught, the former having come on a predatory excursion into Munster; and both parties having engaged through mistake, the Sil-Muireadhaigh left their spoils behind.

M1131.14

Fine-Gall was plundered by Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn.

Annal M1132.

M1132.0

The Age of Christ, 1132.

M1132.1

Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair sat in the successorship of Patrick, at the request of the clergy of Ireland.

M1132.2

Maelbrenainn Ua hAnradhain, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta, died.

M1132.3

Maelbrighde Mac Doilgen, noble priest of Ard-Macha, and senior of the priests of Ireland, died in the fifty-second year of his priesthood, and in the eightieth year of his age, on the 27th of August.

M1132.4

Uareirghe Ua Neachtain, head of the Culdees of Cluain-mic-Nois, and its venerable senior, died.

M1132.5

Cucaille Ua Finn, airchinneach of Cill-Colgain, died.

M1132.6

An army was led by Conchobhar Ua Lochlainn to Ath-Fhirdiadh; and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc came into his house, and gave him hostages.

M1132.7

Maelseachlainn, son of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, lord of Ui-Ceinn-sealaigh, was slain.

M1132.8

Maenmhagh was plundered by Conchobhar Ua Briain, who carried off many cows.

M1132.9

The castle of Bun-Gaillmhe was burned and demolished by a fleet of the men of Munster; and a great slaughter was made of the people of West Connaught, together with Ua Taidhg an Teaghlaigh, and many other noblemen.

M1132.10

The son of Amhlaeibh Ua Lochlainn, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, was slain by the same fleet.

M1132.11

A great slaughter was made of the Connaughtmen by the men of Munster, wherein Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught, the two sons of Cathal Ua Mughroin, and many others, were slain.

M1132.12

Oilen-na-Beithe in the Sinainn was burned by the men of Munster, and twenty persons, together with the chief of Muintir-Chinaith, fell there.

M1132.13

Diarmaid Mac Eitigen, chief of Clann-Diarmada, died.

M1132.14

The prey of Feasog by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, against a party of the men of Teathbha


p.1043

and of Connaught, until he reached the camp of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1132.15

Magh-Luirg was plundered by the men of Breifne.

M1133.0

The Age of Christ, 1133.

M1133.1

Muireadhach Ua Duibhinnsi, airchinneach of Lughmhadh;

M1133.2

Conaing, son of Dubhdaleithi, fosairchinneach of Ard-Macha;

M1133.3

Maelbrighde Ua hAinnin, noble martyr of Ireland, and pious paragon of the mildness and charity of the western world, died.

M1133.4

Ros-Cre and Lughmhadh were burned.

M1133.5

Muircheartach, successor of Patrick, made a visitation of Tir-Eoghain; and he received his tribute of cows and horses, and imparted his blessing.

M1133.6

Conchobhar, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Teamhair, was slain by Donnchadh Mac Gillamocholmog, royal heir of Leinster; and Donnchadh himself was killed by the men of Meath, i.e. by the people of Aedh Ua hAedha, at the end of a month, in revenge of Conchobhar.

M1133.7

Lusca, with its church full of people and relics, was burned upon the Fine Gall by the same party, in revenge of the son of Murchadh, i.e. Conchobhar.

M1133.8

A great depredation was committed by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, in revenge of his son; and he plundered Fine-Gall and the east of Leinster.

M1133.9

An army was led by Cormac Mac Carthaigh and Conchobhar Ua Briain into Connaught; and they killed Cathal, son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, and Gilla-na-naemh Ua Floinn, chief of Sil-Maeileruain; and they demolished Dun-Mughdhorn and Dun-mor, and plundered a great part of the country: they afterwards returned without hostages.

M1133.10

A depredation was committed by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and the men of Fearnmhagh in Fine Gall, but the foreigners came up with them at Finnabhair-na-ninghean; and they made battle, in which Raghnall, son of Pol, and a great party of the foreigners about him, were slain. The men of Fearnmhagh, however, encountered great danger.

M1133.11

A depredation was committed by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, upon the Ui-Fiachrach of the North.

M1133.12

A battle was gained by the men of Teathbha over the Sil-Muireadhaigh, wherein fell Amhlaeibh, grandson of Aireachtach Ua Roduibh,


p.1045

chief of Clann-Tomaltaigh, and Mac-an-leastair Ua hAinlighe, chief of Cinel-Dobhtha, was taken prisoner, and many slain.

M1133.13

The bridge of Ath-Luain and its castle were destroyed by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc.

M1133.14

A conference was held by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and Conchobhar Ua Briain, with the chiefs of the clergy of Connaught and Munster, at Abhall-Chethearnaigh, and a year's peace was made between them.

M1133.15

Maelseachlainn, grandson of Diarmaid, son of Maelnambo, and Eochaidh Ua Nuallain, lord of Fotharta, fell in a conflict by Ugaire Ua Tuathail and the Ui-Muireadhaigh, and a great slaughter along with them.

M1133.16

The two sons of Cuchonnacht Ua Conchobhair were drowned in Loch Ribh.

M1133.17

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Birn, who was the royal lawgiver of Ireland, died, and was interred at Ros-Commain.

M1133.18

A great murrain of cows in Ireland, which was called Maelgarbh, the likeness of which was not seen since the great cow mortality which happened in the time of Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, and it left but a small remnant of the cattle of Ireland; of which was said:

    1. Three and thirty, do not conceal,
      A hundred over a thousand years,
      From the birth of Christ at sweet Bethlehem,
      To this cow-mortality in Ireland.

M1133.19

Flaithbheartach Ua Flaithbheartaigh was killed by the son of Lochlainn Ua Lochlainn, in revenge of his father.

M1133.20

The great army of all Leath-Mhogha was led by Cormac Mac Carthaigh and Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn into Connaught, and they slew the grandson of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, and Gilla-na-naemh Ua Floinn, chief of Sil-Maelruanaidh; and they burned Dun-Mughdhorn and Dun-mor, and returned without peace or hostages.


p.1047

Annal M1134.

M1134.0

The Age of Christ, 1134.

M1134.1

Ceileachair, son of Cormac Ua Cuinn na mBocht, learned senior, head of the counsel, and fountain of the wisdom and history, and head of the hospitality and keeping of the rule of Cluain-mic-Nois, died in Imdhaidh-Chiarain, after the victory of penance, on the Nones of September. It was for him the son of Macamh Ua Cicharain, of Eadargabhail, composed this quatrain:

    1. Happy for thee in thy life,
      O Mac Cuinn, O Celeachair!
      Thou art now, O Celechair of Cluain,
      In a bright life of bright victory.

M1134.2

Maelciarain, a son of the same Cormac, a noble priest, prop of piety and wisdom, noble head of Cluain-mic-Nois, died on Michaelmas Night, and it was in Imdhaigh Chiarain he died.

M1134.3

Fogartach Ua Riagain, airchinneach of Ros-Cre,

M1134.4

and Gillabhrenainn Ua hAnradhain, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta, died.

M1134.5

Imhar Ua hAedhagain, by whom the church of Paul and Peter at Ard-Macha was erected, died at Rome on his pilgrimage.

M1134.6

Bebhinn, daughter of Mac Conchaille, female airchinneach of Doire Choluim-Chille, died on the 23rd of December.

M1134.7

Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair made a visitation of Munster, and obtained his tribute.

M1134.8

Archu Ua Flaithbheartaigh, royal heir of Oileach, fell by the Cinel-Conaill in the heat of a conflict.

M1134.9

Donnchadh, grandson of Murchadh Ua Briain, with his son, was killed by the people of Desmond.

M1134.10

Donnchadh, i.e. son of Cuaifne Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, and Maelseachlainn, his father's son, fought a battle, in which they mutually fell by each other.

M1134.11

An army was led by the son of Mac Murchadha and the Leinstermen into Osraighe, and the Osraighi resisted and slaughtered them, and slew Ugaire Ua Tuathail, royal heir of Leinster, with many others.

M1134.12

A slaughter was made of the Osraighi, and of the foreigners of Port-Lairge, by the son of Mac Murchadha, in revenge of the slaughter aforesaid.

M1134.13

A church which was erected by Cormac, grandson of Carthach, King of Caiseal, was consecrated by a synod of the clergy,


p.1049

assembled in one place.

M1134.14

Muircheartach, son of Domhnall, son of Amhalghaidh, successor of Patrick, died, after the victory of martyrdom and penance, on the 17th of September.

M1134.15

Niall, son of Aedh, was installed in the successorship of Patrick.

M1134.16

A change of abbots at Ard-Macha, i.e. Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair in the place of Niall.

M1134.17

Maelmaedhog afterwards made his visitation of Munster, and obtained his tribute.

M1134.18

Aedh, grandson of Lochlainn Mac Cochlain, lord of Dealbhna-Eathra, died.

M1134.19

Murchadh Ua hEaghra, and his wife, the daughter of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, were killed by Taichleach Ua hEaghra.

Annal M1135.

M1135.0

The Age of Christ, 1135.

M1135.1

Cinaeth Ua Baeighill, a noble bishop, i.e. Bishop of Clochar, and chief senior of the north of Ireland;

M1135.2

Bishop Ua Cattan, Archbishop of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh;

M1135.3

and Maelisa Ua Finnachta, comharba of Ros-Commain, died.

M1135.4

Gillacommain Ua Conghalaigh, lector of Ros-Commain, was killed by the Conmhaicni.

M1135.5

Domhnall, son of Muircheartach Ua Briain, who had been lord of the foreigners, and previously of Leinster, died in clerical habit, at Lis-mor, at an advanced age.

M1135.6

Fiachra Mac Etnen, learned senior of Cluain-Iraird, and of all the men of Meath, died.

M1135.7

Flann Ua Sinaigh, keeper of the Bachall-Isa, died after good penance.

M1135.8

Maelisa Ua hAinmire, i.e. Bishop of Port-Lairge, and chief senior of the Irish, died at Lis-mor-Mochuda, after the eighty-eighth year of his age.

M1135.9

Eachmarcach Ua hAinmire, learned senior of the Irish, fountain of wisdom and charity, died at Lis-mor.

M1135.10

Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, successor of Patrick, purchased the Bachall-Isa, and took it from its cave on the seventh day of the month of July.

M1135.11

Doire-Choluim-Chille, with its churches, was burned on the 30th of March.

M1135.12

Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, warlike and defensive pillar of charity and humanity, was slain by the


p.1051

men of Magh-Itha, namely, by Maelruanaidh Ua Caireallain and the Clann-Diarmada, after which a great slaughter was made of the Cinel-Eoghain by the Cinel-Conaill.

M1135.13

Cathal, son of Tadhg Ua Conchobhair, Tanist of Connaught, was killed by the men of Teathbha, and many others along with him.

M1135.14

Cluain-Iraird, Ceanannus, Rath-Luraigh, and many other churches, were burned.

M1135.15

Many of the men of Desmond fell by those of Thomond, at the causeway of Cluain-caein-Modimog. Of these was Finguine Ua Caeimh, lord of Gleannamnach, and Mathghamhain Ua Donnchadha, lord of Cinel-Laeghaire; Maelgorm Ua Rinn, and the son of Lochlainn Ua Cinaedha, of the Ui-Maccaille, and many others.

M1135.16

Aedh Ua Conchobhair, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, and Cumara, son of Cumara, son of Domhnaill, lord of Ui-Caisin, fell of the Thomond men in the heat of the conflict.

M1135.17

Magh nAei, Magh Luirg, and Corann, were burned by the Conmhaicni.

M1135.18

Ros-Commain was plundered and burned, both houses and churches, by the same party, at the end of a month afterwards.

M1135.19

Ua Madadhain, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, and of Ui-Maine for a time, was treacherously killed by Gillacaeimhghin Ua Ceinneidigh, and the choice part of his people along with him.

M1135.20

Amhlaeibh, son of Domhnall Finn Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha, was slain by the Ui-Fiachrach of the north.

M1135.21

The fleet of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn on the Sinainn and on Loch Ribh; the Sil-Muireadhaigh, with their king, i.e. Conchobhar, son of Toirdhealbhach, and the Ui-Maine, with their lord, i.e. Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh, came, and both left hostages with Murchadh.

M1135.22

Lightning struck off the head of the Cloictheach of Cluain-mic-Nois, and pierced the cloictheach of Ros-Cre.

M1135.23

The men of Fearnmhagh turned against the Meath men, and made peace with the men of Breifne.

M1135.24

Stephen assumed the kingdom of England on the 2nd of December.


p.1053

Annal M1136.

M1136.0

The Age of Christ, 1136.

M1136.1

Aedh Ua Finn, Bishop of Breifne, died at Inis-Clothrann.

M1136.2

Domhnall Ua Dubhthaigh, Archbishop of Connaught, and successor of Ciaran, head of the wisdom and hospitality of the province, died after mass and celebration at Cluain-fearta-Brenainn.

M1136.3

Robhartach Ua Ceallaigh, airchinneach of Fathain-mor, died after good penance.

M1136.4

Gillachrist Ua hEchain, successor of Finnen,

M1136.5

and Saerbhreathach Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Ua Suanaigh, died.

M1136.6

Mac Ciarain, airchinneach of Sord, fell by the men of Fearnmhagh.

M1136.7

Maelmaire Mac Colmain, airchinneach of Doire-Lurain;

M1136.8

Maelisa Mac Maelcoluim, chief keeper of the calendar of Ard-Macha, its chief antiquary and librarian, died, after good penance, on the night of Good Friday.

M1136.9

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, who was first lord of Aileach, and king of all the north, both Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, Ulidians and Airghialla, and also royal heir of Ireland, was killed by the men of Magh-Itha, by treachery.

M1136.10

Echri Ua hAitteidh, lord of Ui-Eathach, was killed by the Ui-Eathach themselves.

M1136.11

Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was killed by the people of the Tuathas, after they had treacherously invited him to inaugurate him as king, and some of his servants of trust were killed along with him.

M1136.12

The son of Domhnall Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha, was killed.

M1136.13

Donnchadh, son of Maeleachlainn Ua Faelain, fell by Cormac Mac Carthaigh, by treachery.

M1136.14

Aedh, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair was blinded by Toirdhealbhach himself.

M1136.15

Domhnall Ua Caindealbhain,


p.1055

lord of Cinel-Laeghaire, was killed by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc and the Ui-Briuin, and many of the men of Breifne were slain by the men of Meath.

M1136.16

A breach of the peace between the men of Meath and Breifne. A predatory incursion was made by the people of East Meath into Ui-Briuin, and they carried off countless cows. Another predatory incursion was made by the same party into Fearnmhagh.

M1136.17

Loch Cairgin was plundered by the men of Teathbha, and they burned the castle, and slaughtered its people.

M1136.18

Another predatory excursion was made by the same party, and they plundered Muintir-Fidhnigh.

M1136.19

A predatory excursion was made by Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, over Ui-Dunchadha and it was by this predatory excursion that Gillaseachnaill, son of Gillaseachnaill, was slain.

M1136.20

Gillamura Ua hOgain was slain by the son of Niall, grandson of Lochlainn.

M1136.21

The visitation of Munster was made by Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, successor of Patrick.

M1136.22

A change of abbots at Ard-Macha, i.e. Niall, son of Aedh, in place of Maelmaedhog.

M1136.23

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Uada Ua Concheanainn were taken prisoners by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, they being under the protection of the successor of Iarlath and Ua Dubhthaigh, and of the Bachall Buidhe i.e. the yellow staff or crozier, and Ua Domhnallian.

M1136.24

Neidhe Ua Maelchonaire, the historian, died.

M1136.25

Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair resigned the successorship of Patrick for the sake of God.

Annal M1137.

M1137.0

The Age of Christ, 1137.

M1137.1

Domhnall Ua Conaing Archbishop of Leath-Mogha, prop of the piety, prayer, wisdom, and bestowal of food and jewels upon the feeble and the mighty.

M1137.2

The Bishop Ua Baeighill; the Bishop Ua Maelfoghmhair died. Bishop Ua Cleirigh of Connaught; and the blind Ua Cadhla, a learned sage, died.

M1137.3

Macraith Ua Forreith, a learned historian aand an anmchara of meekness and mildness;

M1137.4

Aedh Ua Finn, chief lector of the men of Breifne, died.

M1137.5

Mac Gillafhinain Ua Gibhleachain, successor of Feehin of Fobhar, died.

M1137.6

A change


p.1057

of abbots at Ard-Macha, i.e. the airchinneach of Doire Choluim Chille in place of Niall, son of Aedh.

M1137.7

Cluain-uamha and Ard-achadh of Bishop Mel were burned, both houses and churches.

M1137.8

A great wind-storm throughout Ireland, which prostrated many trees, houses, churches, and other buildings, and swept men and cattle into the sea, in Magh-Conaille.

M1137.9

Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Ireland and of Teamhair for a time, the only Guaire Aidhne of Ireland in his time for his hospitality, was killed by the Saithni and the people of East Meath, with a slaughter of his people about him, for he had made war against his father and them.

M1137.10

Uada Ua Conceanainn was blinded by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair for his evil deeds.

M1137.11

Mor, daughter of Muircheartach Ua Briain, the wife of Ua Maeleachlainn, died at Dearmhach Choluim-Chille, after penance.

M1137.12

The siege of Waterford by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, and Conchobhar Ua Briain, King of Dal-gCais, and the foreigners of Ath-cliath and Loch-Carman, who had two hundred ships on the sea. They carried off with them the hostages of Donnchadh Mac Carthaigh, of the Deisi, and of the foreigners of Port-Lairge.

M1137.13

Conchobhar Ua Briain, lord of Thomond and Ormond, went into the house of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, and left hostages there for defending Desmond for him.

M1137.14

A predatory excursion was made by Cormac, grandson of Carthach, upon Ceinneidigh Ua Briain and the foreigners of Luimneach.

M1137.15

A fleet was conveyed by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair upon the Sinainn and Loch Ribh. This was, indeed, a brave expedition for him against the fleet of the men of Breifne, under Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and against the fleet of the men of Meath, under Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair, where there were two hundred vessels; and Toirdhealbhach had but twenty ships.

M1137.16

Benmidhe, daughter of Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, died at Cluain-Eraird, after a long and well-spent life.

M1137.17

A breach of the peace between the men of Meath and the men of Breifne.

M1137.18

Ard-Macha, Tuaim-da-ghualann, Conga, and Tearmann Ceallainne, were burned.

M1137.19

Magh-nEo and Buidheamhnach were burned.

M1137.20

All the province of Connaught was laid waste, from Drobhaeis to the Sinainn and to Echtghe, and the people themselves were driven into West Connaught.


p.1059

Annal M1138.

M1138.0

The Age of Christ, 1138.

M1138.1

Gillachrist Ua Morgair, Bishop of Clochar, a paragon in wisdom and piety; a brilliant lamp that enlightened the laity and clergy by preaching and good deeds; a faithful and diligent servant of the Church in general, died, and was interred in the church of Peter and Paul at Ard-Macha.

M1138.2

Maelpadraig Ua Drugain, paragon of the wisdom of the Irish, chief lector of Ard-Macha; head of council of the west of Europe in piety and devotion, died on his pilgrimage at the Island of Loch Cre, on the second of January.

M1138.3

Cill-dara, Lis-mor, Tigh-Moling, and Sord, were burned.

M1138.4

The visitation of Munster the first time by the son of the poet, and he obtained his tribute.

M1138.5

Cormac, son of Muireadhach, son of Carthach, King of Desmond, and Bishop of the kings of Ireland for bestowal of jewels and wealth upon the clergy and the churches, an improver of territories and churches, was killed in his own house by treachery, by Toirdhealbhach, son of Diarmaid Ua Briain, and by the two sons of O'Conchobhar Ciarraighe.

M1138.6

Raghnall, son of Imhar Ua Cathain, lord of the Craebh, Cianachta, and Fir-Li, fell through treachery and guile, by the Ui-Eoghain of the Valley.

M1138.7

Maelruanaidh Ua Caireallain, lamp of the north of Ireland for personal form, wisdom, and chivalry, was slain by the Cinel-Moain.

M1138.8

Domhnall Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbre, was killed by Tighernan Ua Ruairc.

M1138.9

Mathghamhain Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, died.

M1138.10

Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, with the Connaughtmen, Tighernan Ua Ruairc, with the men of Breifne, and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, with the Airghialla, mustered their forces to contest unjustly his own lands


p.1061

with Ua Maeleachlainn. On the other side Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, with the men of Meath, and the foreigners, and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, with the Leinster-men, came to oppose them, and both armies arrived at Craebh-Maighe Lorgaigh. The two camps were so near each other that there was only a pass through a small wood between them. They remained for the space of one week in this manner face to face, but at length God separated them without coming to battle, without one giving hostages to the other. The men of Meath afterwards destroyed the corn crops of the Ui-Briuin, and of the men of Fearnmhagh, so that an insufferable famine prevailed amongst them the year following. After this the Meath-men, Leinster-men, and the foreigners, proceeded to Inis-Mochta to plunder it, and a countless number of them went on rafts, and by swimming, on the lake, to reach the island; and a party of them did reach the island. The people of the island afterwards came to them in vessels, and numbers of them the aggressors were drowned and slain by them; and the party who were on the island fled from thence, not having been able to burn the island, through the miracles of God and the patron saint. On this occasion Cubruinne Ua Longairg, the son of Tadhg, the son of Mac Ualghairc, and the son of Mac Turgaill, were slain.

Annal M1139.

M1139.0

The Age of Christ, 1139.

M1139.1

Cathal Mac Maelfhinn, successor of Tighearnach of Cluain-Eois, fountain of the prosperity and affluence of the north of Ireland, bestower of food upon the laity and the clergy;

M1139.2

Cuchonnacht Ua Dalaigh, chief ollamh in poetry, died at Cluain-Iraird. He was of Leacain, in Meath.

M1139.3

An army was led by the Ulidians to Tulach-Og, and they burned the plain with its churches.

M1139.4

Mathghamhain Ua Dubhda, chief of Clann-Laithbheartaigh, with the chief men of his territory along with him, was slain by Muircheartach, son of Niall, in revenge of Conchobhar Ua Lochlainn.

M1139.5

Donnchadh Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall and Cinel-Fhiachach, was killed in his fetters by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1139.6

Muircheartach Ua Maelmhuaidh, the other lord of Feara-Ceall, was burned by the Feara-Ceall, i.e. by the Ui-Luainimh, in the church of Raithin.

M1139.7

Ua Cadhla, i.e. Aedh, lord of


p.1063

Conmhaicne-mara, was killed by Donnchadh, son of Tadhg, one of his own people.

M1139.8

Donnchadh, son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh, was blinded by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1139.9

Fearghal, son of Raghnall, son of Muireadhach, chief of Muintir-Eolais, was killed by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, while under the protection of the Ul-Briuin and the men of Breifne, both laity and clergy, relics and shrines.

M1139.10

The Clann-Carthaigh were expelled from Munster by the race of Brian.

M1139.11

A year's peace was made between the men of Munster and the Leinstermen, by the successor of Patrick, and the staff of Jesus.

M1139.12

Maelbrighde Ua Brolchain, Bishop of Ard-Macha, head of the piety of the north of Ireland, a paragon of wisdom, meekness, and mildness, after good penance, on the 29th of January.

M1139.13

Niall, son of Aedh, son of Maelisa, successor of Patrick for a time, died after intense penance.

Annal M1140.

M1140.0

The Age of Christ, 1140.

M1140.1

Eochaidh Ua Ceallaigh, chief head of the men of Meath, the most distinguished bishop of all Ireland, died at an advanced age at Dearmhach Choluim Chille.

M1140.2

Domhnall Ua Sealbhaigh, airchinneach of Corcach, pillar of the glory and splendour of Munster, died.

M1140.3

The successor of Patrick made a visitation of Connaught for the first time, and obtained his full tribute, and their churches were adjusted to his jurisdiction by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and the chieftains of Connaught, and the successor of Patrick and his clergy left a blessing on the king and the chieftains of Connaught.

M1140.4

A wicker bridge was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair across Ath-liag, and pitched his camp at Magh-Teathbha, to guard Conmhaicni. Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, with the forces of the men of Meath and Teathbha, and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, with the forces of the men of Breifne, came to attack the camp of the Connaughtmen and the Conmhaicni. These left the camp to them; and the southern party burned it, and slew Raghnall, the grandson of


p.1065

Dubhdara, chief of Muintir-Eolais, with many others.

M1140.5

A conference was held at Ath-Luain, by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn and Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and they took mutual oaths, and made mutual armistice, and parted in peace.

M1140.6

Another wicker bridge was made by Toirdhealbhach across Ath-Luain, and he devastated the west of Meath.

M1140.7

Cu-uladh Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Laeghaire, and Flaithbheartach Ua Cathasaigh, lord of the Saithni, and Domhnall, his brother, were taken prisoners by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, for their own injustice.

M1140.8

Tighearnan Ua Ruairc was expelled from the chieftainship of the Ui-Briuin, by the Ui-Briuin themselves; but he assumed the headship of them again.

M1140.9

A predatory excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and he plundered Muintir-Mael-tSinna. The men of Teathbha made a fierce attack upon his forces, and made a slaughter of them, together with Muireadhach, the grandson of Muireadhach Ua Finnachtaigh, chief of Clann-Murchadha, and the grandson of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri.

M1140.10

A battle was gained by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, over the foreigners of Port-Lairge, in which the son of Mac Tormair was slain.

Annal M1141.

M1141.0

The Age of Christ, 1141.

M1141.1

Domhnall Ua Coinfhiacla, lord of Teathbha, died at Cluain-Eraird, after penance.

M1141.2

Aedh Ua Longain, steward of Munster, died.

M1141.3

The successor of Ciaran was robbed by the Sil-Anmchadha and Conchobhar, the son of Mac Cochlain, at Cluain-finnlocha. The booty was immediately restored by Conchobhar, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1141.4

Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, acted treacherously towards the chieftains of Leinster, namely, towards Domhnall, lord of Ui-Faelain, and royal heir of Leinster, and towards Ua Tuathail, i.e. Murchadh, both of whom he killed; and also towards Muircheartach Mac Gillamocholmog, lord of Feara-Cualann, who was blinded by him. This deed caused great weakness in Leinster, for seventeen of the nobility of Leinster, and many others of inferior rank along with them, were killed or blinded by him at that time.

M1141.5

Donnchadh, son of Goll Gaibhle, i.e. Ua Conchobhair Failghe, was killed by the Ui-Failghe themselves, i.e. the Clann-Maelughra.

M1141.6

Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was slain by the Crotraighi.

M1141.7

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Fearghaile,


p.1067

chief of Muintir-Anghaile, the most prosperous man in Ireland, died at an advanced age, and was interred in Inis-Clothrann.

M1141.8

An army was led by Conchobhar Ua Briain to Ath-cliath, and the foreigners submitted to him as their king. Some of his people died on their return from the East, after having eaten the green corn at a certain place in Laeighis.

M1141.9

A great army was led by the race of Briain, by Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair, by Toirdhealbhach, Tadhg, and Conchobhar, son of Domhnall, across the west of Connaught, from whence they carried off many thousand cows; and they also sacked, plundered, and demolished Dun-Gaillmhe on that occasion.

M1141.10

The same party made a predatory excursion into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, until they reached Loch Garman.

M1141.11

A predatory excursion was made by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha into Laeighis; and the people of Laeighis defeated him, after he had carried off a great prey from them.

M1141.12

The Ulstermen of all Leinster returned to their own territories, i.e. into Ulster, and this was a sign of vengeance in Leinster.

M1141.13

A conference of peace was held at Uisneach between Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, and Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair. Ua Maeleachlainn gave his hostages to Toirdhealbhach, for Meath and Teathbha. The hostages of the men of Breifne were also carried off by Toirdhealbhach on that occasion.

M1141.14

Conchobhar, grandson of Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, was killed in fetters by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn. God performed a miracle upon Murchadh in revenge of it, i.e. Art, his son, died at the end of a fortnight afterwards. This Art was heir-presumptive to the sovereignty of Ireland.

M1141.15

Domhnall, son of Ruaidhri Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, was killed by Muintir-Luainimh, at Rathain-Ui-Suanaigh.

M1141.16

A great plundering army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Fotharta-Airbhreach; and he plundered some of the men of Meath and of the Fotharta, and Regles-Ui-Dhunain.

Annal M1142.

M1142.0

The Age of Christ, 1142.

M1142.1

Ua Rebachain, Abbot of Lis-mor-Mochuda, was killed by Tadhg Ua Ceinneidigh.

M1142.2

Cathasach Ua Circaerech, lector of Ard-Macha, a wise aged priest, the most learned of the Irish, died.

M1142.3

Cill-Dalua, Eanach-duin, and Teach-Mochua, were burned.

M1142.4

Conchobhar, son of Diarmaid


p.1069

Ua Briain, supreme king of the two provinces of Munster, pillar of the valour and prowess of Leath-Mogha, died at Cill-Dalua, after the victory of penance; and the sovereignty of all Munster was assumed by Toirdhealbhach O'Briain immediately after him.

M1142.5

Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, came into the Deisi-Mumhan, and killed some people; but some of his people fell, and Donnchadh himself was taken prisoner by the Deisi, who afterwards delivered him up to Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain.

M1142.6

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain, was expelled by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, and he proceeded to make war in Connaught.

M1142.7

A battle was gained by the son of Niall, grandson of Lochlainn, lord of Cinel-Eoghain, over the Feara-Droma, and he himself was severely wounded in the heat of that battle.

M1142.8

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, accompanied by the men of Meath, Breifne, and Leinster, to march into Munster; but they returned without cows or hostages (save only the hostages of Leinster), after having traversed Osraighe and Laeighis, and destroyed some of their corn.

M1142.9

A great predatory excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, into Leinster; and he plundered the Ui-Muireadhaigh and some of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and carried off countless kine.

M1142.10

Donnchadh Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was killed by the lord of Ui-Caisin, i.e. Cumara Beg.

M1142.11

The son of Mac Conroi, lord of Dealbhna-Thire-da-locha, was killed.

M1142.12

The son of Fearghal Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, was killed by the son of Ruaidhri Ua Maelmhuaidh, at Darmhach-Choluim-Chille.

M1142.13

The son of Mac Ottir, i.e. Ottir, one of the people of Insi-Gall the Hebrides, assumed the chieftainship and government of Ath-cliath.

M1142.14

Mathghamhain, son of Flann Ua Follamhain, lord of Crich-na-gCedach, fell by his own two brothers, in treachery and guile.


p.1071

M1142.15

A predatory excursion was made by Conchobhar, son of Toirdhealbhach, and the Ui-Maine, upon the Cinel-Forgo, and carried off countless kine.

M1143.0

The Age of Christ, 1143.

M1143.1

Macraith Ua Fuilleachain, bishop and virgin;

M1143.2

Macraith Ua Fidan, head of the island of Loch-Cre;

M1143.3

and Gillachrist Mac-an-Bheacanaigh, airchinneach of Druim-mor, died.

M1143.4

Gilla-Aenghusa Ua Clumhain, ollamh of Connaught in poetry, died.

M1143.5

Cluain-Iraird was burned, for the most part, with Less-an-memra.

M1143.6

Ceanannus, Ath-Truim, Domhnach-Seachnaill, and Cill-dara, were burned.

M1143.7

Corcach was burned twice.

M1143.8

Muircheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, royal heir of Teamhair and of West Meath for a time, and Donnchadh Ua Concheanainn, died.

M1143.9

A great predatory excursion was made by the Cinel-Eoghain into Fearnmhagh, by which they greatly injured the territory in its cows and corn. On this occasion Art Ua Ruairc was slain by them.

M1143.10

The chieftainship of Cinel-Eogain was assumed by Ua Gairmleadhaigh, i.e. by Domhnall, after the expulsion of Muircheartach, son of Niall Mac Lochlainn, by the Cinel-Eoghain themselves, and by the aforesaid Domhnall.

M1143.11

Aedh, son of Muircheartach Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of the North, and of Ui-Amhalghada, died.

M1143.12

His own son, i.e. Ruaidhri, was taken by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, in violation of laity and clergy, relics and protection. These were the sureties: Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, with the clergy and laity of Connaught; Tadhg Ua Briain, lord of Thomond; Tighearnan


p.1073

Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; and Murchadh, son of Gilla-na-naemh Ua Fearghail, lord of Muintir-Anghaile. The clergy of Connaught, with Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, fasted at Rath-Brenainn, to get their guarantee, but it was not observed for them.

M1143.13

Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath and its Fortuatha, was taken prisoner by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, while he was under the protection of the relics and guarantees of Ireland. These were they: the altar of Ciaran, with its relics; the shrine of Ciaran, called the Oreineach; the Matha-mor; the abbot and the prior, and two out of every order in the Church; Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, the archbishop, the lord of Connaught; the successor of Patrick, and the Staff of Jesus; the successor of Feichin, and the bell of Feichin; and the Boban of Caeimhghin. All these were between Toirdhealbhach and Murchadh, that there should be no treachery, no guile, no defection of the one from the other, no blinding, no imprisoning, and no circumscribing of Murchadh's territory or land, until his crime should be evident to the sureties, and that they might proclaim him not entitled to protection; however, he was found guilty of no crime, though he was taken. He was set at liberty at the end of a month afterwards, through the interference of his sureties, and he was conveyed by his sureties into Munster; and the kingdom of Meath was given by Toirdhealbhach to his own son, Conchobhar. This capture was effected as follows: a hosting was made by Toirdhealbhach, as if to proceed into Munster; the Connaughtmen, the Conmaicni, and the Ui-Briuin, collected to one place, and Ua Maeleachlainn was taken and conveyed to Dun-mor, together with the hostages of Meath in general; but not the smallest part of Meath was injured on this occasion.

M1143.14

A predatory excursion was made by the Eili into Feara-Ceall, in violation of relic-oaths and sureties.

M1143.15

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster and Connaught; and they cut down the Ruaidh-Bheithigh, and demolished its stone-fort, after which they returned without booty or hostages.

Annal M1144.

M1144.0

The Age of Christ, 1144.

M1144.1

Gillaphadraig Mac Conghail, the paragon of the Irish for wisdom, lector of Cluain-Iraird, and its priest;

M1144.2

and Flannagan of


p.1075

Innis-Faithleann, a distinguished anmchara, died.

M1144.3

Ceanannus was burned thrice this year.

M1144.4

Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, heir apparent of Munster, died in fetters with i.e. while in the hands of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster.

M1144.5

An epidemic colic in Munster and Connaught, of which Brian, son of Toirdhealbhach, son of Diarmaid Ua Briain, died.

M1144.6

Tadhg, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and many others of the Connaughtmen, died of the same epidemic.

M1144.7

Conchobhar, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, heir apparent to the monarchy of Ireland, was killed at Bealach Muine-na-Siride, by Ua Dubhlaich, lord of Feara-Tulach, for he considered him as a stranger in sovereignty over the men of Meath. Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair gave West Meath to Donnchadh, son of Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn; and he divided East Meath equally between Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, and they remained thus under the protection of the Connaughtmen.

M1144.8

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, son of Toirdhealbhach, was released from fetters by his father, at the intercession of the clergy.

M1144.9

A conference of peace between Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, at Tir-da-ghlas, with the chiefs of Munster and Connaught, both laity and clergy; and they made forms of peace according to what the clergy ratified between them.

M1144.10

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Meath, to appoint its kings. He gave from Loch-Aininn eastwards to Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and from Loch-Aininn westwards to the son of Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn. And four hundred cows were given by the men of Meath to Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, as eric for his son, Conchobhar.

M1144.11

A plundering excursion was made by Toirdhealbhach into Leinster; and he carried off many thousand cows, and made a slaughter of heads.

M1144.12

Cearbhall Ua Finnallain, lord of Dealbhna-mor, died.

M1144.13

Domhnall Ua Ceallaigh was


p.1077

killed by the three sons of the grandson of Conchobhar Ua Ceallaigh, namely, Donnchadh, Amhlaeibh, and Lochlainn.

M1144.14

The son of Mac Maelain, lord of Gaileanga-Breagh, was killed.

M1144.15

Cinaedh, son of Mac Amhalghadha, chief of Calraighe, was killed by Flann Mac Amhalghadha.

M1144.16

Donnchadh, son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh, died.

Annal M1145.

M1145.0

The Age of Christ, 1145.

M1145.1

Sluaigheadhach Ua Cathain, bishop and virgin, of the people of Leithghlinn, died.

M1145.2

Treoit was burned by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, against the people of Ua Maeleachlainn, and three score persons were killed therein.

M1145.3

Clain-Fiachra was burned.

M1145.4

A lime-kiln, which was sixty feet every way, was erected opposite Eamhain-Macha, by Gillamacliag, successor of Patrick, and Patrick's clergy in general.

M1145.5

A battle was gained by the Cinel-Conaill, and by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, over Domhnall Ua Goirmleadhaigh and the Cinel-Eoghain, i.e. over those north of the mountain, where many were slain.

M1145.6

A hosting was made by the Cinel-Conaill, to go again to the relief of the son of Niall Mac Lochlainn; and they were joined by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, with the Airghialla; and they banished Domhnall Ua Goirmleadhaigh from his chieftainship, and set up the son of Niall in his place.

M1145.7

Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, turned against the Connaughtmen. A prey was made by Tighearnan in Corann.

M1145.8

A prey was made by Toirdhealbhach in Magh-Luighne, upon the men of Breifne, and he carried off many thousand cows.

M1145.9

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, to Leitir-cranncha, in Sliabh-Bladhma, to come against Ua Ruairc into Meath.

M1145.10

The camp of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair was at Rubhann, and he had his son, Domhnall Midheach; Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh


p.1079

Ua Maeleachlainn; Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain; and Diarmaid, son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh, with numerous hosts, along with him, to defend Feara Ceall, and prevent the Munstermen from coming thither. The Munstermen came from the south on a certain day, to scour the woods; and the other party met them, and made a slaughter of them. The Munstermen then returned home without prey, without hostage, without peace, without truce.

M1145.11

Aedh, son of Tadhg Ua Cuinn, chief of Muintir-Gilgain, fell by a party of the Muintir-Gilgain and the men of Teathbha.

M1145.12

The battle of Dun-Dubhain, in Dealbhna, was gained by Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and by the Cairbri, over the men of Breifne, wherein fell three hundred of their soldiers, among whom were the Ui-Connachtaigh, the Ui-Cathluain, and the Ui-Cubh-rain.

M1145.13

Great war in this year, so that Ireland was a trembling sod.

M1145.14

A predatory excursion was made by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn into Fearnmhagh, and he carried off many cows, and killed many persons.

M1145.15

A prey was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc in Magh-Luirg.

M1145.16

A predatory excursion was made by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn into Airghialla, and he carried off cows from Cuailgne.

M1145.17

The men of Munster proceeded with an army into Connaught; and they carried off Ua Ceallaigh, i.e. Tadhg, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Maine, and slew Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh.

M1145.18

A predatory excursion was made by the Cairbri-Ua-Ciardha into Ui-Briuin; they burned Daingean-Bona-Cuilinn, and broke three large boats, and carried off many cows.

M1145.19

A plundering force was led by Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn into Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna; and on this occasion Maeleachlainn, son of Domhnall Sugach, the son of Cochall Fliuch Mac Seanain, and many others, were slain by the Ui-Briuin.

M1145.20

Finn Ua Cearbhaill, Tanist of Eile, was killed.

M1145.21

An attack was made by the Ui-Briuin and a party of the Connaughtmen on the fleet of the Sil-Muireadhaigh, and of the Tuatha; and Donnchadh Ua Maelbhrenainn, chief of Clann-Conchobhair, was slain there, and Donn Ua Mannachain, lord of Ui-Briuin-na-Sinna.

Annal M1146.

M1146.0

The Age of Christ, 1146.


p.1081

M1146.1

Cormac Ua Cathasaigh, Archbishop of Leinster, died.

M1146.2

Fochard-Muirtheimhne was all burned.

M1146.3

A slaughter was made of the foreigners of Ath-cliath by the people of East Meath, where two hundred persons were slain, together with Raghnall Mac Torcaill, Mormaer of Ath-cliath, and Jufraigh, and many others of their chieftains.

M1146.4

Ceallach Ua Ceallaigh, lord of the men of Breagha, was slain by Cathasach Ua Cathasaigh, and the foreigners.

M1146.5

A predatory excursion was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc across Magh-nAei, to Loch-Long and Dun-Imghain; he destroyed and burned four ships, and slew the son of Ua Maeleachlainn, who was defending them, and many others. Gillabrighde, son of Dubhdara, chief of Muintir-Eolais, was wounded; and he afterwards died at his house, having plundered Cluain-Coirpthe some time before.

M1146.6

Gillaphadraig, the grandson of Donnchadh, lord of Osraighe, was killed by the O'Braenains, by treachery, in the middle of Cill-Cainnigh.

M1146.7

A plundering army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain into Leinster; they plundered Ui-Failghe, and carried off many prisoners.

M1146.8

Eigneach, son of Amhlaeibh Ua Caemhain, was killed by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill.

M1146.9

A great wind-storm occurred on the third day of December, which caused a great destruction of woods throughout Ireland; it prostrated sixty trees at Doire-Choluim-Chille, and killed and smothered many persons in the church; it also killed other people at Cill-Sleibhe.

M1146.10

Domhnall Ua Braein, lord of Breaghmhaine, died.

M1146.11

Ceallach Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha, was killed by Flaithbheartach Ua Cathasaigh and the foreigners of Ath-cliath.

M1146.12

Gilla-na-naemh, grandson of Cumeadha, fell by his own brother, i.e. Domhnall; and Cumeadha, his son, died.

Annal M1147.

M1147.0

The Age of Christ, 1147.

M1147.1

The Bishop Ua Meanngoran died.

M1147.2

Muireadhach Ua Flannagain, a distinguished priest, died after intense penance.

M1147.3

Gilla-Ailbhe, grandson of Flann;

M1147.4

Cuilen, son of the lector of Imleach-Ibhair;

M1147.5

and Fiacha Mac Muireadhaigh, airchinneach of Lughmhadh for a time, died.

M1147.6

Ros-Cre and Oentrobh were burned.

M1147.7

A thunderbolt fell this year upon the cloictheach


p.1083

of Daimhliag-Chianain, and knocked off its beannchobhair.

M1147.8

Duarcan Ua hEaghra fell by Ua hEaghra, by treachery.

M1147.9

A predatory incursion was made by Cuuladh Mac Duinnsleibhe, King of Uladh, into Fearnmhagh, and he plundered the greater part of Cluain-Maelduibh.

M1147.10

An army was led by Muircheartach Mac Neill Ua Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and the Airghialla, into Ulidia. The Ulidians were encamped at the brink of Uchdearg, to meet them; but they abandoned the camp to the Cinel-Eoghain and the Airghialla, who pursued them till they reached the shore of Dun-droma, in Leath-Chathail. The Ulidians gave them battle there, on the day of the festival of Paul and Peter; but they were defeated, and a great number of them slain, together with Archu Ua Flathrai, lord of Leath-Chathail. After this the forces plundered and burned all Leath-Chathail, and carried off hostages from the Ulidians.

M1147.11

Tadhg Ua Briain was released from his fetters, at the intercession of the bishops of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick, Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, and Domhnall Ua Longargain, for he was taken prisoner while under their protection.

M1147.12

Great fruit throughout Ireland this year.

M1147.13

Gillamochoinni Ua Cathail, lord of Ui-Fiachrach-Aidhne, was killed by the grandson of Domhnall Ua Conchobhair.

M1147.14

The battle of Ath-luain was gained over Domhnall, the son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and the Ua-Maine, by the men of Teathbha, where the grandson of Amhalghaidh Ua Flainn and others were slain.

Annal M1148.

M1148.0

The Age of Christ, 1148.

M1148.1

The church of Cnoc-na-seangan was finished by the Bishop O'Caellaidhe and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, and was consecrated by Ua Morgair, successor of Patrick; and a Neimheadh, i.e. ecclesiastical land, was assigned it in Lughmhadh.

M1148.2

A synod was convened at Inis-Padraig, by Maelmaedhog, successor of Patrick, at which were present fifteen bishops and two hundred priests, to establish rules and morals for all, both laity and clergy; and Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, by advice of the synod, went a second time to


p.1085

Rome, to confer with the successor of Peter.

M1148.3

Malachias, i.e. Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, Archbishop of the Chair of Patrick, chief head of the west of Europe, legate of the successor of Peter, the only head whom the Irish and the foreigners obeyed, chief paragon of wisdom and piety, a brilliant lamp which illumined territories and churches by preaching and good works, faithful shepherd of the Church in general,—after having ordained bishops and priests, and persons of every degree; after having consecrated many churches and cemeteries; after having performed every ecclesiastical work throughout Ireland; after having bestowed jewels and food upon the mighty and the needy; after having founded churches and monasteries (for by him were repaired in Ireland every church which had been consigned to decay and neglect, and they had been neglected from time remote); after leaving every rule and every good moral in the churches of Ireland in general; after having been the second time in the legateship; after having been fourteen years in the primacy; and after the fifty-fourth year of his age, resigned his spirit to heaven on the second day of November; and the Church celebrates the feast and solemnity of St. Malachias on the third day, it having been changed by the seniors from the feast day of All Souls to the day after, in order that he might be the more easily revered and honoured; and he was buried in the monastery of St. Bernard at Clarvallis, in France, with honour and veneration.

M1148.4

Ua Duibhin, Bishop of Cill-dara;

M1148.5

the Bishop Ua Naidheanan;

M1148.6

Ceallach Ua Domhnagain, noble head of Cill-Beneoin,

M1148.7

died; and Maelchiarain Mac Mengain, noble priest of the church of Suidhe-Choluim-Chille at Ceanannus, died after victory of martyrdom and penance.

M1148.8

Cluain-Iraird, Lann-Leire, and Lughmhadh, were burned.

M1148.9

An army was led


p.1087

by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, by the Cinel-Eoghain and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, and the Airghialla, into Ulidia; and they carried off the hostages of the Ulidians, together with the son of the King of Ulidia, and left four lords over Ulidia on that occasion. The Ulidians and Airghialla turned against Mac Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain after this.

M1148.10

Another army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, across Tuaim, into Ulidia; and he expelled Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe from Ulidia, and placed Donnchadh in his place; and they proceeded on this occasion into Machaire-Chonaill, and burned the plain, except the churches only, which were protected by the successor of Patrick.

M1148.11

An army was also led by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill into Ulidia, as far as Craebh-Tealcha; and they plundered the country, and placed Cuuladh in his kingdom again; however, he was immediately expelled by the Ulidians themselves.

M1148.12

A meeting was held at Ard-Macha by Ua Lochlainn, with the chieftains of the Cinel-Eoghain; by O'Cearbhaill, with the chieftains of the Airghialla, and the chief men of Ulidia, with their lords, and made perfect peace under the Staff of Jesus, in the presence of the successor of Patrick and his clergy; and they left hostages with O'Lochlainn. The hostages of the Cinel-Conaill were also in the hands of Ua Lochlainn.

M1148.13

Ua Goirmleadhaigh, i.e. Domhnall, who had been lord of Cinel-Eoghain for a time, was banished into Connaught by O'Lochlainn.

M1148.14

Sitrick Ua Braenain, lord of Breaghmhaine, was slain by his own brothers.

M1148.15

A meeting between Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc at Snamh-Rathainn; and the Aithcleireach, son of Cuchairne Ua Fearghail, wounded Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, as he was going to the meeting.

M1148.16

A great prey was taken by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair from the men of Teathbha; and the men of Teathbha overtook him at Ath-Luain, but he turned upon and made a slaughter of them.

Annal M1149.

M1149.0

The Age of Christ, 1149.

M1149.1

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Muircheartaigh, noble bishop of the south of Ireland, a chaste, wise, and pious senior;

M1149.2

Muircheartach


p.1089

Ua Maelmoicheirge, noble Bishop of Ui-Briuin-Breifne, a noble senior;

M1149.3

and the Bishop Ua Gormghaile, a noble pious senior; died after penance and intense penitence.

M1149.4

Macraith, a venerable, benevolent cleric of the people of Ard-Macha, died.

M1149.5

The half of Daimhliag was plundered by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha and the Leinstermen; and they killed Diarmaid, son of Maghnus Ua Lochlainn, Tanist of Oileach, who was taking revenge for the plunder, and his body was brought to Ard-Macha, and there interred.

M1149.6

Doire-Choluim-Chille was burned, and Inis-Mic-Dairen with its church.

M1149.7

Laeighseach Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis and the Comanns, died after penance.

M1149.8

Cuuladh, i.e. the son of Conchobhar, came into Ulidia again, and expelled Donnchadh from the chieftainship of the upper part of Ulidia: and Ua Mathghamhna and the two sons of Aedh Mac Duinnsleibhe (Donnchadh and Murchadh) made an attack upon his camp, but they were defeated by Cuuladh, and Murchadh was killed by him.

M1149.9

An army was led by the Cinel-Eoghain to Magh-an-chairn, to expel Conchobhar; but Ua Cearbhaill prevented them, for he delivered his own son up to them, for the sake of Ulidia.

M1149.10

Another army was led by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, being joined by the people of the north of Ireland, namely, the Cinel-Conaill, the Cinel-Eoghain, and the Airghialla, into Ulidia; they plundered all the upper part of Ulidia, from the harbour of Snamh-Aighneach to Droichet-na-Feirtsi. A party of them went upon the islands of Loch Cuan, and they plundered Inis-Cumscraidh, Leathghlais, Cill-Aedhain, Magh-bile, Beanchor, and all the other churches of the country, except Dun Leathghlais and Sabhall. Ua Duinnsleibhe afterwards came into the house of Ua Lochlainn, and delivered his own son up to him as a hostage, and whatever other hostages he demanded. After this they


p.1091

returned back to their houses, with a countless cattle spoil, and with many prisoners.

M1149.11

A predatory incursion was made by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe into Breagha, and they carried off many spoils. The men of Breagha afterwards came in pursuit of them, and they plundered the half of Tearmann-Feichin, and carried off some of the cattle of the monks.

M1149.12

A royal journey was made by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, with the cavalry of Cinel-Eoghain, to Lughmhadh, where Tighearnan Ua Ruairc came into his house, and left him hostages. From thence Ua Lochlainn and Ua Cearbhaill proceeded to Ath-cliath. Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, came into his house, and Ua Lochlainn made a complete peace between the foreigners and the Irish.

M1149.13

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain and the men of Munster into Connaught, until they arrived at Magh Ua mBriuin; they carried off a great spoil of cattle, and demolished Dun-Gaillmhe; and Ua Lochlainn, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, was drowned in the Gaillimh.

M1149.14

Ceallachan, grandson of Carthach, died.

Annal M1150.

M1150.0

The Age of Christ, 1150.

M1150.1

Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, Archbishop of Connaught, chief senior of all Ireland in wisdom, in chastity, in the bestowal of jewels and food, died at Conga, on the sixteenth of the month of May, on the festival of Saint Brenainn, in the seventy-fifth year of his age.

M1150.2

Maelisa Ua Branain, airchinneach of Doire-Choluim-Chille, head of the happiness and prosperity of the north of Ireland, died.

M1150.3

Ua Follamhain, successor of Finnen of Cluain-Iraird, died at Ceanannus.

M1150.4

Cailleach of Cill-Sleibhe, a pious good senior, died, after good penance, at an advanced age.

M1150.5

The northern half of the Trianmor of Ard-Macha was burned on the night of the festival of Cianan.

M1150.6

Ceanannus, Sord, and Cill-mor-Ua-Niallain,with its oratory, were burned.

M1150.7

The successor of Patrick and the clergy of Patrick made a visitation of Tir-Eoghain, and they obtained their full tribute of cows, i.e. a cow from every house of a biatach and freeman, a horse from every chieftain, and twenty cows from the


p.1093

king himself.

M1150.8

The visitation of Cinel-Eoghain was made by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain; and he obtained a horse from every chieftain, a cow from every two biatachs, a cow from every three freeholders, and a cow from every four villains, and twenty cows from the king himself; a gold ring of five ounces, his horse, and his battle-dress, from Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland.

M1150.9

The grandson of Domhnall Ua Conchobhair was killed by Ruaidhri, son of Domhnall Ua Conchobhair.

M1150.10

Murchadh, son of Gilla-na-naemh Ua Fearghal, pillar of the glory and splendour of the east of Connaught, died on the island of Inis-Clothrann.

M1150.11

Conchobhar Mac Raghnaill, lord of Muintir-Eolais, was killed by Aedh, son of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc.

M1150.12

Muireadhach Ua Flannagain, chief of Clann-Cathail, died on his pilgrimage at Conga.

M1150.13

Diarmaid Mac Branain, lord of Corcachlann, was blinded by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1150.14

Gillaclaen Ua Ciardha, lord of Cairbri, was slain by the Ui-Faelain.

M1150.15

A royal journey by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, with the chieftains of the north of Ireland, to Inis-Mochta, to meet Ua Cearbhaill and Ua Ruairc. The hostages of Connaught were brought him to that place, without a hosting, through the blessing of Patrick, the successor of Patrick, and his clergy. He divided Meath on this occasion into three parts between Ua Conchobhair, Ua Ruairc, and Ua Cearbhaill; and they banished Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn from Meath, through the curse of the successor of Patrick and his clergy.

M1150.16

Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha, was killed by the Ui-Comhaltain, on the island of Loch-Laeghaire.

M1150.17

Ua Canannain, with his army, proceeded into Feara-Luirg, and carried off many cows. The Feara-Luirg overtook them, and many of the people of Ua Canannain, with his two sons, four of the Ui-Maelgaeithe, Gillamartan Ua Canann, Ua Fogartaigh, and many others of their nobles.

M1150.18

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain to Loch Ua nGobhann, in Machaire-Gaileang, and he


p.1095

plundered Slaine. Ua Cearbhaill and Ua Ruairc overtook them, and slew some of their people, among whom was the son of Ua Ifearnain. In the absence of the men of Munster, Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair marched with an army into Munster, and plundered the plain of Munster, and carried off many cows; but he lost some of his people, and among the rest Ua Rodhuibh.

M1150.19

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain to Ath-cliath, and the foreigners came into his house, and submitted to him; and from thence to Commarmana, and to Abha, and burned Domhnach-mor Mic Laithbhe.

M1150.20

An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, with the Cinel-Eoghain and the Ulidians, to relieve Ua Cearbhaill and Ua Ruairc, to Dun-Lochad, in Laeghaire; and the foreigners made a year's peace between Leath-Chuinn and Leath-Mhogha.

M1150.21

Conghal Ua Braein, lord of Breaghmhaine, was killed by Muintir-Ceithearnaigh at Gardha na gamhnaighe, at Cluain-mic-Nois.

Annal M1151.

M1151.0

The Age of Christ, 1151.

M1151.1

Ua Maelfoghmhair, Bishop of Ui-Amhalghadha and Ui-Fiachrach-Muaidhe;

M1151.2

Erolbh, Bishop of Luimneach;

M1151.3

and Brian Cleireach, son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh, died.

M1151.4

A cardinal of the successor of Peter, i.e. Johannes Papiron, arrived in Ireland, to establish rules and good morals, and to set all to rights from their faults. He remained a week in the house of the successor of Patrick at Ard-Macha, and imparted his blessing.

M1151.5

The visitation of Connaught was performed, the second time, by the successor of Patrick, Gillamacliag, the grandson of Ruaidhri; and he obtained his full tribute. On this occasion Ua Conchobhair gave the successor of Patrick a ring of gold, of twenty ounces.

M1151.6

This visitation of Sil-Cathasaigh was made by


p.1097

Flaithbheartach Ua Brolcain, successor of Colum-Cille; and he obtained a horse from every chieftain, a sheep from every hearth, and his horse, battle-dress, and a ring of gold, in which were two ounces, from their lord, i.e. from Cuuladh Ua Lainn.

M1151.7

Dearbhforgaill, daughter of Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, King of Ireland, the wife of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught,and the mother of Aedh, Cathal, and Domhnall, died on her pilgrimage at Ard-Macha.

M1151.8

Brian Ua Conchobhair Ciarraighe was killed by the Ciarraighi themselves.

M1151.9

Conchobhar Ciabhach the long-haired Ua hEaghra, Tanist of Luighne, died on his bed. The reason that he died on his bed was, because he was under the laws of Ciaran Mac-an-tSaeir, for no lord, of the lords of Luighne who preceded him, died on his bed, in consequence of a curse of St. Ciaran.

M1151.10

The son of Maelseachnaill Ua Bric was killed by the son of Gearrna-gcuinneog Ua Bric, who was killed immediately after by the sons of Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach.

M1151.11

Gillagott Ua Carrain, lord of Ui-Maccaille, was killed at Cuil-Colluinge, by the Ui-Mictire.

M1151.12

Tadhg, son of Diarmaid Ua Briain, turned against Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, and deposed him; and Tadhg came into the house of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1151.13

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, into Munster; and he subdued all Munster, except West Munster, in which Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was; and the sovereignty of Desmond was assumed by the son of Cormac, grandson of Carthach.

M1151.14

An army was also led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Munster; and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, with the Leinstermen, went to join him. They plundered Munster before


p.1099

them, until they reached Moin-mor. The Dal-gCais, the men of West Munster, and the Sil-Briain, had set out, under the conduct of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, upon a predatory excursion into Desmond; and on their return from the South they fell in with the Connaughtmen, the Leinstermen, and the Meathmen. A battle was fought between them, and the men of Munster were defeated and slaughtered. Seven thousand was the number of the Munstermen slain in this battle of Moin-mor, among whom was Muircheartach, son of Conchobhar Ua Briain, lord of Thomond, and royal heir of Munster; Lughaidh, son of Domhnall Ua Briain; Aneslis Ua Grada; Mac Conmara, the lord of Ui-Caisin; Flaithbheartach Ua Deadhaidh; and others, sons of lords, chieftains, and distinguished men.The chief sway of Munster was assumed by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair on this occasion, and Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was banished.According to the Book of Leacain, the following were the chieftains who were here slain: Muircheartach, son of Conchobhar Ua Briain, lord of Thomond, the second best man of the Dal-gCais; Lughaidh, son of Domhnall Ua Briain; two of the Ui-Ceinneidigh; eight of the Ui-Deadhaidh, with Flaithbheartach Ua Deadhaidh; nine of the Ui-Seanchain; five of the Ui-Cuinn; five of the Ui-Grada, with Aneslis Ua Grada; twenty-four of the Ui-Ogain; four of the Ui-Aichir; the grandson of Eochaidh Ua Loingsigh; four of the Ui-Neill Buidhe; and five of the Ui-Echthighern; with numbers of good men besides them; and there survived but one shattered battalion of the three battalions which had come to that place. There were slain in the heat of this conflict, on the side of Connaught, Tadhg, son of Liathach Ua Conchobhair; Muircheartach Ua Cathalain, chief of Clann-Fogartaigh; Aedh, son of Maelruanaidh Ua Follamhain, chief of Clann-Uadach; four of the Luighni; and many others. Chief sway over Munster was assumed by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair on this occasion, and Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was banished.

M1151.15

An army was led by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, with the Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, and Airghialla, across Eas-Ruaidh, until they reached Coirrshliabh na


p.1101

Seaghsa, in Corann. Thither hostages were brought to them by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, and they returned to their houses.

M1151.16

The hostages of Leinster were sent to his house, to the son of Niall, grandson of Lochlainn, i.e. King of Aileach and Teamhair.

M1151.17

The commencement of the erection of the daimhliag of Cluain-Coirpthe, by Cucaille, son of Mac Scolaighi, and Gillacoimhdhe, the grandson of Leastar Ua hAinlighi, chief of Cinel-Dobhtha.

M1151.18

A great predatory excursion was made by Ruaidhri, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, into Thomond; and he carried away many cows, and burned Cromadh.

M1151.19

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain, lord of East Munster, and the grandson of Donnchadh, grandson of Gillaphadraig, lord of half Osraighe, were taken prisoners by Diarmaid, son of Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, through treachery and guile.

M1151.20

Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, was taken prisoner by Cathal, his own brother.

M1151.21

A changeable, windy, stormy winter, with great rain.

M1151.22

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain went to Luimneach, but he did not get shelter in Munster; and he took many jewels with him, i.e. ten score ounces of gold, and sixty beautiful jewels, besides the drinking-horn of Brian Borumha; and he divided them among the chiefs of Sil-Muireadhaigh, Ui-Briuin, and Conmhaicne.

Annal M1152.

M1152.0

The Age of Christ, 1152.

M1152.1

Finn, grandson of Celechar Ua Ceinneidigh, successor of Colum, son of Crimhthann of Tir-da-ghlas, and who had been successor of Bairre for a time;

M1152.2

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Follamhain, successor of Coman;

M1152.3

and Fearghal Ua Fearcubhais, lector of Ard-Macha for a time, and of the church of Coluim-Cille at Ard-Macha also, died.

M1152.4

A synod was convened at Droichet-atha by the bishops of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick, and the Cardinal Johannes Papiron, with three hundred ecclesiastics, both monks and canons; and they established some rules thereat, i.e. to put away concubines and lemans from men; not to demand payment for anointing or baptizing (though it is


p.1103

not good not to give such, if it were in a person's power); not to take simoniacal payment for church property; and to receive tithes punctually.

M1152.5

Imleach-Ibhair and Luimneach were burned.

M1152.6

Scrin-Choluim-Chille, Domhnach-Seachnaill, and Treoid, were plundered by the Ui-Briuin.

M1152.7

A plundering army was led by Mac Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, to banish Ua Cearbhaill; and he plundered many persons on that occasion, and expelled Ua Cearbhaill from the chieftainship of Oirghialla, in revenge for the successor of Patrick, whom he had wounded and violated some time before.

M1152.8

A meeting took place between Ua Lochlainn and Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair at Magh-Ene, where they made friendship under the Staff of Jesus, and under the relics of Colum-Cille.

M1152.9

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair into Munster; and he divided Munster into two parts between the son of Cormac, grandson of Carthach, and the Ua Briains, namely, Tadhg and Toirdhealbhach.

M1152.10

An army was led by Mac Lochlainn into Meath, as far as Rath-Ceannaigh, to meet the men of Ireland; and Toirdhealbhach proceeded into Meath, to meet Ua Lochlainn and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster. They divided Meath into two parts on this occasion; they gave from Cluain-Iraird westwards to Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and East Meath to his son, Maeleachlainn. They took Conmhaicne from Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, after having defeated him; and they burned the town named Bun-cuilinn, and gave the chieftainship to the son of Gillabraide Ua Ruairc, and their hostages were given up to Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair. On this occasion Dearbhforgaill, daughter of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, and wife of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, was brought away by the King of Leinster, i.e. Diarmaid, with her cattle and furniture; and he


p.1105

took with her according to the advice of her brother, Maeleachlainn. There arose then a war between the Ui-Briuin and the men of Meath.

M1152.11

The hostages of Ua Ruairc, i.e. Tighearnan, were conveyed to Ath-Luain by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, for Ui-Briuin only.

M1152.12

Finghin, son of Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, was killed by his brethren, through mistake.

M1152.13

Domhnall, son of Righbhardan, lord of Eile, was slain by the son of the Long-legged Ua Cearbhaill.

M1152.14

Cathal, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was killed by the son of Cronn-Luachra Ua Coscrachain, and by the Calraighi of Corann, i.e. the Callraighi-mora.

M1152.15

Diarmaid Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, was expelled and plundered by the son of Cormac, grandson of Carthach, lord of Desmond.

M1152.16

Aedh, son of Mac Amhalghadha, lord of Clann-Maelduibh, died.

M1152.17

The daughter of Ua Caellaighe, wife of Laeighseach Ua Mordha, died.

M1152.18

Cumidhe Ua Cormaidhe, chief of Ui-Mac-Uais of Meath, died.

M1152.19

Munster was much injured, both church and state, in consequence of the war between the Sil-Briain and the Clann-Carthaigh, so that great dearth prevailed in Munster from that war; and their peasantry were dispersed in Leath-Chuinn, and many others of them perished of the famine.

M1153.0

The Age of Christ, 1153.

M1153.1

Aedh Ua Maeleoin, successor of Ciaran of Cluain-mic-Nois, fountain of the prosperity and affluence of Leath-Chuinn, a man of charity and mercy, completed his life.

M1153.2

Colman Ua Breislein, noble priest of Ceanannus, a distinguished sage;

M1153.3

Dunlaing Ua Cathail, successor of Caeimhghin, died.

M1153.4

The visitation of Dal-Cairbre and Ui-Eathach-Uladh was made by Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, successor of Colum-Cille; and he received a horse from every chieftain, a sheep from every hearth; a screaball, a horse, and five cows, from the lord Ua Duinnsleibhe, and an ounce of gold from his wife.

M1153.5

Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair and Meath, with its dependent districts, of Airgialla, and, for a time, of the greater part of Leinster, —flood of the glory, magnificence, and nobility of Ireland,—died at Dearmhach-Choluim-Chille.

M1153.6

Flaithbheartach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, and his wife, Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, were drowned, with the crew of a ship of their people along with them, in the sea, opposite Cairbre of Druim-cliabh.

M1153.7

Domhnall Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne,


p.1107

was slain by Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn; and Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, was blinded by him.

M1153.8

Niall Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis, was released from fetters by the King of Leinster, Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, after he had been blinded against the guarantee of the laity and clergy.

M1153.9

Muirgheas, grandson of Murchadh (or Muircheartach) Odhar, chief of Clann-Tomaltaigh, died.

M1153.10

Donncathaigh, son of Aireachtach Ua Rodhuibh, died after a good life.

M1153.11

An army was led by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, to Doire-an-ghabhlain, against Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, and took away the daughter of Ua Maeleachlainn, with her cattle, from him, so that she was in the power of the men of Meath. On this occasion Tighearnan Ua Ruairc came into his house, and left him hostages.

M1153.12

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was banished into the north of Ireland by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair; and Munster was divided into two parts between Tadhg Ua Briain and Diarmaid, son of Cormac, son of Muireadhach, son of Carthach.

M1153.13

An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Mac Lochlainn, and the people of the north of Ireland, to relieve Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, and restore him to the kingdom of Munster; and they came to Craebhteine. Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair assembled the Connaughtmen, and marched to Magh-Lice-Padraig against the Northerns. Tadhg Ua Briain arrived with his forces at Raithin-Ui-Shuanaigh, to assist the Connaughtmen, and both proceeded to Magh-Cisi. Ua Lochlainn then set out with two battalions of the flower of his army across Ath-Maighne, leaving the remainder of his army (all except these) at Craebh-teine; and he marched with this small force to attack the camp of Tadhg Ua Briain, and he defeated him, and made a slaughter of his people. He also defeated the cavalry of Leinster. He then returned to his own camp at Craebh-teine, carrying off many cows, after plundering some of the men of Teathbha. He set out thence to attack the Connaughtmen, and arrived at Iseal-Chiarain. Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair proceeded westwards across Ath-Luain. Ruaidhri, son of Toirdhealbhach, and the battalion of West Connaught, and the recruits of Sil-Muireadhaigh, came to Fordruim; but as they were pitching their camp there, the heroes of the North poured upon them without


p.1109

previous notice, and numbers of the Connaughtmen were slain by them, and among the rest Gillacheallaigh Ua hEidhin, lord of Aidhne, and his son, Aedh; Brian Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of the North; Muircheartach, son of Conchobhar (who was son of Toirdhealbhach) Ua Conchobhair; Domhnall Ua Birn; Domhnall, son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair; and Sitric Mac Dubhghaill. After this Ua Lochlainn proceeded with his forces to Loch Aininn Lough Ennell, and Ua Maeleachlainn came into his house, and left him hostages; and he Ua Lochlainn gave him all Meath, from the Sinainn to the sea, and also Ui-Faelain and Ui-Failghe. He gave Ui-Briuin and Conmhaicne to Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and carried the hostages of both with him; and before Ua Lochlainn returned back to his house, he billeted the Munstermen upon the men of Meath, Breifne, Airghialla, Ulidia, Conaill, and Tir-Eoghain, for Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was seized with a disease on that expedition, which prevented him from returning into Munster.

M1153.14

Tadhg Ua Briain was taken prisoner by Diarmaid Finn Ua Briain. and blinded by him immediately.

M1153.15

Toirdhealbhach proceeded into Munster, and he assumed half the kingdom of Munster, through the power of Muircheartach Mac Lochlainn.

M1153.16

The hostages of Ui-Failghe and Ui-Faelain were taken by Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh, King of Meath.

M1153.17

Gearr-na-gCuinneog Ua Bric, lord of the Deisi, was killed in fetters by Diarmaid, son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh.

M1153.18

The wicker bridge of Ath-Luain was destroyed by Maelseachlainn, and its fortress was demolished.

M1153.19

The wicker bridge of Ath-liag Ballyleague was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1153.20

Flann Ua Flannagain, lord of Teathbha, died.

M1153.21

Dearbhforgaill, daughter of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, came from the King of Leinster (Diarmaid) to Tighearnan Ua Ruairc again.

Annal M1154.

M1154.0

The Age of Christ, 1154.

M1154.1

Muireadhaigh Ua Clucain, Abbot of Ceanannus,

M1154.2

and Cian Ua Gerachain, successor of Cainneach, died.

M1154.3

Tadhg Ua Briain, King of Munster, died.

M1154.4

Cill-Dalua, Imleach-Ibhair, Ros-Cre, Lothra, and Daurmhaghi, were burned.

M1154.5

Diarmaid Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ciarraighe-Luachra, died.


p.1111

M1154.6

Mac Gillamocholmog, lord of Ui-Dunchadha, was killed by his brethren.

M1154.7

Fearghal, grandson of Cinaeth Ua Maelbrighde, fell by the lord of Gaileanga.

M1154.8

Mac-Cuirr-na-gColpach Ua Fiachrach, lord of Ui-Feineachlais, was slain by Muircheartach Ua Tuathail, lord of Ui-Muireadhaigh.

M1154.9

The son of Raghnall Donn Ua hAireachtaigh, chief of Muintir-Maelmartain, was slain by the son of Muircheartach, son of Bran Ua Fearghail.

M1154.10

Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, assumed the lordship of Tir-Conaill.

M1154.11

A fleet was brought by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair on the sea, round Ireland northwards, i.e. the fleets of Dun-Gaillmhe, of Conmhaicne-mara, of the men of Umhall, of Ui-Amhalghadha, and Ui-Fiachrach, and the Cosnamhaigh Ua Dubhda in command over them; and they plundered Tir-Conaill and Inis-Eoghain. The Cinel-Eoghain and Muircheartach,


p.1113

son of Niall, sent persons over sea to hire (and who did hire) the fleets of the Gall-Gaeidhil, of Ara, of Ceann-tire, of Manainn, and the borders of Alba in general, over which Mac Scelling was in command; and when they arrived near Inis-Eoghain, they fell in with the other fleet, and a naval battle was fiercely and spiritedly fought between them; and they continued the conflict from the beginning of the day till evening, and a great number of the Connaughtmen, together with Cosnamhaigh Ua Dubhda, were slain by the foreigners. The foreign host was however defeated and slaughtered; they left their ships behind, and the teeth of Mac Scelling were knocked out.

M1154.12

An army of the north of Ireland was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn into Connaught, till he reached Dun-Imghain, in Magh-Aei; and he plundered the fort and destroyed the corn-crops of Magh-Luirg and Magh-Aei. He did not, however, obtain cows or hostages. He afterwards directed his course across the ford of Innsin-Sruthra into Breifne, and compelled the men of Breifne to submit to Tighearnan Ua Ruairc; and Ua Lochlainn banished Godfrey Ua Raghallaigh into Connaught. He proceeded from thence to Ath-cliath; and the foreigners of Ath-cliath submitted to him as their king;

M1154.13

and he gave the foreigners twelve hundred cows, as their wages, after which he returned to his house.

M1154.14

A predatory incursion was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, but he returned without cows, after the loss of his son, Maelseachlainn, and Donnchadh Ua Cathail, lord of Cinel-Aedha-na-hEchtghe, who were slain.

M1154.15

A battle was gained by the Osraighi over the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, in which many were slain, together with the son of Eochaidh Ua Nuallain.

M1154.16

A plundering army was led by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Leinster; and he plundered Ui-Muireadhaigh, both churches and territories.

M1154.17

The Muintir-Maelsinna were plundered by Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh; and they were afterwards banished into Connaught, with their chieftain, i.e. Imhar Mac Carghamhna.

M1154.18

A prey was taken by the people of Desmond from the Dal-gCais, and a prey was taken by the Dal-gCais from those of Desmond.

M1154.19

His own son was blinded by the son of Deoradh Ua Flainn, because he had assumed the lordship of Ui-Tuirtre in opposition to his father.


p.1115

The son of Deoradh was afterwards banished into Connaught by Ua Lochlainn.

M1154.20

There was a great destruction of the cattle of Ireland this year.

M1154.21

The second Henry was made king over the Saxons on the 27th of October.

Annal M1155.

M1155.0

The Age of Christ. 1155.

M1155.1

Maelmuire Mac Gillachiarain, airchinneach of the Fort of the Guests of Christ at Ard-Macha, a venerable cleric, who was kind towards the laity and clergy of Ireland;

M1155.2

Fearghal Ua Finachta, a noble priest of Ross-Commain,

M1155.3

and Maelruanaidh Ua hAinlighi, noble priest of Cluain-coirpthe, died.

M1155.4

Ath-Truim, with its church, was burned; and Dearmhagh also was twice burned in one month this year.

M1155.5

Cill-dara, Tuaim-da-ghualann, and Cill-meadhoin, were burned.

M1155.6

Maelseachlainn, son of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath and of the greater part of Leinster, died in the thirtieth year of his age, of a poisonous drink, at Daurmhagh-Choluim-Chille, in the flood of his prosperity and reign, on the night of the festival of Brighit, after the victory of penance. The death of this man was like swine-fattening by hot fruit, like a branch cut down before its blossoming.

M1155.7

The Athchleireach Ua Conchobhair Failghe was killed by his own people.

M1155.8

Amhlaeibh Mac Cana, lord of Cinel-Aenghusa, pillar of the chivalry and vigour of all Cinel-Eoghain, died, and was interred at Ard-Macha.

M1155.9

Aedh Ua hEaghra, lord of Luighne, died.

M1155.10

Fiacha, son of Cethearnach Ua Ceirin, lord of Ciarraighe-Locha-na-nairneadh, died.

M1155.11

An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, to Ath-Duine-Calman on the Inneoin; and he took the hostages of Teathbha, and he gave a full restitution of the cattle of the men of Meath to such as he had before plundered. He also gave the kingdom of Meath, from the Sinainn to the sea, to Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, after which he returned to his house.

M1155.12

Tighearnan Ua Ruairc took Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, prisoner, after he had gone to meet him, to Ceanannus, with a small force; and he incarcerated him on Loch Sileann, where he was detained for a month and a fortnight, but he was ransomed,


p.1117

through the miracles of God, and of Patrick, and of the saints in general, by Godfrey Ua Raghallaigh, who slew the party who were keeping him; and Donnchadh assumed the lordship of Oirghialla again.

M1155.13

A predatory incursion was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Corann, and he carried off many cows.

M1155.14

A fleet was brought by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair to Ath-Luain, and the wicker bridge of Ath-Luain was made by him for the purpose of making incursions into Meath.

M1155.15

The castle of Cuileanntrach was burned and demolished by Ruaidhri, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair.

M1155.16

The bridge of Ath-Luain was destroyed, and its fortress was burned, by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1155.17

Gillagott Ua Ciardha was slain at Cluain-Iraird, by Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath;

M1155.18

and Donnchadh was then deposed by the Meathmen themselves, in revenge of the dishonouring of Finnen, and they set up Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, in his place.

M1155.19

Cuilen of Claenghlais, lord of Ui-Conaill-Gabhra, fell by Ua Cinnfhaelaidh, who was slain immediately after by Cuilen's people.

M1155.20

Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain, and the son of Mac Gillamocholmog, were enlarged by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, in exchange for hostages and oaths.

M1155.21

A battle was gained by Imhar Mac Carghamhna and Gillachrist, his son, and by Muintir-Maelsinna, over the Breaghmhaini, Muintir-Thadhgain, and Muintir-Tlamain, in which fell the chief of Muintir-Tlamain, Gillafiadnatan Mac Aedha, and his son, Gillariabhach. It was Ciaran that turned this battle against the Breaghmhaini, for they had gone to Cluain, bringing with them cots, in which they carried off all they could find of the pigs of Ciaran's clergy. The clergy went after them with their shrine, as far as Lis-an-tsoiscela, but they were not obeyed. On the following day they sustained a defeat, in consequence of disobeying Ciaran's clergy.

M1155.22

A predatory incursion was made by Domhnall Ua Conchobhair into Tuath-ratha, and carried off a countless number of cows.

M1155.23

Magh-Finn was preyed by the men of Teathbha, who plundered some of the Ui-Maine.


p.1119

Annal M1156.

M1156.0

The Age of Christ, 1156.

M1156.1

The first year of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn over Ireland.

M1156.2

Maelmaedhog, i.e. Aedh Mac Dubhradain, Abbot of the Canons of Sabhall, died.

M1156.3

Tadhg Ua Catharnaigh, lord of Teathbha, died in religion.

M1156.4

Eochaidh Ua Cuinn, the chief master, was burned in the cloictheach of Fearta.

M1156.5

Ceanannus was burned, both houses and churches, from the cross of Doras-Urdoimh to Sifoc.

M1156.6

Daurmhagh-Ua-nDuach, Achadh-mic-Airt, Cul-Caissin, and Fearta-Caerach were burned.

M1156.7

A fleet was brought by Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair upon Loch-Deirg-dherc; and Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain came into his house, and delivered him hostages for obtaining the half of Munster.

M1156.8

A meeting between Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc; and they made a general peace and armistice between the men of Breifne, Meath, and Connaught, till the May next ensuing.

M1156.9

Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, Meath, Breifne, and Munster, and of all Ireland with opposition, flood of the glory and splendour of Ireland, the Augustus of the west of Europe, a man full of charity and mercy, hospitality and chivalry, died after the sixty-eighth year of his age, and was interred at Cluain-mic-Nois, beside the altar of Ciaran, after having made his will, and distributed gold and silver, cows and horses, among the clergy and churches of Ireland in general.

M1156.10

The kingdom of Connaught was assumed by Ruaidhri, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, without any opposition.

M1156.11

The three sons of Toirdhealbhach Ua Conchobhair, Brian Breifneach, Brian Luighneach, and Muircheartach Muimhneach, were taken prisoners by the Sil-Muireadhaigh, and given into the custody of Ruaidhri, son of Toirdhealbhach.

M1156.12

Brian Breifneach was blinded by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Diarmaid Mac Taidhg.

M1156.13

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain came to Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and left him twelve hostages of the chieftains of Dal-gCais.

M1156.14

Aedh, son of Ruaidhri Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, was


p.1121

slain by Ua Cathain and Feara-na-Craeibhe, by treachery.

M1156.15

The Ulidians turned against Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, and proclaimed war upon him.

M1156.16

An army was led by Muircheartach into Ulidia, and he obtained the hostages of the Ulidians to secure their obedience to him; however, some of the Ulidians, under the conduct of Ua Duinnsleibhe, made an attack upon some of the army, and slew Ua hInneirghe, chief of the Cuileanntrach. Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dal-Araidhe, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain.

M1156.17

Another army was led by Muircheartach and the people of the north of Ireland into Leinster, and they gave the kingdom of Leinster to Diarmaid Mac Murchadha for hostages, and they plundered Osraighe, both churches and territories.

M1156.18

A victory was gained by Diarmaid, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, over Donnchadh, his brother, wherein was slain the son of Gilladeacair Ua Cairbre, chief of Tuath Buadhgha.

M1156.19

A predatory incursion was made by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, into East Meath, and they plundered the country, both churches and territories, and they carried off the cows of Ard-Breacain, Slaine, Cill-Taillteann, Domhnach-Padraig, and some of the cows of the country in general.

M1156.20

The battle of Cuasan at Lis-Luighdhi in Laeghaire was gained over Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, by Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, the foreigners of Ath-cliath, and Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, where many were slain, and, among others, Domhnall Mac Finnbhairr, chief of Muintir-Gearadhain; Fogartach Ua Cuinn; Aedh Mac Dubhdothra, and the son of Cinaedh Breac Ua Ruairc. Aedh, son of Donnchadh Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, was slain by Muintir Luainimh, and Conchobhar Ua Braein, of Breaghmhaine, at Inis-Mochuda-Raithne.

M1156.21

Muircheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Maelseachlainn, was plundered and taken prisoner by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall.

M1156.22

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maelseachlainn, took the kingdom of Meath, and Diarmaid, son of Domhnall, was banished into Connaught.

M1156.23

Magh-Teathbha, and Machaire-Cuircne,


p.1123

by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair.

M1156.24

Dailfinn, daughter of Bracan, the wife of Cuuladh Ua Caeindealbhain, died.

M1156.25

There was great snow and intense frost in the winter of this year, so that the lakes and rivers of Ireland were frozen over. Such was the greatness of the frost, that Ruaidhri Ua Concobhair drew his ships and boats on the ice from Blean-Gaille to Rinn-duin. The most of the birds of Ireland perished on account of the greatness of the snow and the frost.

Annal M1157.

M1157.0

The Age of Christ, 1157.

M1157.1

Gillaphadraig, son of Donnchadh Mac Carthaigh, successor of Bairre of Corcach, died.

M1157.2

Daimhinis, Lis-mor, and Lothra, with their churches, were burned.

M1157.3

Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe Ui-Eochadha, King of Ulidia, died, after penance, at Dun-da-leathghlas, and was interred at Dun itself.

M1157.4

Domhnall Ua Raghallaigh was slain by the Gaileanga.

M1157.5

Ruaidhri Ua hEaghra, lord of Luighne, was killed with his own axe.

M1157.6

Tadhg, son of Murchadh Ua hEaghra, was killed by Donnchadh Ua hEaghra.

M1157.7

Cuuladh Ua Cain-dealbhain, lord of Laeghaire, a man of unbounded hospitality like Guaire Aidhne, courteous and prosperous like Mongan, son of Fiachna, a brilliant lamp in charity to the poor, the chief lamp of chivalry of the Irish race, was killed through treachery and guile, while under the protection of the laity and clergy of Ireland, by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath. These were the sureties for him: the successor of Patrick and the Staff of Jesus, together with the legate, i.e. Ua Condoirche; the successor of Colum-Cille, with his relics; Grene, Bishop of Ath-cliath; the abbot of the monks of Mellifont; the successor of Ciaran, with their relics; the successor of Fechin, with his relics; Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland (i.e. with opposition); Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster; and the chiefs of the men of Meath, and of the men of Teathbha in general. Wo to the country in which this deed was perpetrated!


p.1125

M1157.8

A predatory incursion was made by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, in revenge of their guarantee, and they plundered the Saithni; but Fearghal Ua Ruairc, and many others along with him, were slain by the Saithni.

M1157.9

A synod was convened by the clergy of Ireland, and some of the kings, at the monastery of Droicheat-atha, the church of the monks. There were present seventeen bishops, together with the Legate and the successor of Patrick; and the number of persons of every other degree was countless. Among the kings were Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, Ua hEochadha, and Ua Cearbhaill. After the consecration of the church by the successor of Patrick, Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn was excommunicated by the clergy of Ireland, and banished by the kings from the kingdom of Meath; and his brother, Diarmaid, was made king in his place. Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn presented seven score cows, and three score ounces of gold, to God and to the clergy, as an offering for the health of his soul. He granted them also a townland at Droicheat-atha, i.e. Finnabhair-na-ninghean. O'Cearbhaill also gave them three score ounces of gold; and the wife of O'Ruairc, the daughter of Ua Maeleachlainn, gave as much more, and a chalice of gold on the altar of Mary, and cloth for each of the nine other altars that were in that church.

M1157.10

An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, accompanied by the people of the north of Ireland, into Leinster; and the King of Leinster, Mac Murchadha, gave him hostages. The people of Laeighis, Ui-Failghe, and of the half of Osraighe, then fled into Connaught. After this he Muircheartach proceeded, accompanied by the Leinstermen, into Desmond, and carried off the hostages of Desmond. He went from thence to the Dal-gCais, and expelled them from Thomond, and plundered some of them in Thomond. He afterwards laid siege to Luimneach, until the foreigners submitted to him as their


p.1127

king, and banished Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain from among them. He afterwards divided Munster between the son of Mac Carthaigh, i.e. Diarmaid, son of Cormac, and Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Briain. He afterwards came to Magh-Ua-Farca, and sent forth a marauding host over Adhairceach, into Sil-Anmchadha. This host was defeated, and many of them were slain, together with Ua Cathain of Craeibh. On this occasion the Cinel-Eoghain destroyed Ros-Cre. He Muircheartach returned from thence to his house in triumph.

M1157.11

While these things were doing, Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair went into Tir-Eoghain, burned Inis-Eanaigh, and cut down its orchard, and plundered the country as far as Cuaille-Cianacht.

M1157.12

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, into Munster, and he gave half the kingdom of Munster to Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain; and Diarmaid, son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh, gave hostages into his hands for a time, and who were to fall to him, unless Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn should come to defend them.

M1157.13

The head of Eochaidh, i.e. of Eochaidh, son of Luchta, was found at Finnchoradh; it was larger than


p.1129

a great cauldron; the largest goose would pass through the hole of his eye, and through the hole of the spinal marrow.

M1157.14

A fleet was brought by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair upon the Sinainn, the like of which was not to be found at that time for numerousness, and for the number of its ships and boats.

Annal M1158.

M1158.0

The Age of Christ, 1158.

M1158.1

Domhnall Ua Longargain, Archbishop of Caiseal, chief senior of Munster, a paragon of wisdom and charity, died at an advanced age.

M1158.2

The Brehon Ua Duileannain, airchinneach of Eas-dara, ollamh of law, and chief of his territory, died.

M1158.3

A synod of the clergy of Ireland was convened at Bri-mic-Taidhg, in Laeghaire, where there were present twenty-five bishops, with the legate of the successor of Peter, to ordain rules and good morals. It was on this occasion the clergy of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick, ordered a chair, like every other bishop, for the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, and the arch-abbacy of the churches of Ireland in general. The bishops of Connaught who were going to this synod were plundered and beaten, and two of their people killed, at Cuirr-Cluana, after they had left Cluain, by the soldiers of Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath, and they returned to their houses.

M1158.4

Conchobhar Ua Briain, the son of Domhnall, lord of East Munster, and his son, were blinded by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, against the protection of the clergy and laity of Munster.

M1158.5

Cearnachan Ua Braein, lord of Luighne in Meath, died.

M1158.6

Ua Domhnaill, lord of Corca-Bhaiscinn, was slain by Ua Conchobhair of Corca-Modhruadh.

M1158.7

Fearghal, son of Aedh na n-amhas Ua Ruairc, died.

M1158.8

Tadhg, son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, died.

M1158.9

Ua Failbhe, lord of Corca Duibhne, was slain by the


p.1131

Ui-Seghdha.

M1158.10

Cuuladh, son of Deoraidh Ua Flainn, lord of Ui-Tuirtre and Dal-Araidhe, the Guaire Aidhne of the north of Ireland for hospitality, died.

M1158.11

The Cinel-Conaill turned against Ua Lochlainn.

M1158.12

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, with the Ulidians and Airghialla, into Tir-Conaill, and they plundered the country, both churches and territories; but the Cinel-Conaill made an attack upon the camp of the Ulidians, and slew Aedh Ua Duinnsleibhe Ui Eochadha, King of Ulidia, and the Gall Ua Searraigh, and many others of the nobility and commonalty besides them.

M1158.13

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair as far as Leithghlinn, and he took the hostages of Osraighe and Laeighis; and he fettered Macraith Ua Mordha, lord of Laeighis.

M1158.14

Sitric, son of Gilla-Enain Ua Domhnaill, chief of Clann-Flaitheamhail, was slain by Murchadh, grandson of Tadhg Ua Ceallaigh; and the two sons of Murchadh, son of Tadhg, were killed in fetters by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, in revenge of him.

M1158.15

A great fleet was sent by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair into Tir-Eoghain, which did many injuries therein.

M1158.16

A predatory incursion was made by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, into Teathbha; and he plundered some of the Muintir-Ceirin, and carried off many cows. The men of Teathbha routed a party of his people, and slew Tomaltach Ua Maelbhrenainn; and Donnchadh, grandson of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri; and the son of Gillade Ua Treasaigh; and Ua Macliag; and Mac Aedha na n-amhas; and Fearchair Ua Follamhain; and the son of Ua Flaithbheartaigh was taken prisoner; and many others were killed besides those above mentioned.

M1158.17

The Cairbri-Ua-Ciardha, and some of the men of Teathbha, turned against Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, and again set up Donnchadh as king. Tighearnan Ua Ruairc and Diarmaid came in pursuit of them, and gained the battle of Ath-Maighne over them, and made great preys upon the Sil-Ronain and the Cairbri. The Cairbri then and Donnchadh were banished into Leinster. The Cairbri were afterwards conciliated, and Donnchadh proceeded into Connaught.

M1158.18

There was then a breach of the peace between the Connaughtmen and the men of Breifne and Meath.

M1158.19

There was great rain in the summer, from which there came great floods of water into the river of Inis-na-subh, in


p.1133

Sliabh-Fuaid, and twenty-three persons were drowned on Inis-na-subh.

M1158.20

Cucoirne Ua Madadhain, lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died.

Annal M1159.

M1159.0

The Age of Christ, 1159.

M1159.1

Maelmaire Ua Loingsigh, Bishop of Lis-mor, died.

M1159.2

Abel and Gillamuireadhaigh, both anchorites of Ard-Macha, died.

M1159.3

Gillacaeimhghin Ua Ceinneidigh, lord of Ormond, died on his pilgrimage at Cill-Dalua.

M1159.4

Ceinneidigh Ua Briain, i.e. the grandson of Murchadh, died.

M1159.5

Domhnall Mac Conmara was drowned in the Sinainn.

M1159.6

Diarmaid, son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Magh-Luirg, head of the counsel, wisdom, and good supplication of the province of Connaught, died.

M1159.7

Aedh, son of Donnchadh Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, was killed by Maelseachlainn, son of Conghalach, son of Cuaifne Ua Conchobhair.

M1159.8

Ua Maeldoraidh and his two brothers were treacherously slain by O'Canannain.

M1159.9

An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, to Rubha-Chonaill, in Meath, and he banished Diarmaid, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, from the kingdom of Meath, and gave the kingdom of Meath, from the Sinainn to the sea, to Donnchadh, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1159.10

There was a pacific meeting between Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan; and they made peace, and took mutual oaths before sureties and relics. Tighearnan and the men of Breifne then turned against Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, and joined the standard of Connaught.

M1159.11

A wicker bridge was made at Ath-Luain by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, for the purpose of making incursions into Meath.

M1159.12

The forces of Meath and Teathbha, under the conduct of the King of Meath, Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, went to prevent the erection of the bridge; and a battle was fought between both parties at Ath-Luain, where Aedh, son of Ruaidhri


p.1135

Ua Conchobhair, royal heir of Connaught, was wounded, and he died of his wounds at the end of a week.

M1159.13

A great army was after this led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair with the Connaughtmen, and a battalion of Thomond, and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, with the men of Breifne, into Meath, until they reached Loch Semhdhighe. They afterwards proceeded from thence to Ath-Fhirdiaidh in the plain of the Oirghialla. Another army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, with the chiefs of Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, and of the north in general, to Ath-Fhirdiadh also, to relieve the Oirghialla. A battle was there fought between them, in which the Connaughtmen, the Conmhaicni, and Ui-Briuin, amounting in all to six large battalions, were defeated, and the other two battalions were dreadfully slaughtered; and among the rest Gillachrist, son of Tadhg Ua Maelruanaidh, lord of Magh-Luirg; Muircheartach Mac Taidhg; Muireadhach Ua Mannachain, lord of Ui-Briuin-na-Sinna; Branan Mac Branain, chief of Corca-Achlach; Ceithearnach Ua Follamhain, chief of Clann-Uadach; Aedh, son of Mac Uallachain, chief of Muintir-Chinaetha; Gealbhuidhe Ua Seachnasaigh; Donnchadh, son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri; Diarmaid Ua Conceanainn; Athius, son of Mac Cnaimhin; the two sons of Conchobhar Ua Conchobhair; Murchadh, the son of Domhnall Ua Flaithbheartaigh; and many others of the nobility and commonalty along with them. These were the chieftains there slain of the Ui-Briuin: Mac-na-haidhche Ua Cearnachain; Cumara Ua Cumrain; Gilla-na-naemh Ua Galain, chief of Clann-Dunghalaigh; Annadh, son of Noenneanaigh Ua Cearbhaill, and his brother; the son of Cufraich Ua Loingsigh, chief of Cinel-Bacat; Macraith Ua Tormadain, and Macraith Ua Cuagain, two chiefs of Cinel-Duachain; the son of Mac-Finnbhairr Ua Gearadhain, and many others besides them. Also a great number of the Munstermen, with the son of Gillachiarain Ua Ceinneidigh. Muircheartach devastated Tir-Briuin and plundered Muintir-Geradhain.He gave Tir-Beccon, Tir-Fhiachach, Cailli-Follamhain, Sodhair, and Finntain, which were his own lands, to the men of Meath. And after this the Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, and Muircheartach, returned to their houses


p.1137

with victory and exultation.

M1159.14

Another army was led by Muircheartach, having the Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, the Airghialla, and all the northerns, with him, into Connaught; and they burned Dun-mor, Dun-Ciarraighe, Dun-na-nGall, and destroyed a great part of the country generally.

M1159.15

Another army was led by Ua Lochlainn, into Meath, to expel Ua Ruairc. He billeted the two battalions of the Cinel-Conail and Cinel-Eoghain, for the space of a month, upon the men of Meath, i.e. a battalion on West Meath and another on East Meath. He afterwards made peace with Ua Ruairc, and left his own land to him, i.e. the land of the defence. He also gave the kingdom of all Leinster to Mac Murchadha, and expelled the son of Mac Fhaelain. On his return to his house he plundered Dealbhna-mor, and Ui-Mic-Uais-Breagh.

Annal M1160.

M1160.0

The Age of Christ, 1160.

M1160.1

Finn Mac Gormain, Bishop of Cill-dara, and who had been abbot of the monks of Iubhair-Chinn-trachta for a time, died.

M1160.2

Neachtan, a bishop, died.

M1160.3

Gilla-na-naemh Ua Duinn, lector of Inis-Clothrann, a paragon in history and poetry, and a good speaker, sent his spirit to his heavenly patrimony, amid a choir of angels, on the 17th of December, in the fifty-eighth year of his age.

M1160.4

Gillachrist Ua Maelbeltain, the noble priest and chief master, died at an advanced age, after a good life.

M1160.5

Aedh of Daimhliag died.

M1160.6

Lughmhadh and Ceann-coradh were burned.

M1160.7

Donnchadh, son of Domhnall


p.1139

Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath, was killed by Murchadh Ua Finnollain, lord of Dealbhna-mor, and his son, through old grudges, and through his own faults.

M1160.8

Two of the Ui-Maeldoraidh were killed by the Aithchleireach Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, while under the protection of the laity and clergy of the Cinel-Conaill themselves.The Aithchleireach himself and two others of the Ui-Canannain were killed by the Cinel-Conaill, in revenge of their guarantee.

M1160.9

Lorcan Ua Caindealbhain, lord of Laeghaire, fell by Aedh, son of Cuuladh Ua Caindealbhain, at Ath-Truim.

M1160.10

Domhnall Ua Goirmleadhaigh, chief of Cinel-Moain, was slain by Maelruanaidh, lord of Feara-Manach, and the chiefs of Cinel-Moain along with him, through treachery and guile, at the instance of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn.

M1160.11

Aedh Ua hAnmchadha, lord of Ui-Maccaille, was slain by the sons of Gillacaech Ua hAnmchadha.

M1160.12

Brodar, son of Turcall, lord of Ath-cliath, was killed by Maelcron Mac Gillaseachnaill.

M1160.13

Flaithbheartach Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne, lamp of the chivalry and prowess of Meath, died.

M1160.14

Domhnall, son of Gillaseachnaill, lord of South Breagha, was killed by Muircheartach, son of Domhnall Ua Maeleachlainn, without his being guilty of any crime.

M1160.15

Murchadh Ua Ruadhacant, lord of Ui-Eathach, died.

M1160.16

Tadhg Ua Fearghail was killed by his own brother, Aedh Ua Fearghail.

M1160.17

Ruaidhri Ua Tomaltaigh, chief of Muintir-Duibhetain, soul of the hospitality and prowess of Ui-Tuirtre, fell by the men of Breifne.

M1160.18

Some of the Cinel-Eoghain, with Ua Goirmleadhaigh and the son of Ua Neill, turned against Ua Lochlainn, and committed a great depredation against him. A great commotion arose in the north of Ireland, in consequence of this, so that the country was much injured. A predatory force was sent after them the aforesaid party of the Cinel-Eoghain by Ua Lochlainn, to Tearmann-Daibheog, which forced a countless number of cows from them.

M1160.19

The battle of Magh-Luadhat was gained by the Cinel-Eoghain of Tulach-Og over Ua Goirmleadhaigh, Domhnall Ua Crichain, and the Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha; and on this occasion Muircheartach Ua Neill was undeservedly killed by Lochlainn Mac Lochlainn; and Lochlainn was afterwards slain, in revenge of him, by the son of Ua Neill.

M1160.20

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, to Ath-Feine, at Iraras; and he took the hostages of the men of Teathbha and Meath,


p.1141

and he placed Diarmaid, son of Domhnall Ui Maeleachlainn, in chieftainship and lordship over them.

M1160.21

There was a pacific meeting at Eas-Ruaidh, between Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn; and they separated from each other without concluding a peace or armistice.

M1160.22

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, with the people of the north of Ireland about him, to Ath-na-Dairbhrighe, for the purpose of taking the hostages of the men of Meath and the men of Breifne. An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair to Magh-Gartchon, to relieve Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, and Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath. But God separated them, without battle or conflict, without peace, without armistice.

M1160.23

A fleet was brought by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair upon the Sinainn, and upon Loch-Dergdherc; and he took the hostages of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain and the DalgCais.

Annal M1161.

M1161.0

The Age of Christ, 1161.

M1161.1

Aedh Ua hOissen, Archbishop of Tuam, head of the piety and chastity of Leath-Chuinn;

M1161.2

Tadhg Ua Longargain, Bishop of Thomond;

M1161.3

Isaac Ua Cuanain, Bishop of Eile and Ros-Cre, a virgin, and chief senior of East Munster;

M1161.4

Maelbhrenainn Ua Ronain, Bishop of Ciarraighe Luachra;

M1161.5

and Imhar Ua hInnreachtaigh, airchinneach of Mucnamh, and who had been lord of Ui-Meith for a time, died.

M1161.6

Raghnall Ua Dalaigh, ollamh of Desmond in poetry, died.

M1161.7

Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Connaught, took the hostages of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain.

M1161.8

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, with the Connaughtmen, and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, with the men of Breifne, into Meath, and took the hostages of the Ui-Faelain and the Ui-Failghe, and left Faelan, the son of Mac Fhaelain, in the lordship of the


p.1143

Ui-Faelain, and Maelseachlainn Ua Conchobhair in the lordship of Ui-Failghe.

M1161.9

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn into Ui-Briuin, and he plundered the country before him, until he arrived at Leac-Bladhma. The foreigners and the Leinstermen, with their king, Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, came into his house there. Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair gave him four hostages for Ui-Briuin, Conmhaicne, the half of Munster and Meath; and Ua Lochlainn gave him his entire province of Connaught. He also gave the entire province of Leinster to Diarmaid Mac Murchadha. Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn was therefore, on this occasion, King of Ireland without opposition. He gave the half of Meath which came to him to Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, and the other half was in the possession of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair. After this Ua Lochlainn returned to his house.

M1161.10

Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn granted Beann-Artghaile to God and St. Ciaran.

M1161.11

Another army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn into Meath, to attend a meeting of the men of Ireland, both laity and clergy, at Ath-na-Dairbhrighe; and he obtained all their hostages. It was on this occasion the churches of Colum-Cille in Meath and Leinster were freed by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain; and their tributes and jurisdiction were given him, for they had been previously enslaved.

M1161.12

The visitation of Osraighe was made by Flaithbheartach; and the tribute due to him was seven score oxen, but he selected, as a substitute for these, four hundred and twenty ounces of pure silver.

M1161.13

Godfrey Ua Raghallaigh was killed at Ceanannus, by Maelseachlainn Ua Ruairc. His son, Gilla-Isa Ua Raghallaigh, also fell by the same Maelseachlainn, on the following day.

M1161.14

A house was forcibly taken by Cathal Ua Raghallaigh, i.e. the son of Godfrey, against Maelseachlainn Ua Ruairc, in the middle of Slaine; and there were killed therein Muircheartach Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha, and his wife, i.e. Indearbh, daughter of Ua Caindealbhain. Maelseachlainn, however, made his escape on this occasion.

M1161.15

A victory was gained by Domhnall Caemhanach, son of Mac Murchadha, and the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, over the foreigners of Loch-Carman Wexford, where many were slain, together with Ua Domhnall.

M1161.16

Matudhan,


p.1145

grandson of Cronan, lord of Cairbre-Gabhra, fell by the sons of Mac Congeimhle.

M1161.17

Domhnall, son of Conghalach, son of Cuaifne Ua Conchobhair Failghe, Tanist of Ui-Failghe, was slain by the Clann-Maelughra.

M1161.18

A battle was gained by the people of Thomond over those of Desmond, wherein were slain Maelseachlainn, son of Ceallachan, grandson of Carthach, and Amhlaeibh Ua Donnchadha, and many others.

M1161.19

Another battle was gained by the same party over the people of Desmond, wherein were slain Aedh Ua Caeimh, lord of Feara-Muighe, and two of the Ui-Anmchadha.

M1161.20

Demon ships were seen on the Bay of Gaillimh, and they sailing against the wind. The fortress on the day following was consumed by fire.

M1161.21

Domhnall, son of Cumeadha Ua Laeghachain, chief of Clann-Suibhne, was slain by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, in fetters, he being under the protection of Ciaran.

M1161.22

Fallamhan Finn Ua Fallamhain died in religion.

Annal M1162.

M1162.0

The Age of Christ, 1162.

M1162.1

Greine, Archbishop of the foreigners and Leinster, distinguished for his wisdom and knowledge of various languages, died; and Lorcan Ua Tuathal, successor of Caeimhghin, was appointed to his place by the successor of Patrick.

M1162.2

Cathasach Mac Comhaltain, lector of Doire-Choluim-Chille, died: he was a distinguished scholar.

M1162.3

Diarmaid Ua Laighnen, lector of Cluain-Uamha, was killed by the Ui-Ciarmhaic.

M1162.4

The relics of Bishop Maeinenn and of Cummaine Foda were removed from the earth by the clergy


p.1147

of Brenainn, and they were enclosed in a protecting shrine.

M1162.5

Cairbre Mac Samuel, chief ollamh of Ireland in penmanship, died at Ard-Macha, on the 4th day of February.

M1162.6

The monastery of the monks at Iubhar-Chinntrechta was burned, with all its furniture and books, and also the yew tree which Patrick himself had planted.

M1162.7

Imleach-Iubhair, with its church, was burned.

M1162.8

A separation of the houses from the church of Doire was caused by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, and by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland; and they removed eighty houses, or more, from the place where they were; and Caiseal-an-urlair was erected by the successor of Colum-Cille, who pronounced a curse against any one that should come over it.

M1162.9

A synod of the clergy of Ireland, with the successor of Patrick, Gillamacliag, son of Ruaidhri, was convened at Claenadh Clane, where there were present twenty-six bishops and many abbots, to establish rules and morality amongst the men of Ireland, both laity and clergy. On this occasion the clergy of Ireland determined that no one should be a lector in any church in Ireland who was not an alumnus of Ard-Macha before.

M1162.10

The visitation of Cinel-Eoghain was made by the successor of Patrick, Gillamacliag, son of Ruaidhri, the like of which had not previously occurred.

M1162.11

An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, accompanied by the people of the north of Ireland, the men of Meath, and a battalion of the Connaughtmen, to Ath-cliath, to lay siege to the foreigners; but Ua Lochlainn returned without battle or hostages, after having plundered Fine Gall. He left, however, the Leinstermen and Meathmen at war with the foreigners. A peace was afterwards concluded between the foreigners and the Irish; and six score ounces of gold were given by the foreigners to O'Lochlainn, and five score ounces of gold were paid by Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn to Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair for West Meath.

M1162.12

Cill Ua Nilucain and Ros-Mide


p.1149

were freed by Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, for God and Ciaran, from regal coigny cess for ever.

M1162.13

Conchobhar, son of Tadhg Ua Briain, was slain by Muircheartach, grandson of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain.

M1162.14

Cathal, grandson of Cathal Ua Mughroin, lord of Clann-Cathail for a time, died.

M1162.15

Donnchadh, son of Mac Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe, died.

M1162.16

Cathal Ua Raghallaigh, lord of Muintir-Maelmordha, head of the hospitality and prowess of the Ui-Briuin, was drowned.

M1162.17

A predatory incursion was made by Maelseachlainn Ua Ruairc into Cairbre-Ua-Ciardha; but the men of Cairbre defeated him, and he left behind a slaughter of his people.

M1162.18

Maelseachlainn, son of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, royal heir of Breifne, lamp of the chivalry and hospitality of Leath-Chuinn, was slain by Muintir-Maelmordha and the son of Annadh Ua Ruairc.

M1162.19

A predatory irruption was made by Diarmaid Ua Maelseachlainn, King of Meath, upon the men of Breifne; and Tadhg, grandson of Carrghamhain Ua Gilla-Ultain, was slain by the men of Breifne.

M1162.20

A predatory irruption was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc upon the Cairbri-Ua-Ciardha, on which occasion the grandson of Finnbharr Ua Gearadhain was slain by the Cairbri.

M1162.21

A great war broke out between Desmond and Thomond; and many depredations were committed, and men were slaughtered, between them.

M1162.22

Macraith Ua Macliag, chief of Cinel-Lughna, died.

M1162.23

The son of Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, was taken prisoner by Cormac, grandson of Carthach.

M1162.24

A predatory incursion was made by the Ui-Failghe into Eile and Ormond, and they carried off countless cows.

M1162.25

The


p.1151

son of Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, escaped from fetters.

M1162.26

The Ui-Dimasaigh, i.e. Ceallach, Cubrogha, and Cuilen, were slain by Maelseachlainn Ua Conchobhair, lord of Ui-Failghe, in the middle of Cill-achaidh.

M1162.27

Cosnamhaigh Ua Dubhda, lord of Ui-Amhalghadha, was slain by his own tribe.

M1163.0

The Age of Christ, 1163.

M1163.1

Maelisa Ua Laighnain, Bishop of Imleach, and successor of Ailbhe;

M1163.2

Maelisa Ua Corcrain, successor of Comhghall;

M1163.3

Gillachiarain Ua Draighnen, successor of Fechin;

M1163.4

and Maelchiarain, chief senior of the men of Meath, a paragon of wisdom and piety, died.

M1163.5

Gillabrighde Ua Dimusaigh, successor of the two Sinchells;

M1163.6

and Caillechdomhnaill, daughter of Naeneanaigh, abbess of Cluain-Bronaigh, and successor of Samhthann, died.

M1163.7

Gleann-da-locha was burned, together with Cro-Chiarain and Cro-Chaeimhghin, and the church of the two Sinchells.

M1163.8

A lime-kiln, measuring seventy feet every way, was made by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, and the clergy of Colum-Cille, in the space of twenty days.

M1163.9

A royal heir's feasting visitation was made by Niall, son of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, the son of the King of Ireland, through Leath-Chuinn. He proceeded to Ulidia, and first to Cill-sleibhe; afterwards into Airghialla, Tir-Briuin, and Meath; and he committed various acts of violence in territories and churches, and particularly at Ceanannus, Ard-Breacain, Fobhar-Fechin, Eacharadh-Lobrain, and Cluain-mic-Nois. He afterwards proceeded across Ath-Luain, into Connaught, with a force of twelve score men; and they feasted upon the Ui-Maine, but they were all killed by Conchobhar Ua Ceallaigh, Conchobhar Maenhaighe, and the Ui-Maine, through treachery and guile, except some deserters and fugitives; and Niall, son of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, was taken prisoner, and conducted in safety to his house, by advice of their meeting.

M1163.10

Muircheartach Ua Maelseachlainn, i.e. the son of Domhnall, royal heir of Teamhair, fell off the bridge of Corcach, and was drowned in the Sabhrann.

M1163.11

The son of Finn Ua Cearbhaill, lord of North Eile, was slain by Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach


p.1153

Ua Briain.

M1163.12

Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn was deposed by the men of Meath, and five score ounces of gold were given to Muircheartach Mac Lochlainn for the kingdom of Westmeath.

M1163.13

Cucaisil Ua Finnallain was slain by Aedh Ua Ruairc through treachery, i.e. through guile.

Annal M1164.

M1164.0

The Age of Christ, 1164.

M1164.1

Donnchadh Ua Briain, i.e. the son of Diarmaid, Bishop of Cill-Dalua;

M1164.2

and Maelcaeimhghin Ua Gormain, master of Lughmhadh, chief doctor of Ireland, and who had been Abbot of the monastery of the canons of Tearmann-Feichin for a time, died.

M1164.3

The great church of Doire, which is eighty feet long, was erected by the successor of Colum-Cille, Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, by the clergy of Colum-Cille, and Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, King of Ireland; and they completed its erection in the space of forty days.

M1164.4

Ard-Macha, Cluain-mic-Nois, Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, and Tuaim-da-ghualann, were burned.

M1164.5

Lughmhadh was burned for the most part, by fire issuing from the house of Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, in which Muircheartach, son of Niall, King of Aileach, and the chieftains of Cinel-Eoghain, were staying, after they had dishonoured the Staff of Jesus.

M1164.6

The son of Donnchadh, grandson of Carthach, was killed by his kinsman, the son of Cormac.

M1164.7

A great prey was taken by the Feara-Manach and the Ui-Fiachrach of Ard-sratha, in Tir-Eoghain.

M1164.8

Ua Crichain, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of Ardsratha, fell by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn.

M1164.9

Muircheartach Ua Tuathail, lord of Ui-Muireadhaigh, and chief of Leinster in hospitality and prowess, died after penance.

M1164.10

Tuaim-Greine and Tir-da-ghlas were burned.

M1164.11

David, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, was killed by the Ui-Eathach-Uladh, by treachery.

M1164.12

Maelseachlainn Ua Conchobhair Failghe, was slain by the Clann-Maelughra.

M1164.13

Amhlaeibh, son of Gillacaeimhghin Ua Ceinneidigh, lord of Ormond, was blinded by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain.


p.1155

Annal M1165.

M1165.0

The Age of Christ, 1165.

M1165.1

Maghnus Ua Canannain, lord of Cinel-Conaill, died.

M1165.2

A great war and mutual depredations between the men of Meath and the men of Breifne.

M1165.3

Sitric Ua Ruairc, Tanist of Breifne, was killed by Ua Ciardha and the Cairbri. A great depredation was committed by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and the people of all the province of Connaught, upon the Cairbri, in revenge of Sitric. Another depredation by the same, upon the men of Breagha, the Saithni, and the Ui-Colgain; and they plundered the whole country.

M1165.4

The Ulidians began to turn against Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, and proceeded with a force against the Ui-Meith, and carried off cows, and slew many persons. They made another deprecatory irruption upon the Ui-Breasail-Airthir, and another upon the Dal-Riada. A great army was afterwards led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, consisting of the Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, and Airghialla, into Ulidia; and they plundered and spoiled the whole country, except the principal churches of Ulidia; and they made a countless slaughter of men, and slew, among others, Eachmarcach Mac Gilla-Epscoib and Ua Lomain; and they banished Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe from Ulidia, after having deprived him of his kingdom; and all the Ulidians gave their hostages to Ua Lochlainn for his royal power.

M1165.5

Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn proceeded with the Cinel-Eoghain to Inis-Lochain, and burned and destroyed the island. The Cinel-Eoghain afterwards returned to their houses in triumph, with vast spoils and many ships. Ua Lochlainn then went to Ard-Macha, whither Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, and Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe, came to meet Muircheartach, to request that he would again restore Mac Duinnsleibhe to his kingdom. Ua Lochlainn gave him the kingdom, in consideration of receiving the hostages of all Ulidia; and Eochaidh gave him a son of every chieftain in Ulidia, and his own daughter, to be kept by Ua Lochlainn as a hostage; and many jewels were given him, together with the sword of the son of the Earl. He also gave up the territory of Bairche to Ua Lochlainn, who immediately granted it to Ua Cearbhaill, i.e. Donnchadh; and a townland was granted to the clergy of Sabhall, for the luck of the reign of Mac Lochlainn.

M1165.6

Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain was deposed by Muircheartach, son of Toirdhealbhach, and expelled into Leinster.

M1165.7

An army was led by Ruaidhhri Ua Conchobair


p.1157

and the Connaughtmen to Desmond; and the chiefs of Desmond came into his house, with their lord, Diarmaid, son of Cormac Mac Carthy.

M1165.8

Domhnall Mac Gillaphadraig, lord of Osraighe, was slain by the people of Laeighis-Ui-Mordha.

M1165.9

Macraith Ua Conchobhair, lord of Conchobhair, died after penance.

M1165.10

Fearghal Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall and Cinel-Fiachach, lamp of the prowess and hospitality of the men of Meath, was slain by the Ui-Bracain.

M1165.11

Gillachrist Ua Maelbhrenainn, chief of Clann-Conchobhair, died.

Annal M1166.

M1166.0

The Age of Christ, 1166.

M1166.1

Gillamacaiblen Ua hAnmchadha, successor of Brenainn of Cluain-fearta, died.

M1166.2

Celechair Ua Conghaile, airchinneach of the Teach-aeidheadh at Cluain-mic-Nois;

M1166.3

and Gilla-na-naemh Ua Ceallaigh, successor of Ua Suanaigh at Rathain, died.

M1166.4

The shrine of Manchan, of Maethail, was covered by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and an embroidering of gold was carried over it by him, in as good a style as a relic was ever covered in Ireland.

M1166.5

Macraith Ua Morain resigned his bishopric; and Gillachrist Ua hEochaidh was afterwards appointed to the chair of Conmhaicne.

M1166.6

Ard-Macha was burned in two streets, from the Cross of Colum-Cille to the Cross of Bishop Eoghan, and from the Cross of Bishop Eoghan in the second street to the Cross at the door of the fort, and all the fort with its churches, except the church of SS. Paul and Peter, and a few of the houses, and a street to the west of the fort, from the Cross of Seachnall to the Cross of Brighit, except a little.

M1166.7

Doire-Choluim-Chille, together with the Duibh-Regles, was burned.

M1166.8

Lughmhadh, Sord-Choluim-Chille,


p.1159

and Ard-bo, were burned.

M1166.9

Aedh Ua Maelfabhaill, lord of Carraig-Brachaidhe, was slain by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn.

M1166.10

Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua Eochadha, pillar of the prowess and hospitality of the Irish, was blinded by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn; and the three best men of the Dal-Araidhe, i.e. two Mac Loingsighs, and the grandson of Cathasach Ua Flathrae, were killed by the same king, in violation of the protection of the successor of Patrick and the Staff of Jesus; of Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and in violation of the protection of the relics, laity, and clergy of all the north of Ireland.

M1166.11

After this an army was led by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, into Tir-Eoghain, to revenge the violation of the guarantee of Patrick and his own guarantee.Three large battalions was the number of his army, i.e. the battalion of Oirghialla, the battalion of Ui-Briuin, i.e. of Breifne, and the battalion of Conmhaicne. These hosts arrived at Leitir-Luin, in the Feadha of Ui-Eachdhach, in Tir-Eoghain. When these met Ua Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain with a few troops, a fierce and merciless battle was fought between them, in which the Cinel-Eoghain were defeated, with the loss of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, Monarch of all Ireland, the chief lamp of the valour, chivalry, hospitality, and prowess of the west of the world in his time; a man who had never been defeated in battle or conflict till that time, and who had gained many battles. There were slain along with him in the battle, Ua Gillalainne and Ua hAdhmaill, two distinguished chieftains, and Mac Gillamartain, chief of Cinel-Fearadhaigh, with many others. It was to foretell the battle of Leath-Caimm and this battle, Dachiarog, i.e. the saint of Airegal, said:

    1. Lethi-Cam!
      Great heroes shall perish there,
      They shall be caught at Leitir-Luin,
      Though far, though late, though slow.


p.1161

M1166.12

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair to Eas-Ruaidh, and he took the hostages of the Cinel-Conaill.

M1166.13

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, with the Connaughtmen, the men of Meath and of Teathbha, to Ath-cliath; and Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair was there inaugurated king as honourably as any king of the Gaeidhil was ever inaugurated; and he presented their stipends to the foreigners in many cows, for he levied a tax of four thousand cows upon the men of Ireland for them. On this occasion the foreigners accompanied Ruaidhri to Droicheat-atha, whither Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and the chieftains of Airghialla came into his house, and gave him their hostages.

M1166.14

Fearna was burned by Mac Murchadha, from fear that the Connaughtmen would burn his castle and his house. Ruaidhri then proceeded, accompanied by the same forces, back to Leinster, and took their hostages; and he afterwards advanced to Fidh-dorcha, and cleared the pass of that wood; and next proceeded into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, and took the hostages of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, and of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh in general.

M1166.15

Another great army of the men of Connaught, Breifne, and Meath, was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair into Leinster, into Osraighe, and afterwards into Munster; and all the kings of Leath-Mhogha came into his house, and submitted to him. He divided Munster into two parts, of which he gave one to the Sil-Briain, and the other to Diarmaid, son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh.

M1166.16

An army, composed of the men of Breifne and Meath, and of the foreigners of Ath-cliath and the Leinstermen, was led by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh; and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha


p.1163

was banished over sea, and his castle at Fearna was demolished. They set up as king, Murchadh, the grandson of Murchadh, he giving seventeen hostages to Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, to be sent to Tir-Fiachrach-Aidhne.

M1166.17

A battle was gained by the Dartraighi, and the son of Donnchadh Ua Ruairc, over the men of Lurg and Tuath Ratha, where numbers were slain.

M1166.18

The blind Ua Conallta, i.e. Gillamaire, royal poet of Ireland, died; he was of the tribe of Ui-Briuin.

M1166.19

The son of Domhnall Bracanach, grandson of Carthach, was slain by Cormac, grandson of Carthach.

Annal M1167.

M1167.0

The Age of Christ, 1167.

M1167.1

Torgelsi, Bishop of Luimneach;

M1167.2

Ua Flannain, Bishop of Cluain-Uamha;

M1167.3

Cinaeth Ua Cethearnaigh, priest of Inis-Clothrann;

M1167.4

Mor, daughter of Domhnall Ua Conchobhair Failghe, Abbess of Cill-dara;

M1167.5

Maelmichael Mac Dotheachain, noble priest, chief sage, and pillar of piety of the family of Ard-Macha;

M1167.6

and Ua Dubhacan, i.e. Gillagori, successor of Einde of Ara, died.

M1167.7

Toirdhealbhach, son of Diarmaid Ua Briain, King of Munster and of Leath-Mhogha, a man who had aimed at the sovereignty of all Ireland, the best man that came in his time for bestowing jewels and wealth upon the poor and the indigent of God, died.

M1167.8

Muircheartach, son of Ladhmann Ua Duibhdhiorma, lord of Fordruim, pillar of the magnificence of all the north of Ireland, was treacherously slain by Donnchadh Ua Duibhdhirma, and by all the people of Bredach, in the middle of Magh-bile; and two of his sons were killed on the following day, and another son blinded.

M1167.9

Conn Ua Maelmhiadhaigh, chief of Muintir-Eoluis, died.

M1167.10

A great meeting was convened by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and the chiefs of Leath-Chuinn, both lay and ecclesiastic, and the chiefs of the foreigners at Ath-buidhe-Tlachtgha. To it came the successor of Patrick; Cadhla Ua Dubhthaigh, Archbishop of Connaught; Lorcan Ua Tuathail, Archbishop of Leinster; Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia; Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair; Raghnall, son of Raghnall, lord of the foreigners. The whole of their gathering and assemblage was thirteen thousand horsemen, of which six thousand were Connaughtmen, four thousand with O'Ruairc, two thousand with Ua Maeleachlainn, four


p.1165

thousand with Ua Cearbhaill and Ua hEochadha, two thousand with Donnchadh Mac Fhaelain, one thousand with the Danes of Ath-cliath. They passed many good resolutions at this meeting, respecting veneration for churches and clerics, and control of tribes and territories, so that women used to traverse Ireland alone; and a restoration of his prey was made by the Ui-Failghe at the hands of the kings aforesaid. They afterwards separated in peace and amity, without battle or controversy, or without any one complaining of another at that meeting, in consequence of the prosperousness of the king, who had assembled these chiefs with their forces at one place.

M1167.11

A hosting and mustering of the men of Ireland, with their chieftains, by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair. Thither came Diarmaid, son of Cormac, lord of Desmond; Muircheartach Ua Briain, lord of Thomond; Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Meath; Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and all the chieftains of Leinster. They afterwards arrived in Tir-Eoghain, and Ua Conchobhair divided the territory into two parts, i.e. gave that part of Tir-Eoghain north of the mountain, i.e. Callainn, to Niall Ua Lochlainn, for two hostages, i.e. Ua Cathain of Craebh, and Macan-Ghaill Ua Brain, and that part of the country of the Cinel to the south of the mountain to Aedh Ua Neill, for two other hostages, i.e. Ua Maelaedha, one of the Cinel-Aenghusa, and Ua hUrthuile, one of the Ui-Tuirtre Ua Neill's own foster-brothers. The men of Ireland returned back southwards over Sliabh-Fuaid, through Tir-Eoghain, and Tir-Conaill, and over Eas-Ruaidh to meet thelr sea-fleet; and Ua Conchobhair escorted the lord of Desmond, with his forces, southwards through Thomond as far as Cnoc-Aine with many jewels and riches.

M1167.12

Diarmaid Mac Murchadha returned from England with a force of Galls, and he took the kingdom of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh.

M1167.13

Another army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, until they arrived at Cill-Osnadh.A battle was fought between some of the recruits and cavalry of Connaught, and the cavalry of Ui-Ceinnsealaigh; and six of the Connaughtmen, together with Domhnall, son of Tadhg, son of Maelruanaidh, were slain in the first conflict; and there were


p.1167

slain in the second conflict, by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, twenty-five of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, together with the son of the King of Britain, who was the battle-prop of the island of Britain, who had come across the sea in the army of Mac Murchadha. Diarmaid Mac Murchadha afterwards came to Ua Conchobhair, and gave him seven hostages for ten cantreds of his own native territory, and one hundred ounces of gold to Tighearnan Ua Ruairc for his eineach.

M1167.14

Dearbhail, daughter of Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, died at Cluain-mic-Nois, after the victory of will and confession.

M1167.15

Uada Ua Conceanainn who had been lord of Ui-Diarmada at first, and afterwards in religion, died at Cluain-mic-Nois.

M1167.16

The church of the Nuns at Cluain-mic-Nois was finished by Dearbhforgaill, daughter of Murchadh Ua Maeleachlainn.

M1167.17

Fabhar-Fechine, Ailfinn, and Birra, were burned.

M1167.18

Muireadhach, the son of Mac Cana, was slain by the sons of Ua Lochlainn.

M1167.19

A church was erected at Cluain-mic-Nois, in the place of the Dearthach, by Conchobhar Ua Ceallaigh and the Ui-Maine.

Annal M1168.

M1168.0

The Age of Christ, 1168.

M1168.1

Flannagan Ua Dubhthaigh, bishop and chief doctor of the Irish in literature, history, and poetry, and in every kind of science known to man in his time, died in the bed of Muireadhach Ua Dubhthaigh, at Cunga.

M1168.2

Macraith Ua Morain, i.e. bishop of the men of Breifne, the son of Ua Dunain's fosterson, died at Ardachadh of Bishop Mel, in the eighty-third year of his age.

M1168.3

The Bishop Ua Cearbhaill, Bishop of Ros-ailithir, died.

M1168.4

Murchadh Ua Muireadhaigh, chief sage of Connaught and a noble priest;

M1168.5

Maelpadraig Ua Callada, successor of Cronan of Ros-Cre;

M1168.6

the great priest, Ua Mongachain, successor of Molaisi of Daimhinis;

M1168.7

and Galbhrat, son of Duairic Ua Tadhgain, great priest of Cluain-mic-Nois, died.

M1168.8

Muircheartach,


p.1169

son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster, and royal heir of Ireland (he was the son of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair's mother), was slain by the grand-son of Conchobhar Ua Briain, and he himself and his conspirators were killed immediately after by Ua Faelain, lord of the Deisi-Mumhan, who did this deed for Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair. The grandson of Conchobhar was killed immediately in revenge of him by Diarmaid Finn and Ua Faelain, as were seven sons of chieftains, with their people.

M1168.9

The kingdom of Munster was assumed by Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, after his brother, Muircheartach.

M1168.10

Murchadh Ua Finnallain, lord of Dealbhna-mor, was slain by Diarmaid, son of Donnchadh Ua Maelseachlainn, in revenge of his father, in violation of the protection of the people of the province of Connaught, and the Airghialla.

M1168.11

Enna Mac Murchadha, royal heir of Leinster, was blinded by the grandson of Gillaphadraig, i.e. Donnchadh, lord of Osraighe.

M1168.12

A meeting was convened by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland, with all the people of Connaught; Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, with the Airghialla, at Ochainn, to demand their eric from Diarmaid Ua Maelseachlainn and the men of Meath, after their having killed Ua Finnallain, in violation of the protection of the province of Connaught and the Airghialla. The men of Meath and their king gave them eight hundred cows for their eineach, and another eric to the Dealbhna.

M1168.13

On this occasion the fair of Tailltin was celebrated by the King of Ireland and the people of Leath-Chuinn, and their horses and cavalry were spread out on the space extending from Mullach-Aiti to, Mullach-Taiten.

M1168.14

Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn was deposed by the people of East Meath, in revenge of the payment of the aforesaid cows.

M1168.15

The victory of Ath-an-chomair, at Druim-criaigh, was gained by Ua Maeleachlainn and the people of West Meath over the battalion of Tuath-Luighne, wherein many were slain, together with the son of Gairbheth Ua Sirten, of the Gaileanga; and Conchobhar, the son of Mac Carrghamhna, was killed in the heat of the conflict.

M1168.16

Dubhchobhlaigh, daughter of Ua Cuinn, and wife of Mac Carrghamhna,


p.1171

died after the victory of unction and penance, and was interred in Inis-Clothrann.

M1168.17

Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Airghialla, flood of splendour, and magnificence, died after being mangled with his own battle-axe by a man of his own people, i.e. Ua Duibhne,—one of the Cinel-Eoghain,—after the victory of unction and penance, and after bestowing three hundred ounces of gold, for the love of God, upon clerics and churches.

M1168.18

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc to Aine-Cliach Knockany; and they obtained hostages, and divided Munster into two parts between the son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh and Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain; and three times twelve score cows were given to Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair by the people of Desmond, as eric for the killing of Muircheartach Ua Briain.

M1168.19

Conchobhar Lethdhearg, son of Maelseachlainn Ua Conchobhair, lord of Corca-Modhruadh, was killed by the son of his brother.

M1168.20

Domhnall Ua Sleibhin, chief poet of Oirghialla, died.

M1168.21

Amhlaeibh Mac Innaighneorach, chief ollamh of Ireland in harp-playing, died.

M1168.22

Dubhchobhlach, daughter of the son of Tadhg, i.e. of Maelseachlainn Ua Maelruanaidh, and wife of Toirdhealbhach, King of Connaught, died.

M1168.23

The chieftains of Cinel-Eoghain and the comharba of Doire came into the house of Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland, at Ath-Luain; and they carried gold, raiment, and many cows with them to their houses.

Annal M1169.

M1169.0

The Age of Christ, 1169.

M1169.1

Conghalach Ua Tomaltaigh, noble priest and chief lector of Cluain-mic-Nois, and the paragon of wisdom of the Irish, died.

M1169.2

Magh-eo of the Saxons, with its church, Fobhar-Fechine, and Daimhliag-Chianain, were burned.

M1169.3

This was the year in which Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland, granted ten cows every year from himself, and from every king that should succeed him, for ever, to the lector of Ard-Macha, in honour of


p.1173

Patrick, to instruct the youths of Ireland and Alba Scotland in literature.

M1169.4

Diarmaid Ua Maelseachlainn, King of Meath, of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, of Ui-Failghe, and Ui-Faelain, head of the prosperity and affluence of his tribe, was killed by Domhnall Breaghach, son of Maelseachlainn Crosach, and Donnchadh Ceinsealach Ua Ceallaigh, and the men of Breagha.

M1169.5

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair to Ath-na-riach; and he expelled Domhnall Breaghach, in revenge of that deed, and divided Meath into two parts; and he gave the eastern half to Tighearnan and to the men of Breifne, and he kept the western half himself.

M1169.6

Brian of Sliabh-Bladhma, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, King of Munster and of the two Eiles, was treacherously blinded by Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach.

M1169.7

Fearchair Ua Fallamhain, chief of Clann-Uadach, and steward of Ui-Maine, died after penance.

M1169.8

Raghnall Ua Maelmhiadhaigh, chief of Muintir-Eolais, died after penance.

M1169.9

The fleet of the Flemings came from England in the army of Mac Murchadha, i.e. Diarmaid, to contest the kingdom of Leinster for him: they were seventy heroes, dressed in coats of mail.

M1169.10

An army of the men of Ireland was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair to Teamair; and the chiefs of the north of Ireland came to meet him, together with Maghnus Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and they went from thence to Ath-cliath, and returned home again.

M1169.11

The King of Ireland, Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, afterwards proceeded into Leinster; and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne, and Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlain, King of Teamhair, and the foreigners of Ath-cliath, went to meet the men of Munster, Leinster, and Osraigh; and they set nothing by the Flemings; and Diarmaid Mac Murchadha gave his son, as a hostage, to Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair.

M1169.12

The kingdom of Cinel-Eoghain was assumed by Conchobhar Ua Lochlainn.


p.1175

Annal M1170.

M1170.0

The Age of Christ, 1170.

M1170.1

The relics of Comman, son of Faelchu, were removed from the earth by Gilla-Iarlaithe Ua Carmacain, successor of Comman, and they were enclosed in a shrine with a covering of gold and silver.

M1170.2

Maelruanaidh Ua Ruadhain, Bishop of Luighne-Chonnacht, chief senior, and a paragon of wisdom and piety, died.

M1170.3

Maelmordha Mac Uaireirghe, a learned charitable senior, the prosperity and affluence of Cluain-mic-Nois, and head of its Culdees, died in the month of November.

M1170.4

Cormac Ua Lumluini, lector of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, the remnant of the sages of lreland in his time, died.

M1170.5

Diarmaid Ua Braein, successor of Comman, and chief senior of East Connaught, died at Inis-Clothrann, after the ninety-fifth year of his age.

M1170.6

Conchobhar, son of Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, lord of Cinel-Eoghain, and royal heir of Ireland, was slain by Aedh Beg Mac Cana and the Ui-Caracain, on Easter Saturday, in the middle of Trian-mor, at Ard-Macha.

M1170.7

The son of Ceallachan, grandson of Carthach, was slain by the son of Tadhg Ua Briain.

M1170.8

Taillte, daughter of Muircheartach Ua Maeleachlainn, and wife of Domhnall, son of Murchadh Ua Fearghail, chief of Muintir-Anghaile, died in the fortieth year of her age.

M1170.9

Aindileas, son of Gilla-Aenghusa Ua Clumhain, who was an ollamh in poetry, died.

M1170.10

Domhnall, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, lord of half Munster, turned against Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair; and he appropriated the hostages of DalgCais.

M1170.11

Robert Fitz Stephen and Richard, son of Gilbert, i.e. Earl Strongbow, came from England into Ireland with a numerous force, and many knights and


p.1177

archers, in the army of Mac Murchadha, to contest Leinster for him, and to disturb the Irish of Ireland in general; and Mac Murchadha gave his daughter to the Earl Strongbow for coming into his army. They took Loch Garman, and entered Port-Lairge by force; and they took Gillemaire, the officer of the fortress, and Ua Faelain, lord of the Deisi, and his son, and they killed seven hundred persons there.

M1170.12

Domhnall Breaghach Ua Maeleachlainn, with numbers of the men of Breagha along with him, proceeded into Leinster; and Donnchadh Ua Ceallaigh, lord of Breagha, fell by the Leinstermen on that occasion.

M1170.13

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland; Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, against Leinster and the Galls aforesaid; and there was a challenge of battle between them for the space of three days, until lightning burned Ath-cliath; for the foreigners Danes of the fortress deserted from the Connaughtmen and the people of Leath-Chuinn in general. A miracle was wrought against the foreigners Danes of Ath-cliath on this occasion, for Mac Murchadha and the Saxons acted treacherously towards them, and made a slaughter of them in the middle of their own fortress, and carried off their cattle and their goods, in consequence of their violation of their word to the men of Ireland. Asgall, son of Raghnall, son of Turcall, chief king of the foreigners Danes of Ath-cliath, made his escape from them.

M1170.14

A victory was gained by the son of Cormac, grandson of Carthach, and the people of Desmond, over the knights who were left to protect Port-Lairge.

M1170.15

An army was led by Mac Murchadha and his knights into Meath and Breifne; and they plundered Cluain-Iraird, and burned Ceanannus, Cill-Tailltean, Dubhadh, Slaine, Tuilen, Cill-Scire, and Disert-Chiarain; and they afterwards made a predatory incursion into Tir-Briuin, and carried off many prisoners and cows to their camp.

M1170.16

The hostages of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha were put to death by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, King of Ireland,


p.1179

at Ath-Luain, namely, Conchobhar, son of Diarmaid, heir apparent of Leinster, and Diarmaid's grandson, i.e. the son of Domhnall Caemhanach, and the son of his foster-brother, i.e. O'Caellaighe.

M1170.17

Domhnall Breaghach and the people of East Meath turned against O'Ruairc and O'Conchobhair, and delivered hostages to Mac Murchadha.

M1170.18

The hostages of East Meath were put to death by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc.

M1170.19

The son of Mac Fhaelain and the son of Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig were banished by Mac Murchadha.

M1170.20

An army was led by Mac Murchadha into Breifne, and a party of his people were defeated by the soldiers of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc. They afterwards made an attack upon the camp in which he himself was, with the Leinstermen, Galls English, and the men of Meath and Oirghialla, about him, and slew numbers of them. And they left their camp.

M1170.21

Domhnall Ua Briain and the DalgCais turned against Ruaidhri.

M1170.22

A great fleet was brought upon the Sinainn, by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, to plunder Munster.A predatory incursion was made by the Ui-Maine into Ormond, and a predatory incursion was made by the people of West Connaught into Thomond. They the Ui-Maine plundered Ormond on this occasion, and destroyed the wooden bridge of Cill-Dalua.

M1170.23

Lorcan Ua hEchthighern was slain by the sons of Mac Conmara and the Ui-Caisin.

M1170.24

Diarmaid Ua Cuinn, chief of Clann-Iffearnain, was slain by the Cinel-Aedha of Echtghe.

M1170.25

Diarmaid Ua hAinbhfeth, lord of Ui-Meith, and leader of the cavalry of the lord of Oileach, was slain on Inis-Lachain, by a fleet which came from the InsihOrc Orkney Islands.

M1170.26

A predatory incursion was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc into Gaileanga and Saithne, and he carried off many cows.

M1170.27

A predatory incursion was made by the Airghialla into Tir-Briuin.

M1170.28

Murchadh Ua Fearghail, lord of the Fortuatha, was slain by Ua Fiachrach, lord of Ui-Fineachlais.

M1170.29

Ruaidhri Mac Aedha, lord of Clann-Cosgraigh, died on his pilgrimage at Tuaim-da-ghualann.

M1170.30

An unknown, atrocious deed was committed by Maghnus Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and the monk Amhlaeibh, son of the successor of Finnen, and by the Ulidians in general,—except Maelisa, bishop,


p.1181

and Gilladomhangairt, son of Cormac, successor of Comhghall, and Maelmartain, successor of Finnen, with their people,—i.e. a convent of religious monks, with their abbot, whom Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, legate of the successor of Peter, had appointed at Sabhall-Phadraig, were expelled from the monastery, which they themselves had founded and erected; and they were all plundered, both of their books and ecclesiastical furniture, cows, horses, and sheep, and of every thing which they had collected from the time of the legate aforesaid till then. Wo to the lord and chieftains who perpetrated this deed, at the instigation of one whom the monks of Droichet-atha Drogheda had expelled from the abbacy for his own crime. Wo to the country in which it was perpetrated; and it did not pass without vengeance from the Lord, for the chieftains who had done this deed were slain together by a few enemies, and the king was prematurely wounded and slain, shortly after, at the town where the unjust resolution of perpetrating it had been adopted, namely, at Dun. On Tuesday the convent were expelled. On Tuesday also, at the end of a year, the chieftains of Ulidia were slain, and the king was wounded. On Tuesday, shortly after, he was killed by his brother, at Dun.

Annal M1171.

M1171.0

The Age of Christ, 1171.

M1171.1

Petrus Ua Mordha, Bishop of Cluain-fearta-Brenainn, who had been first a pious monk, was drowned in the Sinainn on the 27th of December.

M1171.2

Sadhbh, daughter of Gluiniairn Mac Murchadha, successor of Brighit, died after penance.

M1171.3

The Cloictheach of Telach-aird was


p.1183

burned by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, with its full of people in it.

M1171.4

Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, by whom a trembling sod was made of all Ireland, —after having brought over the Saxons, after having done extensive injuries to the Irish, after plundering and burning many churches, as Ceanannus, Cluain-Iraird, &c.,—died before the end of a year after this plundering, of an insufferable and unknown disease; for he became putrid while living, through the miracle of God, Colum-Cille, and Finnen, and the other saints of Ireland, whose churches he had profaned and burned some time before; and he died at Fearnamor, without making a will, without penance, without the body of Christ, without unction, as his evil deeds deserved.

M1171.5

Maelcron Mac Gillaseachnaill, lord of South Breagha, died.

M1171.6

Tailltin, daughter of Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, and wife of Imhar Ua Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne, died.

M1171.7

Domhnall, grandson of Ruaidhri Ua Maelmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall, was slain by Muintir-Muineacha. Domhnall Ua Fogarta, lord of South Eile, was slain by Domhnall, son of Donnchadh Mac Gillaphadraig of Osraighe; and he made a slaughter of the people of the two Eiles, where he slew three hundred persons.

M1171.8

A plundering fleet was brought by the Ulidians into Tir-Eoghain, in which they carried off a countless number of cows.

M1171.9

A predatory incursion was made by Niall, son of Mac Lochlainn, and the Cinel-Eoghain, into Ulidia, and numbers were slain by them; and they carried off countless cows.

M1171.10

The hostages of the Airghialla were afterwards taken by Niall Ua Lochlainn.

M1171.11

A great predatory force was led by Maghnus Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua hEochadha and the Ulidians into Cuil-an-tuais-ceirt; and they plundered Cuil-rathain Coleraine and other churches. A small party of the Cinel-Eoghain, under Conchobhair Ua Cathain, overtook them; and a battle was fought between them, in which the Ulidians were defeated, with the loss of one-and-twenty chieftains and sons of chieftains, with many others of the commonalty; and Maghnus himself was wounded, but he escaped from the conflict on that occasion. He was afterwards killed by his own brother, Donnsleibhe, and Gilla-Aenghusa, son of Mac Gillaepscoip, ruler


p.1185

of Monaigh at Dun Downpatrick, after having perpetrated many evil deeds.

M1171.12

A predatory incursion was made upon the Saithni by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, with the men of Breifne. They slew numbers of persons, and carried off many cows.

M1171.13

Another predatory incursion was made by Tighearnan into South Breagha; and he slew Gillan-Enain Mac Lughadha, i.e. chief of Cuircne, and Mac Gillaseachlainn, chief of South Breagha. Ua Lamhdhuibh was slain by the men of Meath on this occasion.

M1171.14

Domhnall Breaghach, lord of Meath, delivered hostages to Tighearnan Ua Ruairc.

M1171.15

Seven predatory incursions were made by the Ui-Maine into Ormond, from Palm-Sunday till Low-Sunday.

M1171.16

Daimhliag-Chianain Duleek was plundered by the knights of Milo Cogan; and some of them were slain on the following day by the foreigners i.e. Danes of Ath-cliath, in revenge of Cianan.

M1171.17

The battle of Ath-cliath was fought between Milo Cogan and Asgall, who was for some time before king of the foreigners Danes of Ireland. Many were slaughtered on both sides of the Saxon knights and the foreigners Danes of Ath-cliath. Asgall, son of Raghnall, fell therein, as did Eoan, a Dane from the Insi-hOrc Orkney Islands, and many others besides them.

M1171.18

An army was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, to Ath-cliath, to lay siege to the Earl, i.e. Strongbow, and Milo Cogan. There were conflicts and skirmishes between them for the space of a fortnight. O'Conchobhair afterwards went against the Leinstermen, with the cavalry of the men of Breifne and Airghialla, to cut down and burn the corn of the Saxons. The Earl and Milo Cogan afterwards entered the camp of Leath-Chuinn, and slew many of their commonalty, and carried off their provisions, armour, and horses.

M1171.19

A victory was gained by the son of Cormac Mac Carthaigh over the foreigners of Luimneach. A great number of them was slain by him, and, among the rest, Foirne, son of Gillacainnigh, and Torchar, son of Treni; and he burned the market and half the fortress to its centre.

M1171.20

An army was led by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc


p.1187

and the men of Breifne and Airghialla, a second time, to Ath-cliath; and they made battle with Milo Cogan and his knights, in which the men of Breifne and the Airghialla were defeated; and Aedh, son of Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, Tanist of Breifne, and the grandson of Diarmaid Ua Cuinn, and many others along with them, were slain.

M1171.21

A predatory incursion was made by the Sil-Muireadhaigh into Thomond, and they plundered Sirtheachan Ua Litiudha, and slew himself in a battle.

M1171.22

A predatory incursion was made by the Sil-Anmchadha and Muintir-Chinaetha into Ele, and they carried off many cows.

M1171.23

A predatory incursion was made by the son of the Earl, and he plundered the churches of Magh-Laighean, and many of the Ui-Faelain.

M1171.24

A predatory incursion was made by the people of West Connaught and some of the Sil-Muireadhaigh, and they plundered the west of Corcumdhruadh, and carried off countless cows.

M1171.25

A predatory incursion was made by the people of the son of the Earl, in which he plundered Cluain-Conaire, Galam read Gailinne, and Lathrach-Briuin.

M1171.26

The daughter of Ua hEochadha, and wife of Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, died.

M1171.27

The fleet of Connaught, from Allhallowtide to May-day, upon the Sinainn and Loch Deirgdheirc.

M1171.28

A peace was made by Domhnall Breaghach with Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and the people of East Meath came into his house.

M1171.29

The King of England, the second Henry, Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, Earl of Andegavia, and lord of many other countries, came to Ireland this year. Two hundred and forty was the number of his ships, and he put in at Port-Lairge.